Skip navigation
The Habeas Citebook Ineffective Counsel - Header

Berkeley Ctr for Criminal Justice Downsizing the State Youth Corrections System Report 2010

Download original document:
Brief thumbnail
This text is machine-read, and may contain errors. Check the original document to verify accuracy.
A NEW ERA IN CALIFORNIA JUVENILE JUSTICE: 
DOWNSIZING THE STATE YOUTH CORRECTIONS SYSTEM 

 
Barry Krisberg, PhD 
Distinguished Senior Fellow and Lecturer in Residence at University of California, Berkeley Law School

Linh Vuong 
Research Associate at the National Council on Crime and Delinquency 
 

Christopher Hartney 
 Senior Researcher at the National Council on Crime and Delinqency 
 

Susan Marchionna 
Communications Consultant to the Berkeley Center for Criminal Justice 

 
 

October, 2010

 

A New Era in California Juvenile Justice
 

 
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
California created a statewide system of youth 
corrections facilities in 1941. The newly formed 
California Youth Authority (CYA) was considered a 
major progressive step forward in juvenile justice. 
Part of its focus in its early years was 
programming designed to keep youth close to 
their home communities. In its first three decades, 
the CYA population never exceeded 7,000. 
Leadership and policy changes in the late‐1970s 
and early 1980s, however, started a long period of 
increase in the CYA population. 
 
By 1996, the number of incarcerated youth in the 
CYA grew steadily to over 10,000 youth. The rise 
was driven by several major factors: a fear that a 
growing California youth population was 
increasingly dangerous; a decrease in state 
funding to counties for local programs; and the 
cost savings to counties of sending youth to the 
CYA rather than county facilities or group homes. 
After 1996, the trend of a rising youth inmate 
population turned around, with fewer and fewer 
young people being held in the CYA. By the end of 
2009, the CYA held 1,499 youth. This decline in 
the CYA population is the largest drop in youth 
confinement that has been experienced by any 
state. 
The research presented here attempts to examine 
the many factors that may have contributed to 
that “decarceration”. We also examine concurrent 
trends in crime, arrests, and the use of other, non‐
CYA forms of custody for these youth.  
 
In 1996, California began to reverse traditional 
funding trends and passed legislation to make 
counties pay more to send youth to the CYA. The 
state also began giving grants to counties to build 
new juvenile facilities and implement new 
alternative sentencing programs. The influence of 
youth advocacy groups such as Books Not Bars, 
 

 

                         
1

the Youth Law Center, the Commonweal Institute 
and National Council on Crime and Delinquency 
(NCCD) intensified in the early 2000s. However, 
the voters continued to embrace policies such as 
Proposition 21 which increased penalties for many 
crimes and made it easier to move young 
offenders to the adult courts. Also, a 
reorganization of state corrections under 
Governor Schwarzenegger moved the CYA under 
the control of the California Department of 
Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) – despite 
the objections of most juvenile justice 
professionals and youth advocates. The CYA is 
now known as the Division of Juvenile Facilities 
(DJF) under the CDCR. (For the purposes of this 
paper, we continue to refer to the agency by its 
older name of CYA.) 
Reports of substandard conditions of confinement 
in the CYA began to surface, prompting the 
Legislature to hold public hearings. The Office of 
Inspector General conducted a series of 
investigations about alleged abusive practices at 
state juvenile prisons. The media began 
highlighting these abuses with several in‐depth 
investigate reports. As the deplorable conditions 
of confinement for youth in custody appeared on 
front pages, some of the people responsible for 
sending youth to the CYA‐‐judges, probation 
officers, and prosecutors‐‐began to express public 
concerns that their decisions may have been doing 
more harm than good. 
 
In the face of these allegations of abuse, growing 
evidence that recidivism rates were very high, and 
because the CYA had become so expensive, 
sending youth to state facilities became 
increasingly unpopular. The negative publicity 
worsened in 2003 in the wake of a major lawsuit 
brought by the Prison Law Office. Part of the 
litigation involved an independent investigation of 

A New Era in California Juvenile Justice
the CYA funded by the California Attorney General 
in 2003. With the investigation findings public, the 
state quickly entered into a consent decree in 
Farrell v. Harper, which mandated reform of many 
aspects of the CYA. In 2007, legislators enacted 
comprehensive reforms to “realign” the juvenile 
justice system, requiring that nonviolent juvenile 
offenders and parole violators be kept at the local 
level and shifting some funding to counties to 
manage the new clients. 
 
Despite the many changes in the juvenile justice 
system over the last 15 years, significant reforms 
in state juvenile facilities are still “a work in 
 
 

progress.” Significant levels of violence are still 
occurring at some facilities and evidence‐based 
rehabilitation programs are still being designed 
and pilot‐tested. Although some observers, 
including the Little Hoover Commission, and many 
youth advocates continue to call for the closing of 
the CYA altogether, for now, state facilities 
provide a needed setting for more serious youth 
offenders whose needs are not being met at the 
local level. Without a better option to existing 
county programs, there is concern that there will 
be an influx of youth being sent to adult prisons 
and jails, a placement far worse than the CYA 
itself.

This study was supported by grants from the Van Löben Sels RembeRock Foundation, the San Francisco 
Foundation and the W.T Grant Foundation.  The views expressed in this report are those of the authors and 
do not necessarily represent those of the funders. 

 

 

                         
2

A New Era in California Juvenile Justice
INTRODUCTION
Behind the media and political attention focused 
on California prisons, plagued with severe levels of 
crowding and a federal court order to reduce the 
inmate population by over 40,000, lies one of 
California’s best kept secrets: the state’s youth 
correctional custodial population has declined 
over 80 percent in just over the past decade. Just 
since 2004 the California Youth Authority (CYA) 
population declined by over 5,000 inmates. The 
state has already closed five major juvenile 
facilities and four forestry camps for juvenile 
offenders. 
 
A number of factors have contributed significantly 
to the drop in the population of the CYA, now 
known as the Division of Juvenile Facilities∗ under 
the California Department of Corrections and 
Rehabilitation (CDCR). The most frequently cited is 
the very negative media publicity in the early 
2000s about the conditions inside facilities, the 
case of Farrell v. Harper in 2003, and the 
realignment legislation passed in 2007 that 
required that more youthful offenders be 
managed at the county level. However, the CYA 
population began declining as early as 1997—
before these events. The trend towards increased 
costs for counties to send youth to the CYA, and 
doubt that the CYA was an appropriate setting for 
many of the youth being sent there had already 
begun in the late 1990s. 
 
While no single factor accounts for the drastic 
change in the CYA population, the research 
presented here points to multiple forces that 
came together in the mid‐ to late‐1990s and early 
2000s to change public perception, judicial 
behaviors, probation programs, sentencing 
policies, and state funding streams. We also find 
that this population reduction is particularly 
notable because it did not result in an increase in 
∗

For clarity, this report uses the older acronym CYA to refer 
to the state agency operating juvenile corrections facilities. 

 

 

                         
3

juvenile crime, as some had erroneously 
predicted. 
 

METHODS 
In preparing this report, the authors gathered data 
from several state agencies, conducted interviews 
with individuals who had first‐hand knowledge 
about the decline in the CYA population, and 
reviewed media coverage of youth crime. The 
data sources revealed how the numbers changed, 
and the interviews and the media review provided 
the context around the changing numbers. The 
data sources include the California Attorney 
General’s Criminal Justice Statistics Center for 
juvenile arrest and placement data, and the 
Corrections Standard Authority for historical data 
on new admissions to the California Youth 
Authority. Interviews were conducted with those 
who worked on the issue at a macro‐level, such as 
youth advocates (Lenore Anderson, former 
Director of Books Not Bars; David Steinhart, 
Director of the Commonweal Juvenile Justice 
Program; Daniel Macallair, Executive Director of 
the Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice; Sue 
Burrell, Youth Law Center), and with those who 
saw the changes happen at the local level, such as 
chief probation officers (Chiefs Jerry Powers of 
Stanislaus County and Donald H. Blevins of Los 
Angeles County, formerly of Alameda County) and 
the court (Kurt Kumli, Superior Court Judge in 
Santa Clara County and formerly chief deputy 
district attorney. A media review was conducted 
through Lexis Nexis and several major reports 
were also consulted. 
 

 

A New Era in California Juvenile Justice
HISTORY AND MANDATE OF THE CYA 
Rehabilitation has been the primary goal of the 
California juvenile justice system for more than a 
half century. According to the Welfare and 
Institutions Code 1700, the juvenile system is 
designed to 1) protect public safety and 2) 
rehabilitate youthful offenders through 
community and victim restoration and offender 
training and treatment in lieu of retributive 
punishment. This attitude was also reflected 
nationally, as evidenced by the Youth Corrections 
Authority Act of 1940, the model legislation with 
the intent of rehabilitating offenders between the 
ages of 16‐21. This age range was deemed “a 
more promising time of life for dealing with 
delinquents or criminals than any later period.”1 
California passed this Act in 1941 and in the 
process created the California Youth Authority 
(CYA).  
The newly established CYA was celebrated as a 
major, progressive step forward in juvenile justice. 
During its first three decades, the CYA was led by 
Herman G. Stark, Karl Holton, and Allen Breed, 
each a nationally known leader in the field. During 
this period, the youth resident population of the 
CYA never exceeded 7,000. During the 1960s and 
1970s, the CYA instituted a number of programs 
designed to keep delinquent youth in local 
placements. However, during the administration 
of Governor Jerry Brown, many of these 
community‐based programs were eliminated and 
the population in state juvenile facilities began to 
steadily rise through the administrations of 
Governors George Deukmejian, Peter Wilson, and 
Gray Davis. 
 
 
 
 
1

 Coghill, H. (1943). “The Proposed Youth Correction 
Authority Act.” American Journal of Psychiatry, 99 (890‐893). 
 

 

                         
4

 
 

The Commitment Process
The process of sending youth to CYA
begins at the county level, with
prosecutors, public defenders, probation
officers, juvenile court judges and others
who play a role in determining if a youth
will be placed out of home and, if so,
where and for how long. Rehabilitation is
meant to be a top priority. There are
several options for processing arrested
youth, most of which are far less harsh
than commitment to CYA. After arrest,
youth can be referred to probation or
counseled and released. Once referred,
probation officers can close the case, place
youth on probation, divert youth away from
the system, or file a petition in juvenile
court. Judges determine whether the youth
is deemed delinquent and make final
sentencing decisions, including maximum
confinement
time
based
on
recommendations by probation officers, the
district attorney, and defense attorney. At
this point, youth can be placed under state
wardship, placed on probation, diverted, or
dismissed. Wardship placements can
include home supervision, county facilities,
group homes, health or welfare facilities, or
CYA. At each of the decision points from
arrest through disposition, the youth may
also be transferred for processing in the
adult system. It is county probation
departments that bear the cost of a youth’s
placement, whether it is local, state, or out
of state.

A New Era in California Juvenile Justice

A GROWING STATE YOUTH CORRECTIONS POPULATION 
Although it held as many as 6,700 in 1965, the CYA population was never over 5,000 in the 1970s (see Figure 
1). Then began a long period of growth, surpassing 6,000 in 1984, 8,000 in 1987, and reaching its peak of 
10,122 youth in 1996. The rise in the incarcerated population was fueled by fears that there was a growing 
number of very violent youth in California, especially those involved in gangs. Furthermore, the rise in 
commitments to the CYA was driven by two cost factors. First, since the late‐1960s, the state had given 
counties money for local programs, encouraging rehabilitation of offenders at the local level. The California 
Probation Subsidy Act of 1965 paid counties $4,000 for each adult or juvenile who could be diverted to 
probation instead of incarcerated. This state subsidy ended in 1978, but was replaced with the County 
Justice System Subvention Program, which gave state grants to counties for local programming. By 1992, 
however, because costs continued to rise but the level of state funding did not, these grants covered less 
than 10% of actual county expenditures on local juvenile justice programs.2 Secondly, sending youth to state 
prison was inexpensive compared to keeping them at the county level. Until 1996, it cost counties only 
$25/month to commit a youth to the state. 
 
The CYA had the facilities and infrastructure that the counties did not have for holding wards on a long‐term 
basis, but these cost incentives had the effect of encouraging counties to send short‐term wards to the state 
as well. At least until the early 1990s, the counties did so with some confidence in the CYA’s standards and 
practices. Although some advocates, lawmakers, and judges were starting to doubt that it was always an 
appropriate setting for the youth sent there, most stakeholders believed the CYA to have decent facilities, 
programming and services. In fact, probation officers reported being as shocked as the public when horrible 
stories about the CYA later began making front‐page news. 
 

A SHRINKING STATE YOUTH CORRECTIONS POPULATION  
Figure 1 shows that since its peak in 1996 the CYA population has steadily declined, falling to 1,499 in 
December, 2009. Pending legislation would make the state youth corrections system even smaller and 
experts believe the population will continue to decline.3 

2

 Nieto, M. (1996). The Changing Role of Probation in CA’s Criminal Justice System. California Research Bureau. 
 California Department of the Youth Authority, Ward Information and Parole Research Bureau (nd).  
 A Comparison of the Youth Authority’s Institution and Parole Populations: June 30 Each Year, 1993‐2002. See 
http://www.cdcr.ca.gov/reports_research/docs/research/pops_93‐02.pdf.
3

 

 

                         
5

A New Era in California Juvenile Justice
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Figure 1

Admissions and Length of Stay 
Like any custodial system, the CYA population is determined by the number of admissions and the
length of stay of these admissions. The changes in policy and practice described in this report mainly
speak to changes in admissions. While length of stay has increased somewhat, the driving force
behind the decline in the CYA population has been a decline in admissions.
New admissions fluctuated between 3,500 and 4,000 from 1985 to 1996. Then began a sharp
decline, with new admissions dropping a full third in the year after the state began charging the
counties more for youth sent to the CYA, and continuing to drop to just 504 new admissions in 2009.
The average length of stay among CYA inmates also fluctuated, but generally rose since the late
1990s. The average length of stay in the decade leading up to 1996 was 21.1 months, while between
1997 and 2009 it was 25.4 months. This change was most likely due to toughened penalties for
youth offenders as well as lower-level offenders being sent to counties, thereby increasing the
proportion of more serious offenders with longer sentences sent to the CYA.4

4

 CDCR (2010). Population Movement Summaries.  See 
http://www.cdcr.ca.gov/Juvenile_Justice/Research_and_Statistics/index.html. 
 

 

                         
6

A New Era in California Juvenile Justice
IMPACT ON PUBLIC SAFETY 
 

Reported Crime 
Prior to 1996, California's rate of reported violent crime was rising while the property crime rate was falling. 
From 1996 to 2009, both violent and property crime rates steadily declined to their 25‐year lows of 454 per 
100,000 for violent crimes and 1,548 per 100,000 for property crimes in 2009.5 The dramatic decline in the 
CYA population was not associated with an increase in crimes reported to the police. 
 

Juvenile Arrests 
The juvenile felony arrest rate reached a 25‐year high in 1991, at 2,902. Figure 2 shows that the rate 
consistently declined since then—throughout the years of the decline in the CYA population—to 1,345 per 
100,000 youth aged 10‐17 in the general population in 2004 and, after a brief rise in 2005‐06, dropped to a 
50‐year low of 1,290 345 per 100,000 youth aged 10‐17 in the general population in 2009.6  
 
This drop in juvenile arrests is important in two ways. First, to some extent, it most likely contributed to the 
decline in CYA custody—fewer arrests generally mean fewer youth in the system. Second, and more 
importantly, the decline in CYA custody did not contribute to a decrease in public safety (that is, a rise in 
arrests), as some feared it would. 
 
Figure 2
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
5

 California, Office of the Attorney General, Criminal Justice Statistics Center (2010). Crime in California, 1983‐2009: By Category. 
See http://ag.ca.gov/cjsc/glance/data/1data.txt  
6
 California, Office of the Attorney General, Criminal Justice Statistics Center (2010). California Arrest Rates, 1960‐2009: Total 
Felony Violations. See http://ag.ca.gov/cjsc/glance/data/5data.txt
 

 

                         
7

A New Era in California Juvenile Justice
Adult Arrests and Incarceration 
Similar to juvenile arrest rates, the adult felony arrest rate began a decline in the 1990s from a high in 
1989 of 2,577 to 1,586 in 2009.7 This is relevant to the CYA population decline since many of the youth 
who exit the youth prisons have passed their 18th birthday and are eligible to be arrested as adults. 
 
Unlike CYA population figures, California’s prison population grew in this period, from 131,232 in 1995 
to 166,569 in August, 2009.8 
 

ALTERNATIVES TO THE CYA 
 
County Custody 
A question that arises when one considers counties no longer send as many of their delinquent youth 
to the CYA is: Where did they go? Counties have several alternatives to the CYA. Most youth sentenced 
to residential placement in the county will serve their time in juvenile hall or county camps or ranches. 
Figure 39 illustrates that, while there were some increases at the beginning of the past ten years, the 
number of post‐disposition youth placed in these settings has remained static or dropped. (Youth 
being detained in juvenile halls awaiting trial are not included in these numbers, since CYA youth are 
not likely to have that status.) 
 
Figure 3
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
7

 California, Office of the Attorney General, Criminal Justice Statistics Center (2010). California Arrest Rates, 1960‐2009: 
Total Felony Violations. See http://ag.ca.gov/cjsc/glance/data/5data.txt 
8
 CDCR (Fall, 2009). Corrections: Moving Forward (CDCR Annual Report). See 
http://www.cdcr.ca.gov/News/2009_Press_Releases/docs/CDCR_Annual_Report.pdf 
9
 Corrections Standards Authority (2010). Juvenile hall population summary, 1993‐2008 & Camps population summary, 
1993‐2008. Obtained via special request. 
 

 

                         
8

A New Era in California Juvenile Justice
A key alternative to incarceration is home supervision or probation, in which the youth lives at home 
under supervision of the probation department. Figure 410 shows rising trends in the use of home 
supervision, which usually includes intensive supervision, electronic monitoring, day reporting, or some 
other form of probation. 
 
 
Figure 4
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Transfers to the Adult System 
In the past few years, California has seen an increase in direct files to adult court (Figures 5 and 611). 
Serious juvenile cases may go to adult court if a juvenile is deemed unfit for juvenile proceedings, but 
in such a case, a prosecutor has initially filed the case in the juvenile court. With a direct file to adult 
court, a prosecutor bypasses the juvenile justice system. In addition to Proposition 21, which required 
that juveniles charged with certain violent crimes be tried in adult court, the increase of direct file 
cases may reflect that prosecutors believe that there are fewer options for very serious offenders in 
lieu of the CYA. With many judges tacitly refusing to commit youth to the CYA, and because many 
county facilities are not designed to hold juveniles for extended periods of time, prosecutors may be 
resorting to direct file. However, this tactic may not be succeeding. There has not been a major change 
in the number of persons under the age of 20 serving time in adult facilities, suggesting that the rise in 
direct files has not resulted in more young people being sent to CDCR. For example, in 1999 there were 
2,811 new admissions to CDCR of persons under the age of 20. By 2009, after the major decline in the 
CYA population, the number of felony admissions to CDCR of youth under age 20 was only 2,594.12  
 
10

 California, Office of the Attorney General (2010). Juvenile Justice in California 2002‐2008 [Series]. See 
http://www.ag.ca.gov/cjsc/pubs.php#juvenileJustice 
11
California, Department of Justice, Office of the Attorney General (2010).  Juvenile Justice in California 2002‐2009 [Series]. 
See http://www.ag.ca.gov/cjsc/pubs.php#juvenileJustice 
12
 See http://www.cdcr.ca.gov/Reports_Research/Offender_Information_Services_Branch/index.html. 
 

 

                         
9

A New Era in California Juvenile Justice
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

Figure 5

 

Figure 6

                         
10

A New Era in California Juvenile Justice
CONTEXT OF THE DECLINE 
 

Rehabilitation at the County Level 
After the CYA population peaked in 1996, it 
began a steady decline that continues today. In 
the mid‐1990s, CYA facilities were growing 
increasingly crowded, so CYA administrators 
developed plans for increasing capacity by 25%, 
mainly through new construction. State 
lawmakers balked, citing the costs to the state, 
the increasing use of the CYA as a catch‐all 
system for even very low‐level offenders, and 
growing concern about the quality of care 
received there. Instead the Legislature passed 
SB 681 in 1996, which set up a sliding scale of 
costs, making the minimum monthly payment 
$150 per month per juvenile offender. 
Payments increased as severity of offense 
decreased, with the least severe offenders 
costing counties $2,600 per month, or 100% of 
the actual cost to the state. This structure 
encouraged counties to find rehabilitative 
options for less serious youth at the county 
level; the CYA should be reserved for the most 
serious youth, whose needs could not be met 
at the county level. Several other factors were 
also at work. AB 2312, also passed in 1996, 
authorized $33 million to support local juvenile 
justice programs. The Juvenile Crime 
Enforcement and Accountability Challenge 
Grants gave nearly $50 million to local counties 
to support graduated sanctions at the local 
level and nearly $500 million for the 
construction of local juvenile facilities. 
 

Increasing Costs of the CYA 
The cost to the state to house a youth in the 
CYA has always been higher than adult prison, 
in part because of the serious needs of youth 
sent there. Other factors contributing to high 
per capita CYA costs include the salaries of CYA 
corrections staff and maintenance of 
 

 

deteriorating state youth facilities. In 1996, the 
annual cost to house a ward in the CYA was 
$36,118. In 2003, before the Farrell consent 
decree, this cost had already risen to $83,223. 
The Farrell consent decree has required hiring 
more medical, mental health, and education 
staff for CYA facilities and this has led to cost 
increases. As the youth custodial population 
has decreased and a number of CYA facilities 
have been mothballed, the agency’s overhead 
costs have remained largely the same and state 
personnel rules have slowed the process of 
reducing the CYA workforce. This drove the 
annual cost per youth to $218,000 in 2007. 
With California’s state budget already in crisis 
by 2001, it is not surprising that the CYA 
became a target for budget cuts and pressures 
to close more CYA facilities. 
 

Realignment Legislation 
In 2007, the state passed historic “realignment” 
legislation: SB 81. Though it had been pushed 
for before 2007, many believe that the growing 
cost of the CYA, along with the cost of 
implementing the reforms required by the 
Farrell lawsuit, helped SB 81 to pass when it 
did. The bill redefined placement options, 
allowing only the most serious violent 
offenders and sex offenders to be sent to the 
state; all other offenders had to be kept in 
county facilities. (Counties were also allowed, 
but generally not forced, to recall from the CYA 
juvenile offenders who had been committed on 
a nonserious offense.) SB 81 further changed 
the population of the CYA, as nonviolent youth 
were no longer sent to state facilities. Although 
the state provided some additional money to 
the counties for their increased caseloads, 
many chief probation officers felt blindsided. 
With little warning, they had to accept youth 
into their facilities that were previously sent to 
the CYA. The chief probation officers had 
initially opposed SB 81 and complained that 

                         
11

A New Era in California Juvenile Justice
they had little time to prepare their facilities 
and programs for the changes. There is ongoing 
uncertainty that state funding to offset county 
costs will still be available as the state budget 
deficit becomes more severe. 
 
The reduction in new admissions to the CYA 
averaged several hundred fewer youth each 
year statewide. While not all of these youth 
were sent to county placement options, this is a 
substantial number that could not easily be 
absorbed into the various county placement 
options. The influx, which included young 
people with multiple mental health, special 
education, and substance abuse treatment 
needs, and the associated costs of providing 
these services made for big changes in the 
already burdened and tightly budgeted county 
systems. Furthermore, since youth who were 
sent to the CYA and youth who remained with 
the counties was based on each youth’s current 
offense without regard to priors, youth with 
very serious offense histories currently being 
held for a lesser offense remained the 
responsibility of the counties. For example, a 
youth with several violent priors currently 
being held for a relatively minor property 
offense would stay with the county, even 
though his priors might suggest the need for a 
more secure setting. Probation chiefs feel this 
new county population has contributed to 
increases of in‐custody incidents, gang activity, 
and difficulty in finding appropriate 
programming for these deeper‐end youth. 
There are, however, no data that supports 
these anecdotal observations. On the other 
hand, chief probation officers interviewed for 
this report also held the view that probation 
departments have come out better for 
realignment. Counties have been forced to get 
creative, to augment or develop local programs 
for youth, and to change the way their local 
facilities ran. They have increased the use of 
such approaches as community probation and 
 

 

intensive supervision, and have increased 
prevention efforts. They have found that 
keeping these youth at the local level is not 
only cheaper than the current costs of the CYA, 
but it gives youth access to local programs and 
services and keeps them connected to their 
families and communities.  
 
 

INSTITUTIONAL ABUSE AND THE 
STRUGGLE FOR YOUTH JUSTICE 
 
Despite the decrease in the incarcerated youth 
population that commenced towards the end 
of the 1990s, the CYA’s problems continued. 
The violence within the state facilities was 
beginning to become public, starting with the 
inmate murder of a CYA counselor, Ineasie 
Baker, in 1996. Many familiar with the CYA 
believe that it was this incident that began the 
era of extensive 23‐hour solitary confinement 
of many youth. The practice of 23‐hour lockups 
consisted of isolating youth (with behavioral 
and psychological problems) in their cells for 23 
hours a day, for days and even months on end, 
with one hour of large muscle exercise.13 In 
some instances, the Office of the Inspector 
General found that youth were denied this one 
hour and, in other instances, that this one hour 
of activity was conducted in a wire cage. This 
practice prevented youth from receiving any 
programming or services to which they were 
entitled. But high levels of violence within the 
CYA had begun long before Baker’s murder. A 
1989 lawsuit over the lack of special education 
programming had given the Youth Law Center 
(YLC) a unique window into the disturbing 
practices of the CYA: the suit provided inmates 
with YLC contact information. In the following 
years, YLC was inundated with letters from 
13

 California, Office of the Inspector General. (2000). 23 
and 1 Program Review. See 
http://www.oig.ca.gov/pages/reports/bai‐reviews.php 

                         
12

A New Era in California Juvenile Justice
inmates and families of inmates detailing 
abusive practices. With overwhelming evidence 
of abuse coming from youth themselves, youth 
advocates in the 1990s began actively lobbying 
for improved conditions and even the outright 
closing of the facilities. YLC and other like‐
minded organizations such as NCCD, the Center 
on Juvenile and Criminal Justice, and 
Commonweal began coordinating their efforts, 
meeting frequently to discuss strategies for 
pushing reform of the CYA. 
 
With the passage of Proposition 21, youth 
advocates fought even harder to keep youth in 
local, rehabilitative facilities. Proposition 21, 
passed by California voters in March, 2000, 
increased penalties for certain delinquency 
offenses and required transfers to the adult 
system for youth aged 14 and over who were 
charged with murder and/or certain sex crimes. 
Books Not Bars began organizing families of 
youth incarcerated in the CYA to lobby for the 
shuttering of the youth prison system. Their 
campaign was a very public one, working to 
keep the cause in the media constantly, 
informing the public not only of the abuses, but 
also of the possible alternatives, like the 
Missouri Model, a successful juvenile 
corrections reform effort in the Midwest.  
 
With so much happening around CYA reform, 
groups like Books Not Bars and the Youth Law 
Center began educating judicial leadership not 
only about the changes in law but also about 
the options counties had for their youth. YLC 
began a list‐serve among the public defender 
community, educating them about different 
legislation and initiatives taking place. As these 
decision makers were beginning to realize the 
abuses and violence that youth were facing in 
the CYA, coupled with the agency’s high price‐
tag, these re‐education efforts were timely. 
Many juvenile justice practitioners began 
reconsidering committing youth to the state, 
 

 

with several Bay Area counties even declaring a 
moratorium on youth commitments to the CYA, 
though follow‐through was uneven. 
 

Support in the Legislature 
Between 1999 and 2000, state leaders began 
taking a new look at the CYA. As Chairman of 
the Committee on Public Safety, State Senator 
John Vasconcellos held a number of public 
hearings over the allegations of abuse in the 
CYA. As a result of these hearings, the Office of 
the Inspector General and the Attorney General 
conducted a series of investigations, publishing 
scathing reports about rampant abuse, along 
with conditions of confinement, such as the use 
of cages and extended, 23‐hour lockdown 
periods.  
 
In 2003, Senator John Burton pushed through a 
significant piece of legislation altering juvenile 
justice proceedings. The Youthful Offender 
Parole Board had, by then, gained a reputation 
of being out of touch with the CYA and 
conditions within the facilities, constantly 
lengthening sentences of youth without 
knowing the conditions to which they were 
being subjected. SB 459 took away most of the 
Parole Board’s authority, putting in place a 
different governance structure. SB 459 also 
allowed counties to recall wards who were not 
receiving proper treatment. Lastly, the law 
allowed juvenile court judges to set maximum 
confinement time for inmates to be less than 
the maximum term an adult would receive for 
the same offense, which had been the prior 
practice. 
 
Another champion of CYA reform in the State 
Senate was Senator Gloria Romero, a 
consistent advocate for reform, holding 
legislative hearings and authoring several bills. 
Senator Romero became very involved in CYA 
reform after she obtained a video tape showing 

                         
13

A New Era in California Juvenile Justice
the beatings of two youth by several CYA youth 
at the Chadjerian facility. There were also well‐
publicized suicides of youth who had been 
placed in the 23‐hour solitary confinement 
program. Senator Michael Machado, chair of 
the powerful budget subcommittee covering 
CDCR, authored SB 81 that led to the major 
realignment in 2007. 
 

Lawsuits 

and defendants agreed to the findings of 
several expert reviews; remedial plans were 
finalized and a schedule for reform was set. Yet 
despite the “cautious optimism”15 of advocates 
following the Farrell suit, the reforms have still 
not materialized as quickly as they had hoped, 
and stories of inmate abuse, violence and 
decrepit facilities are still frequently found in 
the media. 
 

Effect of the Media 
Several lawsuits were brought against the 
California Youth Authority in the early 2000s, 
including one that required all 11 health care 
facilities to obtain state certification. The 
biggest and most influential case, however, was 
Farrell v. Harper, filed in 2003 by Prison Law 
Office. The Farrell suit challenged practically all 
aspects of incarceration in the CYA, including 
physical safety of wards, segregation, medical 
and dental care, mental health care, 
programming/rehabilitation (i.e. education, 
substance abuse treatment, sex offender 
treatment, exercise, physical facilities, religion), 
access to courts and redress of grievances, use 
of force, disability discrimination, and sex 
discrimination.  
 
At the same time that the Farrell suit was filed, 
California was undergoing a change in 
leadership at the top level. Gray Davis, who 
often turned a blind eye to the accusations 
against the CYA, was being replaced by Arnold 
Schwarzenegger. Schwarzenegger visited CYA 
facilities, saw the cages used to deliver 
“education” to incarcerated youth, and soon 
after took steps to end their use in the CYA.14 
This change in leadership is one of the main 
reasons the lawsuit resulted in a consent 
decree in 2004. In the next year, both plaintiffs 

Mainstream media picked up many stories of 
abuse within the facilities throughout the 
period of CYA population decline (see Table 1). 
Videos and news reports continued to surface, 
with several leading news outlets such as the 
Los Angeles Times and the San Jose Mercury 
News conducting in‐depth investigations. For 
the first time, the public knew about the 
incidents and trends that occurred behind the 
closed doors of the CYA. Abuse was perhaps 
the most common, ranging from inmate‐inmate 
and inmate‐staff violence, to staged fights and 
forcing girls to participate in pornographic 
videos. Newspapers also reported inmate 
deaths, both homicides and suicides, and 
quoted parents describing the desperate 
situation their kids faced and the lack of 
response from authorities. Other stories 
covered the 23‐hour isolation practices, the 
deterioration and out‐dated facilities, and the 
worsening mental health conditions for youth.  
 

14

 California, Office of the Governor (2004). Governor 
Schwarzenegger Announces Settlement in CYA Case 
[Press Release].  See http://gov.ca.gov/press‐
release/2677/ 
 

 

15

                         
14

 From interview with Sue Burrell of YLC.

A New Era in California Juvenile Justice
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
 

 

 

Table 1
Sample of Media Stories from 1999‐2005
Dec. 24, 1999 
Jan. 9, 2000 
2001, 2005, 2007 
2004 
Dec. 30, 2003 
Jan. 20, 2004 
Jan. 28, 2004 

April 1, 2004 
Sept. 2004 
Nov. 23, 2004  
‐  Jan. 21, 2005 

Head of California Youth Authority resigns under fire, 
Associated Press 
California Youth Authority Shifts from Rehab to Brutality, Los 
Angeles Times 
Various reports by the Office of the Inspector General 
revealing abuse within facilities. 
Video: System Failure: Violence, Abuse, and Neglect in the 
California Youth Authority, Books Not Bars 
 
Dog bite at N.A. Chaderjian Youth Correctional Facility, 
YouTube, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GFdz349InCQ 
Youth Beaten Down at Chaderjian Youth Correctional Facility, 
YouTube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rV4JzOM2QAk 
Allegations Of Abuse Being Investigated – Scathing report on 
Youth Authority, San Jose Mercury News 
Young inmates caged, drugged, state study finds, Associated 
Press 
Videotape shows guards beating two CYA inmates, Associated 
Press 
Cover‐up feared in prison death – 4th Youth Authority inmate 
to die in custody this year, San Francisco Chronicle 
California Youth Authority (in‐depth six investigative report 
series), San Jose Mercury News 

                         
15

A New Era in California Juvenile Justice
IN THE AFTERMATH… 
 
In the past 15 years, the number of youth 
incarcerated in the CYA has declined more than 
80 percent. This decline did not come as a 
result of large increases in spending on new 
alternative programs, but rather a series of 
changes in funding structures as well as 
changed attitudes on the effectiveness of the 
youth prison system. In fact, it is possible to see 
the ongoing state budget problems as one 
major cause of reducing the CYA population 
that will continue into the immediate future. 
Most importantly, this decline in the youth 
prison population did not endanger public 
safety; California crime rates have continued to 
decline and fewer youth are being arrested. 
Although some youth who might have gone to 
the CYA are now sent to county camps and 
ranches, many youth are being rehabilitated at 
the local level under probation supervision.  
 
The reduction in the number of youth confined 
at the state level has not hugely impacted 
counties in a negative way. The shifting of 
youth back to the county has allowed—or, in 
some cases, forced—probation officers, judges, 
and district attorneys to get creative with their 
resources, to find and create local alternatives, 
and to invest in programs that work for their 
communities. Some counties are converting or 
building new facilities to house long‐termers, 
but even these youth benefit from serving time 
in a local setting. 
 
With the CYA population so greatly declined, its 
facility conditions are still changing at a slow 
pace. Although preventing new admissions and 
removing non‐violent youth from the CYA is 
certainly a step in the right direction, finding 

appropriate alternatives for serious youth 
offenders is critical. 
 
We have already seen a rise in the number of 
juvenile cases being filed in adult court. 
Without a plan for effective rehabilitation for 
serious offenders, it is likely that more of them 
will be sent to adult prison, which would in 
many ways reverse much of the progress that 
has already been made in reducing the CYA 
population. There must be an alternative to 
adult prison; youth should be afforded a 
rehabilitative environment where their safety 
and well‐being can be guaranteed. 
 
As noted earlier, the radical decline in the CYA 
population is one of the state’s and nation’s 
best kept secrets. Other large states such as 
New York, Ohio, Michigan, Texas, and Illinois 
have achieved significant reductions in their 
state youth corrections populations, but not to 
the same extent as California. In each of these 
locales, the public exposure of abusive 
practices, stories of institutional violence and 
budgetary pressures are driving the 
decarceration movement. While the decline in 
the CYA population has yet to free up 
significant funding to expand local prevention 
and intervention programs, these budgetary 
shifts are likely to be achieved in the coming 
legislative session. 
 
The California experience illustrates how the 
reduction of incarcerated youth can save lives 
and cost less money than expensive and failed 
state facilities. Perhaps the lessons of the 
declining youth inmate population can offer 
clues on how to better manage our bulging 
adult corrections system in California. 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 

                         
16

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Berkeley Center for Criminal Justice, University of California, Berkeley 
2850 Telegraph Avenue, Suite 500, Berkeley, CA 94705‐7220   Tel: 510‐643‐7025   Fax: 510‐643‐4533 
www.bccj.berkeley.edu 

 
The National Council on Crime and Delinquency 
1970 Oakland Broadway, Suite 500, Oakland, CA 94612   Tel: 510‐208‐0500   Fax: 510‐208‐0511 
www.nccd‐crc.org 
 
                         
17

 

 

CLN Subscribe Now Ad 450x600
PLN Subscribe Now Ad 450x450
Stop Prison Profiteering Campaign Ad 2