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Draft CoreCivic resolution 2018

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RESOLUTION
RESOLVED: That the stockholders of the Company request that the Board of Directors
adopt the following policy, to be implemented no later than December 31, 2019:
1.
CoreCivic shall prohibit immigrant detainee children (persons under the age of
18 who are held in custody because they are suspected of entering the United States in
violation of immigration laws), who have been separated from their parent or parents by
any U.S. government entity, from being housed at any facility owned or operated by the
Company.
2.
CoreCivic shall prohibit adult immigrant detainees (persons over the age of 18 who
are held in custody because they are suspected of entering the United States in violation of
immigration laws), who have been separated from their child or children by any U.S.
government entity, from being housed at any facility owned or operated by the Company.
3.
CoreCivic shall prohibit immigrant detainee families (consisting of one or both
parents and one or more children who are held in custody because they are suspected of
entering the United States in violation of immigration laws) from being housed at any
facility owned or operated by the Company, whether the parents have been separated from
their children or not.
4.
If CoreCivic houses any immigrant detainees described in sections 1, 2 or 3
above, pursuant to contracts with any government entity, the Company shall, upon the
implementation of the above policies, immediately move to withdraw from or terminate
such contracts as soon as possible, including invoking any early termination options or
clauses in such contracts.
Supporting Statement
The controversial issue of separating immigrant detainee parents from their children in
the United States has made headlines across the country. 1
While CoreCivic has said it does not house immigrant detainee children who have been
separated from their parents, the Company may change that policy in the future. Further,
the Company currently houses immigrant detainee families.
The Company has had a controversial history with respect to housing immigrant
detainees. A CoreCivic employee was convicted of sexually abusing multiple female
detainees at the Company’s T. Don Hutto Residential Center. 2 Immigrant detainees have

1

www.npr.org/2018/06/19/621065383/what-we-know-family-separation-and-zero-tolerance-at-the-border
www.texasprisonbidness.org/2011/09/former-hutto-supervisor-pleads-guilty-federal-charges-molestingdetained-women

2

staged protests and hunger strikes at CoreCivic detention centers. 3 There have been at
least 32 deaths at Company-operated immigrant detention facilities, including at least
seven suicides. 4 The Company is currently being sued for using immigrant detainees to
perform work for wages as low as $1.00 per day. 5
These incidents pose risks to CoreCivic’s reputation and thus to shareholder value, and
raise liability concerns. Should the Company decide in the future to house immigrant
parents or children who have been separated, that also would create reputational harm.
Accordingly, this resolution requires CoreCivic to enact policies that prohibit it from
housing immigrant detainee parents or children who have been separated, and immigrant
detainee families, in order to reduce reputational harm and liability risks to the Company
and to protect shareholder value.

3

www.prisonlegalnews.org/news/2016/nov/7/hunger-strikes-immigrant-detainees-expose-abuses-iceprivate-detention-centers; www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/force-feed-hunger-striking-immigrantdetainee_us_57325786e4b096e9f09314ca
4
www.prisonlegalnews.org/news/2015/jul/7/32-deaths-cca-operated-immigration-detention-facilitiesinclude-least-7-suicides/
5
www.motherjones.com/politics/2018/04/immigrant-detainees-claim-they-were-forced-to-cleanbathrooms-to-pay-for-their-own-toilet-paper/

 

 

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