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Gwinnett County Ga Board of Commissioners Report and Recommendations on Prison Closure 2010

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PROJECT REPORT
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RECOMMENDATIONS
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GWINNETT COUNTY CORRECTIONAL
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SERVICES"
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Initial Draft Submitted:
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Final Draft Submitted:
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October 20, 2010
December 7, 2010
February 4, 2011
February 14,2011
March 14,2011

TABLE OF CONTENTS

I. Executive Summary
II. Purpose of Study
III. Background
IV. Committee
V. Methodology
VI. Department Overview
VII. Services Provided
VIII. Current Issues
IX. Short-Term Business Plan
X. Technology
XI. Impact of Closing the Correctional Complex
XII. Cost Analysis and Financial Issues
XIII. Opportunities to Mitigate Financial Impact
XIV. Findings
XV. Recommendations
XVI. Exhibits
2

PURPOSE OF STUDY
The purpose of the study is to evaluate whether or not Gwinnett County should operate a
correctional facility and depending on the outcome, recommend CUtTent and future
business plans for the Department of COITectional Services.
BACKGROUND
In 2009 Gwinnett County implemented a number of cost-cutting initiatives through the
Service, Value, and Responsibility Project (SVR); however, a shrinking tax digest and
declining revenues still left the county facing a $45 million budget gap for FY201O. In
order to close this gap and produce a balanced budget, the Board of Commissioners
proposed the first millage rate increase in more than 20 years. Citizens expressed strong
opposition to the rate increase during a series of public hearings and on June 2, 2009, the
board voted to leave the millage rate unchanged. Staff was subsequently directed to
identifY service reductions that would produce a balanced budget in FY20 10 without a
property tax increase.
On July 21,2009 the Board of Commissioners approved a resolution to implement deep
budget and service reductions in all departments for the purpose of balancing the fiscal
year 2010 tluough 2014 financial plan. This resolution included a directive for the
County Administrator to close the Gwillilett County Comprehensive Correctional
Complex as soon as practical but no later than July 1,2011; and eliminate the Department
of Correctional Services.
The budget cuts and diminished service levels identified in the July resolution also
produced citizen opposition, including some calls for a tax increase. In December 2009
the Board of Commissioners approved a smaller millage rate increase that reversed some,
but not all, ofthe previously identified service cuts. A superseding resolution passed on
December 15, 2009 directed the County Administrator to maintain Corrections as a
county department pending further analysis of departmental operations and services. The
BOC further directed the County Administrator to develop recommendations regarding
the Corrections Department with a first report due for the board's review no later than
October 30, 2010.
COMMITTEE
In response to the board's directive, County Administrator Gleim Stephens formed a
project team to evaluate whether or not Gwinnett County should operate a correctional
facility and to recommend current and future business plans for the Depmiment of
Correctional Services. The following county employees were appointed as team
members:
Phil Boudewyns - Administrative Office of the Courts
DOillm Buhler - Financial Services
Eric Horne - Community Services
Darrell Johnson - Corrections
David Peek - Corrections
Mike Plonowski - SuppOli Services
3

Kenneth Poe - Human Resources
Barry Puckett - ITS
Scott Callan - Financial Services
Col. Don Pinkard of the Sheriff's Department was subsequently added to the team in
order to provide insight on how project team recommendations could impact operation of
the Gwirmett County Jail.

METHODOLOGY
The initial meeting ofthe project team was held on February 18,2010. County
Administrator Glenn Stephens explained the purpose ofthe study and directed team
members to complete their work in time for him to meet the October 30, 2010 deadline
established by the Board of Commissioners. Mr. Stephens also explained that the team
should not wait until the end of the study to submit recommendations that could produce
inmlediate cost savings and/or efficiency improvements.
During the initial meeting, team members discussed the implications of closing the
Correctional facility and identified relevant questions that had been raised in various
forums. Team members were divided into subgroups according to their area of expertise,
and each subgroup was assigned to evaluate a particular issue or issues. Subgroups
worked independently throughout the study and were free to utilize other employees and
resources as needed to conduct their evaluations.
The full team met an additional six times over the next seven months so that subgroups
could present their findings and/or raise newly identified issues. Information provided by
subgroups was obtained by the following means:
•

Surveying Gwimlett County judges regarding the value of the correctional facility
as a sentencing alternative;

•

Reviewing vendor contracts and agreements for mowing and landscaping
services;

•

Soliciting input from department directors regarding the potential use of offender
labor within their respective depatiments;

•

Visiting the correctional complex to evaluate technology utilization and needs;

•

Performing a cost analysis of offender incarceration and labor;

•

Comparing the pros and cons of housing state imnates on behalf of the Georgia
Department of Corrections;

•

Identifying capital budget issues;

•

Allowing imnates to work in new areas on a trial basis in order to determine
feasibility; and,

•

Researching the use of offender labor in other jurisdictions.

4

Information from the subgroups was compiled and presented to all team members for
review. The findings outlined in this report are the consensus ofthe project team.
DEPARTMENT OVERVIEW
History
Gwinnett County has operated a correctional facility since at least the 1930s. In 1957 a
new 112 bed prison, referred to as the public work camp or PWC, was constructed on
Swanson Drive. The woi'k performed by the inmates primarily consisted of patching pot
holes in paved roads, building and repairing wooden bridges, and cutting grass on public
property. The department also operated a farm, slaughterhouse, cannery, and
smokehouse that provided food for the inmate population.
In 1984 the prison was expanded by 120 beds and became known as the Correctional
Institution, or CI. The expansion included a day room, indoor isolation cells, and
additional office space. The expansion was jointly funded by·the Georgia Depmiment of
Conections as part of a program to relieve inmate overcrowding in the state prison
system.
In 1985 the Board of Commissioners consolidated Police Services, Fire Services,
Correctional Services, Animal Control, and Emergency Management into a single
Department of Public Safety. In 1989, modular housing units were added to the
Conectional Institution and used to house pre-trial detainees on behalf of the Sheriffs
Department. This action was taken in response to a federal lawsuit regarding living
conditions in the overcrowded Gwinnett County Jail. Detainees were housed in the
Correctional Institution until a new jail opened in 1991.
After the new jail opened, the modular housing units vacated by the pre-trial detainees
were used to implement a new Work Release Program that allowed defendants to
maintain private employment while spending their non-working hours in custody. When
the new jail opened in 1991, the Correctional Services Division assumed control of the
old jail located on Hi Hope Road and convetied it into a Diversion Center to house its
Work Release Program and Work Alternative Program. After several months of
renovation, the Diversion Center opened in March 1992 with 170 beds and 18 employees.
With the removal of work release residents from the COlTectional Institution, the inmate
capacity there increased to 262.
In 1993 the Board of Commissioners abolished the Department of Public Safety and
created four new departments, including the Depmiment of Correctional Services. Due to
increasing need for bed space at the Diversion Center, two modular housing units were
added in 1995 increasing the number of work release beds to 230.
In 1998 the county developed plans to build a new state-of-the-art correctional facility to
replace the existing Correctional Institute and Diversion Center. In exchange for a state
construction grant in the amount of $3.2 million, the county added 128 inmate beds to the
original design and allocated the additional beds to the Georgia Department of
CotTections for a period often years.

5

In July 2000 a groundbreaking ceremony took place on the site ofthe planned SOO-bed
Comprehensive Correctional Complex. After several years of planning and construction,
the correctional complex opened at pm1ial capacity on September 12, 2002, and then at
full capacity in 2004. The new facility cost $21 million to build, and it remains the
largest county-owned correctiomil facility in Georgia. In 2009, the facility became the
first government-owned prison in Georgia to earn national accreditation through the
American Correctional Association.
Organizational Structure

The Department of C011'ectional Services is directed by a Warden, who is appointed by
the County Administrator. The Warden directs departmental operations and is
responsible for ensuring that the department's policies, procedures, and standards supp011
the county's vision. Qualifications for the position of Warden include a bachelor's
degree in a closely related field and ten years of progressively responsible experience
related to the area of assignment, including four years in an upper management position;
or, an equivalent combination of education and experience sufficient to successfully
perform the essential duties of the job. The Warden must be a cet1ified correctional·
officer in the State of Georgia, and the Georgia Board of Corrections must approve
his/her appointment.
The Department of Correctional Services is normally comprised oftwo divisions,
Security and Supp011 Services. Each division is directed by a Deputy Warden who
rep011s to the Warden and is responsible for managing all operations within his/her
division. Qualifications for the position of Deputy Warden include a bachelor's degree
in a closely related field and six years of progressively responsible experience related to
the area of assignment, including two years experience as a manager; or, an equivalent
combination of education and experience sufficient to successfully perform the
essential duties of the job. The Deputy Warden must also be a cet1ified correctional
officer in the State of Georgia, and the Georgia Board of Corrections must approve
his/her appointment.
The Security Division is responsible for the safe and secure operation of the
Comprehensive Correctional Complex. This responsibility includes maintaining
custody of all offenders in the complex; providing direct supervision in inmate housing
areas; enforcing rules and maintaining discipline; maintaining strict control and
accountability of keys, tools, and hazardous products; and preventing/controlling
contraband.
The Support Services Division is responsible for inmate care and treatment, field
operations, food service, maintenance, technical suppot1, and fiscal management. These
responsibilities include offender counseling, education, and vocational training; and
administering the offender labor program.
Note: Nine employees, including both deputy wardens and the business officer, retired
fi'om the department in 2009. Only one ofthe deputy warden positions was replaced in
2009; therefore, it was necessmJI to make tempormy changes to the department's
organizational structure. Rathel' than two divisions each headed by a Deputy Warden,
all departmental operations are currently consolidated under the direction ofthe Warden
and one Deputy Warden (see Exhibits A and B).

6

Authorized Budget
The department's adopted budget for FY2010 is summarized in the following chart. A
complete copy of the budget is attached to this repmi (see Exhibit C).
Category

General Fund

Personal Services
GOE
Contributions:

9,397,253
3,088,065
235,679

103,035
43,935
2,288

9,500,288
3,132,000
237,967

Total:

12,720,997

149,258

12,870,255

1,686,369

78,650

1,765,019

Projected Revenue:

Inmate Welfare Fund

Total

Authorized Staffing
The department began 2010 with 142 authorized positions; 125 sworn and 17 civilian.
However, two senior management positions were eliminated from the department's
position control, and one correctional officer position was transfelTed to the Depmiment
of Fire and Emergency Services as part of an SVR initiative to consolidate public safety
warehouse operations. The following chart summarizes the number and type of positions
within the depmiment; the actual position control is attached to this repmi (See Exhibit
D).
Swom
Warden
Deputy Warden
Captain
Lieutenant
Sergeant
Corporal
Classification Officer
Correctional Officer
Total:

2009
1

Civilian
Administrative Support
Building Services
Business Office
Food Services
Vocational Training
Work Alternative Program
Total:

2010
1
1

2

2

1

6
8
9

6
8
9

2

2

95

94

125

122

2009
2

2010
2

2

2
5

5
5

5
2
1

2*
1

17

17

* One position is grant funded
Mission

7

Change

-1
-1

-1
-3
Change

The mission of the Gwinnett County Depatiment of Conections is to promote connnunity
safety by maintaining a safe and secure environment that encourages positive change and
provides quality services that make a difference.

Vision
To be a model of excellence in the field of Corrections.

Values
The values that best represent the core principles of the Gwinnett County Department of
Corrections are Integrity, Professionalism and Respect.

SERVICES PROVIDED
Incarceration aud Labor Program
The department applies modern correctional management techniques to provide care and
custody for minimum and medium security inmates. Under an agreement with the
Georgia Depatiment of Corrections, 128 ofthe department's 512 inmate beds are
reserved for state inmates while the remaining beds are available for county inmates
sentenced directly by Gwinnett County judges. In exchange for housing inmates for the
Georgia DoC, Gwinnett County receives $20 per diem for each state inmate housed and
realizes the benefit ofthe inmates' labor.
To further offset the costs of housing prisoners, inmates serving time provide a
supplemental labor force to Gwinnett County; imnates perfonn janitorial, landscaping,
maintenance, and other services at many county-owned facilities. The Comprehensive
Correctional Complex is rated for inmates classified as minimum or medium security. In
accordance with rules established by the Georgia Board of Corrections, minimum
security imnates may work outside of the facility under the supervision of civilian
employees who have completed an approved training course. Medium security inmates
may also work outside of the facility, but only under the direct supervision of a celiified
correctional officer.
Most imnate workers from the Correctional facility are supervised by a correctional
officer assigned to the depatiment's Field Operations Unit. Officers drive imnates to
various work sites around the county and supervise their work. Depatiments/agencies
that supervise their own minimum security inmates pick up their assigned inmate workers
in the m01'11ing, supervise their work activities, and retu1'11 them to the correctional
complex in the afte1'11oon.

Work Release Program
The Work Release Program provides a semi-incarceration sentencing alte1'11ative that
allows defendants, called residents, to maintain regular employment while serving their
non-working time in custody. The program allows residents to retain their jobs in the
community, support their families, and pay taxes; while keeping them out of trouble
while not working. Residents are required to pay administrative and daily fees to offset
the cost of the program; in addition to the payment of any court-ordered child support

8

payments, fines, and probation fees. A unique feature of this program is that it allows
judges to incarcerate parents who habitually fail to pay child support without depriving
the parent of his/her employment.
Work Alternative Program
The Work Alternative Program allows first offenders to perform community service work
in lieu of serving time. Offenders sentenced to the program are not incarcerated but report
to the department on a daily basis as ordered by the sentencing court. Participants are
supetvised by part-time civilian employees as they remove litter fimn roadsides and
perform other non-skilled work for other county departments, govermnent agencies, and
non-profit organizations. The program is partially funded through administrative and
daily fees paid by the offenders.
Inmate Job Training and Education Program
Since 1997 Gwinnett County has patinered with the Atlanta Regional Commission to
operate a vocational training program for imnates. This grant funded program is
recognized by the Georgia Department of Labor and has a record of success in reducing
recidivism. The program has received numerous awards and has been featured on
Georgia Public Television. It is a challenge to obtain employment without a high school
diploma; therefore, the department also provides inmates with an opportunity to earn
their GED while in custody.
CURRENT ISSUES
Uncertainty
The Depatiment of Corrections experienced much uncertainty in 2009 and 2010, which
directly affected employee morale, organizational performance, and business planning.
A significant number of employees left the depatiment after the July 2009 BOC
resolution, and many remaining employees perceive the project team study as a threat to
their long-term job security.
Staffing and Service Delivery
Nine employees, including both deputy wardens and the business officer, retired from the
department in 2009 resulting in the loss of 177 years of combined experience. Overall,
forty employees (28%) left the department between July 21, 2009 and September 30,
2010.
Providing an offender labor force requires a fully staffed Field Operations Unit and at
the time of the July 2009 BOC resolution to close the correctional complex, 26
correctional officer positions were dedicated to supervising imnate work crews. By the
end of 2009, however, 18 of these work crews were idle due to lack of staffing. Even
though authorization to fill most vacant positions was granted in April 2010, it will be
early 2011 before all of these positions can be filled.
BCOT Training

9

Before exercising supervisory authority over any inmate, correctional officers must
become state certified in accordance with rules established by the Peace Officers
Standards and Training Council (POST). In order to obtain state certification, newly
hired officers must attend a four week training academy conducted by the Georgia
Department of Corrections, and an additional week of POST-mandated training related
to firearms and use of force issues. In 2009 the Georgia Department of Corrections
reduced the number of academy sessions as a cost cutting measure, which increased
competition for classroom space and lengthened the time required to schedule new
employees for this training. In turn, this change lengthened the amount of time before a
newly hired officer can work independently.
Solid Waste Plan
The change in the county's relationship with GwiImett Clean and Beautiful adversely
affected staffs ability to manage and motivate inmate workers. Prior to 2009, three
inmate work crews were assigned to the Recycling Bank of Gwinnett. Under the fonner
anangement, all newly arriving inmates were initially assigned to work at the RBG and
could earn a transfer to a more desirable job assigrunent through good work and positive
behavior. Additionally, the prospect of returning to the RBG motivated most inmates to
perform well in subsequent assignments. The security design of the RBG also allowed
staff to work higher-risk inmates who are not allowed to work in public settings.
Although there is other work available for most inmates, there is no alternate assignment
that provides the same level of security and motivation.
Changes in the Inmate Population
The original allocation of irunate bed-space in the Comprehensive Correctional Complex
allowed the depmiment to house 254 state inmates under two separate agreements with
the Georgia Department of Corrections; the remaining 258 beds were available for county
inmates sentenced directly to the facility by local judges. The number of countysentenced inmates eventually exceeded available bed-space in the correctional complex,
which created a backlog of inmates in the jail and contributed to inmate overcrowding
there. In order to relieve overcrowding in the jail, the number of beds allocated for state
inmates in the Correctional Complex was reduced from 254 to 128 in late 2008.
After the state inmate allocation was reduced, the need for county inmate bed-space
decreased as the result of a decision by the Georgia Court of Appeals that ended the
longstanding local practice ofjudges sentencing felons directly to the correctional
complex. The Court ruled that all felons sentenced to confinement must be committed to
the Georgia Department of Corrections, and that judges lack the authority or jurisdiction
to designate an alternate place of confinement (Stewart v. State, 285 Ga. App. 760).
These two events resulted in empty bed space in the correctional complex, which led the
department to close one inmate housing unit (64-beds) in November 2009 and eliminate
five correctional officer positions. The department also began to house jail inmates on
behalf ofthe Sheriffs Department in order to fill'ther relieve overcrowding in the jail.
Even so, the correctional complex has consistently remained below full inmate capacity.
Additionally, jail inmates generally do not meet the criteria for working outside of the
facility, and this loss of qualified inmate workers t1u'eatens the depmiment's ability to
meet irunate labor needs.
10

The reduction in state inmates produced a corresponding loss of per-diem revenue from
the Georgia DoC. The change in bedsp<lce allocation also presents operational challenges
because county inmates tend to be younger and more violent. Many county inmates have
never been in prison before, so they resist structure and discipline. They are also more
likely to be members of street gangs, which can lead to more gang-related conflict within
the facility.
Many of the minimum secUt'ity inmates in the Comprehensive Correctional Complex are
state inmates who are housed on behalf of the Georgia Department of Corrections.
Decreasing the number of state inmates has hampered the depmiment's ability to provide
a sufficient number of minimum secUt'ity inmates to other depmiments that supervise
their own inmate workers.

Technology
The lack of technology and reliance on paper documents is a weakness for the
depmiment. A technical assessment completed as pmi of this study is discussed later in
this repoli.

Economic Downturn
The high rate of unemployment over the past two years caused the number of residents in
the Work Release Program to decline significantly; two-thirds of the 288 resident beds
were unused as of September 2010. An increasing number of residents are unemployed
at the time of sentencing; some are only marginally employable and others are
unemployable. The lack of qualified residents and declining revenues are a threat to the
program's existence. Additionally, a significant percentage of program costs have
transferred from the user to the taxpayer.

Capital Funding Needs
The Comprehensive Correctional Complex opened in 2002 and the boiler system that
provides the facility with hot water is beginning to fail. One boiler has developed a leak
that cannot be repaired, which increases water and energy costs. Additionally, several
commercial appliances and systems in the kitchen have reached the end of their service
lives; and the department is spending an inordinate amount of money to maintain its
commercial washers and dryers. Thedepartment will be forced to replace this equipment
in the neal' future.
The depmiment relies heavily on its ability to transpOli inmates outside the facility. In
2007 the Fleet Management Division within the Department of SuppOli Services
recommended replacing all four of the department's full-size 1990 model transport
busses; and a capital project was established to replace these busses over a foUt' year
period begitming in 2009. However, replacement funding was eliminated as pmi of the
2009 SVR project. In the meantime, these vehicles continue to experience expensive
mechanical problems and because of their age, replacement pmis are difficult to obtain.

SHORT-TERM BUSINESS PLAN

11

In response to guidance from the County Administrator regarding short-term
recommendations, team members discussed opportunities to quickly meet identified
service needs while remaining within the depatiment's FY 2010 authorized budget; and
to mitigate the department's impact on the General Fund. In March 2010 team members
submitted, and the County Administrator approved, the following shOli-tenn
recommendations:
1. Provide seven additional inmate work crews to Parks and Recreation by restoring
seven correctional officer positions that were eliminated from the authorized
headcount in 2009.
Although these positions were eliminated in 2009, funding for the positions was
included in the department's authorized budget for FY 2010. At the time ofthis
recommendation, however, only two of the nine requested crews have been
provided due to a lack of staff. This initiative is based on an immediate service
need as two inmate crews carulOt service all county parks and recreational
facilities. The expense of implementing this recommendation is limited to
personal services since the required vehicles and equipment are already on hand.
Additionally, this recommendation does not impact the General Fund since actual
costs are reimbursed from the Recreation Fund.
Note: Two additional crews were provided in September 2010; however, the
2011 business plan for the Department ofCommunity Services reduced the
number ofinmate crews working in county parks fi'om nine to four. The five
remaining correctional officer positions remain unfilled

2. Provide a third irunate crew to Support Services by restoring one correctional
officer position that was delimited in 2009.
As with the first recommendation, the expense associated with providing this
crew is limited to personal services since the required vehicle and equipment are
already on hand. In return for an annual expense of $47,042 the Department of
Support Services can save $42,000 by cancelling a vendor contract. Although the
cost of providing this service with inmate labor is slightly more expensive than
using a private vendor, theinmate crew is a better value because it provides
additional hours and greater flexibility.
Note: Implemented September 2010

3. Reactivate two inmate crews by filling existing vacant positions and make the
crews available to cities within Gwinnett County in exchange for an established
daily rate, currently $310.
The department's authorized staffing includes two vacant conectional officer
positions for this purpose, but both work crews were deactivated in September
2009 because of employee attrition. Due to the time required to hire and train
replacement officers, this service has still not been restored at the time of this
writing. On an annual basis, these two crews represent approximately $125,000
($310 x 4 days per week x 50 weeks x 2 crews) in revenue for the General Fund
12

compared to an annual expense of about $100,000 ($47,042 x 2 officers plus
fuel).

Note: On August 4, 2010 the BOC authorized community improvement districts
located within Gwinnett County to hire inmate work crews under the same terms
and conditions already authorizedfor cities. This service was restoredfor cities
and CIDs in December 2010.
4. Maintain 128 beds in the correctional facility for use by the Georgia Department
of Corrections through February 2013 in order to avoid repayment ofthe state
grant that pat1ially funded construction of the correctional complex.
By not exercising the grant agreement's early termination clause in 2010, the
county avoids the need to repay the grant on a pro-rated basis.
5. Offer 64 additional inmate beds to the Georgia Department of Corrections for a
12-month period beginning July 1, 2010 and if the offer is accepted, reopen the
inmate housing unit, which was closed in 2009, by restoring five correctional
officer positions that were eliminated.
Sh0l1ly after the state inmate population was reduced in 2008, the need for county
inmate bedspace declined markedly in response to the previously mentioned
ruling by the Georgia C0U11 of Appeals. Now that the county inmate population
depends primarily on misdemeanor offenders, it is unlikely to reach ful1 capacity
anytime soon. Restoring the five delimited positions and adding 64 state imnates
would generate $461,000 on an annual basis and provide a more stable and
productive imnate workforce. In exchange, the county would spend
approximately $367,000 annual1y for salaries and benefits, food, and clothing,
The cost of routine medical care would not increase because the CU1Tent medical
contract fee is based on inmate capacity rather than actual population.

Note: The Georgia DoC declined to accept for FY 2011 due to budget
constraints, but expressed interest for FY 2012. Since the state jiscal year begins
in July, these positions were defill1dedfor thejirst six months of2011 in order to
preserve the option without any expense to the county. In the absence of
expressed interestfi'om the Georgia DoCfor FY 2012, these jive positions were
eliminated entirely on March 1, 2011 as part ofbudget balancing initiatives
designed to cut $18millionfi'om the county's 2011 operating budget.

TECHNOLOGY
A 2007 efficiency study of the Depat1ment of Correctional Services recommended a
significant teclmology upgrade to eliminate the reliance on paper documents, improve
offender tracking, and increase the ability to communicate by electronic mail. Nearly
$500,000 was approved in the 2009 ITS budget for this purpose, but it was necessary to
withdraw this funding in an effort to balance the FY 2010 financial plan.
A technical assessment completed as part of this study concluded that the department has
an immediate need to automate its environment so that day_to-day operations are less
13

time and labor intensive and more streamlined. This assessment includes eleven specific
recommendations for efficiency improvements as follows:
I. Maximize the use of the TAG modules licensed to the Sheriffs Depatiment;
2. Automate the creation of paper forms and incorporate digitized/electronic
signatures;
3. Implement reliable and functional fingerprint software and hardware to allow for
identification and tracking of offenders;
4. Install an armband system to replace the CU1l'ent offender ID badge system;
5. Replace the mug-shot system with the system currently used by the Sheriffs
Department;
6. Replace the imnate accounting software with the TAG Institutional Financials
module;
7. Install food management software to improve efficiency with regard to state
regulations for food preparation and management, inventory control, and
purchasing;
8. Install PCs, printers and fingerprint software/hardware in offender housing units
and other areas of the correctional facility;
9. Train departmental staff as needed;
10. Use FileNet to store inmate related paper documents;
II. Utilize the Sheriffs Department Teclmical Services Unit to support the TAG
system.
The teclmical assessment includes detailed information concerning each
recommendation; a copy of the assessment is attached to this repoli (See Exhibit I). The
technical assessment also includes a summary cost sheet that indicates a total cost of
$854,245 to implement all eleven of the aforementioned recommendations.

IMPACT OF CLOSING THE CORRECTIONAL COMPLEX
Although the original decision to close the correctional facility was in response to budget
considerations, the overall impact extends beyond the Department of Correctional
Services and camlOt be measured strictly in financial terms.

Sheriff's Department
The wording of the July 2009 resolution approved by the BOC implied that all imnates
housed in the correctional facility could be transferred to the Georgia Department of
Corrections, but that is not the case. While 128 of the facility's 512 inmate beds are
allocated for state imnates, the remaining 384 beds are reserved for county-sentenced
14

inmates who are not wards of the Georgia DoC. Additionally, the facility's 288 work
release beds are exclusively for county use.
Since the Gwinnett County Jail is the only other option for housing county-sentenced
offenders, closing the correctional facility would have a significant impact on the
Sheriffs Department. If the correctional facility is closed, county inmates and work
release residents who would have been sentenced to the facility will likely end up in the
jail instead.
In order to manage a higher inmate population in the Pre-Trial Detention Center, it will
be necessary for the Sheriffs Department to hire additional staff. The hiring process for
a Deputy Sheriff averages 6-8 weeks, and the length of time to train and work
independently averages 3-4 months. The P.O.S.T. certification requirements for a
cOll'ectional officer and deputy are different; therefore, any correctional officers who
transfer from Corrections to the Sheriffs Department must still obtain P.O.S.T. jailer
certification.
Housing additional inmates in an already overcrowded jail creates several issues for the
Sheriffs Department including:
•

Increased risk of civil suits due to overcrowded conditions;

•

Additional space and resource needs to meet requirements for equal access to
facilities and services, such as the library and medical clinic;

•

Additional space for courtrooms;

•

Additional space within the facility and more outside parking to accommodate the
increased number of staff, visitors; and,

•

Long term capital improvements and operating costs to accommodate the
increased inmate population (see Exhibit J)

The Sheriff has indicated that if the correctional facility closes, it will likely be necessary
to house some of these offenders in other facilities throughout the state. The current rate
for outside housing averages $45 - $55 daily; this rate does not include medical expenses
which are far more difficult to manage in rural areas where most of these facilities are
located. If inmates are housed in other facilities, the Sheriffs Department will incur the
cost of transpoliing offenders between Gwitmett and the other counties. In detelmining
options for housing out inmates, the Sheriff must consider the availability of facilities to
accept inmates; with the understanding that finding a single facility to house the
additional inmates is unlikely.
Provided in Exhibit K is a memorandum from Sheriff Butch Conway to the Board of
Cormnissioners expressing his support in keeping the Correctional Institute operational.
He further states that closing this facility would overly burden his depatiment which is
already stretched to its limits.

Judicial)'

IS

Gwinnett County Judges submitted infonnation to the team in which they expressed
SUppOlt for maintaining the correctional facility, particularly the Work Release Program
(see Exhibit K). Judges opined that the Work Release Program is a plus for Gwinnett
taxpayers and citizens; and they expressed concern that without the program as a
sentencing option, they would be forced to sentence work release eligible defendants to
the Pre-Trial Detention Center (Jail) instead. According to the judges, the Work Release
Program is beneficial because it:
•

Provides the opportunity for defendants to maintain fhll-time employment while
incarcerated;

•

Provides an avenue for the collection of child SUPPOlt, which benefits children
and families in the community;

•

Allows speedier collection of court fines and restitution for crime victims;

•

Defrays the cost of incarceration through disbursements from the defendant's
earnings; and,

•

Provides the groundwork for a more stable citizen and community member after
incarceration.

Local judges have also expressed concern that closing the cOll'ectional facility would clog
their court calendars and increase the amount of time required to adjudicate cases.
Although no specific statistical data is available, the option of sentencing defendants to
the correctional facility, either as an inmate or work release resident, allows prosecutors
to reach plea bargain agreements in cases that would otherwise proceed to trial.
Additionally, closing the correctional facility would eliminate the Work Alternative
Program as a sentencing option.
As of January 14,2011 there were 203 inmates and 76 work release residents sentenced
to the correctional complex by Gwinnett County judges. Closing the correctional facility
before these imnates/residents complete their sentences will require sentence
modifications which, in many cases, will require a court hearing with all patties in
attendance. The number of sentence modifications required depends on the actual
closing date and the number of county-sentenced offenders still in custody at the time.
The release schedule for inmates and residents currently in custody is as follows:
Year

Imnates

Residents

0
0
5
19
179

13
0
10
19
34

Indefinite'
2013
2012
2011 (Jul- Dec)
20 II (Jan - Jun)

*Most child support defendants are sentenced to pay a specified sum of money rather
than serve a fixed period of time.

16

The intrinsic value of the correctional facility as a sentencing option cmmot be measured.
If the facility does close, judges will still have the option to sentence defendants to local
confinement in the county jail. There are also connnunity service alternatives to the
Work Alternative Program. The loss of the Work Release Program is most significant for
local judges because there is no alternative for part-time incarceration. Judges can
sentence work release eligible defendants to jail, but doing so deprives the defendant of
the oppoltunity to maintain gainful employment and meet hislher financial obligations,
such as child support.

Offender Labor
Closing the correctional facility would end the longstanding practice of using sentenced
offenders to provide a supplemental labor force for other Gwinnett County depallments.
Even if sentenced offenders are housed in the jail, operating work crews from the jail is
not practical because the jail is designed primarily as a pre-trial facility and pre-trial
detainees cmmot be forced to work. Even if the Sheriffs Depallment could assume this
responsibility, the costs associated with supervising inmate workers would remain - just
in a different department.
If measured solely in tenus of work hours, the 356,322 hours of offender labor (inmates
and community service workers) provided in 2008 equates to more than 170 full-time
employees. Ifthe offender labor program ceases to exist, departments that currently rely
on offender labor would instead have to utilize paid staff and/or private vendors.
For a price, private vendors are an option for replacing most services currently
accomplished with offender labor. However, the team could not locate any information
regarding vendors to perform roadside litter pickup. Offenders removed litter from more
than 5,000 roadside miles annually during 2008 and 2009.
Capital Expenditures
The Department of Support Services has submitted two capital projects in FY20 lIon
behalf of the Corrections Department. One project proposes to replace two full-size 1990
model transp01l buses at a total cost of $240,000. The second project proposes to replace
the boiler system, kitchen equipment, and laundry equipment in the Comprehensive
Correctional Complex at a total cost of $393,31 O. Closing the facility would eliminate
the need for the transport buses; but the need for the system and equipment repairs
depends on the disposition of the facility.
Offenders and the Community
Closing the c011'ectional facility would also affect the offender population, and arguably
the community as a whole. Correctional facilities are better able to provide self-help
programs, vocationaltraining, and educational opportunities than a jail environment.
National studies indicate that offenders who receive these services while incarcerated are
less likely to commit new crimes after their release from custody. It is impossible to
calculate how these services affect the rate of recidivism, but it is reasonable to believe
17

they have some positive impact on public safety. As already mentioned, elimination of
the Work Release Program would deprive some offenders ofthe opportunity to maintain
employment and meet financial obligations.
Grant Repayment

A decision to close the correctional facility and return state imnates to the Georgia
Department of Corrections prior to February 2013 will require the county to repay a
portion of a grant that patiially funded construction of the correctional facility. After
February 2013, however, no repayment is required.

Disposition of Facility

The Comprehensive Correctional Complex opened in 2002 at a cost of more than $21
million. The facility is located on approximately 6 acres of land; it includes a main
building with an area of132,000 square feet and two warehouse/storage buildings with a
combined area of approximately 15,000 square feet. The main building contains eight (8)
open dormitory style housing units designed for medium and minimum security imnates;
six (6) open dormitory style housing units designed for work release residents; and
twenty (20) individual cells located in the Disciplinary Isolation!Administrative
Segregation Unit. Due to its design as a place of incarceration for low·risk offenders,
convetiing the facility to an alternate use within county government would likely require
extensive renovations.
The Engage Gwitmett Final Report includes a recommendation to explore outsourcing
options for the correctional facility. The project team did not attempt to explore
outsourcing options because doing so would require the solicitation of proposals. The
team did, however, review available information regarding private correctional facilities
currently operating in Georgia.
D. Ray James Prison in Folkston is owned and operated by Cornell Companies and until
earlier this year, Cornell contracted with the Georgia Department of Corrections to house
state inmates. This contract was recently terminated, however, and the prison is being
convetied to a federal holding facility.
Two other private prisons owned and operated by Conections Corporation of America
(CCA) are used to house state imnates for the Georgia Department of Corrections. CCA
signed a contract in September 20 I0 to build another private prison for this purpose in
Jenkins County. CCA houses inmates on behalf of the Federal Bureau of Prisons in its
other Georgia facilities, including the 502 bed North Georgia Detention Center in Hall
County which houses immigration (ICE) detainees.
The business model for private correctional facilities in Georgia is based on warehousing
a large federal 01' state inmate population for the purpose of generating revenue;
providing a supplemental labor force does not appeal' to be pati of that model. Any
decision to house higher·security offenders in the correctional facility would require
extensive security enhancements to eliminate the open·dorm style housing. However, an
RFP will be required to determine if outsourcing is feasible in this situation.
18

If no alternate use for the correctional complex is identified, it will be necessary to
maintain and protect the building and grounds. Even if the facility is vacant, it will still
be necessary to:
•

Operate the HVAC system at a minimum level throughout the year in order to
control humidity and prevent mold;

•

Maintain and monitor the fire alarm and suppression systems;

•

Heat all buildings during cold weather to prevent freeze damage to the fire
suppression (water sprinkler) system;

•

Provide sufficient lighting to deter would-be trespassers and vandals;

•

Maintain pest control services to prevent vermin;

•

Mow grass during warm weather months in order to prevent the complex Ii-om
becoming a public eyesore; and,

•

Inspect the buildings at regular intervals.

In the event the conectional facility remains vacant, the county should expect ongoing
expenses of approximately $60,500 annually for utilities and services as follows:
Electricity·
Natural Gas"
Fire Alarm/Suppression System Maintenance
Fire Alarm Monitoring
Pest Control Service
Grass Mowing···

$18,517
$23,152
$ 1,875
$ 300
$ 1,080
$15,733

Total:

$60,657

* 15% ofcurrent use
** 10% ofcurrent use
*** Based on existing ycndor agreement with DWR
Most of the correctional complex is surrounded by a security fence, but four exterior
doors and several windows on the front side of the main building are easily accessible to
the public. Therefore, it may be desirable to install a security alarm system and have it
monitored along with the fire alarm system.
COST ANALYSIS AND FINANCIAL ISSUES

Note: The information presented in this section pertains only to the General Fund; the
department's Inmate Welfare Fund budget was deemed inconsequential to outcome of
this study. The Inmate Welflire Fund is a restricted use fill1d; its revenue is generated
Fom commisswy sales to inmates and the money can only be usedfor the ben~fit,
welfare, and education ofthe inmate population.
Budget Summary

19

The adopted General Fund budget for the Depmiment of C011'ectional Services was
$12,923,709 in 2008 and $12,720,997 in 2009 and 2010. However, the depmiment's
financial impact on the General Fund was reduced by revenue, the value of offender
labor, and reimbursements.

General Fund Revenue

2008

2009

State Inmate Per-Diem
Contract Work Crews
Inmate Telephone Commission
Work Release Program
Work Alternative Program
Other

$1,708,740
$ 100,750
$ 167,170
$ 703,785
$ 135,651
$ 65,304

$
$
$
$
$
$

Revenue:

$2,881,400

$1,745,681

Inmate Labor
Work Alternative Labor

$3,532,437
$ 328,015

$2,574,442
$ 366,849

Labor Value:

$3,860,452

$2,941,291

Reimbursements fl'om Other Funds

$ 449,287

$ 453,293

896,575
84,320
154,490
428,826
134,159
47,311

Offender Labor Value

Note: Offender labor value represents the cost ofproviding the same service with
paid staff-it is not hard dollars that are retu1'l1ed to the county treasllly. Inmate
labor value is based on the approximate hourly rate ofthe lowest paid county
position, whereas the value ofwork alternative labor is based onfederal minimum
wage. This approach was developed during the I990s by the former Office ofInte1'l1al
Audit, and was revalidated in 2008 by the Pe/:formance Analysis Division.

In 2008, the depmiment's adopted General Fund budget was offset 56% by revenue,
offender labor and reimbursements; this offset declined to 40% in 2009. The 2009
decline was due to a reduction in the number of state inmates housed on behalf of the
Georgia Department of Corrections and the lack of staff to supervise inmate work crews.
In order to fUliher evaluate the department's financial impact on the General Fund, it is
necessary to examine the costs of each service provided by the department. The
cOl'l'ectional facility was designed so that all programs share building space and staff;
therefore, program expenses are intertwined. The deparlment's General Fund budget
contains only one cost center, so program costs presented in this report are estimates
based on personnel assignments, space allocations, expenditures, and financial analysis.
20

(

Note: In order to make a valid comparison, the financial ojftets presented in this
analysis are, with two exceptions, based on 2008 data because 2008 was the lastfilll
year ofnormal operations within the Department ofCorrectional Services. The
exceptions are state inmate subsidy - 2009 data is used because the state inmate
population was reduced by 50% in late 2008; and contract inmate labor - 2009 data is
used because the service was not provided in 2008.
County
Inmate
Incarceration

State
Inmate
Incarceration

Inmate
Labor
Program'

7,455,110

2,485,037

1,543,167

881,876

355,807

-167,377
-25232

-952,367
-8,411

-100,750
-449,287
-3,532,437

-703,785

-135,651

-2,539,307

178,091

Less:
Revenue
Reimbursements
Labor Vaiue
Result:

7,262,501

1,524,259

Work
Release
Program

Work
Alternative
Program

-328,015
-107,859

'" State inmates comprise approximately 25% of the Inmate workforce

Housing County Inmates
The team asked the Depatiment of Financial Services to prepare an inmate expense
analysis, which is attached to this repmi (see Exhibit E). Again, this analysis is based on
2008 data because 2008 was the last full year of normal operations within the Department
of Correctional Services. According to this analysis, the average daily cost to house an
imnate in the correctional facility during 2008 was $53.19; this analysis makes no
adjustments for revenue.
Note: According to staff.fi·om the Sheriff's Department, this amount is close to the
average daily cost ofhousing an inmate in the Gwinnelf County Jail. The Sheriff's
Department and Department ofCorrectional Services use the same vendor to provide
inmate medical care; and share price agreements for the purchase offood, clothing, etc.

Closing the correctional complex will not end the practice of sentencing offenders to
local confinement. Since the Gwinnett County Pre-Trial Detention Center (Jail) is the
only alternative to the correctional facility, it will be necessary to provide the Sheriff's
Department with adequate resources to manage additional county-sentenced inmates,
including those who would have been sentenced to the Work Release Program. A
decision to close the correctional facility will not eliminate the expense of housing
county-sentenced offenders, but will transfer the expense to the Sheriff's Department.
HOllsing State Inmates
The county's longstanding practice of housing state imnates on behalf of the Georgia
Department of Corrections has been questioned in various forums. The primary concern
is whether the $20 per diem, which has not increased since 1999, is sufficient to cover the
county's cost of providing custody and care for state inmates.
21

The average daily cost of housing an imnate was $53.19 in 2008 (see Exhibit E);
however, the State of Georgia pays the county $20 per day for each state inmate housed.
As a result, the average daily cost of housing a state irunate is $33.19. Additionally, the
county's liability for providing medical care to state irunates is limited to $1,000 per
occurrence, whereas it is unlimited for a county sentenced irunate.
Although there is a net daily cost of $33 .19 for each state imnate housed, this amount is
offset by the value of the inmate's labor. According to a cost analysis conducted by
Financial Services, the average value of an irunate's labor is $11.64 per hour (see Exhibit
E). Assuming a state irunate works 235 days mmually for six hours per day, the labor
represents a value of $16,412 on an annual basis. When this amount is considered, the
average daily cost of housing a state inmate is about ($11. 77).
Another financial consideration is the ten-year construction grant that partially funded
construction of the Comprehensive Correctional Complex. In exchange for a $3.2
million grant from the Georgia Department of Corrections; the county is obligated to
house 128 state inmates through February 2013. Exercising the agreement's eady
termination clause in 2010 requires the county to repay $970,418; the pt:o-rated
repayment amount declines to $646,945 in February 2011, $323,473 in February 2012,
and $0 after February 2013.
Returning these imnates to the overcrowded state prison system will impact the State's
ability to pick up newly sentenced felony defendants fi'om county jails. This will most
likely increase the time that the Sheriff is required to house newly sentenced irunates who
are awaiting transfer to the Georgia Department of Conections.
Inmate Labor Progmm
The department's adopted budget for 2010 includes about $1,543,167 to administer the
Inmate Labor Program. In return, inmate work crews generate $100,750 in revenue and
$449,287 in reimbursements from other funds. Additionally inmates provide $3,532,437
in labor value (2008 data).
The Department of Financial Services prepared an analysis comparing the cost of using
inmate labor in five county departments to the cost of hiring private vendors to perform
the same work. According to this analysis, contract services would cost the county
$1,778,490 annually compared to $741,868 using inmate labor - an increase of
$1,036,622 (See Exhibit F).
Staff from Financial Services also reevaluated the fee that cities are charged for inmate
labor because the current $310 daily rate has not been reviewed since 2008. This
reevaluation indicated the cost of providing this service has increased to $318 per day
(See Exhibit G).
Work Release Progt'am
The Work Release Program was designed to be a user financed program that allows
employed defendants convicted of a non-violent crimes to maintain employment while
spending their non-working hours in custody. The Board of Commissioners established
administrative and daily fees to offset the cost of the program, and these fees were last
22

updated by the BOC on February 21,2006 as part of a resolution adopting a county-wide
fee study. The one-time administrative fee is currently set at $125, with a $16 daily fee
for room and board. In addition, program residents are responsible for their own medical
expenses.
In 2007, which was the first full year under the current fee schedule, revenue offset 93%
of program expenses. This offset declined to 78% in 2008 and 49% in 2009. This
decrease is the result of a number of factors; including the economic downturn, a
declining offender population, the number of unemployed and/or underemployed
residents sentenced to the program, and judicial waiver of established fees.
Note: Work release fees are imposed by the BOC rather than the sentencing court, and a
legal opinion issued by the Law Department in 2008 could not definitively answer
whether a sentencing order waiving work release user fees is a permissible exercise of
the sentencing court's authority.

Budget vs. Revenue
Current Fee Strueture
Year

Budget

Revenue

Offset

2007
2008
2009

$868,455
$895,684
$881,876

$806,800
$703,785
$428,826

93%
82%
49%

When Work Release Program revenue is deducted from appropriations, the average daily
cost to house a work release resident in 2008 was $3.26 compared to $53.19 to house a
county-sentenced inmate. If the Work Release Program ceases to exist and offenders
who would have been sentenced to the program are sentenced to the jail instead, the
county will realize this additional expense. The average daily work release population
was 164 in 2008 and 123 in 2009. Using the lower population number, it will cost the
county $2,387,965 annually to house 123 residents in the jail compared to $178,091 to
maintain them in the Work Release Program.
Work Alternative Program
The department's adopted budget for 2010 includes about $355,807 to administer the
Work Alternative Program. In return, the program generated $135,651 in revenue, and
community service workers provided $328,015 in labor value (2008 data).
OPPORTUNITIES TO MITIGATE GENERAL FUND FINANCIAL IMPACT
The team looked for oppol1unities to expand the use of inmate labor as a means to further
mitigate the department's impact on the General Fund. Although such oppol1unities do
exist, a decision to expand the use of offender labor will require additional staffing and
equipment, including vehicles; and additional minimum security inmate workers.
Potential opportunities include: .
23

Cities and CID'S - In 2006, the Board of Commissioners authorized the Warden to
provide inmate work crews to cities within Gwinnett County in exchange for $310.00 per
workday; this authority was expanded in 2010 to include Community Improvement
Districts. This service has not been provided since September 2009 due to a lack of staff,
but two cities have repeatedly asked when they can reacquire inmate work crews on a
full-time basis. Additionally, two other cities and one CID have asked for part-time
crews. This arrangement provides a quality of life benefit for county citizens living,
working, and traveling within participating cities/CIDs; while also providing an
additional source of revenue for the General Fund. There is sufficient demand for this
service to support a third inmate work crew.
DWR PI·opel·ties - The Depmlment of Water Resources currently contracts with private
vendors to cut the grass at 222 pump stations, easements, and other small sites located
tIu'oughout the county at all annual cost of $56,000; and 9 large sites (central office, filter
plants, water reclamation facilities, etc.) at an annual cost of$14l,600 per year. These
tasks could be performed by two inmate crews at an annual cost of$158,800 (see Exhibit
G). Since several pump stations are located in subdivisions, there could be some citizen
opposition to the presence of inmates in neighborhoods. During the course of this study
an inmate crew was used to clear a particularly difficult easement and despite concerns
over preventing escapes in such an isolated area, the work was completed as planned.
Fire Hydrant Maintenance - The Department of Fire and Emergency Services currently
pays the Department of Water Resources $150,000 annually to maintain 1/6111 of the
county's fire hydrants so that all hydrants are flushed and painted every 72 months. The
routine aspects of this service could be provided by one inmate work crew at an annual
cost of $79,400 for personnel and equipment (See Exhibit G). The hydrant maintenance
schedule is an ISO rating factor, and the 72 month schedule could be improved by adding
a second inmate crew for this purpose.
Parks - The Department of Community Services has requested nine inmate crews to
work in county parks, and this level of service can be provided once staff in the
Corrections Department is restored to its cutTent authorized·level using crews formerly
assigned to Gwinnett Clean & Beautiful. The direct General Fund expenses of providing
this service are reimbursed fi'om the Recreation Fund, and the need for this service may
increase if additional parks and recreational areas are added.
Solid Waste - In the event the county's Solid Waste Plan ever includes operation of a
facility to process recyclable materials, inmate labor would be an ideal fit. Dnring the
last year that inmate labor was provided to Gwinnett Clean and Beautiful, irunates
processed 25 million pounds of recyclable materials.
Transportation- For several years the depmlment has maintained one inmate crew for
the purpose of cutting grass and maintaining the landscaping along the entire length of
Ronald Reagan Parkway. This crew was idle for most of 2010 due to staffing, and the
county received several citizen complaints about the parkway's appearance. The new
Sugarloaf Parkway Extension may provide another opportunity to use inmate labor.
However, inmate labor is not feasible for roadside grass-cutting projects that require
heavy equipment, such as tractors, and/or traffic control measures.

24

Vemlor Provided Services - A review of vendor contracts revealed several related to
landscaping services; the county's expense for these agreements exceeds $500,000
annually. While it is not practical to use offender labor in every situation, at least some
of these services could be perfolmed with offender labor instead.
FINDINGS

The operation of a cOlTectional facility is not a mandated function of county government,
and only 23 Georgia counties operate such facilities. Ofthe 23 county correctional
facilities in Georgia, most only house state irunates who are wards of the Georgia .
Department of Corrections. Gwinnett is the largest county cOlTectional facility in the
state, and the only one that maintains a mixed population of state inmates, county
irunates, work release residents, and community service workers.
In a county the size of Gwinnett, there will always be a need to house irunates at the local
level. Incarceration is an expensive proposition, but the expenses are basically the same
whether an inmate is housed in a jail or correctional facility. Housing inmates in a
correctional facility rather than a jail provides a significant return on investment in the
form of a supplemental labor force.
Unless it is determined that the services provided by irunate labor are no longer necessary
or can be significantly reduced, depmiments that utilize irunate labor will have to replace
this service with contract vendors and/or paid staff. In addition, closing the facility
before February 2013 will require partial repayment of a construction grant received from
the Georgia Department of Corrections.
From a purely financial perspective, the annual operating budget impact of closing the
correctional facility ranges from an additional cost of $448,466 if county-sentenced
offenders from the facility are housed in other counties, to a net savings of$91,600 if the
offenders are housed in the Gwinnett County Detention Center. However, housing these
offenders in the detention center will require short-term capital expenditures of
$3,525,000 to accommodate the increased population at the jail. Therefore, the net
financial impact of closing the correctional facility and housing county-sentenced
offenders locally is an additional cost of$3,433,400 (see Exhibit J).
If the correctional facility does close, the county will lose the Irunate Labor Program,
Work Release Program, and Work Alternative Program. The use of offender labor
represents a good value for the county. The availability of a supplemental work force
reduces expenses in other departments, enhances community appearance and quality of
life, and contributes to the Unified Plan goal of keeping Gwinnett as a preferred place. In
addition to the value currently realized from the Inmate Labor Program, there are
opportunities to expand the use of irunate labor as a means to further mitigate the
department's impact on the General Fund.
The Work Release Program and Work Alternative Program are far less expensive than
full-time incarceration. These diversion programs benefit defendants, their families, and
the taxpayers. Additionally, a correctional facility is better able to provide irunates with
educational, vocational, and other self-help programs than a jail setting. These services
and programs better prepare inmates to become productive citizens upon their release
from custody.
25

It is also important to consider the intrinsic value of the conectional facility as a
sentencing option for local judges. As noted in the Engage Gwinnett Final Report, public
safety and the judiciary are complex, interrelated and interdependent; and making
adjustments to one area will impact another area within the system. Although the benefit
of the correctional facility to the judiciary cannot be measured strictly in financial terms,
the facility does provide judges with sentencing alternatives to full-time incarceration.
It is also likely that the loss of the correctional facility as a sentencing option would slow
the disposition of criminal cases.
In the event of a policy decision to eliminate the Depatlment of Corrections and close the
correctional facility, it will take several months to make alternate arrangements for
offenders currently sentenced to the correctional facility. Once a closing date is
established, it will be necessary to stop the inflow of newly sentenced offenders so that
staff can accurately project the offender population throughout the phase-out period and
make plans to reduce the number of employees accordingly. Upon establishing a closing
date, GwiJmett County judges should be quickly notified of the date in writing and
informed that:
1. No newly-sentenced inmates or Work Release Program residents or Work
Alternative Program patlicipants will be accepted in the Comprehensive
Correctional Complex. Once this occurs, more inmates will be sent to Detention
Center which will immediately impact overcrowding.
2. Inmates currently in custody but scheduled for release prior to closing date will be
allowed to finish their sentences in the correctional complex.
3. Residents currently in custody pursuant to a criJninal conviction but scheduled for
release prior to the closing date will be allowed to finish their sentences in the
conectional complex.
4. Indefinite sentences for residents currently in custody pursuant to a civil order
(child support, contempt, etc.) must be modified in order to specify release and/or
transfer prior to the closing date.
5. The sentencing court will be notified on a case-by-case basis if any inmate or
resident is currently sentenced beyond the closing date so that his/her sentence
can be modified.

It will also take time for the Sheriffs Department to prepare for the influx of countysentenced offenders. Once a closing date is established, the following steps will be
necessary:
•

Begin process ofhiJ'ing additional stafffor the Sheriffs jail;

•

Classify inmates and determine the number that can be housed out;

•

Identify agencies that can house inmates;

26

•

Address impact to support operations and mandated services at the jail (service
capacity and space for clinic, library, courtrooms, visitation, etc.); and,

•

Identify inmates and residents who must return to court for sentence
modifications.

The loss of offender labor will require some county departments and other customers to
adjust their business plans. In order to provide a reasonable time in which to make
alternate al'l'angements, depatiment directors and cities/CIDs with active service
agreements should be notified without delay once a closing date is established.
Additionally, it will be necessary to phase out operations in Corrections and conduct a
reduction in force. In addition to transferring inmates and residents, the phase out
process will include a final financial accounting, physical inventory, disposition of fixed
assets, and transfer of files.
RECOMMENDATIONS
After careful and deliberate consideration of the information presented in this
report, it is the unanimous opinion of team members that Gwinnett County should
maintain Correctional Sel'vices as a county department and continue operation of
the Comprehensive Correctional Complex.
If the finding that Gwinnett County should continue operation of the Comprehensive
Correctional Complex is accepted, the team submits the following long-term
recommendations for the Department of Correctional Services.
I. The depatiment should continue, and even expand, the practice of housing state
inmates on behalf of the Georgia Depatiment of COl'l'ections through February
2013; and then on an annual basis subject to an ongoing cost analysis.
The current arrangement is cost effective due to the per-diem revenue paid by the
state, the cap on medical liability, and the value of the inmates' labor. The
presence of state inmates is an impoliant component of the Offender Labor
Program because they provide a more stable and productive inmate workforce.
2. The use of offender labor should be expanded to further mitigate the department's
impact on the General Fund.
There are oppoliunities to expand the use of inmate labor in other departments as
a means to save money, but any decision to do so should be based on the business
plan of the user department. Additionally, the Corrections Department must first
restore services to the level already authorized before it can expand services.
3. The financial burden of operating the Work Release Program should revert to the
user and away from the taxpayer.
The program should return to its original design as a user-financed sentencing
alternative for employed and non-violent defendants.
27

4. Technology enhancements to improve efficiency in the department should be
included in future budget plans and evaluated against requests from other
departments.
Although the technical assessment conducted by ITS staff revealed opportunities
to improve efficiency through the use ofteclmology, cost is a limiting factor in
their implementation.
5. The organizational structure of the department should retu1'1l to two divisions each
directed by a Deputy Warden.
Both incumbent deputy wardens retired in 2009 and although both positions were
funded in the 20 I0 adopted budget, only one wasfilled pending the outcome of
this study. In the meantime, the vacant position was eliminated from the
department's position control and, therefore, will not be funded in future budgets
unless approved as a service enhancement. In a depm1ment with 139 employees,
a second division director is needed to maintain an adequate span of control.
6. The Department of Correctional Services should maintain accredited status
through the American Correctional Association.
Gwhmett County operates the only non-private prison in Georgia that is
nationally accredited. The final report of Engage Gwhmett states, "We should
maintain the highest industry-recognized level of cel1ification that is fiscally
possible for all law enforcement and correctional facilities."
7. The cost charged to cities and CID's for the Inmate Labor Program should be
reviewed a1l1lually.
Current cost analysis indicates that the cost of providing this service has increased.
However, team members recommend holding the current rate until the service is restored.
Once service is being provided again on a consistent basis, it is recommended that cost be
reviewed a1l1lually thereafter.

28

(

Exhibits

A. Organizational Chati - 2008
B. Organizational Chali'- Current
C. Adopted Budget - 2010
D. Position Control- 2010
E. Inmate Expense Analysis
F. Work Crew Analysis
G. Municipality Work Crew Analysis
H. Inmate Labor Report
1. ITS Technical Assessment
J. Cost Analysis to Close Corrections Facility
K. Memos from Sheriff and Judges

29

Gwinnett County
Department ofCorrections
:Z008

Exhibit A

I

I

Wardcm

H

Admini::;lrotivtl

I
I

~

Doputy Warden Support

I

: Lt - flold Oporatklns

I
II

Sergeant

I

Corpornl

\ Bldg SVcs Asse

.

Business Officer

Colpornl

cc SenIor (26)
Field Operations

H
I
Il

Lt- C::Irc & Treatment

-1

I
I
I

BSAII

I
I
I

BSAII

A:l~t II

I

HO::llth Svc. Admin
(CcnlmetStaff)

Deputywarden~Securityl !

I

Captain

I

Cnsewotl<er (3)

-

II

Counso!or (3)

PT GED TCl1chor

r-

PTCh::lplain

f--

WlACoordlnator

IAsst WlA

Coordinmor

Classlfication Offlcer (2)

I

Co Sonlor

I

I

Sergeant

I
I

Co""""

II

I
COSR(11)

I

II

I

Sorgoant

Corporal

II

II

I

"-',,"

i

COrporol

II

COSR(11)

Lt _Morning Shift

I
I

I

Sergoant

Corpor.ll

II

I
COSR(9)

II

I
COSR(11)

I
co SR (12)

sergeant

II

Corpor.:ll

Lt ~ Evening Shift

Sorgoo.nt

I

I

Lt- PSU

Lt- DayStllft

I

j CorporollCounselor

-1

I

BSAlilfWA?Coord

I

FoodSvcSup(4}

BSAIIJ

I

I
: Food Sclvico Manager

II

I

Admlnlstrotivll

I

CllptlJin

AssI~t

I

I

I

I
I

Sergeant

I

COIpornl

II

COSR(10)

I

Gwinnett County

Department ofCorrectioos
ZOIO

ExhibitB
w_,

I

I

Admll1_ .....

_1

Adm.,_ ....>llli

QuoI.... O!IIo...

_.,

_.

-,

I

o.pLllywot<lon.l:IO«Joty!!

I

I

I

-"

I

u.tIoytlh/tl

I

IlZAIIIIWAPCot<d !

I

I

u·p~u

I II

-I

II

.....

I

II

CO~(ll)

~.-

~-

II

II

I

I

--

II

COllR(1:z)

U·MomI"lIllhlll

I

II

--

.....
II

I

COllR(11)

I

.....

I

II

COllR(111

I

I

I ""'- I
II

ro~~

U-FIoIdO»Of>lloo.

.1..--1

I
!I~~l

u_c...loT_ntl

..

H

"",

J

1--,.1
IIe - - ( 1 1 I j eo."",Ior(41 I

H

H

l"TCNploin

I

WIACOO...I.......

!

IAoIl1M.. ~1

-1au._0lIl..,(2j1
I
---j

Co_I.,.

I
~=" I
.........,\

-_

I

COtlR(1ll}

I

--

Co"",..1

II

~-,

.....
I

I

I

U.e.""""'vllhl~
~.-

~-

1\

I

l'<>o<IS\'C:l<lp(4)

I

I

EXHIBIT C
Structure
Fund
Funds Center
Cost Center
Commitment Item

Fund
GC01/001

Adopted Budqet Current Budqet

Commitment Item
General Fund [>GC01/22010001

\J. GC01/50000000
\J GC01/50000500
\J GC01/50001 000

\J

GC01/50101001
GC01/50101003
GC01/501 01 007
GC01/501 01 008
GC01/501 01 011
\J GC01/50002000.
GC01/50104001
GC01/50104002
GC01/50104006
GC01/50104007
GC01/50104013
\J GC01/50003000
GC01/50104003
GC01/50104005
GC01/50004000
[> GC01/50401 000
[> GC01/504011 00
GC01/50404100

Expenditures .
Personal Services
Salaries & Waaes
S&W-Permanent
OtherWaaes
S&W-Temporary
Overtime
Salary Savinqs
Emplovee Benefits
GrouP Self Insurance
FICA
Tuition Reimbusement
Unemployment Insur
OPEB Contribution
Pension
DC Retirement
DB Retirement
General Oper Exp
Professional Service
CourtiSupoort Ops
CS-San Disposal

$12,720,997.00 $12,423,449.00
$9,397,253.00 $8,801,997.00
$6,587,106.00 $6,003,108.00
$6519,207.00 $5,608,048.00
$60,461.00
$60,461.00
$149,048.00
$149,048.00
$185,551.00
$185,551.00
$ (327,161.00)
$0.00
$1,658,704.00 $1,651,846.00
$1,116,262.00 $1,111,328.00
$527,018.00
$528,942.00
$13,500.00
$13,500.00

$1,151,443.00
$263,187.00
$888,256.00
$3,088,065.00
$1,126,701.00

$0.00
$1,147,043.00
$262,181.00
$884,862.00
$3,385,773.00
$1,115,701.00
$30,375.00

EXHIBIT C
Commitment Item
[> GC01/S040411 0
[> GC01/S0404216
[> GC01/S0404240
[> GC01/S0404300
GC01/S0404301
GC01/S0404306
[> GC01/S0407000
[> GC01/S04071 00
[> GC01/S0407200
GC01/S0407301
GC01/S0407407
[> GC01/S0407409
GC01/S0407S01
[> GC01/S0408000
[> GC01/S07011 00
GC01/S0701102
[> GC01/S07011 03
[> GC01/S07011 08
[> GC01/S070112S
[> GC01/S07011S0
GC01/S0701198
[> GC01/S0701200
[> GC01/S0701201
GC01/S0701601
.
GC01/S0701602
[>GC01/S1001617

Fund

I

'\
GC01/S1 001 001
. GC01/S1 001 002
GC01/S1001S01
,
GC01/S1001S02
GC01/S1001S03
GC01/S1 00171 0
[> GC01/S0010000

Overall Result

I

R&M-Vehicles
Indust R&M-Contractd
Office FF&E R&M
Rent-Eat & Other
Copier Lease
Rent-PC
Postal Services
Telecomm Services
Advertisina .
PrintiBindinq Serv
Trav-Reimb Local
TraininqlTravel
Dues/Fees-Prof Assoc
Mise Srvcs & Chras
Parts
Office Supplies
Industrial Supplies
Indust R&M-In House
.Gen Oper Supplies
Supplies-Computer
Supp-Uniform Purch
Utilities
Fuel
OffiCe F F & E
Other Machinerv/Eat
Insurance and Claims
ntributions
irect Cost Alloc
Trans-Vehicle Repl
Trans-Worker's Comp
Trans-Risk Mat
Trans-Auto Liab
Fleet Charaes-Fixed
Capital Outlav

Adopted Budaet Current Budaet
$40,177.00
$40,177.00
$SO,OOO.OO
$8,000.00
$1,000.00
$1,000.00
$780.00
$1S,OOO.OO
$1S,OOO.OO
$1S,974.00
$1S,974.00
$2,000.00
$2,000.00
$2S,000.00
$2S,000.00
$8S0.00
$8S0.00
$800.00
$800.00
$SOO.OO
$SOO.OO
$3,000.00
$3,000.00
$1,400.00
$1,400.00
$SOO.OO
$SOO.OO
$23,727.00
$23,727.00
$10,000.00
$17,000.00
$1,097,336.00 $1,097,336.00
$17,000.00
$44,17S.00
$S2,9SS.00
$4S,006.00
$2S4.00
$17,201.00
$17,201.00
$S28,000.00
$S28,000.00
$42,344.00
$42,344.00
$1,000.00
$1,000.00
$1S,600.00
$10,96S.00
$297,708.00
$23S,679.00
$23S,679.00
$10,000.00
$10,000.00
$S9,324.00
$S9,324.00
$S6,876.00
$S6,876.00
$8S,949.00
$8S,949.00
$3,310.00
$3,310.00
$20,220.00
$20,220.00
$12,720,997.00 $12,423,449.00
$12,720,997.00 $12,423,449.00

EXHIBIT D
Position Control Report
Pos. Effective From:

09/30/2010 to 130/2010

P. Area wi Tot. Pos:

0220(147)

P. Area wi Tot. Emp:
Tot. # of Positions:

0220(127)
148

Tot. # of Employees:
Tot. Emp. Auth
High:

127
22

Support Services Division
DV-SUPPSRV
DE-COR
Correctional Services
Buildina Security Division
DV-BUILDSEC
TM-FOOD
Food Services Team
TM-CARETREAT Care and Treatment Team
TM-CARETREAT Care and Treatment Team
TM-WORKALTP
Work Alternative Proaram
TM-EVENINGS
Eveninq Shift Team
TM-CARETREAT Care and Treatment Team
TM-CARETREAT . Care and Treatment Team
TM-FOOD
Food Services Team
TM-FOOD
Food Services Team
TM-CARETREAT Care and Treatment Team
TM-CLASSUNIT
Classification Unit Team
SC-FIELD
Field Operations Section
TM-DAYSHIFT
Dav Shift Team
TM-EVENINGS
Eveninq Shift Team
Morninq Shift Team
TMcMORNING
. TM-MORNING
Morninq Shift Team
SC-FIELD
Field Operations Section
TM-DAYSHIFT
Day Shift Team

20002527
20002529
20002530
20002532
20002533
20002534
20002535
20002536
20002537
20002538
20002539
20002540
20002542
20002543
20002544
20002545
20002546
20002547
20002548
20002549
20002550

220-CR14-001
220-DD41-001
220-DV32-003
220-FD12-001
220-JT10-001
220-WIOA-001
220-0521-006
220-4125-128
220-0523-001
220-0704-001
220-0712-001
220-0712-002
220-4100-001
220-4100-002
220-4125-139
220-4126-114
220-4125-118
220-4126-127
220-4126-082
220-4125-102
220-4126-122

CORR OFFICER CAPT
DEPARTMENT DIRECTOR
DIVISION DIRECTOR
FOOD SERVICES MANAGER
CORR JOB TRAINING COORD
ASST WIA COORDINATOR
PIT WORK ALTERNATIVE DETAIL
CORROFCR
PIT CHAPLAIN
PIT TEACHER
PIT COOK
PIT COOK
CLASSIFICATION OFCR
CLASSIFICATION OFCR
CORROFCR
CORROFCRSR
CORROFCR
CORROFCRSR
CORROFCRSR
CORROFCR
CORROFCRSR

EXHIBIT D
TM-EVENINGS
TM-EVENINGS
SC-FIELD
SC-FIELD
TM-EVENINGS
TM-EVENINGS
TM-DAYSHIFT
SC-FIELD
TM-MORNING
SC-FIELD
TM-MORNING
TM-EVENINGS
SC-FIELD
TM-MORNING
TM-MORNING
SC-FIELD
SC-FIELD
TM-EVENINGS
TM-CARETREAT
TM-DAYSHIFT
TM-DAYSHIFT
TM-MORNING
TM-EVENINGS
TM-DAYSHIFT
TM-EVENINGS
TM-DAYSHIFT
TM-MORNING
TM-DAYSHIFT
TM-EVENINGS
TM-EVENINGS
TM-DAYSHIFT
TM-EVENINGS
SC-FIELD
TM-EVENINGS
TM-DAYSHIFT
SC-FIELD
TM-DAYSHIFT

Eveninq Shift Team
Evening Shift Team
Field Operations Section
Field Operations Section
Eveninq Shift Team
Evening Shift Team
Dav Shift Team
Field Operations Section
Morninq Shift Team
Field Operations Section
Morninq Shift Team
Eveninq Shift Team
Field Ooerations Section
Morninq Shift Team
Morninq Shift Team
Field Operations Section
Field Operations Section
Eveninq Shift Team
Care and Treatment Team
Day Shift Team
Dav Shift Team
Morninq Shift Team
Evening Shift Team
Day Shift Team
Evening Shift Team
Day Shift Team
Morninq Shift Team
Day Shift Team
Evening Shift Team
Eveninq Shift Team
Day Shift Team
Eveninq Shift Team
Field Operations Section
Eveninq Shift Team
Day Shift Team
Field Operations Section
Day Shift Team

20002551 220-4126-125
20002552 220-4126-110
20002553 220-4126-088
20002554 220-4126-080
20002555 220-4126-106
20002556 220-4125-129
20002557 220-4126-097
20002558 220-4125-136
20002559 220-4126-106
20002560 220-4125-141
20002561 220-4126-102
20002562 220-4126-103
20002563 220-4125-121
20002564 220-4126-006
20002565 220-4126-007
20002566 220-4126-008
20002567 220-4126-009
20002568 220-4126-098
20002569 220-4126-011
20002570 220-4126-012
20002571 220-4126-013
20002572 220-4126-014
20002573 220-4126-120
20002574 220-4125-137
20002575 220-4126-017
20002576 220-4126-128
20002577 220-4126-019
20002578 220-4126-095
20002579 220-4126-021
20002580 220-4125-143
20002581 220-4126-132
20002582 220-4125-109
20002583 220-4125-132
20002584 220-4126-026
20002585 220-4126-027
20002586 220-4126-028
20002587 220-4126-129

CORROFCRSR
CORROFCRSR
CORROFCRSR
CORROFCRSR
CORROFCRSR
CORROFCR
CORROFCRSR
CORROFCR
CORROFCRSR
CORROFCR
CORROFCRSR
CORROFCRSR
CORROFCR
CORROFCRSR
CORROFCRSR
CORROFCRSR
CORROFCRSR
CORROFCRSR
CORROFCRSR
CORROFCRSR
CORROFCRSR
CORROFCRSR
CORROFCRSR
CORROFCR
CORROFCRSR
CORROFCRSR
CORROFCRSR
CORROFCRSR
CORROFCRSR
CORROFCR
CORROFCRSR
CORROFCR
CORROFCR
CORROFCRSR
CORROFCRSR
CORROFCRSR
CORROFCR SR

EXHIBIT D
TM-MORNING
SC-FIELD
TM-EVENINGS
SC-FIELD
TM-DAYSHIFT
SC-FIELD
SC-FIELD
TM-CARETREAT
TM-DAYSHIFT
TM-CARETREAT
TM-MORNING
TM-EVENINGS
SC-FIELD
SC-FIELD
TM-MORNING
TM-DAYSHIFT
TM-MORNING
TM-DAYSHIFT
TM-CARETREAT
SC-FIELD
SC-FIELD
TM-MORNING
SC-FIELD
TM-MORNING
TM-DAYSHIFT
SC-FIELD
TM-CARETREAT
TM-DAYSHIFT
TM-MORNING
TM-EVENINGS
TM-DAYSHIFT
TM-DAYSHIFT
TM-DAYSHIFT
TM-DAYSHIFT
SC-FIELD
TM-CLASSUNIT
TM-EVENINGS

Mornina Shift Team
Field Operations Section
Evenina Shift Team
Field Operations Section
Dav Shift Team
Field Operations Section
Field Operations Section
Care and Treatment Team
Dav Shift Team
Care and Treatment Team
Mornina Shift Team
Evenina Shift Team
Field Operations Section
Field Operations Section
Morning Shift Team
Dav Shift Team
Morning Shift Team
Dav Shift Team
Care and Treatment Team
Field Operations Section
Field Operations Section
Mornina Shift Team
Field Operations Section
Mornina Shift Team
Dav Shift Team
Field Operations Section
Care and Treatment Team
Dav Shift Team
Mornina Shift Team
Evenina Shift Team
Dav Shift Team
Dav Shift Team
Dav Shift Team
Dav Shift Team
Field Operations Section
Classification Unit Team
Evenina Shift Team

20002588
20002589
20002590
20002591
20002592
20002593
20002594
20002595
20002596
20002597
20002598
20002599
20002600
20002601
20002602
20002603
20002604
20002605
20002606
20002607
20002608
20002609
20002610
20002611
20002612
20002614
20002615
20002616
20002617
20002618
20002619
20002620
20002621
20002622
20002623
20002624
20002625

220-4126-030
220-4125-131
220-4126-126
220-4126-033
220-4126-034
220-4126-035
220-4126-036
220-4126-037
220-4126-038
220-4126-039
220-4126-092
220-4126-041
220-4126-042
220-4126-043
220-4125-133
220-4126-101
220-4126-108
220-4126-133
220-4126-048
220-4126-049
220-4125-140
220-4125-130
220-4125-142
220-4126-094
220-4126-107
220-4125-134
220-4126-126
220-4126-104
220-4126-059
220-4126-060
220-4126-061
220-4126-062
220-4125-127
220-4126-109
220-4125-144
220-4126-089
220-4125-112

CORROFCRSR
CORROFCR
CORROFCRSR
CORROFCRSR
CORROFCRSR
CORROFCRSR
CORROFCRSR
CORROFCRSR
CORROFCRSR
CORROFCRSR
CORROFCRSR
CORROFCRSR
CORROFCRSR
CORROFCRSR
CORROFCR
CORROFCRSR
CORROFCRSR
CORROFCRSR
CORROFCRSR
CORROFCRSR
CORROFCR
CORROFCR
CORROFCR
CORROFCRSR
CORROFCRSR
CORROFCR
CORROFCRSR
CORROFCRSR
CORROFCRSR
CORROFCRSR
CORROFCRSR
CORROFCRSR
CORROFCR
CORROFCRSR
CORROFCR
CORROFCRSR
CORROFCR

EXHIBIT D
TM-CARETREAT
TM-EVENINGS
TM-EVENINGS
SC-FIELD
TM-MORNING
TM-EVENINGS
TM-MORNING
TM-MORNING
TM-MORNING
TM-EVENINGS
TM-EVENINGS
TM-MORNING
SC-FIELD
TM-DAYSHIFT
TM-EVENINGS
TM-MORNING
TM-DAYSHIFT
TM-EVENINGS
SC-FIELD
TM-DAYSHIFT
SC-FIELD
TM-MORNING
TM-MORNING
TM-DAYSHIFT
TM-EVENINGS
SC-FIELD
TM-EVENINGS
TM-MORNING
TM-CARETREAT
SC-FIELD
TM-DAYSHIFT
DE-COR
TM-BUSOFF
DE-COR
DE-COR
TM-BUSOFF
TM-BUSOFF

Care and Treatment Team
Evenina Shift Team
Eveninq Shift Team
Field Operations Section
Morninq Shift Team
Evenina Shift Team
Morn/nq Shift Team
Mornino Shift Team
Morn/nq Shift Team
Evenina Shift Team
Eveninq Shift Team
Morn/no Shift Team
Field Operations Section
Dav Shift Team
Eveninq Shift Team
Morn/na Shift Team
Dav Shift Team
Evenina Shift Team
Field Operations Section
Day Shift Team
Field Operations Section
Morn/nq Shift Team
Morn/no Shift Team
Dav Shift Team
Evenina Shift Team
Field Operations Section
Evenina Shift Team
Morninq Shift Team
Care and Treatment Team
Field Operations Section
Day Shift Team
Correctional Services
Business Office Team
Correctional Services
Correctional Services
Business Office Team
Business Office Team

20002626
20002627
20002628
20002629
20002630
20002631
20002632
20002633
20002634
20002635
20002636
20002637
20002638
20002639
20002640
20002641
20002642
20002643
20002644
20002645
20002646
20002647
20002648
20002649
20002650
20002651
20002652
20002653
20002654
20002655
20002656
20002657
20002658
20002659
20002660
20002661
20002662

220-4128-007
220-4126-069
220-4125-145
220-4126-116
220-4126-093
220-4125-135
220-4125-123
220-4126-112
220-4126-076
220-4125-125
220-4126-111
220-4127-001
220-4127-002
220-4127-003
220-4127-010
220-4127-005
220-4127-006
220-4127-007
220-4127-008
220-4128-001
220-4127-011
220-4128-003
220-4128-004
220-4128-005
220-4128-006
220-4127-012
220-4129-001
220-4129-002
220-4129-003
220-4129-008
220-4129-007
220-4129-006
220-4150-001
220-6101-001
220-6103-001
220-6151-001
220-6151-002

CORR OFCR SGT
CORROFCRSR
CORROFCR
CORROFCRSR
CORROFCRSR
CORROFCR
CORROFCR
CORROFCRSR
CORROFCRSR
CORROFCR
CORROFCRSR
CORR OFCR CRPL
CORR OFCR CRPL
CORR OFCR CRPL
CORR OFCR CRPL
CORR OFCR CRPL
CORR OFCR CRPL
CORR OFCR CRPL
CORR OFCR CRPL
CORR OFCR SGT
CORR OFCR SGT
CORR OFCR SGT
CORR OFCR SGT
CORR OFCR SGT
CORR OFCR SGT
CORR OFCR CRPL
CORROFCRLT
CORROFCRLT
CORROFCRLT
CORROFCRLT
CORROFCRLT
CORROFCRLT
WORK ALTERNATIVE COORD
ADMIN SUPPORT ASC II
ADMIN SUPPORT ASC IV
BUSINESS SRVS ASC II
BUSINESS SRVS ASC II

EXHIBIT D
TM-BUSOFF
TM-BUSOFF
SC-FIELD
SC-FIELD
TM-FOOD
TM-FOOD
TM-FOOD
SC-FIELD
TM-EVENINGS
TM-FOOD
TM-WORKALTP
TM-WORKALTP
TM-WORKALTP
TM-WORKALTP
TM-DAYSHIFT
DE-COR
TM-BUSOFF

Business Office Team
Business Office Team
Field Ooerations Section
Field Ooerations Section
Food Services Team
Food Services Team
Food Services Team
Field Ooerations Section
EveninQ Shift Team
Food Services Team
Work Alternative ProQram
Work Alternative ProQram
Work Alternative ProQram
Work Alternative Proqram
Day Shift Team
Correctional Services
Business Office Team

20002663
20002664
20002665
20002666
20002667
20002668
20002669
20004593
20004594
20004595
20004679
20004680
20004680
20004681
20005065
20007056
20007400

220-6151-003
220-6152-001
220-8101-001
220-8102-001
220-8126-001
220-8126-002
220-8126-003
220-4125-138
220-4128-008
220-8126-004
220-0521-002
220-0521-003
220-0521-003
220-0521-004
220-4126-100
LOA RIO
220-B011-001

BUSINESS SRVS ASC II
BUSINESS SRVS ASC III
BLDG SRVS ASC II
BLDG SRVS COORD
FOOD SRVC SUPV
FOOD SRVC SUPV
FOOD SRVC SUPV
CORROFCR
CORR OFCR SGT
FOOD SRVC SUPV
PIT WORK ALTERNATIVE
PIT WORK ALTERNATIVE
PIT WORK ALTERNATIVE
PIT WORK ALTERNATIVE
CORROFCRSR
LOA RIO
BUSINESS OFCR

DETAIL
DETAIL
DETAIL
DETAIL

Corrections - 2008
Inmate Cost Analysis
(When All Revenue is Included)

Exhibit E
Inmate Type

1st Qtr

County Sentenced Population
State Sentenced Population
Work Release Population
Total Population

2nd Qtr
279
247
168
694

3rd Qtr
271
249
158
678

4th Qtr
275
247
167
689

2008 Avg
337
166
165
668

I 2008 Total I

291
227
165
682

Revenue to County
State Subsidy Revenue
City Detail Revenue
Work Release Pr09ram Revenue
Work Alternative Program Revenue
Reimbursements to General Fund (Internal Offset)
Grants Received (Offset of Inmate Programs)
Total Revenue - Offsets Expense

$
$
$
$
$
$
$

443,120
23,560
162,579
33,650
133,502
13,232
809,643

$
$
$
$
$
$
$

443,920
26,970
172,938
35,495
133,502
23,069
835,894

$
$
$
$
$
$
$

447,980
27,590
193,668
33,543
133,502
26,365
862,648

$
$
$
$
$
$
$

300,540
22,630
170,001
32,464
133,502
24,600
683,737

$
$
$
$
$
$
$

408,890
25,188
174,797
33,788
133,502
21,817
797,981

Revenue Not To County (Pass through only)
Child Support Collected
Probation Fees Collected
Total Revenue -- Pass through only

$
$
$

47,753
21,102
68,855

$
$
$

35,910
23,276
59,186

$
$
$

34,925
18,296
53,221

$
$
$

27,020
.10,537
37,557

$
$
$

36,402
18,303
54,705

Total Expense per Quarter
Total County Revenue per Qtr
Total Expense After County Revenue Deduction

$
$
$

3,411,364
809,653
2,601,711

$
$
$

3,272,899
835,894
2,437,005

$
$
$

3,195,725
862,648
2,333,077

$
$
$

3,402,425
683,737
2,718,688

$ 3,320,603
$ 797,983
$2,522,620

Cost Per Inmate per Qtr after Revenue Deduction
Cost per Inmate per Day after Revenue Deduction

$
$

3,748.86
41.20

$
$

3,594.40
39.50

$
$

3,386.18
37.21

$
$

4,069.89
44.72

$ 3,699.83
$
40.66

Value of Inmate Labor per hour
Bill Rate for Low Level Temp (per HR)
Net Savings per Hour when Inmates perform job

$
$
$

11.64
14.42
2.78

S 2,044,450

$
$

125,938
873,983
168,940
667,510
109,083
3,989,903

$
$
$

182,010
91,514
273,524

$

S
$

S

$ 13,282,413
$ 3,191,932
$ 10,090,481

EXHIBIT F
Corrections Closing
Labor Cost Analysis To Departments

\;OSllO

Cost Using Inmate
Labor

Work Crew/Service Provided
Labor Only
DOSS Custodial Crew /DOSS Suoervlslonl
Fire (Custodial & Lawn Mntce)
Community Services /4 crews of 8 chamebackl
DOT (Ronald Reoan Pkwyl
Police /8 to 12 BSAII w/ Benefits·-used 8)

$
$
$
$
$

328,099

TOTAL LABOR COST FOR INMATE SERVICES

$

741,868

TOTAL COSTS TO ADD TO DEPT BUDGETS
NET INCREASE TO 2011 BUDGET

413,769

·
·
·

Change
Amount

Contract for
Services

$
$
$
$
$

734,794
24,400
576,800
75,000
367,496

$

1,778,490

$
$
$
$
$

321,025
24,400
248,701
75,000
367,496

$

1,036,622

Dept Impacted
Suooort Services/Facilities
Fire
Community Services
Deol of Transoortation
Police

Exhibit G
Municipality Inmate Work Crew

Personnel Costs
Initial
CO Sr. Salary (Mid-Step)
Fringes (43.15%)
Firearm
Uniforms
Leather & Rain Gear
Portable Radio

$37,968
$16,383
$700
$500
$300
$4,105

[Total Personnel:

$59,956

Depreciation
Schedule

Annual CosU
Depreciation

N/A
N/A
10
2
4
5

Daily Cost'

$37,968
$16,383
$70
$250
$75
$821

$55,567

$222 ..

Vehicle & Egulpment Costs
Van - 15 Passenger
Light Bar
Exterior Screen
Interior Screen
Decals
Mobile Radio
Landscaping Trailer

$
$
$
$
$
$
$

26,143
1,500
2,000
300
350
3,435
2,850

Sub-Total:

$

36,578

Scag 36" Mower
Mowers (5) 22"
Weedeaters (2)
Edger
Blowers
Handtools

$2,400
$900
$620
$250
$320
$400

Sub-Total:

$4,890

Total Vehicles & Equipment:

4
4
4
4
4
5
4

$6,536
$375
$500
$75
$88
$687
$713
$

3
3
3
3
3
3

8,973

$800
$300
$207
$83
$107
$133
$1,630

$41 ,468

$10,603

$42

Miscellaneous
Consumables
Insurance

$12,500.00
$730.00

Total Miscellaneous:

$13,230.00

ITOTALALL:

$114,654.19

N/A
N/A

$12,500.00
$730.00
$13,230.00
$79,399.94

$ 318 1

• Daily cost is based upon 250 work days per calendar year (365 days minus 104 weekend days minus 11 holidays).

....Use for internal charges

Exhibit H

Department of Corrections
Inmate Labor Summary

Park Janitorial
Park Mowing
Senior Centers

Yes
Yes
No

Training Academy
Headquarters
Warehouse & Apparatus

No
No
No

Recycling Bank of Gwinnett
Cardboard Center
Graffiti Abatement

Yes
Yes
Yes

9

1

Fire

GC&B

3
1
1

Police
Animal Control
Janitorial & Landscaping
Maintenance

No
No
No

GJAC Janitorial
GJAC Maintenance
Fleet Maintance

Yes
Yes
No

1
1

Ronald Reagan Pkwy
Roadside Cleanup

Yes
Yes

1
2

Lawrenceville (FT)
Suwanee, Gra son, Lilburn PT

Yes
Yes

1
1

Utility (Floating)

Various

Yes

2

Water Resources

Central

No

1,902

1,860

-42

Other County

Misc

Yes/No

2,568

15,546

12,978

State of Georgia

Drivers License Facility

No

2,628

2,556

Support Services

Transportation

Cities (Revenue)

Reported Elsewhere Reported Elsewhere

-72

Contents
L Executive Summary _ _•••__••••••••••_._

Technical A.ssessment Report

__

_

••••••_••••••••....•_

•••••••••••_ ••• 2

Background

2

Observations and Analysis

3

Recommendations

4

Conclusion

4

IT. Background •••••••••••••••,,_••••••_

Department of Corrections

__••••••••_

_

•••• 5

DOC Site
Visits

5

ill. Obsenra.tions and Analysis ••••••••_

Gwinnett County, Georgia

_ _.•••••_ •••••••_••_

IV. Reeommendations......_••••_

__

_._.•••_._

V. Conclusion__••••••••••••••_ •..._
Appendix A: SYSCONEstimate

_
_

__
_

_

_

•••••••• _5

••••••

•••__ 8

_ _••••••••__••••_

_ ..

_.19

_ _•••_ ••••••••••••_
_._

Appendi."( B: Horizon Software Estimate

_ •.•._

__

_17
..23

Appendix C: Pinnacle Technologies, Inc. Estimatc•.••..•.•••••••••••••••••••••••••.•••..•••••••••..25
Appendix D: Precision Dynamics Corporation Estimatc

...27

Appendix E: DataWorks Plus Estimate•••••••••••••••..•..•.•••••••••••••••••••••••••.•....•.••••••• .29
Appendix F: Gwinnett County DOC Hardwm'c Inventory

Site Visit:

March 12, 2010
March 23, 2010

April 1, 2010
Report Submitted:

April 16, 2010

Project Staff:

Cathy Morris

.31

I. Executive Summary
On March 2, 2010, Cathy Morris of the GwiJ:mett County Department of Information Technology Services was
assigned the task of performing a technical assessment of the GwiJ:mett County Department of Cottcctions. In
particular, she was asked to: 1) evaluate existing systems to include FileNet and Intrust - Inmate account system
and 2) evaluate proposed systems to include SYSCON - existingjail management system used by the Sheriff's
Department and evaluate the extensive use ofpaper based forms, reports, and tracking ofkey business data..
Background

The Gwlnnett County Department of Corrections is housed in the Comprehensive Correctional Complex, an
SOO~bed facility located at 750 Hi Hope Road in Lawrenceville. The facility opened in Septe:mber 2002 and
contains 512 beds for medium and minimum~security state and county inmates who are sentenced to full-time
incarceration. These inmates are assigned to supervised work crews that provide a supplemental labor force to
GwiImett County. Jmna.tes perform most janitorial and landscaping services at the GwiDnett County Justice and
Administration Center and maintain the landscaping along the Ronald Reagan Parkway. They perform sim1l.:lt
tasks at other county-o"Wtled buildings, roadways, andparks.
The Comprehensive Correctional Complex also contains 288 Work Release Program beds for criminal
offenders, and parents who fail to pay court-ordered child support. The Work Release Program provides a cost
effective semi~incarceration sentencing alternative that benefits the participants (called residents), their families
and the community by allowing offenders to maintain regular employment while serving non~working hours in
custody. Each resident is required to pay administrative and daily fees to offset the costs of tho program in
addition to any court ordered fines, probation fees, and child support payments.
The Gwinnett County Department of Corrections ::Uso administers the Work Alteroative Program which allows
judges to sentence offenders convicted of minor crimcs to perform COIIlIlJ.unity service work in lieu of
incarceration. In contrast to offenders sentenced to full~time incarceration or the Work Release Program.,
participants in the Work Alternative Program report to the Comprehensive Correctional Complex. in the morning
and return home at the end of the work day. Participants provide a supplcmentallabor force to government and
non-profit agoncies by performing such tasks as removing trash from roadsides. parks, school stadiums and
park/ride lots. Work Alternative Program participants must pay a one time administrativc charge and daily fees
to offset the cost of the progr::tm.
The Department of Corrections' facility operations include the following:
Security Operations
Offender counseling, education and training services
Food service
.
Fiscal management
Building maintenance

2008
2009
2010 to date

2

The technical assessment is not based on a comprehensive study of the Department of Corrections' eperat:i.ons
but is consistent with the goals and objectives assigned to Cathy Morris in reviewing and evaluating the
technical environment The observntions, analysis, and recommendations are based upon the environment that
deals with the handling of inmates from the time ofbooking to the time oftransfer orre1ease.
The Department ofCorrections will bo referred to as DOC in the remainder ofthis document.
The Sheriff's Depat1Inentjailmanagcment system will be referred to as TAG in the remainder ofthis document
Observations and Analysis

Based on a review of documents provided by the DOC and staff interviews along with information gather from
the site visits, the following observations and analysis for software solutions should effectuate the changes
needed to sustain the operation ofthe DOC in an efficient and effective manner.
The DOC currently uses the TAG booking module and the classification module on a limited basis.
The DOC uses paper forms to perform approximately 85% to 90% of its business from the time an
inmate is booked into the eorrectional facility until the time an inmate is transferred or released from the
facility. Numerous forms, including forms that must be sent to the Georgia Department of Corrections,
are used to conduct day-to-daybusiness and tasks. Many forms require multiple signatures.
The current fingerprint sofuvnre does not provide a wide range of capabilities in tracking inmates. The
service and maintenance provided by the vendor is unreliable. The software vendor is Sense
Technologies, Inc.
The software used to make inmate JD badges is also a product of the fingerprint vendor Sense
Technologies, Inc. Thc system has bcen out of service since November 2009.
Sense Technologies, Inc provides the mug shot software which is used to capture the inmate's
photograph for the ID badges.
The DOC's Inmate InTrust accounting software is DOS based. The sofuvare is outdated and is limited
in functionality and capabilities.
The DOC food management staffuses approximately 36 paper forms to manage the ordering, tracking,
preparation, and food service.

The average number of inmatc bookings per year is approximately 1,300. The average length of an inmate's
sentencc is 12 months The following table lists the total annual bookings for 2008 - 2010 to date:

Year

The Department of Corrections' day~to-day operations are heavily dependant upon the use ofpaper documents.
Software solutions are needed to streamline the business processes and the tasks performed by the Department
ofCo:rrcctions'staff.

Annual Number
Of,=::te
Boo' !!S
750
2000
442

There are S housing wllts where the medium and minimum-security st::lte and county inmates who :;u-e
sentenced to full4ime incarceration are housed with a correctional officer assigned to the housing unit
The housing units arc not equipped with PCS and printors. Other areas ofthe DOC do not have PCS or
printers installed.
DOC staffwillrequire software training.
FileNet is used for scanning tllnesheets and Human Resources' documents.

3

recognized as essential to conducting the business of justice. Quality input from the DOC staff and resource
availability are important factors that contribute to abigh probability ofautomation success.

Recommendations

Based on the observations and analysis contained in the prior section, the following recommendations are being
made:'

II. Background
The DOC should mmcimize the use of the TAG booking module and classification module. The DOC
should also incorporate the use of all TAG modules where applicable. Sylvia Black,. of the Sheriff's
Department Technical Services Unit, advised that the Sheriff's Department now has a site license for the
software, which should not result in :lIly additional so:ftwnre licensing fees. If an additional module is
needed for corrections, for example the Work Release module, then additional software licensing fces
will apply.
Automate the creation of requited paper forms :lIld incorporate digitized/electronic signatures, using
signature pads, for forms that require multiple signatures or for signatures that must appear on numerous
forms.

•

Reliable and functional fingerprint sofuvare and hardware should be implemented to a.11ow for the
identification of inmates when they are booked into the correctional facility, as they move throughout
the correctional facility, when they leave and rc-enterthe facility, and upon release or transfer from the
facility.

DOC Site Visits
Thc first site visit was conducted on March 12, 2010. Cathy Morris met with Warden David Peek and other DOC staff
to discuss the technical assessment, to discuss preliminlU)' recommendations based upon Cathy Morris' pervious
working knowledge and interaction with the DOC, and to obtain the paper forms used by the DOC.
After receiving the forms, Cathy Morris analyzed them. On March 19, 2010, she met with Lt. David Sullivan of the
Sheriff's Department to obtain screen shots ofthe TAG modules.

After analyzing the DOC forms and the TAG screen shots, Cathy Morris then made a second site visit on :March 23,
2010 and mct with Warden Peek to discuss the DOC forms and how they rela.te to TAG.
On April 1,2010, Cathy Morris made a third site visit and met with Cpt. Greg Newbill to review the DOC booking
process and the classification process. She also met with Captain Donald Dagen and Lt. Barry Sasser to review the
classification process, the handling of incident and disciplinary reports, inmate visitation, and inmate booking statistics.

An .armband system should bo installed to replace the ill badge system.

•

•

The DOC should replace the Sense Technologies, Inc. mug shot system "With the Sheriff's Department
mug shot system.

III. Observations and Analysis

The DOC's Tmnate InTrust Accounting Software is DOS based and should be replaced by the TAG
Institutional Financials module.

Based on an analysis ofthe DOC paper forms and interviews conducted during the site visits, Cathy Morris offers the
following observations and analysis.

Food management software should be installed to adhere to state regulations for food preparation and
management, control inventory, reduce theft, reduce labor, to track and analyze purchasing, receiving.
usage, and costing ofinventory.

Install PCs, printers, and fingerprint sofuvare and hardware in the housing units and in other areas ofthe
correctional facility.

1. The DOC currently uses the TAG booking module and the classification module on a limited basis.

This is duc to the system not being fully configured forthc DOC. Lack ofTAG training is also a factor.
2. The DOC uses paper forms to perform approximately 85% to 90% of its business from the time an
inmate is booked into the correctional facility until the time an inmate is transferred or released
from the facility. Numerous forms, including fonns that must be sent to the Georgia Department
of Corrections, are used to conduct day-to-day tasks. Many forms require mUltiple signatures.

Softwarc training for DOC staff will be required.
•

Usc FileNet to store the inmate related paper documents.

The DOC staffhas adapted to the current limited technical environment and is able to conduct business using
paper forms. However, the amount oftime and labor ittakes to complete these forms impedes the staffs ability
to conduct busincss cfficiently.

Conclusion
The DOC has an immediate need to automate its environment so that the day-to-- day operations are less time
and labor intensive and more streamlined. Moving from a paper-based environment to a more automated,
technical environment is always a hurdle in obtaining a successful outcome. Improvements can be made,
automation can be achieved, and the structure and process can be accomplished by the DOC leadership that is
in place "With the assistance ofa technical implementer.

The following table will provide an overview ofthe number offorms currently being used by the DOC staff to
perform their duties.

The most significant need is to chart the course for the technical improvements and implement those c~s
with the assistance ofthe jail management software vendor SYSCON and an implementer to oversee the proJcct
It is an investment that will pay rich dividends in thc future by saving time, labor, and the costs ofnmning and
managing the correctional facility. The County and the Sheriff's Department have invested in technology that is

4

5

of paper. The paper and the mug shot/photograph are used to make the ill badge. Inmates can remove the ID
badges from their clothing at any time.

Tablcm~l

Corrections' Forms
For:
Kitchen
K Control
Chemical Control

Number of
Forms
36
5
4

Tool Control
Incident and Shift

6
30

Corrections'
FonnsFor:
Inmate Count
Classific:rtion
Personal Property
and Clothing
Inmate Counseling
Isolation and
Seo:rel!:ation
Security Threats /
Groups

Lo~

Financial Forms and

62 Data

Rcpom

Entty

Number of
Fonru<
9
9
3
8
4
5

Screens and
Reports on
DOS based

.I<=tem
Housin
Miscellaneous

Work Alternative

6
5

6

5. Sense Technologies, Inc provides the mug shot software which is used to capture the inmate's
photograph for the 10 badges.
Because of support issues the DOC has experienced with the fingerprint device and the ID badge device, there is
little confidence this piece of hardware would be repaired in a timely manner if it were to stop fimctioning.
Being able to identify an inmate by a visual aid such as 311 armband is crucial for security reasons.
6. DOC's Inmate InTrust accounting software is DOS based. The software is outdated and is limited
in functionality and capabilities.
7. The DOC food management staff uses approximately 36 paper forms to manage the ordering,
tracking, preparation, and food service.
The food management forms are detailed 311d tedious. For example, the Food Temperature Log is kept for each
day of the week for each ''menu wcek cycle". The log is kept for ''Bre3k:fast'', ''Lunch'', "'Super", ''Pack auf',
and "Isolation Tray". The log is kept for the "correctional dining location" and for the ''work release dining
location".
The following is a list ofadditional temperature logs:

An example of a form that requires multiple signatures is the Irrmate Personal Propmy Inventory sheet, which
is a multi-part form that requires 6 signatures. Another example is the Incident Report sheet:, which is a multipart form that requires 3 signatures.
3. The current fingerprint software does not provide a wide range of capabilities· in tracking inmates.
The service and maintenance provided by the vendor is unreliable. The software vendor is Sense
Technologies, Inc.
Sense Technologies. Inc. is the current fingerprint softw::tre vendor. The annual support 311d maintenance
contract cost $2,850.00. The vendor does not provide the type of support the DOC requires. The fingerprint
reader/device located in the booking area stopped functioning in early 2010. The device was sent to Sense
Technologies for repair. The device was not returned until approximately 4 weeks later 311d that was after the
DOC contacted the vendor and requested it be returned.
The fingerprint device is also used by the work rclease inmates. An inmate must scan bis/her fingerprint when
leaving the DOC to report to work and when returning from work. The device will alert the DOC staff after 8
hours ifan inmate does not return. There should be no delays in notifying the DOC staffwhen an inmatc fails to
return to the facility. With the current device, this is not possible.
Also, the fingerprint device does not offer rapid ID of an inmate. The DOC staff should be able to identify an
inmate at 311y time by scanning his/her fingerprints whether at booking, returning from work release, or
returning from a work detail. If there is 311y question of identity, the DOC staff should be able to resolve the
issue immediately.
4. The software used to make inmate 10 badges is also a product of the fingerprint vendor Sense
Technologies, Inc. The system has been out of service since November 2009.

1. Daily Temperature Loglor Dishwasher

2. Daily Temperature Loglor Outside Freeze and Cooler
3. Daily Temperature Logfor Reach-In Coolers
4. Daily Meal Temperatures Log
The Georgia Department of Corrections Temperature Log must also be kept The information collected on the
"Food Temperature Log" previously mentioned could be used to complete the Georgia Department of
Corrections Temperature Log.
Whether inventory is being tracked and ordered, menus are being planned, or recipes are being adjusted, there is
an overwhelming amount of information that must be sorted through.
8. There are 8 housing units where the medium and minimum~security state and county inmates who
are sentenced to full~time incarceration are housed with a correctional officer assigned to the
housing unit The housing units are not equipped with PCs and printers. Other areas of the DOC
do not have PCs or printers.
On April 1,2010, Cathy Morris was allowed to do an inspection of a housing unit so she could determine if
wiring was present for PC. connectivity. Underneath the correctional officer's desk, there is a phone jack:
equipped with a data port.
9. DOC staff will require software training.

Training will be required for staffinclnding swam and non-sworn personnel.
The software used to mnke the inmate ID badges has been out of service since November of2009. Tho device
was sent to Sense Technologies for repair but was not functioning properly when it was returncd. The DOC has
asked Gwinnett County DoITS for assistance. As a work around for making the ill badges, the booking officer
takes a mug shot/photograph ofthe inmate and then uses a typewriter to type the inmate information on a pieco
6

7

10. FileNet is used for scanning timesheets and Human Resources' documents.

To better understand the TAG system and how its use would greatly benefit the Doc,
follows:

The main purpose of TAG is to make the job of the corrections' sl:3ff easier, making them more efficient and
less open to liability. It is essentially a streamlined eleciromc replacement of p~ses ~t used to be d?ne
manually. Application screens eontain controls that can speed up data entry and retrieval while at the same time
reducing the chances ofmaking mistakes.

IV. Recommendations
Many of these recommendations are tactical in nature as well as strategic. In orderto achieve short~term and long~term
goals of updatiog the technical environment and improving efficiency and effectiveness at the DOC, the following
recommendations are being made:

The TAG system is a computerized 1:Il3Illlgement system for storing and updating offender records in adult and
juvenile correctional facilities, as well as local detenti?n centers also knO'WIl as community ja?~ or ~etention
centers. TAG administers booking and custodial functions, outstanding charges, sentence administration, case
management, and trust accounting. These are all areas where the DOC uses paper forms to record and track
inmate information - refer to the previous t:.lble, Table lV-I.

1. The DOC should maximize the use of the TAG booking module and classification module. The
DOC should also incorporate the use of all TAG modules where applicable. Sylvia Black, of the
Sheriff's Department Technical Services Unit, advised that the Sheriffs Department now has a
site license for the software, which should not result in any additional software licensing fees.
If an additional module is needed for corrections, for example the Work Release module, then
additional software licensing fees will apply.

Data is entered once and is stored in a dat:.lbase that is accessible for updating, editing, viewing, SUIIl1J:1.aI'izg,
and reporting. Information is updated throughout the system as transactions occur. TAG contains rigid controls
on data presentation (edit checks and format masks) to streamline operation and prevent entry of invalid data.
The data entered and stored in the system will eliminate the need for amajorlty ofthe paper forms.

The table below lists the forms used by the DOC and the TAG modules that can be used in place of the forms.
Not all forms can be eliminated. The use of the Sheriff's Department TAG system will require some
customization for the DOC.

Numerous controls are in place in the TAG system to streamline movement through screens by using process
workflows and to minimize keystrokes. To ma:omize efficiency and speed, the system minimizes the number of
actions users must perform to complete a task. Consistent and easy to usc screens enable users to obtain required
information effieiently.

Table IV-I
Corrections
Forms &
Reports

TAG ModuIc

Corrections Forms
& Reports

TAG ModuIc

CowtForms

Movements

Clothes and Linens

Property

Housing Forms

MovementsJHousing

Security Threats

Case :Management

Incident &
Disciplinary
Reports

Incidents and
Offenses in Custody

Gan£"

Gan£"

InTrust
Accounting

Institutional
Financials

Inmate Vaccination

Case Management
andlor Medical

Classification

Classmcation

Court Orders

Legal Orders

Shift Logs

Shift Legs

Personal Property

Property

Search functions and inquires provide fast and efficient access to information. The ability to perform inquires
eliminates "time consuming and labor intensive processes requited to gather data such as inmate head COWlts,
annual booking statistics, approved inmate visitors, and verification that an inmate is incarcerated at the
correctional facility.
Each TAG inmate record contains a complete histol)' of that person's 1nvolvemcnt with correctional and
supervisory agencies, covering each period of supervision andlor incarceration. Any officer with the proper
security clearance can immediately view a record or update it. Records can also be transferred to othcr
institutions and agencies that are nmning TAG. The system also maintains a statistical overview of the entire
inmate population. Printed reports can be ron at any "time to sum.marize dm:abase information.
The following is a full list ofTAG modules. The modules in blue print are currently being used by the Gwinnett County
Sheriff's Department.

Additional TAG modules that should be used are:
•

a description of TAG

Visits
Inquires

Ropom
8

•

Admissions and Release
o Enter data and search the database for offender rcrords, admits and releases offenders, and maintains the
count
BiIlingofScrvices
o Tracks offender costs ror billing to other agencies
Biometrics
o Ability to positively identify inmates using £ingc:rprint verification
Case Management
o Offender/client assessments, security levels, case plans, cose notes, substance testing and tracking
Onssificution
o Used to determine appropriate offender custody levels through uscr~definedassessmentquestio:nnaires and
numeric scoring, <l1ong with case management nnd program tracking. Includes the ability to integrate third
party <lSscssmenttools.
Commissary
o Correctionol canteen operations, with full inventory control and (when running alongside Trust
Accounting) the ttbility to debittrostaccounts directly for offender purchases
Community Fimmcia1s

9

Record clientfces, fines and restitution obligations, track payment histories, assist in disbursement of
conected funds
Community Intake and Discharge
o

o Clientrccord search, intake/registration and discharge of clients
File Tracking
o Tracking of ha:rd-copy client files, including merging/un-merging and generation of file labels
Image Capture
o

Elccb'onically capture nnd display offender I clientimagcs with stnndnrd video equipment; im.ngcs con be
printed on any report or docw:nent

IDS (Line-ups)
'I.... ~
cifi . .
_.ct "'....
"
o Provides a search engine for retrieving offender images ma ..:...,o spc c cntcria to cons... u .......e-ups
httcgrated Word Processing
o Integ:ro.tes word processing (ie., 115 Word) dirccfly into TAG to produce text reports based on custom
templates
Legal Cases (Institutional ond/or Community)
. .
o All IegaIinformation on court orders - arrests, court appearances, conVlctions, pte-sentence reports nnd/or
sentencing, for either instimtionnl or community offenders
Medicnl
o Supports offender's medical,. dental and mental hcttlth profile from Initial Health screening to scheduling
and detnils of all medical encounters including dingnosis, meclicntion dispensing, general crISe notes,
outside rclerrals, track offender sick crills, chronic care, medication adminisl:rntion and detoxification
programs.
Offenses In Custody
o Facilitates a fonnal discip1inaIy process for internal incidents and offender rulc violations
Offender Issues
o Record requests and grievances from offenders, staff or agencies and subsequently track action and
outcomes
Orders & Conditions
o Record !E;gcl orders authorizing client supervision; includes the tracking of violations (breaches)
Parole Board Hearings
o Schedule offenders for parole board hearings, records the findings
Inmate Payroll
.
o A companion module to Trust Accounting to maintain work assignments, calculates w:lges, and credits
offender trust accounts
Personnel
o Record officerlstaff information,. with image capture for production of ill cards
Programs & Services
o J):ircetory of avnilable programs and services, c1ientrefcrral and scheduling, tracking attendance tlnd
performance; with option for contract management
Property & Institutional Issue
o Register and track offender property and administer the issuing of instimtional clothing of other items
Reports & Assessments
o Track report requests and their assignment to officers
Schcdules & Movements
o Offender I Oient schedules and recording of movements; work reassignments
Security Threat Groups (Gangs and Non-Associations)
o Track offenders associated with particular gangs and generates non·association lists
Sentence Accounting I Achninistration
o Record offender I client sentence dcbiL with calculation of key adntinistrntion dates customized for each
jurisdiction.
Shift and Incident Logs
o Record shift and incidentinfonnution, both offender- ond non-offender related
Tronsportntion
o Facilitates the trnnsportntion of:i.ronntcs bctweenjails or facilities for events such as court appearances and
medical treatments
10

Trust Accounting
o A full double--entry accounting package that administers offender financial transactions from booking
through release
Visitors
o Schedule and/or record visits, checking for conflicts and restrictions on offenders or visitors
Workload Management
o Reassign work betwcen offices or officers; inquires on weighted workloads
Ad Hoc Report Writer
o Built-in report-building tools used to cxtract databnse information into user-defined reportfonnuts which
includes Oracle Reports und Oracle Discoverer. TAG also supports industry standard report writers such as
Crystal Reports, MS Access und a large number of other third-party Ad-Hoc Reporting tools.

2. Automate the creation of required paper forms and incorporate digitizedlelectronic signatures,
using signature pads, for forms that require multiple signatures or for signatures that must
appear on numerous forms.
The eIitnination of all forms is not possible. The DOC must report information to the Georgia Department of
Corrections. These forms can be generated by the TAG Integrated Word Processing module, whieh integrates
word processing directly into TAG to produce text reports based on custom templates.
The multi-part forms, sueh as the Inmate Personal Propc:rty Inventory sheet and the Incident Report sheet
require multiple signatures. Signatures pads should be used to capture a digitized signature. Numerous forms
that requite the same signature at one time should also be generated by the TAG Integrated Word Proeessing
module.
A PDF ofthe completed form with signatures eould then be transferred to FileNet for longter:m storage.
Note: The multi·part forms must be printed on a high impact printer. There is also the optien of printing the
forms, one page at a time, on a regular laser printer. For example, it the form is a three part form. the
three pages could be printed on a laser printer. The signatures must be captured before printing. The
cost of a high impact printer should be compared to the cost of paper and printer ink if the pages are
printed on a laser printer.
Another word of caution,. the multi~part forms are provided by the State Department of Corrections.
Each form has a state issued tracking number on it If Gwinnett County DOC opts to print the multi·
page forms separately on a laser printer, someone must monitor the state issued form numbers, and the
TAG system must configured so that a system adnllnistrator can ehange those numbers when required.

3. Reliable and functional fingerprint software and hardware should be implemented to allow for
the identification of inmates when they are booked into the correctional facility, as they move
throughout the correctional facility, when they leave and re~enter the facility, and upon release
or b'ansfer from the facility.
SAF·ID Plus, a product by Dataworks offers quick identification or identity verification. This works in
conjunction '\Vith the Motorola MC-75. The MC-75 captures fingerprints and immediately submits them to
AFIS or other :fingerprint databases. Once the identity is confirmed, any available images, criminal histories,
wants and warrants, and demographic data can be viewed on the device.
SAP-ID Plus should be used when an inmate is booked into the correctional facility. This would provide the
booking officer with identity verification as well as information regarding any new or outstanding warrants.
SAP-ID Plus can be integrated with the TAG system to track the movements of inmates. For example, if an
inmate leaves a housing unit for a work detail, the inmate would scan hislher .fingerprint using the MC-75 device
and fingerprint reader. The information would be transferred to thc TAG system. A movement record would be

11

created showing the inmate is out ofthe housing unit on a work detail. By the movement record being updated
automatically, this would provide real-time information for head counts.
SAF~ID Plus should be used for the Work Release Program. Inmates who leave the correctional facility to go to
work would scan bis/her fingerprint when leaving and when returning. An inmate movement record would be
created. An alert would be generated if the inmate does not return wiilrin the specified time. Not only does this
provide real-time information to the DOC staff, but it helps to reduce secmity threats.

There are 11 components of the Institution31 Financials module:
•

The Work Alternative Program inmates should also usc this device to check-in and check-out when they report

Trust Accounting Statements

to the DOC for their community services work det:ill. The stremnJined check-inicheck-out process offers real~
time information indicating the number of hours an inmate has worked. Imnate accountability would be the

Deductions

resulting factor.

Suspended Deductions

The MC.75 devices were purchased for another department but were not used. The devices are being reused
with SAP-ID. The Sheriff's Department and the Gwinnett County Police Department are currently using SAPID Plus, which was purchased off ofthc GBI contract

Beneficiary Inquiry
Checks

It is recommended that the DOC use the MC.75 device with SAP-ill Plus. Integration between the SAP-ill

software and the TAG system would be required.
4.

Financi31s
Accounting General Ledger Balances

Financial Reports

An annband system should be installed to replace the ID badge system.

Financial Accounts Maintenance

Armbands with bar code technology ensure positive inmate identification and streamlined operations. Bar
coding can help reduce misidentification errors, which have proven to lead to problems sueh as erroneous
releases and incorrect administration ofmedications.

Inventory
•

Purchase Orders

Armbands help classify and track inmates by classification level, medication distribution, tracking, and
commissary use. They help save time, money, and labor, while ensuring positive inmate identification.
Unlike ill badges, mmbands remain on the inmates at all times, including during showers, exercise, and sleep.
Wristbands can be used for color coding and classifying inmates to provide at-a-glance identification enabling
officers to easily detect whether inmates are in authorized areas.
5. The DOC should replace the Sense Technologies, Inc. mug shot system with the Sheriffs
Department mug shot system.

The DOC should utilize the Sheriff's Department mug shot system which is part of the SYSCON jail
management system.. There are sever31 advantages to be considered. The DOC would have access to historical
mug shots/photographs of iDmates. The mug shot/photograph of the inmate is displayed on the inmate's TAG
record. The Sheriff's Department system is configured to print mug shots/photographs on armbands, which can
be configured for the DOC armband system..
The costs ::u:e minimal. The DOC must purchase a C3lD.era.
G. The DOC's Inmate InTrust Accounting Software is DOS based and should be replaced by the
TAG Institutional Financials module.

The TAG Institutional Financials module Trost Accounting is a full, double--entry accounting package that
administers offender financial transactions from booking through release. This module is extensive and offers
an efficient and effective moans offinancial reporting, fiscal accountability, and stream1ined workElow.

12

7. Food management software should be installed to adhere to state regulations for food
preparation and management, control inventory, reduce theft, reduce labor, to track and
analyze purchasing, receiving, usage, and costing of inventory.

There are four major areas of food service management a.) Inventory :M:anagcment, b.) Procurement,
c.) Meal Planning and Nutrition Analysis, and d.) Production. A food management software system
would be beneficial in the reduction of labor costs, food costs, and food preparation costs.
For Inventory Management the software should:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•

Allow unlimited amount of inventory items
Keep perpetual inventories
Reduce inventory shrinkage
Include barcode scanning capabilities for physical inventory
Keep inventory usage :iJJformation for a specified number ofyears
Traek shelf life ofinventory items
Facilitate fast and efficient product recalls

13

For Procurement, the software should:

•
•
•
•

8. Install pes, printers, and fingerprint software and hardware in the housing units and in other
areas of the correctional facility.

Provide menu plan forecasting for accurate ordering
Allow for USDA commodity substitution of ordered items
Receiving program to automatically update inventory
Complete Bid Analysis module built in
''Three way match" system. to verify vendor invoices

For Meal Planning and Nutrition Analysis should:

•
•
•
•

Preloaded with all USDA CN food items and recipes
Set up unlimited recipes, items, and menu plans
Generate nutritional analysis ofmenu plans, recipes, and ingredients
Output calendars in a variety offormats
Recipes are automatically scaled when feeding :figurc is adjusted.
Provide recipe and menu-plan cost analysis in real time.
Contain all Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP) instructionsHACCP is a nwnagement system. in which food safety is addressed through the analysis
and control ofbiological, chemical, and physical hazards from raw material prodUction,
procurement and handling, to manufacturing, distribution and consumption ofthe finished
product.

For Production the software should:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•

Each ofthe 8 housing units and the isolation unit where the inmates who are sentenced to full~time incarceration
with a correctional officer assigned to thc housing unit should have a Pc, a printer, and thc fingerprint hardware
installed.
The correctional officer assigned to a housing unit will use TAG for things such as assigning an inmate to
another bed, assigning an inmate to a different housing unit, to schedule movements, and to initiate disciplinary
reports. A printer is necessary to print fonns such as the incidentreports and shift logs.
The fingerprint hardware should be installed to track the movements of the inmates resulting in real-time
information on the whereabouts of an inmate. The identity ofthe inmate can be verified when he/she returns to
the housing unit Ifthere is any question ofan inmate's identity, the issue can be resolved immediately.
The fingerprint devices should also be installed in the booking area, in the work release area, and in the main
and central control rooms.
PCs should be iJJ.sttilled in the work release area and the main and central control rooms. The PCs in the booking
area and the kitchen will need to be replaced to insure the PCs are compatl"ble with new software and hardware.
A high impact printer will need to be installed in the classification area and at the officer work station outside of
the main control room. The PCs may need to be replaced if they are not compatible with the high impact
printer. The high impact printers are needed to print the mul1i~part fonns used for incident :md disciplinary
reports. Thesc forms are provided by the Georgia Department ofCorrections.
9. Software training for DOC staffwill be required.

Produce reports to help reduce food costs and waste
Generate production worksheets loaded with everything a production worker needs
Allow for easy substitution for out-of-stock items
Automatically delete items from inventory
Allow for auto-delete ofinventory items used
Provide for costing-out leftovers for inventory
Generate production records easily
List inventory needed on production~area pull ticket
Include complete daily task scheduling functionality

The software should be able to check and record food temperatures as well as monitor temperatures in the
refrigemtors and freezers without the tedious paperwork.
The Gwinnett County Public Schools use a food management software system by Horizon Software
I.nternationaL The software is capable of'performing all the functions listed in the Inventory Management,
Procurement, Meal Planning and Nutrition Analysis, and Production lists. The software is also capable of
checking and recording temperaturcs using wireless technology.
The DOC would be able to purchase the software off ofthe Gwinnett County Public Schools' contract

Training will be required for staff including swom and non~swom personnel. The training should include
software and hardware training for the TAG system, the mug shot system, the fingerprint system,. the food
management system, the armband system, WORD and EXCEL.
10. Use FileNet to store the inmate related paper documents.

Due to the limited physical space and expense, the inmate records (paper documents) should be scanned and
saved in FileNet The DOC currently has a FileNet SC3IlIler, which can be used. However, it is recommended
that another scanner be purchased. A eapture license would have to be purchased.
The approach is to scan an imnate folder contaiIDng all paper docwnents and save as one large file. The 2010
and 2009 inmate records should be scanned first. A two-step scarming process should be used. One person will
scan the documents while another person indexes the files. For quality control, a log indicating who indexed the
imnate file should be kept.

DoTTS is currently involved with the DOC in this project. It is recommended that the project move forward and
be completed as a short-tcnn goal.
11. Utilize the Sheriff's Department TeChnical Services Unit staff to support the DOC TAG system.

Sylvia Black of the Sheriff's Department Technical Services Unit has offered to support the DOC for the jail
management softw:lre - this includes TAG and the mug shot system.
In the event that the DOC needs assistance and the Sheriff's Department cannot deliver, SYSCON can provide

assistance through the support and maintenance contract If the DOC requires assistance with an issue or project
not covered by the support and maintenance contract, they will provide professional services at a rate of$150.00
per hour.
14

15

The Department of Information Technology Services staff would also be able to support the DOC for things
such as hardware issues, printer issues, and possibly some software issues.

APPENDIX A:
v. Conclusion
The DOC has an immediate need to automate its environment so that the day-to- day operations are less time
and labor intensive and more streamlined. Moving from a pilper-based environment to a more automated.
technical environment is always a hurdle in obtaining a successful outcome. Improvements can be made,
automation can be achieved. and the structure and process can be accomplished by the DOC leadership that is
in place with the assistance ofa technical implementer.

SYSCON JUSTICE SYSTEMS

The most significant need is to chart the course for the technical improvements and implement those changes
with the assistancc ofllie jail management softwm'e vendor SYSCON and an implementer to oversee the project
It is an investment that will pay rich dividends in the future by saving time, labor. and the costs of nmning and
mnnagingthe eorroctional facility. The County and the Sheriff's Department have invested in technologythat is
recognized as essential to conducting the business ofjustice. Quality input from the DOC staff and resource
availability are important factors that contribute to a high probability ofautomation success.
The end result will be measured by the degree to which case processing is streamlined, jail population is
reduced, and cost savings are realized. Full automation of the DOC correctional facility will produce real and
tangible benefits for Gwinnett County and its citizens, the DOC, the courts, and the justice systcm in general.

16

17

Page 2: SYSCON UCENSING COSTS

,
21
2.2
2.3
2.4

Client
Quole#
Date:

2.5

Gwinnett County Dept Of Corrections

26
2.7

April 14, 2010

Quom Valid for 90 d:Jys from Issue dote

2.8

2g

210
2.11

Page 1: SUMMARY COST SHEET
SYSCON TAG Licenses
Procoss Modules
Integrated Microsoft Modules
Imaging Modules
Financial Modulos
Modicai Modules
TOTAL TAG LICENSE

212

2.10

21,000

21,000

SYSCON Services
PRIMs (pre-implementation Studies)
Training
Workshops
Implementation Services
TOTAL SERVlCE

298,400

SYSCON Expenses (Estlmate)
TOTAL EXPENSES

126,025

other SCrvlces & Licenses
Maintenance for
2 years
Customization & Enhancement

92,000
48,000
36,000
122,400

2.14

iTAG nconses for
Modulo

concurrent user system

Integrated MS for
concurrent user system
Module
216
Intogratcd Word Processing
2.17
Intograted Outlook Calondar
2.18
TOTAL INTEGRATED MICROSOFT COST
(customer must provide own Word and Outlook licenses)
iTAG TcchlEnb for
concurrent usor system,
21Q
2.20

2.21
2.22
2.23

Moduio
Faclallmaging for iTAG
Fingerprint Option for iTAG
IDS Search and linoup module
AulomaticTriggors
Signature Capture
IrlScon Option for TAG

2.24

#ofstatiom:

nla
n1a

400,000
408,820

iTAG Ucensos for
Modulo
2.Z Tnr.tAccountlng
~
Inmote Payroll
2.27
Commissary
2.28

TOTAL COST (ALL OF ABOVE)

list Price

Disc Price

21.000

21,000

not bid

21,000

UstPrice
not bid
not bid
not bid
not bid
not bid
not bid

DIsc Price

UstPrice
notb'id
not bid
not bid

Disc Price

UstPrice
not bid
not bid
not bid
not bid
not bid

Disc Price

TOTAL IMAGING COST

8,820

concurrent user Financial sub-system.

1/.

TOTAL OTHER

TOTAL FINANCIAL MODULES COST

854,245
concurrent usor Medical sub-system,
iTAG licenses for
Module
2.2(1
EHR (Electronio Health Rocord) for ITAG
2.~O
MAR (Medicine Administration Reoord foriTAG
2.~1
Dental Moduie
2.~2
CDSS (Isabel- 3rd party product)
2.~3
PharmacyferiTAG

#

'34

TOTALMEDlCAl. MODULES COST

TOTAL SYSCON APPLICATION DISCOUNT COSTS

18

Disc Price

TOTAL PROCESS MODULE COST

#

II

DIsc

not bid
not bid
not bid
not bid
not bId
not bid
not bid
not bid
not bid
not bid
not bid
not bid
not bid
not bid

Core functionulity modulo
Legals Management
Visits Marwgement
Property
Incidents & Violations
Trarmportotion Log
Man Management
Requosts & Griovoncos
Billing of Services
Caso Monogomont
Program Managemont
Pre-Parole
Arrest & Booking
Sex Offender Registmtion

215

Quota Valld fol' 90 days from Issuo dDW

List Prico

19

21,000

Page 3: SYSCON SERVICES
loooodato:
PRIMS _Pre-implementation Reports
Quote Vol1dfor90 dDYS from issuo data
The purpose of tho PRIM is to documont the cllonts bus/nfJ$S processes end/or requirements for each buslnese orca
speclfied. The PRIM document wlll thon mop function poInts to business, highlighting requirements for BPR ond/or
enhonccmontslcust.omTzotion. Tho final PRIM document will Includo a fTno1 project plcn and def1nlt1vo oddltJonuT costs (If

11

Doscription

cny) for the client project

4.01

PRIM Expenses
TTTTroinlng Expenses
DambooeAdmln Tmining Expenses (Off-slte) - Note 2
Project Management Expenses
Installation Expensos
"Go-live Support" Expenses
TOTAL EXPENSES COST
Noto2: Dntobsoo odmin training expenses based on

•

3.01

M2

'"

""
3.05

3.00

4.02
4.03

30
30
30

24,000
24,000

115

92,000

25

Training is split both by function typo (process modules; financial modules and Mecl'ieal modules), as well as by tflITnlng
typo such as end-user, system admlntstrotor and database odmlnlstrotor. Training Is based on train the trainor maxlmizing
know1cdgo tflInsforfor ongoing operation ofthe systom.
3.08
3.09
3.10
3.15

#ofdllyS
30
30

Description
Train the Trainer on Process Moduies
Troln the Trolneron Financbl Modules
Train the Troineron MedIcal Modules
TOTAL TRAINING COST

C,"
24.000
24,000

o
60

4.06
4.07

Ill:lUOdolo:

Quote ValId for 90 days from Issue dDw

C'm
22,200
43,200
3,600
14,100
18,025
24,900
126,025

3 people attending training in VanCOUWlr

Support & Maintenance - Note 3: Year 1 takes into account 3 month warranty.

Training

11

4.04
4.05

TOTAL PRIM coST

''''

Com
20,000
24,000

#ofdays

Description
Process modules PRIM
Flnonoial Applicattons PRIM
Medioni Appllcotion PRIM
Interfuce PRIM
Reports PRIM
Convorslon PRIM

Page 4: EXPENSES & MAINTENANCE.
Expenses "

48,000

11
4.08
4.09
4.10
4.11
4.12
4.13
4.14
4.15

DesCliptton
Covomge '"
24x7
Process Modules
Intcgmlod MS products
Imaging Modules
Finllnciol Modules
Medioal Modules
TOTA1.S&M

Year 1

Yellr2

YearS

Yoar4

YearS

3,780

5,040

not bid
not bid
not bid

not bid
notbtd
notbtd
not bid
not bid

nolbld
not bid
not bid

notb!d
not bid
3,780

5,040

Workshops
Workshops Include :lome sotup In tht.'l pre-production environment For exumple, system odmin workshops may
Include setup of lOVs ond system parameters in tho reiovo.nt functional areas. Similarly, IWP workshops may Include
development of somo templates.

Descriptton
System AdminWorkshop - Process Modules
3.12
System Admin Workshop -sentence calculation
:1.13
System Admin Workshop - Finonciol Modules
3.14
Data Modol Workshop for Reports & COnversion
3.15
System Admin Workshop· Medical Modules
3.16
Datttlxlse Admin Workshop for DBAs (note 1 & 2))
3.17
TOTAL WORKSHOP COST
note 1: Database Admin training Is atSyscon Office only.
nole 2: Database admin training expenses Is based on 3

C,"
5,600

#ofd~s

11

7

3.11

7
10

"o
5
45

2 YRS TOTALS

SUPPORT & MAINTENANCE FOR

5,600
8,000
12,000
4,800
36,000

poople attending In Vancouver

Implementation Services
Implementation services include the project govomnnco os well as tho phys1c{Jllnst8Tft1t10n of tho product and
supporting softWare oomponents where supplied. "Go-live" support Is provided to onsure a smooth tronsltJon of
bus/ness to the new system with SJS subject mDt.ter experts physTcally on-sTte to assist ond-users and IT staff with any issues.
Descriptton
Propel Manogemant
Instolilltlon
"Go-flVO" support- Process Modules
"Go-live" support· FInancial Modules
"Go-Jive" support - Medical Modules
ToTAL IMPLEMENTATION SERVICES COST

TOTAL SYSCQN SERVICE COSTS

20

# of days
75
8
40
30

Cost
60,000
6,400
32,000
24,000

153122,400

298,400

21

'''''

not bid
not bid

Page 5: OTHER SERVICES & 3RD PARTY LICENSES

APPENDlXB:

Other Services
#

Description

eo,t
100,000
75,000

5.01

Fonns Developmont

5.02

Comm1esory Interface ~ Onsis

5.ro

BiometricsWork releooo Interface Ripid 10 FInger Print" DataWork:$

5.04
5,05

100,000
75,000
50,000

Wor!< roloDoo Enhacemcnts
Enhoncenwntto CommissoI)' - Food Monllgemont
TOTAL OTHER SERVICES COST

22

Horizon Software
Food Management

400,000

23

Horizon Software Pricing Information

APPENDIXC:

Back Office Software: Full Package

Modules: Inventory Management, Procurement, Production, Menu PlannerfNutrition
Analysis
;? $7585 Software & License
$9235 Training, Setup & Implementation

$1365 Annual Maintenance (Includes: Software Updates, Customer Support,
etc.)

Pinnacle Technologies, Inc.
Sister Company of Dataworks, Inc.
Armband Identification System

'" Note: Each module can be purchased separately.
TempAlert:
Equipment !O Smart Guards, 2 Smart Shields,! Smart Link
;? $5058 Equipment
$815 Jnstallation
$!OOO Training
$540 .Annual Maintenance
• Note: The equipment and installation charges might vary. They'll change
based on the number ofdevices you'll actually need.
Lee Collier j Horizon Software International

I 800.741.7100 ext. 304

www HOflzonSoftware corn

24

25

APPENDIXD:

BandWorks System Components
Component
Armbands

Description

Quantity

Includes

Pri",

DDSP (Double Sided

1000 per
box

Laminating
Sleeves with

S8S0.DOper
"'"'0

Protect3nt) arrobands with
tensile strength of8000-

ample supply of

lO,OOOpsi. Water

washers and rivets
needed to secure
theannband

resistant

Photo ID Wristbands
(Current vendor for the Sheriff's Department)

around the wrists
ofthe inmates.
Rivet Tool

Custom~madeRivet

Tool is

Precision Dynamics Corporation

1

$300.00

designed to secure the
armbands to the inmates
using the rivets :md
washers supplied with each
order of armbands.

Trim, Die, and
Hole Punch

Mountable, custom~made
Trim, Die, and Hole Punch
is designed to trim the ends
ofthe armbands to punch
the holes for the rivets.

1

$750.00

Laminator

Model 5560 Laminator is a
commercial grade
laminator with heavy duty
heating elements to insure

1

$575.00

1

$700.00

an airtight and watertight
seal between the inner and
outer sleeves of the
armbands.

Armband Photo

Custom-made Armband

!Dcu""

Photo ID Cutter is
designed to trim

photographs to the exact
size and fit to properly
slide into each armband
before laminating.

26
27

Clincher Photo ID Armband Components
APPENDIX E:
The Clincher IV & V are our Photo tD Bands
There are 500 bands in a box - closures of your choice eIther metal or plastic - 15 reusable

laminator sleeves.

I

'-----

DataWorks Plus

Pricing based on 1 to 29 box pricing
Clincher V with metal closures ~ $170.00 per boX
Clincher V with plastic closures ~ $195.00 per box

MC-75 SW, Fingerprint Scanners, Charging Cradles,
Maintenance, Interface with Syscon TAG and Install/Implementation

Clincher lV with metal closures -$159.00 per box
Clincher IV with plastic closures ~ $177.00 per box
The metal closures require a tool for closing this tool is called a dual grip tool & sells for $70.00
each. The plastic closures just snap shut

The Photo [D bands require lamination - there are 2 sizes of laminators they are:
PL4A _ This laminator can laminate one band at a time & sells for $270.00 each
Pl12A- This laminator can laminate up to four bands ata time & sells forS415.00 each
Freight is based on the quantity of merchandise ordered at the time of purchase
The labels/inserts that go inside the Clincher wristbands can be printed in many ways depending
on what is needed such as text, bar code and/or photo, bfw or coior.
You can use a laser or ink jet printer depending on your requirements or JIS systems set up. I do
not recommend thermal printers because the heat generated when laminafmg the Clincher will
darken the thermal stock/media.

28

29

APPENDIX F:
DataWorks
Gwinnett County Depm1mcnt of Corrections Hardware Inventory

SAF-IDPlus
The pnclng below for the fingerprint scanners, charging cradles, mobile device
application software, maintenance and install/implementation for each device. Also
included is pricing for the Interface to the Syscon TAG system. Pricing is based on 12

units.

.

Fingerprint Scanner for Motorola

Quantitv (12)

MC75XX

Repair Cost-Labor &

a

Parts

Motorola MC7)(FPR01R

5 Year Maintenance

Contract (12)

.

Quantitv (12'
Repair Cost-labor &

Charging Cradle for Motorola MC75XX
a Motorola CRD7XOO100RR

$3,960.00
$60jHour+
P,rts

$1800.00
$150!Device
$1560.00
$60jHour+

Parts
$480.00
Contract (12)
$40/device
The repaIr cost-labor and parts listed above would be your cost rfyou decIded to go on
time and materials instead of maintenance. As you can see the cost of the maintenance
is very reasonable and Iwould suggest that option.
Parts

5 Year Maintenance

$6000.00
$500/Device
$840.00

Year 2 Maintenance Mobile
Device A lication Software

•

Install/Implement Motorola Me-75XX
Trainin on site

Interface with Syscon TAG
System

Greg Barmore
Dataworks plus
GreenviJIe, South carolina

$9,500.00

29607~1623

30

31

The following is a list of hardware that is now at the Department of Corrections. Depending on
the compatibility of the hardware with the TAG system, the armband system, and the fingerprint
system, some of this hardware may need to be replaced. In addition, the 8 housings units, the
isolation unit, the main control room and the central control room, work release, and visitor area
will need pes and printers purchased and installed.

rrOOS5375
rrOOS6678
lT0086679

The cost to lease a PC is approximately $405.00.

rrOO87983

If high impact printers are required, a quote from the Gwinnett County suppliers will have to be
obtained, That information is not available at this time because we do not know the specifiCS of
the type of printer that is required.

lT0081984
lToo87985
IT0081986

Additional costs wi11 be incurred if signature pads are installed. The price will depend on the type
the vendor requires, which at this time is not known.

rr0081987
lTOO~72

Department of Corrections Hardware Inventory as of 4122f2010

ITOO81n2
rr004334

rr0083&&8
lTOO83657
lT0083658
lTOO83659
lT0083660
lTOoE3661
IT0083662
lTOO83663
IT0083664
lTOO83667
IT0083669
rr0083670
ITOo83611
lT0083672
ITOO83613
rr0083614
ITOO83575
IT0083676
ITOOS4059
IT0085371
IT0085372
lT0085373
IT0085374

Corrections
Burellu
Corrections
Bureau
Corrections
Bureau
Correctlonn
Bureau
Corrections
Burellu
Correctlons
BUrt!au
Corrections
Bureau
Correct1oo:;
Bureau
Correctlonll
Bureau
Corroctlona
Buro:l1J
Corroctlons
Bureau
CorrectloJ1a
Bureau
CorrectionI':
Bureau
Corroctlons
Buroau
Corrections
Bureau
Correction:;
Buroau
Corrections
8uroaIJ
Corroctlons
Burouu
Corrections
Bureau
Corrections
Bureau
Corrections
BurealJ
Corrections
Burouu
Corroctlone.

WU/tor,Torrl
Johnl::on, Darren
(Corroctlons)
Sligar. Joff
Buleo, Terry
LlcwolIyn, Lisa
White, Gilbert
CovIngton, Vomard

Desktop
Desktop
Desktop
Desktop
Desktop
Desktop
Desktop

rrOO44&O

Dell OptipJex GX260
Dell OptipJex GX620

J7670S1

Dell OptipJex GX620

H7610B1

Dell Optiplex GX620

2666

Dell OptipJex GX620

B7610B1

Dell Optiplex GX620
Dell Optiplex GX620

2<47

28670B1

Walker, Ed

Desktop

Dell Optiplex GX620

G167DB1

Bush. Shawno

Desktop

Dell Optiplex GX620

'122

Carson, Lisa

Desktop

Dell Optipiex GX620

00F'BHB1

Holcomb, Susan

Desktop

Dell Optiplex GX620

GPFBHB1

Myers, Cry:rtnl

IT006108
lT006101
ITOO83582
ITOO781
lT0018B2
1T0044a9
ITOO83996
rr004332

ITOO4325
0086339
rr0086340

Desktop

Deli Optiplex GX620

CRFBHB1

While. Shoroo

Desktop

Dell Optiplex GX620

1PFBHB1

DlJnford, Lisa

Desktop

DeJI OptipJex GX620

2783

lTOO83850

Roberts, Phyl1ls

Desktop

Dell Optiplex GX620

5MFBHB1

Elyrd. Follcltl

Desktop

Dell Optiplex GX620

4QFBHB1

lT0088913
ITOOS8914
ITOOS897S

Woohlngton. Usa

Desktop

Dell OptipJex GX620

2RFBHB1

RhInehart, Mome

Desktop

Dell OptipJex GX620

Desktop

Dell Optip!ex GX620

=,

Clay, D:wld J,

Desktop

Dell Optiplex GX745

1QYRSC1

RIca, Ken

Desktop

Dell Optip!exGX745

DQYRSC1

Jones,Borry

Desktop

Dell Optiplex GX745

9QYRSC1

Sasser, Barry

Desktop

Dell Optiplex GX745

7QYRSC1

SQYRSC1

Desktop

Dell Optiplex GX745

Desktop

Dell Optiplex GX755

579BTH1

Desktop

Dell Optlp!ex GX755

679BTH1

Mnrtln, Aprlol

Desktop

DelIOptip/exGX755

1JR1XG1

HUQ'::on. Alosla

Desktop

Dell Optiplex GX755

JHR1XG1
GHR1XG1

Dagon, Donald

Desktop

Dell Optiplex GX755

Oros, Donnls

Desktop

Detl Optiplex GX755

3JR1XG1
CHR1XG1

Peek, David

Desktop

Dell Optiplex GX755

GordUn, G:ll')'

Desktop

Dell OptipJex GX760

H8HZTK1

Laptop

Dell Latitude 0600

39S3W61

Printer

HP Laserjet2100tn

USGW184812

JACCOROO4334
Coman, LIMl

Printer

HP Laserjet 21 OOtn

USGW184802

Hudson,Alosla

Printer

HP LaserJet2200d

FJPGGJ67187

Washlngton, US:l

Printer

HP LaserJet2200dn

FCNGRH10498

Brazil, Bortha

PrJnter

HP LaserJet2200dtn

FCNGR029596

JACCOR001881

Printer

HP LaserJet2300dn

CNBGC90726

JACCOROO1882

Printer

HP LaserJet2300dn

CNBGB88989

Singletary, Fred

Printer

HP LaserJet4

USFB110570

JACCOR0083996

Printer

HP LaserJet4700dn

JPTLB40860

JACCOR004413

Printer

HP LaserJet 5

JPKK021109

JACCOROO4325

Printer

HP LaserJet 5si

USCC003548

Jone$, Berry

Printer

HP LaserJet P3005dn

??12345

GordUn, GSI')'

Printer

HP LaserJet P3005dn

CNG2R03S66

Wallor. Terri

Printer

622R41.V

BllSh.Shawne

Scanner

Source Technoiogy ST
9512
Kodak 1260 Scanner

Desktop
Desktop
Desktop

Dell Optiplex GX760
Dell Optiplex GX760
Dell Optlplex GX760

FSHZTK1
G8HZTK1
OSHZTK1

7NFBHB1

Slng!Otal')', Frod
NewbIll, Greg

32

rrOOS6338

Bureau
Corroclion:;
Burtl::lu
Corrections
Buteau
Correction:!
BUrtillU
Correctionil
Buretlu
Corrections
Bureau
Corrections
Bureau
CorroctJon:;
Burouu
corrections
Buraau
CorroctJons
Bureau
Corroctlons
Buroau
Corrections
·suronu
CorroctJonn
Bureau
Corroetlon&
BUre:lu
Corrections
Bureau
Corrections
BUreau
Corrections;
Bureau
Corrections
Bureau
Correetlons
Bureou
Corroctlons
Bureau
Corrections
Bureau
Corrections
Bureau
Corrections
Bureau
Corroctlons
Bureuu
Corroctlone.
Bureau
Corrections
Bureau

33

12812630

EXHIBIT J

COST ANALYSIS TO CLOSE CORRECTIONS FACILITY
OPERATING COSTS

SCENARIO A - House Inmates at Detention Center
12011 CORRECTIONS DEPT BUDGET /Adiusted throuoh March 1, 2011)

$

12,276,579

ESTIMATED New Costs for Sheriff

$

/7,554,812'

Increased Labor Cost to Departments
Cost Reduction Between Corrections & Sheriff

$
$

(1,036,622
3,685,145

Lost Work Alternative Communitv Service Value

Grant Repayment to State if Inmates returned between Feb 2012 and Feb 2013

$
$
$
$

(328,015
(2,881,400'
160,657
(323,473)

OPERATING COSTS - 2011

$

Lost Inmate Generated Revenue
Cost to Maintain Vacant Facilitv

NET SAVINGS OR (ADDITIONAL COST)

91,600
CAPITAL COSTS

ISHORT TERM CAPITAL TO ACCOMMODATE INCREASED POPULATION AT JAIL
Additional parkin~ space to accommodate increased staff and visitors

$

2,200,000

Purchase of additional video conferencin~ eauipment and installation

$

1,200,000

Initial prep and setup for recommehded site adjacent to iail for video conferencing equipment

$

125,000

CAPITAL COSTS

$

3,525,000

$

3,433,4001

ITOTAL NET COST IMPACT

13.41

Number of Years Savin s Re uired to Return Investment on Ca ital Ex ense

LONG TERM CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS AND OPERATING COSTS TO ACCOMMODATE
INCREASED POPULATION

CAPITAL & OPERATING
COSTS

Construct additional tower at jail

$

120,000,000

Additional 130 employees needed to staff new tower

$

6,000,000

General Obiiaation Bond Financin~ - Impact to' Averaae Homeowner 10.43 mills)

$

28.04

General Fund Millage Rate Increase (new staff & ooeratina costs at 0.25 mills)

$

16.30

ISSUES TO ADDRESS:
This option Is only feasible If 35 officers requested for 2011 are provided (Included In cost estimate)
Jail will exceed capacity by 400+ Inmates
Triple bunking will be required. creating unsafe environment
Overcrowding will increase risk of litigation

Additional supplies and Inf,astmcture required (Included I" cost eslimate)
Maintenance costs will escalate due to increase lise. Capital improvements already needed.

Escalates plans to expa"d jail with "ew tower· estimated cost = $120 million

COST ANALYSIS TO CLOSE CORRECTIONS FACILITY
OPERATING BUDGET

SCENARIO B - House Inmates at Other Facilities

.

12011 CORRECTIONS DEPT BUDGET (Adjusted through March 1 2011)

Is

122765791
, ,
(8,094,878

Cost Reduction Between Corrections & Sheriff

S
S
S

Lost Work Alternative Communitv Service Value
Lost Inmate Generated Revenue
Cost to Maintain Vacant Facility
Grant Repayment to State If Inmates returned between Feb 2012 and Feb 2013

S
S
S
S

{328,015
(2,881,400
{60,657
(323,473)

S

(448,466)

ESTIMATED New Costs for Sheriff
Increased Labor Cost to DeDartments

2011 NET SAVINGS OR (ADDITIONAL COST)
ISSUES TO ADDRESS:
How many Inmates state sentenced?
What Is availability of facilities to accept Inmates?
Is there adequate bed space available?
A single facility to house Inmates not likely
• results In Inmates scattered throughout state
• Increases transportation costs and need for transport vehicles and staff
Lack of control for medical expenses
Housing Out costs expected to Increase annually

{1.036.622
3,145,079

EXHIBIT J
IMPACT ANALYSIS OF CLOSING CORRECTIONS FACILITY
Closing the correctional complex will not end the practice of sentencing offenders to
local confinement. Since the Gwinnett County Pre-Trial Detention Center (Jail) is the
only alternative to the cOlTectional facility, it will be necessary to provide the Sheriffs
Department with adequate resources to manage additional county-sentenced imnates.

SUMMARY OF TRANSITION PROCESS:
(based on Jail already at maximum capacity):
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•

Determine date for closing Corrections facility
Communicate closing date to Judges to discontinue sentencing inmates to
Corrections
Begin process of hiring additional staff at Sheriff's Jail
Classify inmates and determine number that can be housed out
Identify agencies that can house inmates
Sheriff address impact to support operations and mandated services to inmates
(i.e. service capacity and space/or clinic, librGly, courtroom space, visitation)
Send inmates back to court for re-sentencing
Phase out positions in Corrections and conduct Reduction in Force
Phase in movement of inmates to Detention Center

ISSUES TO ADDRESS WITH CLOSING:
•

Disposition of Existing County-Sentenced Offender Population
o As of October 25, 2010 there were 297 inmates and 94 work release residents
sentenced to the cOlTectional complex by Gwinnett County judges. Closing
the correctional facility before these inmates/residents complete their
sentences will require sentence modifications which, in many cases, will
require a collli hearing with all parties in attendance.
o The number of sentence modifications required depends on the actual closing
date and the number of county-sentenced offenders still in custody at the time.
The release schedule for inmates and residents currently in custody is as
follows:
Year
Indefinite'
2013
2012
2011 (Jul- Dec)
2011 (Jan - Jun)
2010

Inmates

Residents

0
1
4
9
108
175

20
1
10
16
25
22

*Most child support defendants are sentenced to pay a specified sum of
money rather than serve a fixed period of time.
o

o

Once a closing date is established, it will be necessary to stop the inflow of
newly-sentenced offenders so that staff can accurately project the offender
population throughout the phase-out period and make plans to reduce the
number of employees accordingly.
Upon establishing a closing date, Gwinnett County judges should be quickly
notified of the date in writing and informed that:
• No newly-sentenced inmates or Work Release Program residents or Work
Altemative Program participants will be accepted in the Comprehensive
Correctional Complex;
o Once this occurs, more inmates will be sent to Detention Center
which will immediately impact overcrowding
• Irnnates currently in custody but scheduled for release prior to closing date
will be allowed to finish their sentences in the cOl1'ectional complex;
• Residents currently in custody pursuant to a criminal conviction but
scheduled for release prior to the closing date will be allowed to finish
their sentences in the correctional complex;
• Indefinite sentences for residents currently in custody pursuant to a civil
order (child support, contempt, etc.) must be modified in order to specify
release and/or transfer prior to the closing date; and,
• The sentencing court will be notified on a case-by-case basis if any irnnate
or resident is currently sentenced beyond the closing date so that his/ber
sentence can be modified.

•

Disposition of State Inmate Population
o The inmate housing agreement between Gwinnett County and the Georgia
Depmiment of Corrections contains a telmination for convenience clause that
requires sixty (60) days written notice of intent to terminate the agreement
prior to the expiration of the 10-year agreement period. Exercising the
termination clause prior to February 2013 requires grant repayment on a prorated basis.
o Requiring the state to pick up these irnnates will impact the State's ability to
pick up state sentenced irnnates out of the Detention Center and will most
likely require the Sheriff to hold irnnates longer

•

Additional staff must be hired for Sheriff's Jail Operations
o Hiring process averages 6-8 weeks
o Length of time to train and work independently averages 3 - 4 months
o Any officers that transfer from COl1'ections must go to P.O.S.T. for jail
celiification

•

Impact to Sheriff's operations if Jail facility is at capacity at time of Corrections
closing
o Determine options for "housing out" inmates
• How many inmates state sentenced?
• What is availability of facilities to accept inmates?
• A single facility to house inmates not likely

•
•
•

Results in inmates scattered throughout state and puts burden
on Sheriff to transport
Cost (Avg = $45 - $55)
Medical care cost more difficult to manage

•

Impact to Sheriff's budget, services and facilities
o Increased risk oflaw suits addressing over crowding
o Additional space and resources needed to meet requirements for equal access
to facilities and services such as library and medical clinic
• Potential legal issues if unable to provide adequate services
o Additional space needed for courtrooms
o Creates additional staff and visitors which effects ability to accommodate
them (i.e. space within the facility and outside parking)
o Additional parking will be needed to accommodate increased staff and visitors

•

Customer Notifications
o The loss of offender labor will require some county departments and other
customers to adjust their business plans. In order to provide a reasonable time
in which to make altemate a1Tangements, department directors and cities/CIDs
with active service agreements should be notified without delay once a closing
date is established.

(l)winndt Qrnunty
iqcriff'n 1llcpartmcnt
R.L. (Blltclt) COllway, Slteriff

2900 University Parkway
Lawrenceville, GA 30043
(770) 619-6500 Fax (770) 822-3115

Mike Boyd
Cit lefDepllty
DOll Pillkard
Jail Admlllistrator

February 7, 2011

Gwinnett Board of Commissioners
75 Langley Drive
Lawrenceville, Ga. 30045
Dear Commissioners:
I wanted to take this opportunity to express my support in keeping the Gwinnett County
Correctional Institute operational. We could use a well-run facility and this county needs this
department as well as the inmate labor it can produce in keeping our roads and buildings free
from trash and graffiti.
Closing this facility would not benefit Gwinnett taxpayers and it would overly burden my
department, which is already stretched to its limits. GCCI also maintains and operates the work
release program, a program that the Sheriffs Department does not have the manpower to
manage. In a county this large with the number of crimes committed, this facility is not only
needed, but necessary.
If you would like to discuss this further, please don't hesitate to contact me.

Sincere;~ _

4~--

3

SheriffB~onw;

Administrative Office of the Courts
GWINNETT JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
PHILIP M. BOUDEWYNS
COURT ADMINISTRATOR

October 14,2010

Gwitmett County Board of Commissioners
75 Langley Drive
Lawrenceville GA 30046
Re:

Gwinnett County Correctional Institute

Deal' Commissioners:
We have reviewed the Final Report of the Project Committee regarding the
continued operation of the Gwinnett Correctional Institute dated October 11, 2010.
We write to support the unanimous recommendation of the Committee to continue the
Correctional Institute operations. The Project Report validates the decision that
GwiImett County made years ago to operate its own independent correctional facility.
As the Committee found, the correctional facility inmates provide necessary
maintenance labor to the County at a substantial savings, and the facility itself can
provide additional income to the County by housing state inmates.
As judges, we also have a desire to keep the facility in operation because of the
sentencing options available to the Court. For cases that involve unpaid fines, unpaid
child support, or unpaid restitution; the work release option has no comparable
substitute. The Defendant benefits by not losing their employment due to
incarceration; but the entire Gwinnett community benefits when a party actually pays
their court ordered obligations such as child support. The fact that the program is
paid for by the Defendants themselves encourages inmates to work multiple jobs so
that they can be released sooner. Because the inmates are screened for drugs and
alcohol each time they enter the facility, the innlates are usually compliant with
orders to abstain from dangerous substances when they are away from the facility.
In short, we believe the continued operation of the facility is the correct course of
action for the citizens of Gwinnett. Thank you for your consideration of this issue.
Sincerely,

(signatures on next page)

Gwinnett County Correctional Institute

2

MICHAEL C. CLARK, Judge
Super'or Court

Ell CONNER, Judge
Superior Court

WilLIAM M. RAY, II, J
Superior Court

ge

DEBRA K. TURNER, Judge

~~~
R. TIMOTH
Mil, Judge
Superior Cou

CZ~I( (3~
RONN

ATCHElOR, Judge
Supe' Court

WAR EN DAVIS, Judge
Superior Court

~~dL
""lIl'·rc:.~~
,~
JOSEPH C. IANNAZzOf\i€J&ige

O

State Cou.".............

GEO~

(

UTCHINSON, III
!/ ChiefF. Magistrate

/

 

 

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