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Inmate Orientation Booklet UDC UT State Prison 2013

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STATE OF UTAH
DEPARTMENT OF
CORRECTIONS

DIVISION OF INSTITUTIONAL
OPERATIONS
UTAH STATE PRISON
INMATE FRIENDS AND FAMILY
ORIENTATION BOOKLET
Modified and updated September 2013 by Joe Doman, Captain R&O Unit, Uinta Facility

Table of Contents
Introduction………………………………………………………………………………………………
2
General
information………………………………………………………………………………………2
Visiting……………………………………………………………………………………………………
.4
Mail/Commissary/Property…………….…………………………………………………………………
..7
Inmate
Accounts/funds……………………………………………………………………………………….9
Health
Care………………………………………………………………………………………………..10
Board
Pardons……………………………………………………………………………………………11

of

Daily
Routines…………………………………………………………………………………………….13
Telephones……………………………………………………………………………………………….1
5
R&O
Unit………………………….......………………………………………………………………….16
Inmate
Classification……………………………………………………………………………………….17
Privilege
Matrix/OMR…………………………………………………………………………………….18
Victim
Restitution………………………………………………………………………………………….18
Grievance/Disciplinary……………………………………………………………………………………
.18
Inmate
Program(IPP).……………………………………………………………………….19

1

Placement

Programming…………………………………………………………………………………………….2
0
Conclusion……………………………………………………………………………………………….2
2
Appendix
A
Jails)……………………………………………………………………………….23
Appendix
B
(Visiting
Regulations)..………………………………………………………….24

Rules

Appendix
C
(Visiting
Code)……………………………………………………………………….27
Appendix
D
(Sample
Form)…………………………………………………………….28

2

Visitor’s

(County

and

Dress

Consent

UTAH STATE PRISON ORIENTATION FOR INMATE’S FRIENDS AND FAMILY
INTRODUCTION
This is an introductory booklet for the people whose friends or family members are sent to
Prison by the Courts. Although you have seen movies about Prison life, you will find out that
all Prisons are different. You need to know what to expect when dealing with the staff and
Administration of the Utah State Prison. You also need to become familiar with what to expect
should you decide to come out to the Prison for visiting or any other business. You may also
want to know how to keep in touch and maintain ties with inmates while they are incarcerated.
This booklet is written in an easy question and answer format and tries to answer most of the
frequently asked questions. This booklet will also start to prepare you in your expectations and
give you an understanding of how and why things are done the way they are.
This booklet has sections that include general information, the Reception and Orientation unit
(R&O), daily routines, inmate classification, telephone and other subjects. This booklet also
includes the rules and regulations for visiting so you can read them before visiting Prison sites.

GENERAL INFORMATION
Q.
A.

Where do inmates live?
Inmates can live in one of the State's two Prison sites, or in one of several County jails that
have qualified to house State inmates. Inmates are housed based on their gender, classification
and security levels, employment status, and habilitative opportunities, as well as the facilities
space availability and management issues. In most cases, inmates are not segregated because
of their offense(s).
The two Prison sites are the Utah State Prison in Draper, and the Central Utah Correctional
Facility in Gunnison. The Draper complex consists of eight facilities: Lone Peak, Olympus,
Oquirrh, Promontory, Special Services Dormitory (SSD), Timpanogos, Wasatch, and Uinta.
The Gunnison complex consists of two facilities named Henry, and Boulder. Most facilities
have several housing units. The Inmate Placement Program (IPP) places inmates in 21 county
jails statewide.
In addition, a few inmates are placed in out-of-state prisons, Federal Correctional Facilities, and
private correctional facilities through the Western Interstate Compact and the Interstate
Corrections Compact.

3

Q.
A.

Who is in Charge?
The State Prisons are part of the Division of Institutional Operation of the Utah State
Department of Corrections. Each complex has a Warden and Facility Deputy Wardens, and the
housing units within the facilities have a Captain and/or a Lieutenant. The complexes have a
Shift Commander on duty 24 hours a day. If calling or writing about a concern, you may be
referred to one of these Administrators. Usually your concerns will be referred to the housing
unit managers or caseworker.

Q.
A.

What do the Caseworkers do for the inmates?
Caseworkers may be a contact person between inmates and their families or friends outside of
Prison. Caseworkers also aid inmates through some of the processes inside the Prison.

Q.
A.

Will I be able to tour the Prison?
Unfortunately, for safety and security reasons, the public cannot tour the Prisons. If you are on
an inmate’s approved visiting list, you will be able to come onto Prison property to visit the
inmate. Each facility has a designated visiting area. In addition, those interested can attend
public awareness meetings in which inmates answer questions and talk about prison life. If you
would like to attend a meeting, call (801) 576-7065 in Draper or (435) 528-6000 in Gunnison
to make arrangements.

Q.
A.

How are the Prisons cleaned?
The Utah State Prison is cleaned and maintained by inmate labor. Inmates are expected to
clean their own personal areas. Inmate crews are paid to clean larger common areas.

Q.
A.

What is the food like at the Prison?
The meals at the Prison are designed by a dietician to insure that daily nutritional values are
met. The meals served are varied and well prepared. Most inmates will receive their meals on
a thermo tray delivered to the housing unit.

Q.
A.

What is the training of the officers employed at the Prison?
Officers at the Utah State Prison are certified Correctional Officers and have Peace Officer
authority. Their training consists of a 13-week Peace Officer Standard and Training course.
Officers are required to complete an additional forty hours of training every year throughout
their career.

4

VISITING
Q.
A.

Do inmates have the right to visitation?
Visitation serves an important role in preserving the relationship between inmates and their
families and friends. However, visitation is a privilege, not a right, and is subject to rules,
regulations, and procedures (Appendix B). Inmates are not assigned to specific facilities for the
convenience of visitation.

Q.
A.

How do I get on an inmate's visiting list?
The inmate you would like to visit starts the process by signing a visiting application and
sending it to you. You can also get applications on line or from the Visiting Department. After
you have returned your application to the visiting office, they will check for, an inmate
signature, all appropriate documents and do a background check. If the application doesn’t
include the signature or documents or if you have a criminal history your application may be
delayed or denied. If you are approved, your name will be placed on the inmate's visiting list.

Q.
A.

How will I know if I am approved, and when I can visit?
The inmate will be notified, and it is their responsibility to let you know that you have been
approved and what time to visit.

Q.
A.

Are children under 18 allowed to visit inmates?
Minor children are only allowed to visit inmates when accompanied by their parent, legal
guardian, or an immediate family member possessing a notarized statement from the child’s
parent or legal guardian (please refer to the back of the Visiting Request Form for our
definition of immediate family member). You will need to provide copies of birth certificates
and/or adoption documentation and/or court documents establishing legal guardianship, and fill
out a Declaration of Minor Visitors form prior to visitation. Only minor children who are listed
on the form will be allowed to visit. Some inmates may not be eligible to have minors on their
visiting list. Please get with your inmate to find out if he/she has limitations.

Q.
A.

How much information does the Prison need to do a background check?
The visitor application asks for your full name, previous names or aliases, date of birth, and
street address, as well as copies of your Social Security card and driver license or state I.D.
number. Depending on your specific circumstances, you may need to send your birth
certificate, marriage certificate, or divorce decree to verify your relationship to the inmate.

Q.
A.

How long does the process take?
Usually it takes two to three weeks for approval once the request has been received by the
Department of Corrections, however, it may take up to 45 days.

5

Q.
A.

What can I do if my visit request has been denied?
You can appeal to the Deputy Warden of Security in writing. Once they have reviewed it you
will be notified in writing if your application is approved or denied. If your application is
denied you can appeal to the Warden, the Warden's decision is final.
Warden
Warden
Utah State Prison
Central Utah Correctional Facility
P.O. Box 250
P. O. Box 550
Draper, UT 84020
Gunnison, UT 84634

Q.
A.

If I have been on an inmate's visiting list in the past, do I have to reapply?
All first time offenders and Parole Violators are given the opportunity to send visiting request
forms to their family and friends while in R&O. Visitors for Parole violators will either need to
submit a renewal form (applies only if you’ve been on the list before and/or it’s been less than a
year since the inmate was released). If you don’t meet those criteria, you will need to resubmit
a visiting application with all the appropriate documents. All visiting files are reviewed and
updated every year, if the inmate is released and does not return within a year his/her visiting
list is cleared. If you have voluntarily taken your name off an inmate’s visiting list, you must
wait 90 days before you can reapply.

Q.
A.

How do I find out the visiting schedule?
Different facilities have different visiting schedules. Inmates can tell you when you can come
out to visit. You may also call the facility where the inmate is housed to verify the schedule.
An inmate's classification determines how long they can visit or if he is eligible for visits.
Draper site: Lone Peak – 801-576-8200, Oquirrh – 801-576-7178, Timpanogos – 801-5767800, Wasatch – 801-576-7014, Uinta – 801-576-7300.
Web address is
www.corrections.utah.gov. Click on "Institutional Safety" then click on "Visiting" to see the
schedule online.
Gunnison site: All housing units – 435-528-6500

Q.
A.

Is there a dress code?
Yes. The complete dress code has been included in Appendix C.

Q.
A.

Will I be searched when I go in to or out of the Prison?
As a condition of entering a secured facility, all staff, visitors, and business contractors coming
onto Prison property are subject to a search and inspection of their vehicles and property by
officers or canine units. If you do not give consent to a search of your property, you will be
denied entry and/or required to leave Prison property.
Officers search vehicles and property to ensure everyone's safety and to look for items that are
not allowed into the Prison. Some items such as tobacco and pepper spray, which are not
illegal, are considered contraband inside the Prison. Some other items not allowed on Prison
property include, but are not limited to, alcohol, explosive items, poisons, weapons, and
controlled substances. Any visitor who brings controlled substances onto Prison property and
attempts to give them to an inmate may be charged with a felony.
When leaving Prison property, your vehicle may be searched again. An officer will ask you to
open the trunk of your car for a visual inspection.

6

Q.
A.

What will happen the first time I visit an inmate?
During your first visit you will sign a consent form stating you understand the rules and
regulations of the prison and are willing to abide by them. You can view the rules at the
visiting section of the Department of Corrections’ web site.

Q.
A.

What can I bring to a visit?
Visitors are not permitted to bring items of any kind to inmates. Visitors with infants or small
children may bring one transparent bottle and two diapers. The facilities are tobacco free.
Visitors are not permitted to bring cigarettes, cigarette lighters, matches, or any tobacco
products into the facilities.
When coming on Prison property, you will be asked to provide identification, either a driver
license or a State ID card, and to show the identification at several checkpoints while on Prison
property. You need to leave your purses and coats in your car. Prior to visiting, you will be
asked to walk through a metal detector, which you must pass to visit.

Q.
A.

What are the reasons I would not be able to visit with an inmate?
You will be turned away from visiting for any of the following reasons:
1.
You are not an approved visitor
2.
You are visiting at the wrong time
3.
You are not within dress standards
4.
The inmate is locked down
5.
The facility is locked down
6.
You have violated a rule during a previous visit
7.
You have litigation pending
8.
You have an extensive criminal history
9.
You are a crime partner or victim of the inmate
10.
You are a former employee, volunteer, contractor, or student intern
11.
You are under the influence of an illegal substance or intoxicated; or
12.
The inmate is in the R&O unit.

7

MAIL / COMMISSARY / PROPERTY
Q.
A.

How soon can I start sending an inmate letters?
Inmates can start receiving mail as soon as they come to Prison.

Q.
A.

How do I address the envelope?
The mailing address for an inmate is:
Draper
Inmate's Prison commitment name and
Offender number
Utah State Prison
P.O. Box 250
Draper, UT 84020

CUCF
Inmate's Prison commitment name and
Offender number
CUCF
P. O. Box 550
Gunnison, UT 84634

Q.
A.

What happens when inmates move to a different housing unit?
The Prison mailroom locates where an inmate has moved and forwards the mail. This means
the mail may be delayed in getting to the inmate.

Q.
A.

Can I send pictures in the mail?
Inmates are allowed to have 25 photos in their possession. These pictures cannot be larger than
8x10, Polaroid, or be pornographic in nature. Inmates may be required to send some of the
pictures out if they have an excess of the regulated quantity. Inmates may not posses
photographs with their image on it.

Q.
A.

Can I send an inmate his ID such as Drivers License, SSN card, etc.
Forms of ID can be mailed as long as they are sent to the Records Office. If ID(s) are mailed to
the inmate they will be returned.

Q.
A.

Can inmates receive greeting cards?
Yes. However, multilayered cards are not allowed

Q.
A.

Can I send an inmate a Birthday or Christmas presents through the mail?
No. Inmates are not allowed to receive packages in the mail unless prior authorization has been
given. Authorization is usually for medical reasons.

Q.
A.

How does an inmate buy books and magazines?
Books can only be purchased through the inmate Commissary. An Initial Book Request form
will go from the inmates, through UCI Commissary, to the book vendor who will confirm price
and availability for the inmates. The books will be directly shipped from the vendor to the
Mail/Property Unit for inspection and distribution. A family member/friend(s) may get a
magazine subscription for the inmate

Q.
A.

What is the inmate property matrix?
The property matrix is a list of type and quantity of items that inmates can have in their
possession. When officers find inmates who have an excess of an item such as photographs or
hobby craft items, the inmates will be required to send them out.
8

Q.
A.

How do I pick up an inmate's property?
The inmate must first designate that you can pick up their property. To receive information or
to inquire about the availability of an inmate's property please call Draper Site: 801-576-7951,
or 801-576-7952 or CUCF Site: 435-528-6111, 435-528-6412, 435-528-6413
The Draper Property Unit's hours are: Monday thru Friday 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM
Closed: Saturday, Sunday and Holidays
The CUCF Property Unit's hours are: Monday thru Friday 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM
Closed: Saturday, Sunday and Holidays

Q.
A.

What is commissary?
Commissary is a system through which inmates may purchase additional convenience items
that they may be allowed to have. These items include personal hygiene items (different brands
of shampoo, soap, etc.), writing materials and food items (candy bars, cookies, crackers, etc.).
Inmates are also allowed to order approved clothing and hobby craft items. Inmates can order
commissary items once a week.

Q.
A.

What if inmates cannot order what they want in Commissary?
If the item is not in the commissary, inmates cannot have it. Items available in Commissary are
the only items allowed on the inmate's property matrix. The Prison provides all necessary
items for an inmate who is incarcerated.
Directions to Draper Site Property Office

Come from North:
Using Exit 288:

♦
♦
♦
♦
♦

Exit I-15 at #288
Turn right
Turn Right onto Frontage Road
Drive approximately 1 mile
Building is on Left

♦
♦
♦
♦
♦

Exit #289
Turn right
Turn Left at 200 west
At T in road turn Left
1st Driveway after curve on your right!

Using Bangerter:

Come from South:
Using Exit 288:

♦
♦
♦
♦
♦

Exit I-15 at #288
Turn Left and go under Freeway.
Turn Right onto Frontage Road
Drive approximately 1 mile
Building is on Left

♦
♦
♦
♦
♦

Exit #289
Turn Left go over free way
Turn Left at 1st 200 west
At T in road turn Left
1st Driveway after curve on your right!

Using Bangerter:

200 west

Pony express way/ Frontage Road

I-15

Ext

9

Bangerter
289

Exit 288

Property

INMATE ACCOUNTS/FUNDS
Q.
A.

How can I send inmates money?
Inmates may receive money via the telephone and the Internet with your credit card.
TELEPHONE: 1-866-345-1884 (Mon – Fri)
INTERNET: www.inmatedeposits.com
$6.95 per transaction
$5.95 per transaction
$300 per day limit
$300 per day limit
Mailing money to Inmate Accounting
We accept Money Orders or Cashier’s Checks only.
Money orders, or cashier’s checks need to have the inmate’s full name, and Offender # on
them. Sender must have their full name and address on the cashier’s check or money order,
and envelope. We do not accept or forward letters, cards, etc. All funds sent through the
mail, whether for CUCF or Draper, must be mailed to Draper Inmate Accounting.
You can mail funds to the following addresses:
Inmate Accounting
PO Box 250
Draper, Utah 84020

Q.
A.

How can I drop off money for an inmate?
A KIOSK is now available in the Visitor’s Control Center which is the building located in the
front of the Wasatch facility at Draper. At CUCF it is located inside the lobby of the
Administration Building. The KIOSK is accessible during regular business hours. THE
KIOSK WILL NOT ACCEPT CHECKS OR MONEY ORDERS! The KIOSK will accept
Debit or Credit Cards ($5.95 per transaction with a $300 limit) or will take cash ($4.00 per
transaction with a $300 limit; no coins or $1 bills accepted, only $5 bills and larger will be
accepted) Funds will not be accepted at Inmate Accounting.
You will need to know the Inmate’s Name and Offender Number to process the depositing of
funds to an account. Without this information, funds will not be accepted!
State Inmates housed at County Jails will have different processes to receive money on their
accounts. Please check with the County Jails for their process.

Q.
A.

Is there another way for an inmate to get money?
The Prison's expectation is that all capable inmates work. Inmates who work are compensated
at a rate of at least forty cents per hour. Inmates get paid once a month and need to learn how
to budget their money from month to month.

Q.
A.

What happens to inmates who don't have money?
Inmates who don't have money are considered indigent. The Prison provides the inmate's basic
needs of food, clothing, personal hygiene items and mail privileges. The only need for
additional money is to purchase limited amenities and commissary.

10

Q.
A.

Q.
A.

Are there any deductions taken from an inmate’s account?
Funds may be deposited to an inmate’s account through inmate employment. Payroll funds are
deposited once a month for the previous month worked
Money may be removed from an inmate’s account for the following reasons:
1.

Court Ordered Garnishments

2.

Assessments from the Office of Recovery Services (child support);

3.

Inmate disciplinary fines or restitution;

4.

Medical co-pays and prescriptions: and

5.

Court filing fees.

Should I put money on an inmate’s book?
Inmates are given everything they need while in prison. Bear in mind that inmates have the
ability to work and earn money to buy things they want or to pay for fines, judgments or
assessments such as DNA testing. By placing money on an inmate’s account you could be
playing into a scam perpetrated by other inmates. Strong-arming and gambling are a real
problem inside the institution. By allowing the inmate to be responsible for his own finances,
he/she learns a valuable lesson about accountability and responsibility. Placing a small amount
on their books during special occasions such as Birthdays or Christmas is acceptable providing
you don’t do it because it was solicited. NEVER, under any circumstances put money on
the books of another inmate. If you are asked to place money on the books of another inmate,
you can contact the Wardens office for advice or assistance.

HEALTH CARE
Q.
A.

How soon are inmates seen by the medical department?
Each inmate is given a medical screening the first day they come to Prison. While in the R&O
unit, inmates are given an option to have a complete physical examination by qualified staff
member from the clinical bureau.

Q.
A.

What can inmates do if they become depressed while in Prison?
Depression and/or anxiety are common in Prison. Inmates who feel they are suffering from
depression or are having anxiety attacks, can fill out a health request. Also, through an officer,
caseworker, or health care worker Offenders can request to have a mental health clinician see
them.

Q.
A.

What happens to an inmate who has a physical disability?
The Prison is mandated to comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) standards.
The Prison has developed inmate disability policies through which they can be considered
under ADA.

11

Q.
A.

How do inmates get their medication?
Depending on the type of prescribed medication, an inmate may get a blister pack that contains
medication for a certain time period that he/she can self-administer, or if the medications need
to be more carefully monitored, inmates may attend pill line, which is held twice each day.

Q.
A.

How can inmates see a doctor?
Inmates who want to be seen by a doctor can fill out a sick call request form requesting an
appointment. Sick call request forms are picked up every day and are evaluated by medical
staff to determine which level of medical care is appropriate. The Prison usually schedules two
sick calls a day for each housing facility. In case of emergencies, Prison staff have been trained
to evaluate medical emergency situations and to then notify medical staff for appropriate
medical care and follow up.

Q.
A.

What other medical care is available at the Prison?
Inmates can receive dental care, eye care and mental health care while they are incarcerated.

Q.
A.

What happens if the Prison's medical unit cannot care for an inmate?
The Prison's Clinical Bureau has a contract with University of Utah Hospital for the treatment
of seriously ill inmates who cannot be appropriately cared for at the Prison infirmary.

BOARD OF PARDONS AND PAROLE
Q.
A.

How do inmates get out of Prison?
Pursuant to the Utah Constitution and the Utah Code, the Board is the sole authority in Utah to
determine whether an offender will be released from prison earlier than the maximum
(expiration) of any imposed sentence. If the Board decides to release an offender prior to
expiration, the Board determines whether to parole the offender or terminate his/her sentence.
The Board also determines any conditions of parole, and makes any amendments to conditions
of parole. The Board also has the authority to commute or reduce sentences; impose or remit
restitution, fines and forfeitures; terminate the sentence of an inmate or parolee, short of
sentence expiration; pardon offenders (except in cases of treason or impeachment); issue
warrants of arrest for parole violations; impose sanctions for parole violations; revoke parole
and return parolees to prison; and conduct evidentiary hearings

Q.
A.

Who comprises the Board of Pardons and Parole?
Members of the Board of Pardons and Parole are appointed by the Governor, with confirmation
from the legislature. Members generally possess expertise in the areas of law, corrections and
mental health. There are five full time members of the Board and five part-time members. The
Board is a separate entity from the Department of Corrections and while they receive
recommendations from the various departments within Corrections, decisions by the Board are
an independent matter. Similarly, the Board has no direct authority over the various functions
of the Department of Corrections.

12

Q.
A.

When does an offender appear before the Board of Pardons and Parole?
Within six months of commitment to prison the Board will give notice of the month and year in
which the inmate’s original hearing will be conducted. Inmates who are sentenced to death or
life without parole are not granted an original hearing.
When a sentence arises from a death (i.e. homicide, manslaughter, etc.), the Board will
determine a month and year for the original hearing, pursuant to an administrative review
conducted by the Board upon an inmate’s commitment to the prison. The Board, in setting an
original hearing in such cases, will consider the nature of the offense, the sentence(s) imposed;
and any aggravating or mitigating circumstances known to or presented to the court at
sentencing.
For all other cases, the following schedule applies:
st
1 Degree Felonies:
Greater than 15 Year Minimum:
Original Hearing after 15 years incarceration.
10 – 15 Year Minimum:
Original Hearing after 7 years incarceration.
Less than 10 Year Minimum:
Original Hearing after 3 years incarceration.
nd
2 Degree Felony (sex offenses):
Original Hearing after 18 months incarceration.
nd
2 Degree Felony (non-sex offense):
Original Hearing after 6 months incarceration.
rd
3 Degree Felony (sex offense):
Original Hearing after 12 months incarceration.
rd
3 Degree Felony (non-sex offense):
Original Hearing after 3 months incarceration.
The Board will not deviate from this schedule of hearings except in extreme and rare
circumstances, such as those involving the health of the offender, which would prevent holding
the hearing as scheduled.

Q.
A.

How much time do inmates usually serve?
There is no “usual” amount of time an offender will serve. Each case is reviewed on an
individual basis. The Board will consider the following factors in setting the length of
sentence: the nature of the offense, prior criminal history, institutional progress, any mental
health or psychological evaluations, recommendations from the sentencing judge and
prosecutor, and letters from the victim, family and other interested parties.
The goals of the Board in setting a release date are: 1) determining an appropriate sentence for
the crime; 2) protecting the community and the victim from further harm or risk; and, 3)
encouraging the habilitative efforts of the offender. The decisions require careful weighing of
the information in determining what is best for all concerned.
The Board uses guidelines designed to assist them in making a decision. However, the Board is
not bound by these guidelines or any recommendations submitted to them in the process of
gathering information on the offender. Board decisions are final and cannot be appealed.

13

Q.
A.

Can I attend a Board of Pardon's hearing?
All Board of Pardons and Parole hearings are open to the public. Anyone may attend as long as
they are allowed on prison property. Current and former offenders may be denied access to
such a hearing, as well as anyone who cannot produce a valid ID or has outstanding warrants.
The news media is also allowed access to hearings of the Board.

Q.
A.

Can I speak on behalf of the inmate at the hearing?
No. The only individuals allowed to comment during a hearing are the offender and any
victim(s) of record. If you have information you feel the Board should consider, you may
submit such in written form to the Board prior to the hearing.

Q.
A.

Will I be permitted to visit with the inmate after the hearing?
Under specific circumstances, special visits may be granted. However, arrangements must be
made in advance of the hearing or it will be denied.

Q.
A.

How do I learn more about the Board of Pardons?
You may contact the Board of Pardons and Parole at (801)-261-6464 or write them at the
following address:
Board of Pardons
448 East 6400 South, Suite 300
Murray, UT 84107
Web address: www.bop.utah.gov.

DAILY ROUTINES
Q.
A.

What is a typical day for inmates?
Most level 3 and 4 inmates wake up between 6 and 7a.m. Inmates are expected to have their
cell clean, and their personal hygiene taken care of. Inmates are given an opportunity for
breakfast and then are expected to go to their work or schooling assignment.
Officers count the inmates between 11:00 a.m. and noon, and the inmates are offered lunch.
After lunch, inmates are expected to return to their work or schooling assignment. If inmates
do not have a work assignment, they will usually stay in their housing unit.
Officers count the inmates again between 4 and 5 p.m. and then the inmates are offered dinner.
In the evening, inmates are either locked in their cell based upon their privilege matrix level or
permitted opportunity for leisure, recreation or therapy. The latest the inmates are secured in
their cells is 10 p.m.

14

Q.
A.

What can inmates do in their free time for leisure activities?
Under specific conditions inmates have access to a variety of leisure time activities such as
gymnasium, outdoor recreational yard, library, and rental television.
The Prison's recreation department schedules a variety of recreational games, competitions and
tournaments. The recreational department also arranges different hobby craft classes. The
Prisons library system is part of the Utah State Library System. Inmates have access to most
books that are available to people outside of Prison.
Inmates can lease a portable television from the Prison at nominal cost. These televisions can
only be heard on a headset so other inmates are not bothered. Inmates can view movies at
specific times and days on their television set.

Q.
A.

Where can inmates work?
Inmates can work in their housing unit or facility, outside the perimeter fence or off Prison
property depending on their classification level. There are clerical, culinary, grounds,
janitorial, laundry, maintenance, manufacturing, and sewing, jobs available.

Q.
A.

What therapeutic opportunities are available?
The Prison's programming unit offers many therapeutic opportunities such as Alcoholics
Anonymous, Narcotics Anonymous, Substance Abuse Residential Therapy, and Sex Offender
Residential Therapy. Inmates have the responsibility to participate in substance abuse and/or
sex offender therapeutic groups, especially if it is part of their Case Action Plan. Their
participation is considered by the Prison for classification decisions, and by the Board of
Pardons and Parole when determining the inmate release date.

Q.
A.

What type of religious counseling is available at the Prison?
The religious needs of inmates at each facility are addressed through the Volunteer/Chaplain
services program. There are full and part-time chaplains who provide ministerial care to the
entire Prison community. They encourage inmates to stay in touch with their particular faith by
offering pastoral counsel and guidance. Some of the religious groups represented are
Episcopal, Presbyterian, Roman Catholic, Baptist, Jewish, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day
Saints, Jehovah's Witnesses, Islamic, Hindu, Buddhism, Native American, and others.
Religious volunteers provide all religious services. Religious and inspirational books are also
available to inmates throughout the Prison's library system.

15

TELEPHONES
Q.
A.

How often can an inmate call me?
While assigned to the R&O unit an inmate may call once a week either on Saturday or Sunday.
After the inmate moves to a different housing unit, it will depend upon the inmate's privilege
matrix. In some units an inmate may make a 15-minute call once a day.

Q.
A.

Is there a charge for the telephone calls?
Yes. Calls made on the inmate housing telephones are collect calls. The charge is placed on
your telephone bill. The telephone company regulates this charge. When you answer a
telephone call, a recorded message will tell you that the call is coming from the Prison and will
ask you if you will accept the charge. The message will explain to you how to accept the
charge.

Q.
A.

Are the telephone calls monitored?
Yes. Calls originating from the Prison are subject to being monitored and recorded. For this
reason, inmates are not allowed to have cell phones. When you accept a call, your consent is
implied.

Q.
A.

How can I get an inmate to call me?
The purpose of telephone calls is to supplement written correspondence (writing a letter). The
Prison staff does not accept telephone messages for inmates. (In case of emergencies, staff will
verify and evaluate the emergency first, before deciding whether to deliver the message.)
Inmates, while on the R&O unit, fill out a telephone request form to have your telephone
number approved. The form requests your name, address, telephone number and relationship
to the inmate. Your telephone number is cleared through a computer system for the inmate to
call you.

Q.
A.

Is there a way not to have an inmate call me?
You have three options:
1.
Have the telephone company put a voluntary block on your telephone line,
2.
Notify the Prison contractors that you want your telephone number blocked, or
3.
Do not accept the call.

Q.
A.

Is there V-Connect at the Prison?
To establish an account manually, contact VAC at the number below
1-800-786-8521 press 6 for a representative
Payments by mail should be sent to:
VAC - Dept. 2430
P.O. Box 122430
Dallas, TX 75312-2430-8517

16

VAC will accept one of the following payment methods
Master Card
Visa
Money order
Cashier's Check
The V-Connect Account funding minimum will be $25.00 and the maximum will be $100.00
for each V-CONNECT Account
Once an Inmate is released from custody, the owner of the V-CONNECT account will be
instructed to call a toll free number (1-800-786-8521) to receive a refund.
The V-CONNECT account funding minimum will be $50.00 and the maximum will be
$200.00 for each account. V-CONNECT accounts may only be funded once per day.

R&O UNIT
Q.
A.

What is the R&O Unit?
Inmates are housed in the R&O unit when they first enter the prison system. The purpose of
the R&O unit is to intake, orient, prepare the initial classification, and Case Action Plan (CAP)
for all incoming inmates. Inmates are photographed, fingerprinted, as part of the identification
process. Physical, Dental, and Mental Health examinations are conducted, and various tests are
administered to detect physical or mental health problems. Inmates receive an orientation
handbook that explains the rules of the Prison, the Inmate Code of Conduct, and the different
programs that are available. After the inmates' initial assessment, an appropriate housing
assignment is found.

Q.
A.

How long are inmates in the R&O process?
Inmates who are in Prison for the first time are assigned to the R&O unit for an average of 6-14
weeks. Inmates who have returned because of a parole violation may spend an average of 4-10
weeks. Inmates who have been in Prison before and returned because of a new charge may
spend an average of 8-16 weeks. After their initial assessment and CAP, inmates will wait for
an appropriate housing to become available.

Q.
A.

Why does it take so long for a new inmate?
Newly committed inmates need to go through an evaluation and assessment process in order to
be classified and assigned housing. Information is compiled from the Courts, County Jails, and
Adult Probation and Parole to complete the assessment.

Q.
A.

Why is everything taken away when entering the R&O Unit?
To ensure safety and security of the Prison, inmates are allowed only specific items. When
inmates enter an R&O unit any property and clothing are taken and inventoried. The property
is sent to a Prison's property unit and held for thirty days to be mailed out, picked up by friends
and family or donated to charity.

Q.
A.

Where does the inmate go after the R&O Unit?
Inmates are transferred to an appropriate facility based upon their classification.

17

INMATE CLASSIFICATION
Q.
A.

How are inmates classified?
Inmates are classified to place them in the proper housing unit and security level in an attempt
to provide safety for the community, staff, and other inmates. Inmates are initially classified in
the R&O unit. They are reviewed or reassessed for level changes at least once a year, or more
often according to their projected release date. There are five levels of classification. Most
inmates have a level 3 or 4 classification:

Classification
Maximum-security
Level 1 – Death row

Facilities
Uinta facilities
Highly structured and supervised environment; typically confined
to cell 23 hours a day; restrained in the presence of non-inmates.

Level 2 - Close custody

Typically confined to cell 21 hours a day; must be escorted by an
officer when leaving the unit; restrained in the presence of noninmates.

Medium security
Level 3 - Inside compound

All facilities except Uinta and Lone Peak.
Must remain inside a perimeter fence.

Level 4 - On property

Must stay on Prison property but may go outside the fence on
supervised work details. Need a parole date to reach this level.

Minimum-security
Level 5 - Off property

Medium security facilities, Lone Peak, and Promontory
May, with approval, leave Prison property (off-property Utah
Correctional Industries (UCI) work detail, etc.)

1.
2.
3.

Officers also classify male inmates based on their personality type, which is determined by a
combination of past records (behavior), observation, and the inmate's offense. Three categories
are used:
Kappa - assertive and sometimes aggressive,
Omega - not usually the aggressor or the victim, and
Sigma - more passive and easygoing
Inmates are housed based on the total score of their classification, and housed accordingly.
Inmates with the same personality type are housed together. Kappa and Sigma inmates are not
housed together. However, some exceptions may be made for programming.

Q.
A.

What if an inmate disagrees with his/her classification?
Inmates may challenge a classification decision by completing a classification challenge form
and submitting it to the Classification Review Officer (CRO). A challenge must be based on
one or more of the following: 1) decision was based on insufficient or incorrect information,
2) procedures were not properly followed, or 3) the move to a less-secure classification
jeopardizes the inmate’s safety or security. The Classification Review Officer’s decision is
final.

18

PRIVILEGE MATRIX/O.M.R.
Q.
A.

What is the privilege matrix?
The privilege matrix system is a tool whereby inmates can be allowed to demonstrate their
ability to govern their behavior in a progressively responsible manner. Privilege levels are
progressively more permissive allowing the inmate to have more privileges. The privilege
matrix allows for positive reinforcement of manageable inmates by housing unit staff and
OMR.

Q.
A.

Who reviews the inmate's privileges?
Each facility has an Offender Management Review (OMR) team who meet to look at the
inmate's Prison accomplishments, and/or failures. The inmates and the OMR discuss issues of
CAP compliance, noncompliance, education, mental health, prison work, abuse of leisure time,
security, management/behavior issues, classification reassessments and privilege levels.

Q.
A.

What constitutes a privilege?
Privileges include everything from the number of visits and phone calls inmates can have; to
how much out-of-cell time or yard time is allowed; to what time they are locked up each night;
to how much money they can spend in the commissary; to what type of job they can have; to
how they access education, programming, and religious volunteers; to finally, where they eat
their meals.

VICTIM RESTITUTION
Q.
A.

Is the inmate responsible to pay victim restitution?
Inmates need to understand that if they have a victim restitution obligation they need to pay the
obligation as soon as possible. Failure to quickly pay the obligation will cause it to grow
beyond the original amount because of the interest rate attached to the obligation. Overtime,
the interest will exceed the original amount if no payments are made.
If an inmate has more than one victim restitution obligation, it is possible to have a different
interest rate attached to each restitution. Prompt payments would reduce the amounts owed
while non-payments would cause the obligations to increase.
Generally, inmates pay victim restitution voluntarily while at the prison due to their limited
funds. When they are released on parole the obligation becomes part of the parole agreement
and is no longer voluntary. To keep this obligation manageable it is recommended that inmates
make voluntary payments while at the prison.

GRIEVANCE / DISCIPLINARY
Q.
A.

How does an inmate file a complaint?
An inmate may file a complaint through the Prison's grievance process. This process allows the
inmate to make an allegation of personal injury, loss or harm caused by the application or
19

omission of a policy or practice by a staff member, inmate action, or incident.
Administration's intent is to resolve grievances at the lowest possible Administrative level.
Inmates cannot grieve Board of Pardons and Parole procedures or decisions, disciplinary
decisions, or classification decisions. There are other methods to challenge or appeal these
decisions.
Q.
A.

What happens to an inmate who causes problems at the Prison?
Discipline and classification procedures are maintained to reasonably ensure the safety of
inmates, staff and visitors/public. An inmate's expected conduct is spelled out in a document
called the Inmate Code of Conduct. This "Code" is a list of do's and don'ts for the inmates
while incarcerated. When inmates violate this code of conduct, an officer may issue a violation
report or a disciplinary report. A hearing is conducted by an independent Inmate Disciplinary
Hearing Officer (IDHO) who, while providing the inmate due process, hears the allegation and
decides whether the inmate is guilty or not. If the decision is guilty, the Inmate IDHO will
dispense an appropriate sanction.
Sanctions may include a verbal reprimand, fines/restitution, additional cell confinement, or
privilege restrictions. Inmates who have excessive disciplinaries may have their classification
level and/or privilege matrix lowered.
Another option is for the officer to make a referral to the inmate's OMR team to review the
inmate’s behavior.

INMATE PLACEMENT PROGRAM (IPP)
Q.
A.

What is the Inmate Placement Program?
Because of the limited bed space at the Prisons, the Department of Corrections has contracted
with County jails to house State inmates. Currently about 1400 State male and female inmates
are housed in County jails throughout the State. Counties provide much of the same
programming offered at the prison, and give the inmate an opportunity to be closer to family
resources.
The Inmate Placement Program also houses a limited number of inmates in other State
facilities, private correctional facilities, and Federal correctional facilities.

Q.
A.

Whose rules do the inmates in the Inmate Placement Program follow?
Inmates are subject to the policies and procedures, telephone, commissary, visiting privileges,
grievance, and disciplinary processes of the contract facility where they are housed.

Q.
A.

Who do the inmates talk to if they have a problem?
Inmates should discuss their day-to-day problems concerning incarceration with their housing
unit officers at their current location.
IPP staff will see the inmate for an initial orientation within 30 days of them arriving at the
facility, and are at the county jails routinely to meet with inmates who have various issues or
questions.
20

Q.
A.

If an inmate is a citizen of another country can they serve their Prison time there?
According to State and Federal law an inmate can apply to serve his Prison time in his/her
native country. However, there are statutory restrictions. The process is lengthy and the
requested country must belong to the treaty convention before an application can be made. The
inmate may see a list of participating countries and obtain an application from his/her
caseworker.

Q.
A.

How does an inmate apply to go to a county jail?
In R&O the inmate is screened for eligibility by the unit Captain. Once moved to main
population the inmate must speak with his caseworker about a referral. Writing to IPP will not
get you a referral.
Family may contact IPP at the following address and phone number.
Inmate Placement Program
14717 S. Minuteman Drive
Draper, UT 84020
801-545-5558
Family/Friends with inmates housed in county jails may contact the facility for specific
information or for questions related to the operations of that specific facility. Contact
information with all County Jails in Utah is provided on the Utah Sheriff’s Association website
at:
www. Utahsheriffs.org.

PROGRAMMING
Q.
A.

What is an Case Action Plan(CAP)?
Based on various assessments that are conducted in Receiving & Orientation a Case Action
Plan (referred to as CAP) is formulated for offenders to follow during their incarceration.

Q.
A.

Are there educational services at the Prison?
South Park Academy of the Canyons School District (Draper Site) and Central Utah Academy
of the South Sanpete School District (CUCF site) provide educational opportunities for
offenders. Each offender is screened and tested when they first enter prison to determine their
individual educational needs. Offenders are mapped into the appropriate educational tracks
where they can make the most educational gains and increase their skills during their
incarceration. Most of the county jails which the Dept. contracts with offer High School
Diplomas or GEDs.
Literacy: The Literacy program provides offenders with an opportunity to improve reading
skills, reading comprehension, and math skills.
GED.: Offenders that do not have enough time to earn a high school diploma while
incarcerated are encouraged to participate in the GED program.
High School: South Park Academy and Central Utah Academy use an "open enrollment" and
21

offenders may enter the school program at anytime. Students work specifically on the credits
they need to earn their high school diploma.

22

Vocational Technical Programs: Davis Applied Technology College (DATC) offers a variety
of vocational programs for both male & female offenders housed at the Draper Site prison.
DATC courses offered include Automotive Technology, Maintenance Technician, Business
Technology, Machine Tool Technology, and Culinary Arts. These programs culminate with
the student receiving Certificates of Skill Competency or Program Completion. Inmates
incarcerated at Duchesne or Washington County Jails may apply for certificate level residential
construction programs. These programs are offered by Uinta Basin Applied Technology
College (UBATC) and Dixie Applied Technology College (DXATC). At the Gunnison Site,
Snow College offers a Residential Building Construction program as well as a Culinary Arts
program. These programs culminate with the student receiving Certificates of Program
Completion.
Registration & Information:
For more information on the programs listed above and registration requirements write or call
the following offices:
Central Utah Academy Office: 435-528-6240
South Park Academy Oquirrh Office: 801-576-7275
South Park Academy Promontory Office: 801-576-8252
South Park Academy Timpanogos Office: 801-576-7978
South Park Academy Uinta Office: 801-576-7319
South Park Academy Wasatch Office: 801-576-7067
Davis Applied Technology College Draper Office: 801-576-7038
Uinta Basin Applied Technology College Duchesne Office: 435-722-4523
Snow College Building Construction: 435-528-6006
Snow College Culinary Arts: 435-528-6222
Q.
A.

Is there job placement and assistance?
Most inmates that are capable of working will be asked to do so while incarcerated. The job can
be either a volunteer or paid position. This is not program related, but it helps keep offender
busy and productive. The Programming Department also provides a Work Force Services
Workshop to offenders prior to parole to assist them in preparing for interviews & finding jobs
upon release.

Q.
A.

What about life skills services and cognitive training?
The Draper Facility offers offenders numerous life skills classes and programs to help promote
growth and the skills necessary to promote personal change. Some of the classes offered are
Thinking for a Change, Thinking Errors, Anger Management, Impact of Crime, Parenting,
Interpersonal Communication, Financial Literacy, and Computer Literacy.
Registration & Information:
For more information on the programs listed above and registration requirements write the
Education specialists at the appropriate facility or call them at 576- 7812.

Q.
A.

Are there spiritual development programs?
Offenders at the Draper and Gunnison Sites, Utah State Prison, represent more than two-dozen
different religions, including most varieties of Christian denominations and Pagan, Hindu,
Islam, Wicca and so forth. In order to meet each offender's religious educational and spiritual
23

needs, a variety of activities, programs, and services are provided. Chaplains provide offenders
with ecclesiastical counseling and non-denominational services. Programs available for
offender participation are worship services; scripture study courses, religious educational
courses, choir, prayer services, religious-based addiction recovery groups, (LDS) Family Home
Evening groups, (LDS) Family History Center, (Native American) Sweat Lodge and Pipe
ceremonies, In-cell Study courses and Sidda Yoga Meditation. Inmates, in particular inmates
in Reception and Orientation, may request a variety of religious materials including: Bibles
(many different editions), copies of the Book of Mormon, religious commentaries, and
inspirational materials.
Contact Information:
For more information on Religious Programs call or write Draper Site:
Religious & Volunteer Services Office – Timpanogos Facility: 576-7817, 576-7820, or 5767823
Oquirrh Chapel – Chaplain’s Office: - 801-576-7276
Timpanogos Chapel – Chaplain’s Office: - 801-576-7806
Uinta Chaplain’s Office - 801-576-7313
For more information on Religious Programs call or write Gunnison Site:
Boulder Volunteer Services Office: - 435-528-6333
Henry Volunteer Services Office: - 435-528-6222
Q.
A.

Do the inmates have access to library services?
The mission of the Draper and Gunnison Site Libraries is to provide high quality library
services and materials for an underserved population of incarcerated individuals. Library
services to the inmate population are provided according to their classification and privilege
level, as well as their housing assignment. The libraries in each of the facilities attempt to
function as small public libraries. Reading materials available in the libraries range from wide
interest level with low vocabulary skills to college level and technical books.

Q.
A.

Do inmates have recreational activities?
The Recreation Unit provides both unstructured recreational activities, and structured activities
such as classes, tournaments, leagues, and special events. Depending upon the facility, inmates
have access to softball, basketball, handball, tennis, racquetball, weight training equipment,
cardiovascular training equipment, table tennis, billiards, speed bag, heavy bag, volleyball,
horse shoes, and various games and puzzles. Inmates also have use of their yards for walking
and jogging.

CONCLUSION
Web address: www.corrections.utah.gov.
We hope that this guidebook is useful for you and has answered any questions that you have
about the Prison system. We hope that this guide will also show you what happens to an
inmate while in Prison.

24

APPENDIX A - County Jail Addresses and Telephone Numbers
Beaver County Jail
P.O. Box 391
2270 South 525 West
Beaver, UT 84713
(435) 438-6467
Box Elder County Jail
P.O. Box 888
50 South 1000 West
Brigham City, UT 84302
(435) 734-3838
Cache County Jail
1225 W. Valley View Ste 100
Logan, UT 84321
(435) 755-1005
Carbon County Jail
240 West Main
Price, UT 84501
(435) 637-1621
Daggett County Jail
P.O. Box 579
2350 W. Highway 43
Manila, UT 84046
(435) 784-3518
Davis County Jail
P.O. Box 130
800 West State Street
Farmington, UT 84025
(801) 451-4208
Duchesne County Jail
P.O. Box 10
21554 West 9000 South
Duchesne, UT 84021
(435) 738-1104

Moab, UT 84532
(435) 259-4321
Iron County Jail
2136 North Main
Cedar City, UT 84721
(435) 867-7557
Juab County Jail
425 West Sheeplane Drive
Nephi, UT 84648
(435) 623-1349
Kane County Jail
76 North Main
Kanab, UT 84741
(435) 644-4919
Millard County Jail
765 South Highway 99
Fillmore, UT 84631
(435) 743-5585
San Juan County Jail
P.O. Box 788
297 South Main
Monticello, UT 84535
(435) 587-2237
Sanpete County Jail
1500 South Highway 89
P.O. Box 130
Manti, UT 84642
(435) 835-2195
Sevier County Jail
835 East 300 North
Suite 300
Richfield, UT 84701
(435) 896-2660

Garfield County Jail
P.O. Box 370
45 South Main
Panguitch, UT 84759
(435) 676-2678

Summit County Jail
6300 N. Silver Creek Dr. #5
Park City, UT 84098
(435) 615-3723

Grand County Jail
125 East Center

Uintah County Jail
641 East 300 South
Vernal, UT 84078
(435) 781-5424

25

Wasatch County Jail
1361 So Highway 40
Heber City, UT 84032
(435) 657-1619
Washington County Jail
750 South 5400 West
Hurricane, UT 84737
(435)-656-6600
Weber County Jail
P.O. Box 14000
721 West 12th Street
Ogden, UT 84404
(801) 778-6700
Kiesel Facility
2546 Kiesel Ave
Ogden, UT 84404
(801) 399-8427

APPENDIX B - Visitor Rules and Regulations
Utah State Prison
VISITOR RULES AND REGULATIONS
The Visitor has the responsibility of reading visiting rules, which are available on the UDC web page
or through the visiting department. Not all the rules for visiting are listed below. There may be area's
that have additional rules and procedures.
Visiting Regulations:
*
Visitation is a privilege, not a right, afforded to inmates/visitors under the jurisdiction of the
UDC.
*
Visitors shall comply with all UDC rules, policy and procedures.
*
Visitors are subject to search of their person, personal belongings, or vehicle upon entering all
DIO facilities. Visitation may be denied for failure to submit to a search request.
*
Illegal and nuisance contraband is strictly prohibited.
*
Falsification of any visiting forms may result in a visiting suspension.
*
Visitors who have questions regarding the rules, regulations and procedures are responsible to
ask visiting staff questions in order to thoroughly understand them.
*
Visitors not in compliance with visiting rules shall be warned and/or required to leave the
visiting area.
*
Visiting rules apply without exception to all Utah Correctional facilities. In addition, due to the
security problems unique to maximum-security facilities and off property medical locations,
further and more specific visiting procedures apply in those areas.
*
All adult visitors shall submit a renewal form annually. If it's been identified by visiting staff
that a visitor has exceeded the 12 months without submitting a renewal form, the visiting staff
shall notify the inmate or visitor. If visiting staff has not received a renewal form within 30
days, they shall remove the visitor from the inmate’s visiting list.
*
All minor visitors will be automatically removed from an inmate’s visiting list, without
notification, on the minor’s 18th birthday. It is the responsibility of the inmate to submit an
adult application, prior to the minor’s 18th birthday.
*
All visits will be conducted in English.
General Visitor Rules:
*
Visitors shall access only those areas specifically designated as visiting areas.
*
Visitors and inmates should remain seated during their visit at all times, and they should remain
three feet or more from any wall or door in the visiting area.
*
The inmate and visitor shall conduct themselves in a quiet, responsible manner.
*
Visitors shall leave promptly when the visit is over.
*
Visitors shall not be permitted to leave and re-enter the visiting area during a visit.
*
Visitors restroom facilities shall be off-limits to inmates.
*
Visitors are not permitted access to inmate restroom facilities.
*
Children shall not be allowed to use restrooms without supervision by the visiting parent or
other approved adult.
*
Any visitor found in possession of nuisance or illegal contraband may have their visiting
privileges suspended, restricted or revoked and their name removed from the inmate’s visiting
list pending a review. Visitors with illegal contraband shall be referred to the Shift
Commander, for criminal prosecution.
*
Visitors with babies shall bring no more than one transparent baby bottle and no more than two
diapers into the visiting area, no sippy cups allowed.
26

*
*
*
*
*
*
*

Sanitation problems caused by children shall be taken care of immediately by the visitor.
Tobacco products, matches, and lighters are prohibited in the visiting areas.
Food items (gum, candy, etc.) from outside the prison shall not be allowed.
Visitors shall not be permitted to bring pets or other animals onto prison property. Seeing-eye
dogs are permitted.
Visitors shall not be permitted to bring cameras or audio/video recording devices, cell phones
or pagers into the visiting area.
Visitors shall visit with only the inmate they are approved to visit; inmates and visitors shall not
visit with other visitors or other inmates during their visiting time.
Those visitors who have approval to be on more than one inmate’s visiting list, shall only visit
with one inmate per visiting session. The Warden/designee shall make exceptions in writing,
on a case-by-case basis.

Visitor Conduct:
*
Sexual conduct between inmates and visitors such as petting, fondling, prolonged kissing or
bodily contact is prohibited.
*
Any visitor/inmate who displays inappropriate or abusive behavior, foul and/or abusive
language, or refuses to comply with UDC rules, policies or procedures, shall be denied entry
into the visiting room or, if already in the visiting room, shall be required to leave the visiting
area immediately.
*
Any visitor who exhibits characteristics that would indicate that they might be under the
influence of drugs or intoxicants shall be detained and the matter referred to the Shift
Commander.
*
Inmates and the escorting adult visitor are responsible for the behavior of visiting children.
Visitor Dress Standard:
*
All attire must be conservative to enhance a family atmosphere.
*
All visitors shall adhere to the following visitor dress standard:
+
visitors must be fully clothed;
+
visitors must wear shoes or sandals;
+
dresses and/or skirts, including slits in the garments, shall cover the kneecap when
standing.
+
Capri's are allowed but they are defined as mid calf in length.
+
buttons and zippers must remain fastened; and
+
adults and physically mature minor female visitors must wear a bra and undergarments.
*
The following types of clothing shall not be allowed:
+
any clothing, which resembles inmate-issued clothing;
+
camouflage-patterned items (i.e. military-type clothing or military fatigues);
+
transparent, sheer clothing;
+
shorts and culottes
+
dresses and skirts that have slits that expose the knee when standing;
+
open weave sweaters or blouses (i.e. lace);
+
medical clothing (i.e. scrubs);
+
strapless, tube tops, halter, low cut/backless, spaghetti straps or tops that expose the
midriff; sleeveless tops/dresses, tank tops that expose the chest, shoulder and back.
Wrap-around dresses/shirts;
+
layered clothing;
+
tight fitting clothing, i.e. spandex,
+
attire displaying obscene/offensive, derogatory language or drawings;
27

+
+
+
+

+

+
+

attire displaying gang association/gang-related depiction; and/or
hats, hoods, caps, shawls, or scarves.
Children under the age of ten may wear shorts and/or sleeveless shirts.
All visitors must clear the metal detector. Visitors with implanted devices, which
trigger the metal detector, must indicate its specific location in the body. These visitors
shall provide documentation for the implanted device(s). These visitors may be asked
to submit to a clothed pat search prior to the beginning of each visit.
Personal property such as purses, wallets, paper money, coats, sweaters (used as an
outer garment), blankets, writing paper, writing instruments, pictures, letters, etc are not
permitted in the visiting area.
Visitors may not be permitted to bring in more than two keys (vehicle keys only). The
keys should be on a small key ring.
The Department shall not be responsible for the loss of personal items brought on UDC
property.

Processing Visitors Entering Visiting Area:
*
Visitors 16 years of age and older shall present a governmental issued identification prior to
being permitted to visit.
*
Visitors shall be screened with a metal detector, and must clear the metal detector, prior to
visiting.
*
Visitors are subject to a search (i.e. ionizer, property, vehicle search) upon entering the prison
and/or visiting area. Visitations may be denied access for failure to submit to a search request.
Visitors may refuse a search at any time, but shall immediately leave the Prison and shall not be
allowed to visit.
*
Visitor access should not be permitted during any scheduled visiting session if less than 30
minutes remain in the visiting session.
*
A maximum number of five visitors, including minors, will be allowed to visit an inmate per
visiting session.
General Visiting Times and Duration:
*
Visiting times shall be scheduled, and posted in advance.
*
Visitors shall not exceed two hours per visit per day.
*
Level I and Level II inmates shall not exceed one and one-half hours per visit.
*
The Inmate’s Privilege Matrix Level shall determine the number of visits allowed per
week/month.
*
Exceptions shall be evaluated on a case-by-case basis.
Level I and Level II Inmate Visiting:
*
All visits shall be barrier.
*
Inmates and visitors shall remain seated on the chairs/benches provided during visits.
*
Additional rules unique for maximum security include:
+
Visitors shall present themselves to the VDS (Vehicle direction Station) officer for
clearance to the Uinta facility
+
Visitors may store personal items in the lockers provided.

28

APPENDIX C - Visiting Dress Code
Visitor Dress Standard:
*
All attire must be conservative to enhance a family atmosphere.
*
All visitors shall adhere to the following visitor dress standard:
+
visitors must be fully clothed;
+
visitors must wear shoes or sandals;
+
dresses and/or skirts, including slits in the garments, shall cover the kneecap when
standing.
+
Capri's are allowed but they are defined as mid calf in length.
+
buttons and zippers must remain fastened; and
+
adults and physically mature minor female visitors must wear a bra and undergarments.
*
The following types of clothing shall not be allowed:
+
any clothing, which resembles inmate-issued clothing;
+
camouflage-patterned items (i.e. military-type clothing or military fatigues);
+
transparent, sheer clothing;
+
shorts and culottes
+
dresses and skirts that have slits that expose the knee when standing;
+
open weave sweaters or blouses (i.e. lace);
+
medical clothing (i.e. scrubs);
+
strapless, tube tops, halter, low cut/backless, spaghetti straps or tops that expose the
midriff; sleeveless tops/dresses, tank tops that expose the chest, shoulder and back.
Wrap-around dresses/shirts;
+
layered clothing;
+
tight fitting clothing, i.e. spandex,
+
attire displaying obscene/offensive, derogatory language or drawings;
+
attire displaying gang association/gang-related depiction; and/or
+
hats, hoods, caps, shawls, or scarves.
+
Children under the age of ten may wear shorts and/or sleeveless shirts.
+
All visitors must clear the metal detector. Visitors with implanted devices, which
trigger the metal detector, must indicate its specific location in the body. These visitors
shall provide documentation for the implanted device(s). These visitors may be asked
to submit to a clothed pat search prior to the beginning of each visit.
+
Personal property such as purses, wallets, paper money, coats, sweaters (used as an
outer garment), blankets, writing paper, writing instruments, pictures, letters, etc are not
permitted in the visiting area.
+
Coins for vending machines should be contained in a clear plastic coin purse or clear
zip lock bag.
+
Visitors may not be permitted to bring in more than two keys (vehicle keys only). The
keys should be on a small key ring.
+
The Department shall not be responsible for the loss of personal items brought on UDC
property.
NOTE: Please do not bring any of the above items into the institution, as the officers in visiting are not
responsible for any items.

29

APPENDIX D - Sample Visitor's Consent Form

VISITOR CONSENT FORM
FOR ALL ADULT VISITORS
Each question must be answered or the visitor will be DENIED visiting.

Inmates LAST Name

Inmates FIRST Name

USP#

1. Are you a current employee of the Utah Department of Corrections?

Yes

No

2. Are you an ex-employee of the Utah Department of Corrections?

Yes

No

3. Are you currently a volunteer, contractor, or student intern for the Utah
Department of Corrections?

Yes

No

4. Are you an ex-volunteer, ex-contractor, or ex-student intern for the Utah
Department of Corrections?

Yes

No

5. Are you a victim of the inmate you are approved to visit?

Yes

No

6. Are any of your children a victim of the inmate?

Yes

No

7. Are any of the children you may escort to visiting a victim of the inmate?

Yes

No

* I,

have read and understand the visiting
Visitors Printed Name

rules and regulations and I agree to comply with them.

Visitors Signature

Date

***FALSIFICATION OF ANY INFORMATION SHALL BE GROUNDS FOR DENIAL***

30

 

 

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