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Jail Media County Jail Survival Guide

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County
Jail




A
survival
guide
for
inmates,


friends
and
families





Provided
free
of
charge
by:

Jail
Media

jailmedia.com



Help
people
by
sharing
your
experience:

Jail
|
jailmedia.com/inmate‐interview

Rehab
Review
|
rehabio.com/interview

Attorney
Review
|
attornio.com/interview
















Introduction .............................................................................................................................. 4

Background
Information ...................................................................................................... 4

Jail
vs.
Prison ......................................................................................................................................4

Felony
vs.
Misdemeanor .................................................................................................................5

Hiring
an
attorney ............................................................................................................................6

Bail
versus
Bond................................................................................................................................7

The
First
Time .......................................................................................................................... 8

Preparing
for
jail ..................................................................................................................... 8

Classification............................................................................................................................. 9

Things
to
Avoid
Doing
and
Saying ...................................................................................10

Sexual
Offenses ............................................................................................................................................. 10

Violent
Offenses ............................................................................................................................................ 10

DUI...................................................................................................................................................................... 11

Drugs ................................................................................................................................................................. 11

Words
to
avoid
saying
in
county
jail........................................................................................ 11

Don’t
snitch
on
anybody .............................................................................................................. 11

Passing
the
Time....................................................................................................................12

Working
out ..................................................................................................................................... 12

Gambling ........................................................................................................................................... 12

Reading.............................................................................................................................................. 13

Working............................................................................................................................................. 13

Eating ................................................................................................................................................. 15

Time
off
for
Good
Behavior................................................................................................16

Violence ....................................................................................................................................17

Rehab/Detox ...........................................................................................................................17

Preparing
for
jail
with
an
addiction ........................................................................................ 17

Disclosure ......................................................................................................................................... 18

Drugs
in
jail ...................................................................................................................................... 18

Visiting ......................................................................................................................................19

Who
can
visit? ................................................................................................................................. 19

When
can
people
visit?................................................................................................................. 19

What
is
the
visiting
area
like?.................................................................................................... 20

Education
in
Jail .....................................................................................................................20

Becoming
a
trustee ...............................................................................................................20

Hygiene .....................................................................................................................................21


Showering......................................................................................................................................... 21

Going
to
the
bathroom.................................................................................................................. 21


Telephone
Calls......................................................................................................................21

Money
in
Jail............................................................................................................................22

Indigent
inmates ............................................................................................................................ 22

Wealthy
inmates............................................................................................................................. 23

Cash..................................................................................................................................................... 23

Random
Inspections.............................................................................................................23

Clothing
in
jail.........................................................................................................................23

Receiving
Mail ........................................................................................................................24

Church .......................................................................................................................................24

Release
day..............................................................................................................................25

Life
after
jail ............................................................................................................................25

Moving
on ......................................................................................................................................... 25

Finding
a
job .................................................................................................................................... 25

Probation .......................................................................................................................................... 26

Community
Service........................................................................................................................ 26

Conclusion................................................................................................................................27





























































Introduction

Going
to
jail
isn’t
fun
for
anybody
–
the
person
going,
the
family
and
friends
who
are

left
behind,
the
taxpayers.
This
guide
is
meant
to
share
information
that
will
prepare

everybody
for
the
realities
of
life
behind
bars.

Jail
Media
been
criticized
by
some
for
sharing
this
information
–
some
people
think

that
this
means
that
we
condone
criminal
activity
or
think
that
the
American
penal

system
is
too
harsh.
In
fact,
we
believe
that
most
people
who
go
to
jail
deserve
to
be

there
(at
least
for
some
period
of
time).
We
share
this
information
in
the
hopes
that

it
will
take
some
stress
out
of
the
lives
of
friends
and
families
left
behind
–
the

people
we
commonly
refer
to
as
“secondary
victims.”
In
most
cases
these
people

haven’t
done
anything
wrong
and
don’t
deserve
the
pain
that
comes
with

temporarily
losing
a
loved
one.

First‐time
inmates
who
don’t
know
how
to
act
in
jail
can
get
in
trouble
by
doing
or

saying
the
wrong
thing.
This
creates
problems
for
the
inmate,
the
other
inmates
and

the
guards
–
everybody
loses.
Coming
into
jail
with
a
little
bit
of
context
will
help

you
avoid
making
a
few
crucial
mistakes
and
pass
the
time
a
little
bit
faster.

Jail
is
not
just
about
punishment
–
when
the
legal
system
is
working
properly,
it
is

about
rehabilitation
and
prevention.
We
have
interviewed
hundreds
of
ex‐inmates
–

many
have
left
jail
as
better
people
than
they
entered.
At
any
given
time
10%
of
the

US
population
is
either
incarcerated
or
on
probation
–
many
people
still
go
on
to

lead
normal,
productive,
happy
lives.
Just
because
you
or
a
loved
one
may
be
going

to
jail
does
not
mean
that
life
will
never
be
the
same
–
in
fact,
if
you
take
advantage

of
this
opportunity
you
may
grow
from
it
and
be
a
stronger
person.

Our
estimates
show
that
about
85%
of
inmates
are
repeat
offenders
–
that
means

that
15%
of
all
inmates
at
any
given
time
have
not
been
incarcerated
before
and
will

not
be
again.
Almost
all
of
the
85%
repeat
offenders
suffer
from
an
addiction
or

mental
illness.
Inmates
without
a
substance
abuse
problem
or
mental
illness
have
a

very
good
chance
of
not
returning
to
jail.


Background
Information

Jail
vs.
Prison

Most
people
do
not
know
the
difference
between
going
to
jail
and
going
to
prison.

The
media
is
partially
to
blame
–
celebrities
going
off
for
a
stint
in
the
county
jail
are

treated
as
if
they
are
doing
hard
time
in
a
state
penitentiary.


The
truth,
though,
is
that
jail
is
much
different
from
prison.
Jail
is
kind
of
like
a

government‐imposed
timeout.
Many
people
go
through
the
county
jail
system
and

get
their
lives
together
and
move
on
–
unfortunately
the
same
cannot
be
said
about

most
inmates
in
the
prison
system.

You
will
seldom
find
inmates
who
spend
more
than
a
year
in
a
county
jail.
For

instance,
if
somebody
is
sentenced
to
2
counts
of
disorderly
conduct
with
a

maximum
penalty
of
one
year
each,
these
sentences
are
usually
served
concurrently

as
opposed
to
consecutively
meaning
that
they
will
only
serve
one
year
total
(like

they
are
serving
both
sentences
at
the
same
time).
Prison
inmates
are
usually

serving
much
longer
sentences
–
sometimes
even
life
sentences.

A
lot
of
people
who
have
family
members
or
friends
going
to
jail
worry
about
them

being
“institutionalized,”
or
co‐dependent
on
the
state
–
becoming
so
dependent

that
they
are
completely
unable
to
take
care
of
themselves
upon
release.
While
this

does
happen
in
rare
cases,
it
usually
applies
to
habitual
offenders
who
have
been
to

jail
and/or
prison
many
times.
Again,
this
is
very
rare
and
should
not
be
a
concern

with
a
first
time
inmate.
With
a
strong
support
group
virtually
all
first‐time
inmates

can
be
rehabilitated.


Felony
vs.
Misdemeanor

In
general,
felonies
are
more
serious
than
misdemeanors.
Just
because
you
are

convicted
of
a
felony,
however,
does
not
always
mean
that
you
will
go
to
prison.

Many
judges
will
choose
to
send
felons
to
county
jail
if
they
feel
that
a
shorter
stay
is

more
appropriate.

Laws
vary
by
state
but
most
misdemeanors
carry
maximum
sentences
of
three,
six

or
twelve
months.
They
are
usually
also
classified
by
a
grading
system
(Class
A,
B,
C,

etc.)
depending
on
the
severity.
A
Class
A
misdemeanor
is
more
serious
and
carries

a
greater
penalty
than
a
class
B
misdemeanor.

In
general,
most
misdemeanors
can
be
expunged
from
your
record
eventually
–

completely
removed
as
if
the
crime
never
occurred.
There
are
some
exceptions

(many
states
do
not
allow
sex
crimes
involving
minors
to
ever
be
expunged).
Be

sure
to
discuss
the
long‐term
implication
of
your
conviction
before
agreeing
to
a

plea
bargain.

It
is
important
that
you
find
a
competent
attorney
if
you
have
been
charged
with
a

crime.
Just
because
you
have
been
charged
with
several
felonies
does
not
mean
you

will
be
convicted
of
felonies
–
a
good
attorney
may
be
able
to
negotiate
these
down

to
misdemeanors
in
a
plea
bargain
or
even
have
the
charges
dropped.
Prosecutors

are
known
to
“over‐charge”
suspects
in
order
to
strengthen
their
arm
in

negotiations
during
bargaining.


Hiring
an
attorney

Whether
you
have
been
charged
with
a
crime
but
not
convicted,
convicted
but
not

sentenced
or
even
already
sentenced,
you
should
consider
talking
to
a
good
attorney

about
your
case.

Many
people
assume
that
if
they
quality
for
a
public
defender
they
should
just
take

one
because
they
will
save
some
money.
This
is
one
of
the
worst
mistakes
you
can

make
–
in
the
long
run
you
will
generally
pay
much
more
than
you
would
pay
a
very

good
attorney
up
front
(in
terms
of
lost
wages
while
you
are
in
jail,
job
prospects

upon
your
release,
etc.).

There
is
nothing
wrong
with
public
defenders
per
se
–
in
fact,
they
are
the
attorneys

who
will
generally
end
up
commanding
premium
prices
for
high
profile
criminal

defense
cases
later
in
life.
The
real
problem
with
having
a
public
defender
represent

you
or
somebody
you
care
about
is
their
incentive
(or
lack
thereof).

Being
a
public
defender
is
not
a
glamorous
job
–
the
people
you
represent
don’t

think
you
try
hard
enough,
the
prosecutors
think
you
try
too
hard
and
the
judges

assume
that
all
of
your
clients
are
guilty.
If
you
really
try
to
fight
to
keep
somebody

out
of
jail
you
create
problems
with
your
coworkers
–
the
prosecutors.
In
fact,
as
a

public
defender
the
only
people
you
work
with
on
a
regular
basis
are
the

prosecutors,
so
they
naturally
become
your
friends.

Also,
there
is
no
financial
incentive
for
a
public
defender
to
keep
you
out
of
jail
or

minimize
your
sentence
–
whether
you
serve
one
month
or
twelve
does
not
make
a

difference
to
the
public
defender.
They
typically
have
huge
backlogs
of
cases
and
the

goal
is
to
get
through
the
list
as
quickly
as
possible
without
making
too
many

enemies
along
the
way.

Private
defense
attorneys
are
different.
They
can
charge
absurd
prices
for
legal

work
based
on
their
reputation
and
ability
to
make
sure
their
clients
are

aggressively
defended.
They
live
and
die
by
their
track
record
–
they
know
that
if

they
have
a
string
of
convictions
or
heavy
sentences
they
will
lose
credibility,
future

business
and
their
hourly
rates.

A
good
defense
attorney
can
easily
make
a
few
hundred
thousand
dollars
per
year

with
their
good
reputation.
They
take
this
very
seriously
and
when
they
take
you
on

as
a
client
they
know
they
have
to
deliver.

Don’t
assume,
however,
that
all
attorneys
have
the
same
skills
and
will
be
able
to

represent
you
adequately.
Try
to
get
referrals
from
friends
who
have
been
in
similar

circumstances,
talk
to
other
defense
attorneys
(they
are
a
tight
bunch,
you
usually

won’t
find
them
bad
mouthing
each
other
but
will
probably
be
able
to
get
some

indicators
from
them),
negotiate
with
the
attorney
–
get
the
best
possible

representation
you
can
at
the
best
price.


Also,
it
is
important
to
find
out
an
attorney’s
specialty.
If
you
have
been
convicted
of

a
DUI
you
want
an
attorney
who
spends
a
lot
of
time
fighting
DUI’s.
This
is
obvious,

but
often
overlooked
–
just
because
your
cousin
happens
to
be
a
criminal
defense

attorney
does
not
mean
that
he
is
the
best
fit
for
your
case.
Having
a
good
attorney

can
mean
the
difference
between
a
plea
in
abeyance
and
a
twelve
month
sentence
–

choose
wisely.


Bail
versus
Bond

Many
people
don’t
understand
the
difference
between
bail
and
bond
–
it
is
an

important
difference
because
it
can
determine
whether
you
get
your
money
back

later
or
not.

When
you
are
arrested
and
incarcerated
usually
the
court
will
set
your
bail
–
the

amount
of
money
that
you
have
to
temporarily
give
the
court
to
secure
your
release

until
a
future
trial
or
sentencing
date.
So
if
bail
is
set
at
$30,000,
for
instance,
and

you
have
that
much
money,
you
can
give
it
to
the
court
and
the
court
will
return
it

when
you
show
up
for
your
hearing.
Bail
is
a
financial
pledge
to
show
up
for
your

trial
or
hearing
–
if
you
flee
the
court
keeps
the
money
(and
may
use
some
or
all
of
it

pursuing
you).

Most
people
who
are
arrested
don’t
have
this
much
money
or
even
access
to
it
so

they
work
with
a
private
bail
bond
company
(or
in
some
states,
like
Illinois,
they

work
with
a
state‐run
bail
bond
company
because
private
bail
bonds
are
not
legal).

The
bail
bond
company
will
agree
to
make
good
on
the
bail
amount
if
you
skip
town.

In
exchange
they
usually
require
10%
up
front
(which
will
NOT
be
returned
to
you
–

this
is
how
they
make
money).

If
99%
of
inmates
make
good
and
show
up
to
their
appearances
with
an
average
bail

of
$10,000,
the
bail
bond
company
would
collect
$1,000
X
100,
or
$100,000
for

every
hundred
clients.
Suppose
that
one
out
of
of
those
hundred
clients
skipped

town.
This
would
cost
the
bail
bond
company
$10,000,
so
their
profit
(not
including

overhead,
which
is
really
low
anyway)
is
$90,000.
Not
a
bad
business
to
be
in
as

long
as
less
than
10%
of
your
clients
flee
(the
flight
rate
in
most
areas
is
less
than

1%).

Bounty
hunters
are
usually
hired
by
bail
bonds
companies
to
find
people
who
have

skipped
bail
so
the
bond
company
can
get
their
money
back
from
the
court
–
in

practice
money
doesn’t
usually
change
hands
between
the
courts
and
the
bail
bond

companies,
but
the
court
knows
that
if
something
goes
wrong
they
can
collect
the

full
bail
amount
from
the
bail
bond
company.

The
court
does
not
have
to
set
bail
–
if
you
are
seen
as
a
high
flight
risk
or
a
danger

to
yourself
(or
others)
the
court
may
deny
bail,
meaning
you
cannot
get
out
of
jail

for
any
amount
of
money.


The
First
Time

You
should
do
everything
within
reason
and
the
law
that
you
can
to
avoid
going
to

jail–
hire
a
good
attorney,
keep
your
nose
clean,
proactively
seek
therapy
if

necessary.
The
time
period
between
being
charged
and
sentenced
can
be
anywhere

from
the
same
day
to
several
months.
While
it
is
natural
to
want
to
“get
it
over
with,”

understand
that
the
more
time
you
can
put
between
your
crime
and
your
sentencing

date,
the
better.
You
establish
a
track
record
with
the
court
and
show
that
you
can

be
trusted
not
to
flee.
If
your
attorney
files
constant
motions
to
delay
the
hearing,

keep
in
mind
that
this
is
probably
one
of
the
reasons
–
it
is
for
your
own
benefit.

Going
to
jail
for
the
first
time
is
especially
difficult
for
the
inmate
and
the
secondary

victims.
Not
surprisingly,
many
people
even
contemplate
suicide
when
they
learn

that
they
are
going
to
jail.
Again,
the
media’s
portrayal
of
jail
makes
it
seem
worse

than
it
really
is
–
the
truth
is
that
anybody
can
survive
a
little
time
in
county
jail.

If
despite
your
attempts
to
avoid
jail
time
you
are
still
sentenced,
it
is
not
the
end
of

the
world.

It
may
not
always
be
pleasant,
but
you
just
have
to
take
each
day
at
a
time.
The
time

will
pass
and
your
life
will
continue.
The
first
week
or
so
is
a
major
adjustment,
but

you
just
need
to
find
a
routine
that
works
for
you.
Even
inmates
who
serve
a
year
in

county
jail
report
that
the
“time
flew
by”
after
the
first
month.
If
you
figure
out
how

the
jail
culture
works
you
will
probably
even
walk
out
of
jail
with
a
few
fond

memories
and
friends
you
met
along
the
way.


Preparing
for
jail

Being
sentenced
to
report
to
the
jail
at
a
later
date
(as
opposed
to
being
hauled
off
to

jail
right
away)
is
a
mixed
blessing.
In
a
sense
you
can
get
your
life
in
order
before

you
head
off,
but
waiting
for
a
future
sentence
can
also
be
extremely
stressful.

The
first
thing
that
you
can
do
is
get
your
finances
in
order
–
try
to
get
your
cell

phone
plan
put
on
hold
and
any
other
recurring
expenses.
If
you
have
a
car
try
to

sell
it.
While
being
released
from
jail
is
a
great
experience,
the
harsh
reality
of
a

ruined
credit
score
can
add
a
lot
of
unnecessary
heartache
and
make
the
transition

to
life
on
the
outside
even
more
difficult.
Many
ex‐inmates
face
bankruptcy
upon

release
–
take
every
precaution
available
to
avoid
bankruptcy.

Memorize
important
phone
numbers
–
your
parents,
significant
other,
close
friends,

etc.
Write
these
down
as
soon
as
you
are
booked
into
jail
so
you
will
remember
the

numbers
later.
If
you
are
serving
for
more
than
a
few
months
you
may
have
a
hard

time
recalling
phone
numbers
later
and
you
won’t
have
the
convenience
of
a
cell

phone
with
your
contacts
saved.

Talk
to
your
employer
and
tell
them
what
is
going
on.
You
probably
won’t
be
able
to

hide
the
reason
for
your
extended
leave
of
absence.
Even
if
you
can
come
up
with
a

plausible
story
word
will
probably
get
back
to
your
manager
that
you
were
in
jail.
A


manager
will
be
much
more
understanding
if
they
hear
the
facts
from
you
rather

than
through
company
gossip.
They
may
even
hold
your
job
for
you.


Spend
some
time
in
the
gym.
You
should
be
able
to
avoid
violence
if
you
are

prepared
for
jail,
but
it
won’t
hurt
to
be
in
good
shape
if
somebody
is
trying
to
start

something
with
you.
Confidence
is
always
important,
but
especially
in
jail
–

confidence
helps
avoid
confrontation
and
for
most
people
working
out
breeds

confidence.

If
possible,
borrow
some
money
from
a
family
member
or
friend
to
put
on
your

books
(also
known
as
your
inmate
account
–
this
is
like
a
checking
account
in
jail).

Having
a
little
commissary
can
go
a
long
way
toward
making
your
stay
more

bearable.
Don’t
get
into
the
habit
of
giving
away
commissary
to
other
inmates
for
no

reason,
but
occasionally
sharing
will
help
make
friends
(and
help
your
friends
be
a

little
bit
more
loyal).

If
you
don’t
have
an
attorney
you
should
consider
getting
one
to
submit
a
motion
for

review.
If
you
are
sentenced
to
twelve
months,
for
instance,
you
should
try
to
get
a

review
within
a
couple
of
months
–
many
judges
will
let
you
go
on
review
if
you
can

prove
you
are
genuinely
interested
in
cleaning
up
your
act
and
moving
on.
Some

attorneys
may
cut
a
special
deal
with
you
for
a
motion
and
single
court
appearance
–

a
very
wise
investment.


Classification

Very
small
jails
with
less
than
a
hundred
inmates
may
not
separate
inmates

according
to
their
charges.
All
county
jails,
however,
will
classify
inmates
and

separate
some
inmates
from
the
general
population
for
their
safety
and
the
safety
of

those
around
them.

Violent
offenders
are
usually
put
in
their
own
area
with
higher
security.
Sex

offenders
are
almost
always
separated
from
general
population
for
their
own

protection.
This
helps
reduce
violence,
but
does
not
eliminate
it
completely.
For

example,
an
inmate
charged
with
lewdness
who
may
be
in
a
sex
offender
cell
block

may
bully
another
inmate
in
the
same
block
who
has
been
charged
with
sexual

assault
of
a
minor.

Don’t
spend
a
lot
of
time
and
energy
trying
to
explain
why
you
committed
your

crime
or
why
it’s
not
as
bad
as
the
crimes
of
those
around
you.
Doing
so
will

probably
just
make
the
other
inmates
mad.
Depending
on
your
charges
you
may
be

in
some
type
of
therapy
after
release
that
will
help
you
figure
all
that
out.
Your
goal

in
jail
is
to
pass
the
time
as
quickly
as
possible,
incident‐free,
and
move
on
with
your

life.

General
population
is
where
most
inmates
end
up
as
long
as
they
don’t
have
a

violent
crime,
sex
offense
or
haven’t
been
branded
by
other
inmates
as
a
snitch.

Many
inmates
in
general
population
have
been
in
and
out
of
jail
and
know
what
to

do
and
what
not
to
do.
Try
to
make
a
friend
who
knows
what’s
going
on
and
just


follow
their
lead.
Every
county
jail
is
different
and
there
may
be
little
things
that
set

the
other
inmates
off
–
make
sure
you
know
what
these
are
so
you
can
avoid
them.

The
other
classification
is
“medical.”
Inmates
who
are
chronically
ill
may
spend
a
lot

of
time
in
the
medical
area.
Most
jails
restrict
privileges
in
the
medical
area
to

discourage
inmates
from
faking
illnesses,
but
if
you
are
truly
sick
this
may
be
a
good

option.
Most
inmates
who
spend
a
lot
of
time
in
medical
say
that
time
passes
much

slower
than
it
does
when
they
are
working.


Things
to
Avoid
Doing
and
Saying

County
Jails
have
their
own
culture
and
while
each
jail
is
different,
some
rules
apply

universally.
Here
is
a
list
of
things
you
should
never
talk
about
or
say
in
a
county
jail.


Don’t
talk
about
your
charges
–
ironically
most
inmates
don’t
like
“criminals.”

Most
people
who
are
incarcerated
believe
that
they
don’t
deserve
to
be
in
jail
and

their
charges
are
not
as
bad
as
those
around
them.


Sexual
Offenses

This
is
especially
true
if
you
are
serving
time
for
a
sexual
offense.
Remember,

nobody
cares
about
the
circumstances
around
your
offense.
Even
if
you
were

18
and
your
girlfriend
was
17,
you
will
be
branded
a
“rapist”
and
treated
as

such.

If
you
have
any
charges
for
a
sexual
offense,
do
anything
you
have
to
do
to

avoid
sharing
details
of
your
case
–
make
up
fake
charges,
refuse
to
discuss

your
case
and
deflect
questions
when
necessary.
Do
whatever
you
have
to
do

to
avoid
the
subject.
Remember,
your
only
goal
is
incident‐free
survival.

Discussing
these
charges
will
not
benefit
you
in
any
way.

Larger
county
jails
will
usually
separate
sex
offenders
from
general

population.
This
is
for
everybody’s
protection.
Since
larger
jails
tend
to
be

more
dangerous
this
helps
avoid
a
lot
of
inmate
violence.


Violent
Offenses

Most
inmates
also
look
down
on
violent
offenders,
but
not
nearly
as
much
as

they
do
on
sexual
offenders.
In
large
county
jails,
violent
offenders
are

usually
separated
as
well.

If
you
have
been
charged
with
assault
for
something
like
a
bar
fight
between

two
males,
you
are
probably
OK
talking
about
your
case.
If
you
have
been

accused
of
domestic
violence
or
anything
involving
a
female
(assuming
you

are
a
male),
don’t
talk
about
your
case.
Again,
the
circumstances
don’t

matter
to
other
inmates
–
you
will
be
considered
a
coward
and
will
be
a

target
for
violence.


DUI

If
you
have
a
DUI
you
probably
won’t
be
spending
too
much
time
in
county

jail
(unless
you
have
multiple
DUI’s,
a
particularly
aggressive
DA
or
a
totally

incompetent
attorney).
Your
attorney
will
probably
push
the
DA
for

community
service
or
home
confinement.


While
you
are
in
jail,
though,
you
should
avoid
discussing
your
DUI.
In
most

cases
other
inmates
won’t
care
about
a
DUI,
but
we
have
seen
at
least
one

circumstance
where
a
violent
offender
attacked
an
inmate
charged
with
a

DUI
while
they
were
both
in
classification
(you
will
typically
spend
1‐7
days

in
a
special
classification
area
depending
on
the
size
of
the
jail).
Jail
officials

later
found
that
the
attacker’s
brother
had
died
in
an
accident
involving
a

drunk
driver.
Play
it
safe
–
don’t
discuss
your
case
if
you
don’t
have
to.


Drugs

If
you
have
been
charged
with
a
crime
involving
drugs,
only
share
details
of

your
case
reluctantly.
If
you
are
too
eager
to
talk
about
your
charges
you

draw
unwanted
attention
to
yourself.
This
can
make
you
a
target
for
violence.

Some
estimates
show
drug‐related
crimes
account
for
95%
of
all
inmate

activity
at
county
jails
(taking
into
account
that
most
robberies
and

burglaries
are
drug‐related).
Drug
offenders
have
the
highest
recidivism
rate

(meaning
they
are
the
most
likely
to
return
to
jail).
For
this
reason,
many

inmates
with
drug
charges
will
know
each
other
from
having
been
in
and
out

of
jail.

Be
aware
that
these
inmates
can
often
be
irritable,
especially
their
first
few

days
as
their
body
adjusts
to
life
without
rugs.
Some
meth
addicts
come
in

and
sleep
for
several
days
straight
after
having
spent
days
or
weeks
without

any
sleep.
Their
temperament
can
change
on
a
dime
–
try
not
to
do
or
say

anything
that
could
possibly
set
them
off.


Words
to
avoid
saying
in
county
jail

Honestly,
you
could
probably
get
away
with
calling
most
people
in
county
jail
a
punk

or
bitch
and
either
get
a
laugh
out
of
them
or
at
least
get
them
to
ignore
you.
Some

inmates,
though
(especially
those
who
have
done
prison
time)
will
be
set
off
by

these
words.

They
both
imply
that
somebody
is
not
willing
to
stick
up
for
themselves
and
are

submissive
to
other
inmates.
Do
yourself
a
favor
and
avoid
ever
using
these
words.

They
are
so
inflammatory
to
some
inmates
that
they
will
not
think
twice
about

picking
up
more
charges
(for
violence)
to
defend
themselves
from
the
allegation.


Don’t
snitch
on
anybody

A
“snitch”
is
somebody
who
tells
on
somebody
else.
In
the
real
world
this
is
not
a

powerful
word
–
it
is
usually
used
playfully
and
isn’t
offensive.
On
the
county
jail


food
chain,
though,
you
don’t
get
much
lower
than
a
snitch
(with
the
exception
of
a

sex
offender,
also
known
as
a
molester
or
“mo”).

One
of
the
hard
things
for
first‐time
inmates
to
understand
is
that
sometimes
you

need
to
just
look
the
other
way.
If
something
doesn’t
involve
you,
such
as
other

inmates
fighting,
gambling,
smuggling
contraband,
etc.,
don’t
get
involved.
You
will

be
exposing
yourself
to
tremendous
risk
for
no
reason.

The
only
time
you
should
consider
talking
to
the
guards
is
if
you
feel
like
you
are
in

immediate
danger.
Even
then,
you
don’t
need
to
tell
the
guards
who
you
are
being

threatened
by
–
just
request
a
transfer
or
protective
custody.

If
you
must
request
a
transfer
(or
protective
custody,
also
known
as
PC,
where
you

are
temporarily
separated
from
the
general
population),
make
sure
not
to
make

your
request
obvious
to
other
inmates.
Many
jails
have
grievance
forms
that
you
can

fill
out
on
your
own
and
submit
through
a
drop
box
–
if
the
threat
is
not
immediate

this
is
the
best
approach.


Passing
the
Time

Working
out

Most
county
jails
don’t
have
workout
equipment
these
days.
Inmate
legend
has
it

that
the
inmates
were
getting
too
strong
for
guards
to
handle.
The
real
reason
is

more
practical
–
workout
equipment
is
expensive
and
inmates
aren’t
known
for

taking
great
care
of
their
stuff.
Also,
taxpayers
don’t
have
a
whole
lot
of
sympathy

for
inmates
and
resent
footing
the
bill
for
any
discretionary
expenses.

This
doesn’t
mean
that
you
can’t
stay
in
shape
while
in
jail.
Most
county
jails
will

give
you
access
to
a
yard
where
you
can
walk
around
outside
or
jog,
especially
if
you

are
in
a
warmer
climate.
Even
if
no
yard
is
available,
though,
you
should
have

enough
room
in
the
common
area
to
do
pushups,
sit‐ups,
etc.

Most
inmates
are
pretty
resourceful
–
in
some
jails
they
fill
trash
bags
with
water

and
use
them
as
free‐weights
with
a
broomstick
(this
usually
is
not
allowed
by
jail

rules
but
the
guards
have
bigger
problems
to
deal
with).
Running
in
place
is
also

popular
–
the
temperature
in
most
jails
is
very
cold
(to
prevent
infections)
which

also
keeps
the
cells
from
getting
too
stuffy
when
people
work
out.


Gambling

Most
county
jails
have
strict
rules
against
gambling
but
this
does
little
to
prevent
the

practice.
To
pass
the
time
many
inmates
play
cards
–
gambling
keeps
the
game

interesting.
Popular
games
include
poker,
spades,
hearts
and
pinochle,
but
they
will

play
any
game
that
can
be
played
with
face
cards.
Some
of
the
games
require
a
solid

understanding
of
math
and
probability
–
some
inmates
mastery
of
complicated

algorithms
will
surprise
you.


Inmates
usually
either
gamble
commissary
or
“trays”
(meals).
This
is
why
the
jails

try
to
crack
down
on
it
–
a
string
of
bad
luck
can
result
in
an
inmate
not
having
any

food
for
several
days.
If
you
are
going
to
gamble
in
jail,
gamble
commissary
since
it

is
something
you
can
live
without
(unless
you
have
enough
commissary
to
replace
a

meal).

The
bigger
problem
with
gambling
is
that
it
tends
to
lead
to
violence.
When
food
is

on
the
line
(which
is
the
currency
in
jail),
people
get
more
upset
when
they
lose.
If

somebody
thinks
you
are
cheating,
sometimes
with
no
better
reason
than
the
fact

that
you
are
winning,
they
become
confrontational.
This
creates
a
no‐win
situation
–

either
you
win
and
risk
upsetting
the
other
inmates
or
you
lose
and
give
up
a
meal

or
commissary.

Whether
or
not
you
are
incarcerated
you
probably
shouldn’t
gamble
anything
that

you
can’t
afford
to
lose,
but
this
is
especially
true
in
jail.
If
you
are
going
to
gamble
in

county
jail
you
should
avoid
gambling
with
anybody
who
has
been
to
prison
–

they
are
probably
much
better
at
cards
than
you
and
are
more
prone
to
violence.


Reading

Most
inmates
have
a
lot
of
free
time.
If
a
television
is
available
it
is
pretty
uncommon

for
the
inmates
to
come
to
a
consensus
on
what
they
should
watch.
For
this
reason

most
inmates
read
–
a
lot.

Usually
(especially
in
larger
jails)
your
family
cannot
just
bring
you
books
from

home.
The
jails
are
worried
about
drugs
being
smuggled
in
so
they
require
that
all

books
be
shipped
directly
from
the
retailer,
such
as
Amazon,
Borders
or
Barnes
and

Noble.
They
usually
have
to
be
brand
new
(check
with
your
jail
to
find
out
their

specific
policy
on
receiving
books).

Inmates
who
don’t
have
the
luxury
of
people
on
the
outside
shipping
them
new

books
usually
have
their
pick
of
books
that
have
been
left
behind
by
other
inmates

or
donated
to
the
jail.
Competition
for
good
books
can
be
fierce
–
depending
on
how

bad
the
selection
is
you
may
have
to
trade
some
commissary
for
a
new
John
Grisham

book,
for
instance.

Some
jails
have
book
carts
that
come
around
weekly
(or
daily)
allowing
inmates
to

exchange
their
books,
but
most
of
the
trading
still
takes
place
directly
between

inmates.


Working

The
single
best
way
to
pass
time
in
jail
is
by
working.
There
are
three
possible
ways

that
you
can
work
while
incarcerated
–
through
a
work
release
program,
a
formal

jail
work
program
or
in
the
jail
itself.


Work
release
–
If
you
are
granted
work
release
you
actually
work
outside
of
the
jail

at
a
normal
job
and
check
into
the
jail
at
night
and
for
the
weekends.
The
judge
must

approve
work
release,
but
if
this
is
an
option
you
should
definitely
take
it.


Usually
in
a
work
release
program
you
will
check
out
of
the
jail
in
the
morning,
call

the
jail
when
you
arrive
at
work
and
check
back
in
at
night.
Not
all
jails
offer
work

release
programs
(they
are
difficult
to
administer),
but
this
is
a
great
way
to
keep

low
risk
offenders
productive
while
they
serve
their
time.

Work
release
allows
you
to
keep
your
job,
but
be
aware
that
you
will
need
to
tell

your
employer
that
you
are
incarcerated.
The
jail
will
sometimes
send
an
officer
out

to
make
sure
you
are
at
work
and
they
may
call
your
employer
to
check
up
on
you

occasionally.

If
the
judge
offers
you
work
release
he
or
she
is
basically
sending
a
message
to
the

jail
that
you
are
not
a
flight
risk.
Violent
offenders
are
rarely
offered
work
release,

but
it
is
common
for
drug
crimes.
You
will
be
drug
tested
periodically,
however,
and

frequently
strip‐searched
when
you
return
to
jail
(in
states
where
it
is
still
legal).

The
best
thing
about
work
release
is
that
you
get
to
keep
your
job
and
make
money

while
you
are
incarcerated.
You
usually
have
to
pay
a
daily
rate
for
this
privilege,
so

work
release
inmates
are
less
of
a
burden
on
taxpayers
than
regular
inmates.


Jail
Work
Program
–
This
is
a
new
concept
that
has
been
gaining
momentum
over


the
past
few
years
–
in
these
situations
the
jail
has
a
formal
partnership
with
a

government
agency
or
private
corporation
where
several
inmates
are
either

transported
to
a
work
site
and
work
under
supervision
or
do
the
work
on‐site
at
the

jail.

In
Orange
County
Jail,
for
instance,
you
may
be
transferred
to
“The
Farm”
where
you

actually
work
on
a
farm
that
supplies
fruits,
vegetables
and
over
8,000
eggs
every

day
to
jail
kitchens.
This
also
provides
an
advantage
to
taxpayers
because
it
makes

the
jail
a
little
more
self‐sufficient.

Life
in
jail
goes
a
lot
faster
when
you
are
working
in
one
of
these
programs
because

you
have
a
reason
to
get
up
every
day
and
something
to
distract
you.
Jail
work

programs,
however,
are
slightly
less
desirable
than
work
release
because
you

typically
make
little
to
no
money
and
are
not
working
in
a
job
that
will
continue

upon
your
release.

Jail
work
programs
are
not
subject
to
minimum
wage
requirements
because
your

housing
is
included
and
working
is
optional
(you
can
always
choose
to
spend
your

time
in
the
normal
part
of
the
jail
if
you
want),
but
you
can
learn
new
skills
and
pass

the
time.
Also,
usually
the
judge
does
not
have
to
approve
a
jail
work
program
so
it

is
a
good
alternative
to
work
release
if
work
release
isn’t
offered
as
an
option.

Like
work
release,
the
jail
itself
may
not
approve
you
for
a
work
program
if
you
have

violent
charges
or
something
that
would
jeopardize
the
jail’s
ability
to
continue
the

program
in
the
future.
Some
work
programs
allow
inmates
to
work
with
non‐
inmates,
for
instance,
who
would
probably
not
be
comfortable
working
with
certain

types
of
inmates.


Also,
working
in
one
of
these
programs
will
increase
the
likelihood
of
a
judge

releasing
you
on
a
review.
Judges
are
more
sympathetic
to
inmates
who
are
trying

to
learn
new
skills
and
be
more
self‐sufficient.


Working
in
the
jail
‐
Depending
on
the
size
of
the
jail
you
may
be
able
to
get
a
job

cleaning,
landscaping
or
in
the
kitchen.
The
best
job
you
can
get
is
in
the
kitchen

(and
it
should
be
the
easiest
since
they
usually
require
so
much
labor).


You
are
not
well
fed
when
you
are
in
jail.
Most
inmates
complain
that
as
bad
as
the

food
is
they
are
still
not
given
enough.
When
you
work
in
the
kitchen
you
usually
get

extra
food.
Also,
just
as
with
any
job,
it
helps
you
pass
the
time.
When
inmates
have

something
to
focus
on
other
than
just
the
ticking
of
the
clock,
violence
between

inmates
is
much
more
rare.

Some
jails
require
a
minimum
time
commitment
to
work
in
the
jail
so
you
may
not

be
a
candidate
on
a
short
sentence
(less
than
a
month
or
so),
but
other
than
that
you

should
try
everything
you
can
to
get
a
job.


Eating

You
will
get
three
meals
a
day
in
any
county
jail
in
the
US
with
the
possible

exception
of
classification
when
you
first
arrive
(some
inmates
report
spending
up

to
twelve
hours
in
classification
in
larger
jails).
Most
inmate
reviews
of
jail
food

range
from
mediocre
to
inedible.

If
you
are
a
picky
eater
you
should
stockpile
some
commissary
to
assure
that
you

will
have
an
alternative
to
the
regular
meals
if
necessary.
Ramen
noodles
are

popular
and
available
in
almost
every
county
jail.

Commissary
is
usually
available
only
once
a
week
though
some
larger
jails
now
offer

it
a
few
days
a
week.
In
order
to
purchase
commissary
you
need
to
have
some

money
on
your
inmate
account,
most
commonly
known
as
your
“books.”
In
order
to

get
money
on
your
books
you
need
to
have
a
friend
or
family
member
come
down
to

the
jail
with
a
cashier’s
check
or
cash.
Some
jails
now
accept
Western
Union
(a

special
program
specifically
for
jail
accounts)
or
another
form
of
wire
transfer,
but

hefty
fees
are
taken
out.
You
are
better
off
having
somebody
deliver
a
check
(or
mail

it).

You
won’t
be
able
to
get
commissary
until
you
have
been
classified.
In
a
very
small

jail
this
may
take
minutes.
Classification
in
a
larger
jail,
though,
can
take
several

days.
Even
when
you
are
classified
and
can
order
commissary
you
may
only
have

certain
commissary
options
based
on
your
cellblock.
Some
cellblocks
get
more

commissary
privileges
than
others
(for
instance,
some
blocks
may
be
able
to
order

radios
while
others
can’t).

Commissary
prices
are
always
much
higher
than
what
you
could
get
similar
food
for

on
the
street.
Some
types
of
candy
and
food
may
cost
ten
times
what
you
would
pay


outside
of
jail,
but
commissary
is
a
privilege,
not
a
right,
so
complaints
to
the
jail
will

go
unanswered.

Most
jails
offer
microwaves
to
inmates
in
at
least
some
of
the
cellblocks
(usually
the

more
privileged
blocks
where
the
inmates
have
earned
special
rights
with
good

behavior).
Since
microwaves
are
usually
only
accessible
during
certain
hours
some

inmates
find
other
ways
to
heat
water
–
one
of
the
more
popular
devices
is
called
a

“stinger.”
A
stinger
is
an
incredibly
dangerous
contraption
that
plugs
into
the
wall

on
one
end
and
is
dropped
into
a
cup
of
water
to
complete
a
circuit
on
the
other.

They
are
usually
made
out
of
the
cord
from
an
alarm
clock
on
one
end
and
two

pieces
of
metal
with
electrical
tape
in
the
middle
on
the
other.
Stingers
are
made
out

of
contraband
and
are
never
allowed,
but
they
can
boil
water
within
a
few
seconds

and
are
popular
for
making
late
night
snacks.

Inmates
are
very
resourceful
and
come
up
with
creative
recipes
from
commissary

items.
Probably
the
most
popular
inmate
dish
is
a
“jail
burrito.”
Inmates
crush
up

Ramen,
Cheetos
and
sausage,
all
available
on
commissary,
and
pour
it
in
an
unused

garbage
bag.
They
pour
boiling
water
(heated
up
in
a
microwave
or
with
a
stinger)

and
let
it
cook
for
fifteen
minutes
or
so.
It’s
called
a
burrito
because
they
let
it
cook

in
a
rolled
up
white
towel
that
resembles
a
burrito.


Time
off
for
Good
Behavior

Jails
that
are
prone
to
overcrowding
often
institute
“time
off
for
good
behavior.”
This

is
a
misnomer
–
if
you
are
going
to
a
jail
that
offers
time
off
(also
called
good
time),

the
jail
will
assume
on
day
one
that
you
will
be
released
early
taking
into
account

your
good
time.
You
won’t
lose
time
off
unless
you
do
something
really
bad
(like

fighting
or
using
drugs)
and
even
in
these
cases
it
is
not
uncommon
for
them
to
still

give
you
your
time
off.

If
you
want
to
know
whether
a
jail
offers
time
off
you
just
need
to
call
them.
Most

county
jails
that
offer
time
off
give
one
day
off
for
two
served,
meaning
you
will
only

end
up
serving
2/3
of
a
sentence.
Severely
overcrowded
jails,
however,
can
offer

even
more.
LA
County
is
known
to
reduce
inmate
sentences
to
10%
of
the
original

sentence.
This
means
that
inmates
sentenced
to
a
year
usually
serve
just
over
one

month.

On
the
other
side
of
the
coin
some
county
jails
don’t
have
overcrowding
problems

and
don’t
offer
any
time
off
for
good
behavior.
Don’t
make
any
assumptions
–
just

call
up
the
jail
and
ask
them
what
the
current
policy
is.
Occasionally
jails
will
put

inmates
on
house
arrest
with
ankle
bracelets,
but
this
is
a
very
rare
practice
and
is

typically
reserved
for
minor
crimes
(or
people
with
disabilities).

While
the
jail
really
wants
you
to
serve
your
time
and
get
out
as
quickly
as
possible

the
judge
may
choose
to
rescind
your
time
off.
Any
such
ruling
will
often
be

reviewed
and
turned
over
by
the
sentencing
judge
later.
Usually
in
these
cases
you

will
get
credit
for
time
already
served
as
well.
It
is
also
not
uncommon
to
be


released
on
review
–
this
is
one
of
many
situations
where
having
a
good
attorney

can
really
pay
off.


Violence

You
will
probably
see
some
violence
in
jail
but
if
you
are
smart
and
know
how
to

react
you
will
be
able
to
avoid
it
for
yourself.

One
of
the
most
popular
questions
is
whether
you
need
to
join
a
gang
or
align

yourself
with
a
group
of
people
to
avoid
violence
in
jail.
The
answer
really
depends

on
which
jail
you
are
going
to.

If
you
are
going
to
jail
in
an
area
with
a
lot
of
gang
activity,
like
Cook
County
or
Los

Angeles,
aligning
yourself
with
people
of
your
own
race
is
important.
This
is
most

important
if
you
have
a
longer
sentence
–
if
you
will
only
be
in
for
a
couple
of
weeks

you
should
be
able
to
keep
to
yourself
and
be
fine.

Joining
a
gang,
however,
is
not
necessary
in
county
jail
and
will
make
you
a
higher

risk
for
violence.

If
somebody
is
threatening
you
in
jail,
you
need
to
make
some
friends.
People
won’t

be
as
likely
to
fight
with
you
if
you
have
friends
because
somebody
might
stick
up

for
you.
At
the
same
time,
though,
acting
scared
and
showing
your
weakness
won’t

improve
things
either
–
you
need
to
be
willing
to
stand
up
for
yourself
or
at
least
act

like
you
are
willing
to
if
somebody
tries
to
start
something.
Nobody
will
respect
you

if
you
don’t
stick
up
for
yourself
–
confidence
is
key.

This
doesn’t
mean
that
you
need
to
throw
a
punch
or
fight,
just
that
you
need
to
be

willing
to
protect
yourself
if
anybody
attacks
you.
This
is
unlikely
if
you
know
what

you
are
doing
in
jail,
but
be
prepared
for
the
possibility
of
violence.


Rehab/Detox

Most
inmates
have
drug
problems.
Jail
can
be
a
good
opportunity
for
somebody
to

get
clean,
but
going
cold
turkey
can
be
dangerous
as
well.
The
medical
staff
should

be
able
to
deal
with
withdrawals
but
be
prepared
for
the
possibility
that
they
will

not
be.


Preparing
for
jail
with
an
addiction

If
you
are
scheduled
to
serve
a
future
sentence
and
you
have
a
drug
addiction
it
is

highly
recommended
that
you
seek
help
detoxing
before
you
check
in
to
jail.
A
rehab

center
or
private
facility
will
give
you
a
much
safer
alternative
to
going
cold
turkey

in
county
jail
(and
you
will
probably
find
them
more
sympathetic).

Going
to
jail
with
a
drug
addiction
is
not
good
for
anybody
–
you,
other
inmates,

guards
or
the
medical
staff.
Also,
when
you
are
booked
into
jail
you
are
much
more

likely
to
receive
prescriptions
if
you
have
already
have
a
doctor’s
order
from
outside


the
jail.
Every
jail’s
medical
staff
deals
with
a
flood
of
prescription
requests
every

day
and
not
surprisingly
most
of
them
are
denied.


Disclosure

You
should
disclose
any
drug
addictions
during
booking
so
the
jail
has

documentation
of
your
condition.
If
you
have
a
friend
or
loved
one
on
the
outside

you
should
have
them
call
the
jail
and
talk
to
the
medical
staff
to
make
sure
they
are

aware.

Rehab
programs
in
jail
are
sometimes
sponsored
by
the
jail
but
are
usually

sponsored
by
volunteers
who
want
to
help.
If
you
have
a
drug
or
alcohol
problem

you
should
take
advantage
of
these
rehab
programs.
It
will
give
you
a
change
of

scenery
(something
you
don’t
get
a
lot
in
jail)
and
a
change
of
pace.
You
might
also

learn
some
important
coping
mechanisms
to
ensure
you
don’t
end
up
back
in
jail.


Note
that
while
these
programs
are
good
they
aren’t
quite
as
structured
as
regular

drug
rehab
programs
offered
outside
of
jail
(they
will
probably
offer
2‐3
classes
per

week
in
jail),
so
it
is
not
a
good
replacement
for
a
full‐blown
treatment
program.
You

should
still
go
to
rehab
after
you
are
released
from
jail
because
the
transition
from

not
using
when
you
are
in
jail
and
when
drugs
are
available
is
difficult
for
most

people.
Sadly,
most
inmates
start
using
again
when
they
are
released.


Drugs
in
jail

Some
county
jails
have
huge
drug
problems.
Drugs
can
be
smuggled
in
many
ways
–
new
inmates
bring
them
in
(most
often
smuggling
through
a
body
cavity),
work

release
inmates
bring
them
in
when
they
return
at
night
and
sometimes
the
guards

bring
them
in.
Because
the
supply
of
drugs
is
so
limited
they
fetch
much
higher

prices
than
they
do
on
the
streets.

If
you
are
caught
smuggling
(or
with
drugs),
you
will
probably
pick
up
additional

charges
and
extend
your
stay.
In
fact,
you
could
be
sent
to
prison.
Don’t
smuggle
or

buy
drugs
in
jail
–
it
is
just
not
worth
the
risk.
The
main
problem
with
buying
drugs

is
that
a
handful
of
people
will
know
about
the
transaction.
They
can
try
to
use
this

information
to
secure
an
early
release
(by
snitching).
Don’t
assume
anybody
will

protect
you
if
their
own
personal
freedom
is
at
stake
–
it
just
doesn’t
happen.

Prescription
drugs
are
also
commonly
abused
in
jail.
Twice
a
day
a
medical
cart

comes
by
with
all
of
the
prescriptions
(you
can
also
request
Advil
or
Tylenol
if
you

have
a
headache).
Usually
the
nurse
will
watch
you
take
your
medicine
and
have
you

open
your
mouth
to
prove
that
the
pill
went
down,
but
some
inmates
are
really
good

at
“cheeking”
their
medicines
without
the
nurses
noticing.

Inmates
may
cheek
their
medicine
so
they
can
take
them
later
or
to
sell
them
to

other
inmates.
Not
all
drugs
are
allowed
(it
is
rare
to
see
opiates
distributed
in
jail)

but
Xanax
and
Valium
are
common
and
can
be
traded
for
quite
a
bit
of
commissary.


In
order
to
get
the
necessary
medications
you
need
to
have
somebody
contact
the

jail
with
your
prescription.
They
are
usually
pretty
good
at
finding
your
doctor
and

getting
prescriptions,
but
if
you
are
worried
about
not
getting
the
right
medicine

you
should
have
a
somebody
on
the
outside
initiate
contact.


Visiting

Most
county
jails
allow
visiting
in
some
form
or
another,
but
there
are
some
things

that
you
should
be
aware
of
before
trying
to
visit
an
inmate.


Who
can
visit?

Most
jails
require
that
visitors
be
at
least
eighteen
years
old
unless
they
are

accompanied
by
an
adult.
Even
young
children
are
usually
allowed
to
visit
as
long
as

they
are
with
somebody
over
eighteen.

If
you
have
been
to
jail
in
the
past
year
(five
years
in
some
jails)
you
may
have
to
do

some
extra
paperwork
to
visit
an
inmate.
Some
jails
don’t
even
allow
you
to
visit
an

inmate
if
you
have
recently
been
incarcerated
or
if
you
have
a
felony
on
your
record

–
contact
the
jail
to
find
out
their
specific
visitor
policy.

If
you
have
a
warrant,
don’t
visit
somebody
in
jail.
You
won’t
be
allowed
to
visit
the

inmate
and
will
probably
be
detained.
The
jail
will
check
your
identification
and
do
a

warrant
check
before
allowing
you
to
visit
an
inmate.

Most
jails
will
not
allow
visitors
who
are
“dressed
inappropriately.”
This
is

completely
at
the
discretion
of
the
guards,
so
just
dress
conservatively.
We
have

seen
many
reports
of
visitors
turned
away
for
wearing
short
skirts,
tank
tops,
short

dresses,
etc.

Pretty
much
everybody
who
visits
an
inmate
in
jail
has
a
story
about
how
mean
the

guards
are
–
don’t
take
it
personally.


When
can
people
visit?

You
will
need
to
contact
the
local
jail
to
find
out
visiting
times
–
in
larger
jails
this

will
vary
for
different
cellblocks
so
you
need
to
find
out
exactly
where
the
inmate

you
are
visiting
is
housed.

Most
jails
allow
the
inmates
two
visits
per
week,
but
some
only
allow
one
and
others

offer
three
(and
a
few
allow
a
visit
every
day
of
the
week).
You
should
talk
to
the

inmate
and
find
out
when
they
want
you
to
visit
–
if
they
have
a
girlfriend,
for

instance,
who
visits
twice
a
week
they
may
not
want
you
to
visit
at
all
(or
they
might

want
you
to
come
along
with
their
girlfriend
–
usually
you
can
have
up
to
three

people
per
visit).

If
an
inmate
gets
a
half
hour
visit
you
will
need
to
budget
at
least
a
couple
of
hours

to
get
through
the
paperwork.
Some
jails
are
so
inefficient
that
it
can
take
up
to

three
hours
of
waiting
just
to
get
to
the
visiting
area.
Subsequent
visits
should
not


take
as
long
as
the
first,
but
you
might
still
have
to
wait
a
couple
of
hours
during

busy
hours.

Receiving
visitors
is
a
privilege
and
not
a
right
–
when
a
cellblock
is
put
on
“lock

down”
(usually
following
a
fight
or
drug
bust),
the
jail
sometimes
takes
away
visiting

rights
for
all
of
the
inmates,
sometimes
for
several
days.
If
you
are
traveling
from

out
of
state
to
visit
an
inmate
you
should
call
the
jail
–
they
may
make
a
special

exception
for
you
depending
on
the
circumstances.


What
is
the
visiting
area
like?

First
of
all,
no
county
jail
in
the
United
States
allows
conjugal
visits.
Some
prisons

offer
conjugal
visits,
but
even
these
are
rare.

Most
county
jails
don’t
allow
contact
visits
at
all
(a
contact
visit
means
there
is
no

window
between
you
and
your
visitors)
because
of
the
fear
that
visitors
will

smuggle
things
into
the
jail.
At
most
county
jails
you
will
be
speaking
to
your
visitors

through
a
telephone
on
each
side
of
the
glass
or
slots
in
the
glass.

If
the
county
jail
you
are
visiting
does
offer
contact
visits
you
may
be
searched
prior

to
the
visit.


Education
in
Jail

If
you
are
going
to
be
in
jail
for
more
than
a
couple
of
months
you
should
take

advantage
of
any
educational
programs
that
the
jail
offers.
These
are
usually
free

and
give
inmates
the
opportunity
to
develop
skills
that
allow
them
to
be
successful

upon
release.

Most
large
jails
offer
GED
programs
for
those
who
didn’t
graduate
from
high
school.

Some
jails
work
with
local
county
colleges
and
offer
college
credits.
You
probably

won’t
be
approved
for
one
of
these
programs
unless
you
have
a
pretty
long
sentence

(at
least
a
few
months),
but
they
are
also
a
great
way
to
pass
the
time
and
stay
busy

while
incarcerated.


Becoming
a
trustee

Each
cellblock
has
at
least
a
couple
of
trustees,
sometimes
more
(depending
on
the

size
of
the
block).
The
trustees
do
random
jobs
around
the
blocks
–
passing
out

meals,
cleaning
up,
doling
out
clothing,
taking
out
the
trash,
etc.
The
benefit
of
being

a
trustee
varies
from
jail
to
jail,
but
usually
trustees
are
given
a
few
special

privileges
such
as
extra
meals
and
their
choice
of
a
bed.
Some
jails
even
allow

trustees
to
go
outside
and
smoke
occasionally
(most
county
jails
are
smoke‐free

these
days).

In
some
jails
the
trustees
run
the
show
–
they
will
tell
new
inmates
where
to
sleep

and
really
act
as
the
leaders
of
the
block.
In
other
jails
they
are
simply
seen
as

helpers
and
not
given
much
respect
from
other
inmates.


Trustees
usually
have
non‐violent
charges
and
longer
sentences
(more
than
a
couple

of
months).
If
you
want
to
become
a
trustee
you
will
have
a
good
chance
by

becoming
friends
with
the
existing
trustees
and
staying
out
of
trouble
–
when
they

are
leaving
just
have
them
mention
to
the
guards
that
you
would
be
a
good

replacement
and
this
is
usually
enough
to
guarantee
you
the
job.


Hygiene

Showering

One
of
the
most
common
concerns
that
first‐time
inmates
have
is
what
the

showering
situation
will
be
like.
Will
they
be
forced
to
shower
with
a
bunch
of
other

guys?
Do
inmates
really
get
raped
in
the
shower?

Actually,
many
county
jails
these
days
have
individual
showers
that
allow
inmates
to

shower
in
privacy.
Always
wear
sandals
in
the
shower
–
these
will
be
provided
by

the
jail.
Infections
are
very
common
(staph,
athlete’s
foot,
etc.)
so
be
careful
with

what
you
expose
yourself
to.

Even
in
jails
with
communal
showers
most
county
jail
inmates
do
not
like
showering

at
the
same
time
and
have
a
system
that
allows
inmates
to
shower
by
themselves.

Some
jails,
though,
only
allow
inmates
access
to
the
showers
during
certain
times

and
inmates
are
forced
to
shower
together.
If
you
must
shower
with
other
inmates

rest
assured
that
sexual
violence
in
jail
is
very,
very
rare
(prison
is
a
different
story).

The
other
inmates
won’t
put
up
with
it
and
anybody
attempting
sexual
violence
in

county
jail
is
quickly
taken
care
of.

Usually
the
jail
will
issue
soap
and
shampoo
for
free
to
each
inmate
but
it
is
usually

really
low
quality
–
most
commissary
lists
include
name
brands
that
will
be
more

familiar
and
help
you
get
a
little
cleaner.



Going
to
the
bathroom

In
larger
county
jails
(which
tend
to
be
a
little
more
violent
and
rougher),
you

should
ask
another
inmate
which
bathroom
you
should
when
you
first
get
booked.

Some
toilets
are
reserved
for
certain
races
or
groups
of
people.
Cook
County
is

known
for
having
bathroom
assignments
(all
controlled
by
the
inmates,
the
guards

don’t
care).

Don’t
go
out
of
your
way
to
use
another
race’s
toilet
to
make
a
point
–
it’s
not
worth

it
and
could
easily
turn
a
whole
crowd
of
people
against
you.


Telephone
Calls

Telephone
rules
and
rates
vary
wildly
in
US
jails
but
they
have
one
thing
in
common

–
they
are
expensive.
Usually
when
an
inmate
makes
an
outgoing
phone
call
the

county
jail
phone
system
starts
by
announcing
to
the
caller
that
they
are
receiving
a


call
from
the
jail
and
asking
if
they
want
to
accept
the
charge.
These
charges
range

from
a
couple
of
dollars
to
eight
dollars
for
a
ten
to
fifteen
minute
call.

If
you
want
to
get
the
most
out
of
your
phone
call
you
should
talk
until
the
phone

actually
cuts
out.
This
may
cut
off
a
conversation,
but
you
will
know
how
much
you

can
really
get
out
of
each
call.
Some
jail
phones
say
that
the
phone
call
is
limited
to

ten
minutes,
for
instance,
but
the
call
doesn’t
actually
cut
off
until
you
have
been

talking
for
fifteen
minutes.
Since
you
aren’t
charged
per
minute
(usually)
you
should

make
the
most
of
your
call.

Some
jails
offer
phone
cards
on
commissary.

This
allows
inmates
to
make
outgoing

phone
calls
without
having
to
call
collect.
While
this
is
convenient,
many
of
these

systems
have
problems
calling
cell
phones.
Anybody
who
wants
to
accept
incoming

phone
calls
from
inmates
should
either
make
sure
they
have
a
landline
available
or

call
their
cell
phone
carrier
–
occasionally
the
cell
phone
carrier
can
simply
remove

a
block
from
the
phone
and
allow
incoming
calls
from
inmates.

All
county
jail
phone
calls
are
subject
to
surveillance
though
they
rarely
are
because

of
the
volume
of
calls
the
jail
handles.
Calls
may
be
recorded
and
played
back
later
if

jail
officials
suspect
you
are
planning
a
crime
from
behind
bars.
Also,
the
prosecutor

may
request
recordings
of
your
calls
for
evidence
against
you.
Be
careful
what
you

talk
about
–
anything
you
say
over
the
phone
can
be
used
against
you
in
court.

For
the
most
part
inmates
cannot
receive
inbound
phone
calls
from
anybody
but

their
attorney.
If
you
want
to
talk
to
an
inmate
on
the
phone
you
should
put
money

on
the
inmate’s
books
and
send
them
a
letter
requesting
a
call.
Make
sure
to
send

your
number
–
most
people
just
store
phone
numbers
in
their
cell
phone
so

sometimes
remembering
phone
numbers
while
they
are
in
jail
is
difficult.

Most
jails
will
provide
free
access
to
a
special
phone
for
calls
to
your
attorney
but
a

lot
of
inmates
don’t
know
about
this.
Ask
the
guards
if
you
need
to
place
a
call
to

your
attorney.
These
phone
calls
should
not
be
recorded
to
protect
your
attorney‐
client
privileges.


Money
in
Jail

Indigent
inmates

Inmates
who
don’t
have
the
luxury
of
somebody
on
the
outside
putting
money
on

their
books
are
typically
considered
“indigent.”
In
some
jails
indigent
inmates
will

be
provided
some
basic
commissary
supplies,
such
as
pencils
and
paper,
free
of

charge.
Some
jails
even
provide
stamps
for
indigent
employees
to
send
letters.

Most
county
jails
have
a
lot
of
indigent
inmates
–
all
this
means
is
that
nobody
is

putting
money
on
their
books,
not
that
they
are
poor.
A
very
wealthy
person
who

did
not
want
to
tell
anybody
they
were
incarcerated,
for
instance,
could
be

considered
indigent.


Wealthy
inmates

If
you
have
a
lot
of
money
on
the
outside
you
should
not
advertise
this
in
jail.
You

make
yourself
a
target
by
bragging
about
how
wealthy
you
are
on
the
outside.
This

also
makes
it
hard
for
most
inmates
to
relate
to
you,
which
can
keep
you
from

making
friends.

Remember
that
just
because
you
have
a
good
relationship
with
an
inmate
in
jail

doesn’t
mean
they
will
be
the
same
on
the
outside.
If
an
inmate
knows
that
you
are

wealthy
it
puts
you
and
your
family
in
danger
after
your
release.


Cash

In
some
jails
the
money
you
have
in
your
wallet
will
immediately
be
put
on
your

books.
Other
jails
will
put
the
money
in
a
deposit
box
to
be
collected
upon
your

release.
Either
way,
the
jail
should
not
steal
your
money
–
if
you
suspect
the
guards

of
mishandling
cash
you
should
file
a
formal
complaint.

It
is
very
rare
for
a
county
jail
to
allow
inmates
to
carry
cash.
Most
likely
your

money
will
be
kept
on
your
inmate
account,
more
commonly
known
as
your

“books.”
You
use
the
money
on
your
books
to
purchase
commissary,
which
then

becomes
the
currency
between
inmates.


Random
Inspections

The
guards
have
the
right
to
come
in
and
inspect
all
inmate
property
whenever
they

want.
Occasionally
they
will
send
all
of
the
inmates
into
the
common
areas
(or

sometimes
even
out
to
the
yard)
while
they
search
all
property
looking
for

contraband.
They
will
go
through
all
of
your
stuff
and
if
they
find
contraband,
you

will
likely
lose
some
privileges
and
possibly
everybody
in
the
cellblock
will
have

privileges
revoked.
These
can
include
telephone
access,
visits,
commissary,
mail,

recreational
time
and
anything
else
the
guards
can
think
of
(though
they
won’t

actually
take
away
your
meals
since
that
would
violate
state
laws).
Being
the
one

responsible
for
everybody
losing
privileges
can
make
you
a
very
unpopular
inmate.

When
you
first
arrive
you
should
receive
a
handbook.
Read
the
section
about

contraband
careful
so
you
know
what
is
and
isn’t
considered
contraband.
For

instance,
many
jails
allow
you
to
have
pictures
sent
by
family
members,
but
some

limit
how
many
you
can
have.
If
the
limit
is
ten
per
inmate
and
you
have
eleven,
that

may
be
considered
contraband.
Also,
anything
smuggled
in
is
obviously
contraband

and
anything
that
may
be
concocted
from
commissary
items
for
a
purpose
other

than
what
it
is
designed
for
is
also
contraband
(occasionally
inmates
will
put

together
tattoo
guns
from
commissary
items
but
this
is
more
popular
in
prison).



Clothing
in
jail

Most
people
assume
that
inmates
wear
orange
jumpsuits
in
jail
like
they
do
on

television.
Most
county
jails
these
days,
however,
opt
for
scrubs
like
doctors
wear

with
separate
top
and
bottoms.
They
will
usually
have
the
name
of
the
jail
on
the


back.
You
should
also
be
issued
a
pair
of
sandals
–
always
wear
these,
even
in
the

shower,
to
prevent
athlete’s
foot.
MRSA,
a
strain
of
staph
infection
that
is
immune
to

traditional
treatments,
has
become
more
common
in
county
jails
in
the
last
few

years
so
be
careful
about
germs.

If
you
are
an
average‐sized
inmate
you
may
find
a
shortage
of
clothes
that
actually

fit.
When
you
have
some
seniority
in
the
cellblock
you
will
be
able
to
get
clothes
that

fit
a
little
better.
The
trustees
usually
dole
out
the
laundry
every
week
so
if
you
get

in
good
with
a
trustee
you
can
increase
your
chances
of
receiving
clothes
that

actually
fit.


Receiving
Mail

All
mail
sent
to
inmates
is
searched
by
the
jail
before
delivery.
This
means
that
mail

delivery
can
take
a
few
extra
days
than
it
normally
would,
especially
around

holidays
when
the
mail
stacks
up.
Some
county
jails
manage
to
get
mail
distributed

the
same
day
it
is
received
while
the
busiest
jails
can
take
up
to
a
week
or
more.

Inspecting
mail
prevents
smuggling
of
contraband.
Every
jail
has
different
rules

about
what
can
and
can’t
be
delivered
–
a
quick
phone
call
to
the
jail
should
be

enough
to
figure
out
what
is
acceptable.

Most
jails
don’t
allow
stickers
because
drugs
can
be
smuggled
under
them
(or
acid

can
even
be
in
the
sticker
itself).
Photographs
may
be
allowed,
but
most
jails
have

strict
content
guidelines.
Provocative
pictures
or
nudity
may
be
confiscated.
They

may
either
be
destroyed
or
put
in
your
inmate
deposit
box
for
collection
upon

release.

Inmates
can
usually
receive
books
as
long
as
they
are
brand
new
and
sent
directly

from
the
retailer,
such
as
Amazon
or
Borders.
Check
the
jail’s
policy
on
sending

books
–
some
jails
make
the
book
property
of
the
jail
when
it
is
received
so
the

inmates
have
to
leave
them
behind
for
other
inmates
when
they
are
released.


Church

Most
jails
in
the
US
offer
some
type
of
church
services.
Larger
jails
typically
cater
to

many
different
religious
beliefs
while
smaller
jails
may
only
offer

interdenominational
services.

Church
is
a
great
opportunity
for
inmates
to
escape
the
daily
grind
of
jail.

Surprisingly
most
inmates
probably
won’t
hassle
you
about
attending
religious

services
–
they
are
very
popular
even
among
the
most
hardened
criminals.

Going
to
church
is
considered
a
privilege,
not
a
right
–
if
you
or
your
cellblock
get
in

trouble,
church
services
may
be
temporarily
suspended.


Release
day

Many
inmates
are
superstitious
–
one
of
the
most
popular
jail
myths
is
that
if
you

take
any
commissary
with
you
when
you
leave
jail
you
will
be
incarcerated
again
as

a
punishment.
Obviously
this
is
a
self‐serving
myth
–
the
other
inmates
want
to

collect
commissary
from
outgoing
inmates.

Prior
to
your
release
date
you
should
ask
the
guards
what
time
you
will
be
released

–
some
jails
release
inmates
early
in
the
morning
while
others
wait
until
the

afternoon.
Most
will
not
wait
until
the
evening,
but
ask
to
be
sure.

Most
jails
consider
any
portion
of
the
day
served
as
a
full
day
–
that
is
to
say
that
if

you
are
booked
in
at
11:59
at
night
you
will
still
get
credit
for
serving
a
full
day.
For

this
reason
you
may
be
released
a
day
earlier
than
you
would
think
your
getting
out.

If
you
are
uncertain
what
your
release
date
is
make
sure
to
ask
the
jail.

Make
sure
that
whoever
is
picking
you
up
does
not
have
a
tight
schedule
–
it
can

sometimes
take
hours
to
process
outgoing
inmates.
Nothing
is
truly
efficient
in
this

legal
system.


Life
after
jail

Moving
on

Most
inmates
worry
a
lot
more
about
going
to
jail
than
about
being
released.
In

many
ways,
though,
the
transition
from
incarceration
to
freedom
can
be
as
difficult

as
the
transition
to
life
in
jail.

In
jail
you
learn
to
keep
an
emotional
distance
between
you
and
other
inmates
–
this

is
natural
and
it
is
for
your
own
protection.
This
can
make
relationships
on
the

outside
difficult,
though.
If
you
have
spent
at
least
a
few
months
in
jail
you
should

make
an
effort
to
talk
about
what
your
jail
experience
was
like
with
somebody
close

to
you.


Finding
a
job

If
you
have
been
charged
with
a
felony,
finding
a
job
can
be
difficult.
Most

background
checks
will
show
felony
charges
so
you
should
always
be
sure
to

disclose
them
in
your
initial
interview.
Consult
with
your
attorney
on
whether
or

not
your
misdemeanor
charges
will
show
up
–
under
some
situations
you
may
not

even
need
to
disclose
your
record.

Also,
many
states
will
actually
let
you
convert
felonies
to
misdemeanors
after
you

have
complied
with
all
of
the
terms
of
your
sentence
–
be
sure
to
ask
your
attorney

about
whether
this
is
a
possibility
in
your
situation.

You
should
contact
your
jail
for
a
list
of
companies
that
hire
felons.
If
they
don’t
have

a
list
available
you
may
want
to
call
some
local
attorneys.
In
some
cases
the


employers
may
require
that
you
be
bonded,
which
costs
a
little
money,
but
it
is
a

small
price
to
pay
for
gainful
employment.


Probation

Upon
your
release
you
may
still
be
on
probation
for
a
little
while
–
this
is
similar
to

parole
which
most
former
prison
inmates
are
required
to
serve,
but
not
quite
as

restrictive.

Usually
when
you
are
sentenced
to
serve
jail
time
you
have
other
conditions
on
your

sentence
as
well
–
fines,
restitution,
therapy,
probation,
etc.
The
purpose
of

probation
is
basically
to
ensure
that
you
keep
your
nose
clean
and
comply
with
all
of

the
terms
of
your
sentence.

Your
probation
officer
may
give
you
limitations
on
where
you
can
travel.
In
some

cases
you
will
be
required
to
check
in
at
a
police
station
when
you
reach
your

destination,
for
instance.
Make
sure
you
comply
with
all
of
these
rules
–
usually

when
you
have
complied
with
all
of
the
other
terms
of
probation
(restitution,
fines,

therapy,
etc.)
and
established
a
good
track
record
(at
least
a
few
months
without

any
problems)
your
probation
will
be
terminated
early.

While
you
are
on
probation
your
probation
officer
has
the
right
to
random

inspections
–
they
can
come
over
whenever
they
want
and
search
your
home

without
a
warrant.
They
can
also
visit
you
at
work
but
most
probation
officers
don’t

do
this
because
they
don’t
want
to
risk
you
losing
your
job
–
people
without
jobs

tend
to
get
in
more
trouble,
which
makes
life
harder
for
them.

In
addition
to
random
inspections,
most
probation
officers
require
that
you
visit

them
monthly
(or
sometimes
even
more
frequently).
Whether
or
not
you
have
drug

charges
they
randomly
administer
UA’s
(urine
analysis)
to
make
sure
you
are
not

doing
drugs.
If
you
test
dirty
(meaning
they
detect
drugs
in
your
system)
you
can
be

hauled
off
to
jail
with
more
charges.
If
the
terms
of
your
probation
prohibit
you
from

drinking
alcohol
they
may
also
test
you
for
the
presence
of
alcohol
as
well.

Sometimes
you
will
not
be
given
a
probation
officer
but
put
on
“written
probation,”

or
“court
probation.”
This
means
that
you
need
to
go
to
the
court
or
administrative

building
every
month
and
just
sign
in
and
let
them
know
your
current
address.
You

are
still
subject
to
urine
analysis.


Community
Service

Community
service
may
be
assigned
by
the
jail
in
lieu
of
or
in
addition
to
jail
time.

Sometimes
community
service
can
be
applied
toward
court
fines
as
well.
Most

people
imagine
inmates
picking
up
trash
on
the
road
–
while
this
is
popular
in
some

counties
there
are
a
variety
of
different
community
service
activities
to
choose
from.

Check
with
your
probation
officer
to
find
out
what
opportunities
are
available
to

you.


Voluntary
community
service
is
a
great
way
to
reduce
the
length
of
your
probation.

Most
people
commit
crimes
because
they
are
selfish
–
doing
service
is
a
great
way
to

show
the
judge
and
your
probation
officer
that
you
have
changed
and
are
putting

the
needs
of
others
above
your
own.


Conclusion

If
you
are
facing
jail
time
for
the
first
time,
you
probably
feel
like
you
don’t
belong
in

jail.
You
probably
have
a
preconceived
notion
of
what
an
inmate
is
like
and
don’t

feel
like
you
fit
the
profile.

The
truth
is
that
there
is
no
stereotypical
inmate
–
you
are
going
to
jail
because
you

made
a
bad
decision
(or
series
of
bad
decisions)
that
put
you
in
that
situation.
The

sooner
you
can
learn
to
see
other
inmates
as
regular
people,
like
yourself,
who
have

made
some
bad
decisions,
the
easier
your
stay
will
be
and
the
faster
the
time
will
go.

In
a
strange
way
jail
gives
you
an
opportunity
to
learn
things
about
yourself
that
you

wouldn’t
learn
otherwise
–
you
may
find
confidence
that
you
didn’t
realize
you
had

before
or
learn
how
to
relate
to
other
people
better.
If
you
can
use
this
period
of

time
as
an
opportunity
to
improve
yourself,
the
time
will
not
just
be
wasted.

Then
again,
maybe
it
won’t
be
a
great
experience
for
you
–
maybe
it’s
just
something

you
need
to
endure
so
you
can
open
the
next
chapter
of
your
life.
Either
way,
rest

assured
that
the
time
will
pass.

Help
somebody
else
out

We
hope
you
found
this
guide
helpful
–
we
provide
this
information
free
of
charge

because
we
know
how
difficult
the
jail
experience
can
be
for
the
family
of
the

incarcerated.


Help
somebody
else
out
–
if
you’ve
been
to
jail
go
share
your
experience
at

http://jailmedia.com/inmate‐interview
–
you
can
post
your
experience

anonymously
and
we
will
publish
the
story
to
one
of
our
jail
websites.
If
we
don’t

already
have
a
site
for
your
jail
we’ll
start
one!

If
you
have
been
to
rehab
consider
reviewing
the
facility
you
were
in
–
this
is
helpful

for
people
considering
rehab
options.
Just
go
to
http://rehabio.com/interview

Also,
if
you
have
ever
hired
an
attorney
(or
worked
with
a
public
defender),
you
can

write
a
review
as
well.
Our
visitors
are
always
looking
for
the
best
representation
–

just
go
to
http://attornio.com/interview
‐
it
should
only
take
a
few
minutes.

More
information

To
find
more
information
about
a
particular
county
jail
you
can
read
interviews

from
inmates
across
the
country.
Just
go
to
jailmedia.com/Properties.php
and
find

the
jail
nearest
you.


If
you
don’t
see
your
jail
listed
drop
us
a
line
at
content@jailmedia.com
and
we
will

try
to
find
some
ex‐inmates
to
provide
this
information.

 

 

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