Skip navigation

Study of Psychological Effects of Administrative Segregation, Colorado DOC, 2010

Download original document:
Brief thumbnail
This text is machine-read, and may contain errors. Check the original document to verify accuracy.
The author(s) shown below used Federal funds provided by the U.S.
Department of Justice and prepared the following final report:

Document Title:

One Year Longitudinal Study of the
Psychological Effects of Administrative
Segregation

Author:

Maureen L. O’Keefe, M.A., Kelli J. Klebe, Ph.D.,
Alysha Stucker, B.A., Kristin Sturm, B.A.,
William Leggett, B.A.

Document No.:

232973

Date Received:

January 2011

Award Number:

2006-IJ-CX-0015

This report has not been published by the U.S. Department of Justice.
To provide better customer service, NCJRS has made this Federallyfunded grant final report available electronically in addition to
traditional paper copies.

Opinions or points of view expressed are those
of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect
the official position or policies of the U.S.
Department of Justice.

 

2010 

IIIIMMININE

i 

One Year Longitudinal  
Study of the 
Psychological Effects of 
Administrative Segregation 
 
 
 

By: 
 
Maureen L. O’Keefe, M.A. 
Colorado Department of Corrections 
2862 South Circle Drive 
I
Colorado Springs, CO  80906 
(719) 226‐4364 
 
Kelli J. Klebe, Ph.D. 
Alysha Stucker, B.A. 
Kristin Sturm, B.A. 
William Leggett, B.A. 
w.
w.,
,
w.,
University of Colorado – Colorado Springs 
w.
w.,
,
Department of Psychology 
w.
w.,
,
w.
,
w.
,
1420 Austin Bluffs Parkway 
w.
w.,
,
w.,
Colorado Springs, CO  80918 
(719) 255‐4175 
 
 

Submission Date to NIJ:  October 31, 2010 
Aristedes W. Zavaras 
Executive Director 
Department of Corrections 
 
Pamela Shockley‐Zalabak 
Chancellor 
University of Colorado 
Colorado Springs 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
This  project  was  supported  by  Grant  No.  2006‐IJ‐CS‐0015  awarded  by  the  Na‐
tional Institute of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice. 
Points of view in this document are those of the author and do not necessarily 
i 
  represent the official position or policies of the US Department of Justice. 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 
 
The  research  team  would  like  to  gratefully  acknowledge  the  following  individuals  who  served  on  the 
project’s advisory board for their significant time commitment and invaluable insights into this project: 
 
 

Jamie Fellner, Esq. 
Human Rights Watch 
 
Jeffrey Metzner, M.D. 
University of Colorado – Denver  
 
Joel Dvoskin, Ph.D. 
University of Arizona 
 
Larry Reid, M.A. 
Susan Jones, M.C.J. 
Joanie Shoemaker, M.B.A. 
Jim Michaud, Ph.D. 
Elizabeth Hogan, M.D. 
Colorado Department of Corrections 
 
John Stoner, Ph.D. 
Colorado Department of Corrections, Retired 
 

 

 
The  researchers  would  also  like  to  acknowledge  the  support  of  Mr.  Aristedes  Zavaras  and  the  staff  at  the 
Department of Corrections. This project would never have been possible without the commitment and con‐
tributions of management, mental health, case management, offender services, and security staff.  
 

 

i 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

ABSTRACT 
 
One of the most widely debated topics in the field of corrections – the use of long‐term administrative se‐
gregation (AS) – has suffered from a lack of empirical research. Critics have argued that the conditions of AS 
confinement  exacerbate  symptoms  of  mental  illness  and  create  mental  illness  where  none  previously  ex‐
isted. Empirical research has had little to offer this debate; the scant empirical research conducted to date 
suffers  from research  bias  and  serious methodological  flaws.  This  study  seeks  to  advance  the  literature  in 
this regard. 
This study tested three hypotheses: (1) offenders in AS would develop an array of psychological symptoms 
consistent  with  the  security  housing  unit  (SHU)  syndrome,  (2)  offenders  with  and  without  mental  illness 
would deteriorate over time in AS, but at a rate more rapid and extreme for the mentally ill, and (3) inmates 
in AS would experience greater psychological deterioration over time than the comparison groups. 
Study  participants  included  male  inmates  who  were  placed  in  AS  and  comparison  inmates  in  the  general 
population (GP). Placement into AS or GP conditions occurred as a function of routine prison operations. GP 
comparison participants included those at risk of AS placement due to their institutional behavior. Inmates 
in both of these study conditions (AS, GP) were divided into two groups – inmates with mental illness (MI) 
and with no mental illness (NMI). A third comparison group of inmates with severe mental health problems 
placed in San Carlos Correctional Facility, a psychiatric care prison facility, was also included. A total of 302 
inmates were approached to participate in the study, and 55 refused to participate or later withdrew their 
consent. Participants were tested at 3‐month intervals over a yearlong period.  
Standardized test data were collected through self‐report, correctional staff and clinical staff measures. Tests 
with demonstrated reliability and validity were selected to assess the eight primary constructs of interest: (1) 
anxiety, (2) cognitive impairment, (3) depression‐hopelessness, (4) hostility‐anger control, (5) hypersensitivity, 
(6) psychosis, (7) somatization,  and  (8)  withdrawal‐alienation. Extensive analyses of  psychometric  properties 
revealed  that  inmates  self‐reported  psychological  and  cognitive  symptoms  in  remarkably  reliable  and  valid 
ways.  
The results of this study were largely inconsistent with our hypotheses and the bulk of literature that indi‐
cates AS is extremely detrimental to inmates with and without mental illness. Similar to other research, our 
study  found  that  segregated  offenders  were  elevated  on  multiple  psychological  and  cognitive  measures 
when  compared  to  normative  adult  samples.  However,  elevations  were  present  among  the  comparison 
groups  too,  suggesting  that  high  degrees  of  psychological  disturbances  are  not  unique  to  the  AS  environ‐
ment.  In  examining  change  over  time  patterns,  there  was  initial  improvement  in  psychological  well‐being 
across all study groups, with the bulk of the improvements occurring between the first and second testing 
periods, followed by relative stability for the remainder of the study. Patterns indicated that the MI groups 
tended to be similar to one another but were significantly elevated compared to the NMI groups, regardless 
of their setting. Contrary to our hypothesis, offenders with mental illness did not deteriorate over time in AS 
at a rate more rapid and more extreme than for those without mental illness. Finally, although AS inmates in 
this study were found to possess traits believed to be associated with long‐term segregation, these features 
cannot be attributed to AS confinement because they were present at the time of placement and also oc‐
curred in the comparison study groups. Implications for policy and future research are discussed.  

ii 

 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

CONTENTS 
 
Executive Summary ................................................. iv 

Official Record Data .......................................... 40 

Introduction ........................................................ iv 

Group Comparisons .......................................... 45 

Purpose of Present Study .................................... iv 

Normative Comparisons ................................... 46 

Method ................................................................ v 

Change over Time ............................................. 52 

Findings ............................................................. viii 

Predictor Analyses............................................. 75 

Policy Implications .............................................. ix 

Discussion .............................................................. 78 

Introduction ............................................................. 1 

Limitations ......................................................... 79 

Characteristics of Long‐Term Segregation ........... 1 

Future Research ................................................ 80 

Criticisms of the AS Model ................................... 2 

Policy Implications ............................................ 81 

Case Law Review .................................................. 3 

References ............................................................ 84 

Research Review .................................................. 5 

Appendix A ............................................................ 91 

The Colorado System ........................................... 7 

Appendix B ............................................................ 95 

Purpose of Present Study ...................................15 

Summary of Study Measures ............................ 95 

Method ..................................................................17 

Description of Individual Measures .................. 96 

Group Assignment .............................................17 

Normative Comparisons ................................. 125 

Participants ........................................................19 

Composite Scores ............................................ 126 

Materials ............................................................19 

Summary ......................................................... 138 

Procedures .........................................................28 

Appendix B References ................................... 139 

Results ....................................................................31 

Appendix C .......................................................... 145 

Data Analysis Plan ..............................................31 

Prison Symptom Inventory Analyses .............. 145 

Sampling .............................................................32 

Summary ......................................................... 150 

Validity of Responses .........................................36 

 

iii 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 
INTRODUCTION 
One of the most widely debated topics in the field of corrections – the use of long‐term administrative se‐
gregation (AS) – has suffered from a lack of empirical research. The placement of offenders in AS environ‐
ments,  particularly  those  with  serious  mental  illness,  has  been  a  point  of  contention.  Critics  have  argued 
that  the  conditions  of  AS  confinement  exacerbate  symptoms  of  mental  illness  and  create  mental  illness 
where none previously existed. The use of AS across the country has persisted as a corrections management 
tool despite litigation, although in many states, the placement of mentally ill into AS is no longer permitted. 
Empirical research has had little to offer this debate; the scant empirical research conducted to date suffers 
from research bias and serious methodological flaws.  
Now  decades  after  the  deinstitutionalization  of  states’  mental  health  hospitals,  corrections  agencies  have 
seen a surge of offenders with serious mental illness in their prisons. The rate of serious mental illness in the 
community  is  6%  (National  Institute  of  Mental  Health,  2010).  Among  the  incarcerated,  the  rate  of  serious 
mental illness is tripled at about 18% (Ditton, 1999; O’Keefe & Schnell, 2008). A similar phenomenon is oc‐
curring within prisons, whereby a disproportionate rate of mentally ill are found within AS, estimated to be 
50% higher than the rate within the general prison population (O’Keefe, 2008a). It is not known the extent 
to which this difference is caused by the AS environment. Researchers have been unable to settle the ques‐
tion of whether these high rates of mental illness are caused by AS relative to the general prison population 
or whether there is a selection bias such that offenders with mental illness, unable to adapt to general pris‐
on settings, are placed in AS at higher rates. This study seeks to advance the literature in this regard.   

PURPOSE OF PRESENT STUDY 
The broad purpose of the project was to evaluate the psychological effects of long‐term segregation on of‐
fenders, particularly those with mental illness. This study examined conditions as they existed in the Colora‐
do prison system with respect to AS, using the Colorado State Penitentiary (CSP) as the AS study facility. On‐
ly  males  were  included  because  females  represent  2%  of  Colorado’s  AS  population.  We  did  not  assign  in‐
mates to segregation, but studied those conditions as they naturally occurred. The following are the primary 
goals and hypotheses.  
Goal 1: To determine which, if any, psychological domains are affected, and in which direction, by the differ‐
ent prison environments. A multitude of psychological dimensions were examined, drawing from those most 
often  cited  in  the  literature.  The  broad  constructs  of  interest  were  depression/hopelessness,  anxiety,  psy‐
chosis, withdrawal and alienation, hostility and anger control, somatization, hypersensitivity, and cognitive 
impairment. We hypothesized that offenders in segregation would develop an array of psychological symp‐
toms consistent with the security housing unit (SHU) syndrome, with elevations across the eight constructs.  
Goal  2:  To  assess  whether  offenders  with  mental  illness  decompensate  differentially  from  those  without 
mental illness. We were particularly interested in whether long‐term segregation had a differential impact 
based on the presence of mental illness in offenders. We sought answers to the following questions: Does 
AS  exacerbate  symptoms  in  offenders  with  mental  illness?  Does  AS  create  symptoms  of  mental  illness  in 
those who did not exhibit any at placement? It was hypothesized that offenders with and without mental 
illness  would  deteriorate  over  time,  but  the  rate  at  which  it  occurred  would  be  more  rapid  and  more  ex‐
treme for the mentally ill. 
iv 

 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

Goal 3: To compare the impact of long‐term segregation against the general prison setting and a psychiatric 
care prison. In this study, the psychological and behavioral symptoms of offenders in AS were compared to 
similar offenders who were sent to San Carlos Correctional Facility (SCCF) or returned to the general prison 
population pursuant an AS hearing. This study used a repeated measures design over the course of a year to 
explore whether psychological distress was attributable to the various prison environments. It was hypothe‐
sized that inmates in segregation would experience greater psychological deterioration over time than the 
comparison groups. 
This study also included an examination of individual characteristics such as mental health status, personali‐
ty, and trauma history to determine if certain factors could predict patterns of change. Prediction analyses 
were  exploratory  in  nature  and  we  did  not  formulate  a  hypothesis  about  the  variables  that  might  predict 
differential rates of psychological decompensation.  

METHOD 
Group Assignment 
Study  participants  included  male  inmates  who  were  placed  in  AS  and  comparison  inmates  in  the  general 
population  (GP).  Placement  into  AS  or  GP  conditions  occurred  as  a  function  of  routine  prison  operations, 
pending  the  outcome  of  their  AS  hearing,  without  involvement  of  the  researchers.  All  study  participants 
classified to AS were waitlisted for and placed in CSP. Inmates who returned to GP following an AS hearing 
were assumed to be as similar as possible to AS inmates and, therefore, comprised the comparison groups. 
Comparison participants also included inmates targeted for a diversionary program that identified inmates 
at  high  risk  of  AS  placement  due  to  their  disruptive  behavior.  This  program  discontinued  shortly  after  the 
study  commenced,  hence  few  participants  were  identified  through  this  method.  Inmates  in  both  of  these 
study conditions (AS, GP) were divided into two groups – inmates with mental illness (MI) and with no men‐
tal illness (NMI). There are fewer inmates with mental illness than without, but because both subgroups were of 
equal interest to this study, separate groups enabled over‐selection of inmates with mental illness.   
A  third  comparison  group  was  included.  This  group  included  inmates  with  severe  mental  health  problems 
placed in SCCF. Of the inmates placed in SCCF, only those with patterns of prison misbehavior, as measured 
by  disciplinary  violations,  were  included  in  the  study.  The  purpose  of  the  SCCF  comparison  group  was  to 
study inmates with serious mental illness and behavioral problems who were managed in a psychiatric pris‐
on setting.  
Participants 
A total of 302 male inmates were approached to participate in the study. Thirty refused to participate. Two 
more offenders were considered a passive refusal and were removed for inappropriate sexual behavior to‐
wards the researcher during the first testing session. An additional 23 offenders later withdrew their con‐
sent, although the data collected to the point of their withdrawal was used. In addition to refusals and with‐
drawals, 10 inmates released prior to the end of the study due to discretionary releases by the Parole Board 
and one participant death.  
Five testing sessions were initially established at 3‐month intervals, beginning with the date of consent and 
initial administration. Therefore, tests were scheduled at 3 months, 6 months, 9 months and 12 months af‐
ter  the  baseline  assessment.  However,  this  schedule  was  problematic  for  the  AS  groups.  When  the  study 
 

v 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

began, there was a 3‐month average wait for inmates to be transferred to CSP due to a shortage of AS beds. 
While on the waitlist, AS inmates were held in a punitive segregation bed at their originating facility. It was 
determined that the primary goal was to study inmates in a single long‐term segregation facility (CSP) to lim‐
it confounding variables and that therefore the baseline measure should be collected upon placement into 
CSP. However, it was also recognized that significant changes could occur while inmates were held in segre‐
gation at their originating facility. Therefore, a “pre‐baseline” measure was collected as close to the AS hear‐
ing as possible, which meant that the CSP groups completed six test intervals rather than five. The time be‐
tween the pre‐baseline and baseline measure varied according to how long the inmate was on the waitlist. 
The median  time between pre and  baseline tests was 99 days, although eight offenders were moved into 
CSP  so  quickly  that  they  did  not  have  a  pre‐baseline  measure.  In  the  analyses,  tests  were  aligned  across 
groups according to the test number, such that the CSP groups had an additional test at the end rather than 
at the beginning.  
Participants’ ages ranged from 17 to 59 at the time of consent, with a mean age of 31.8 (SD = 9.1). The ra‐
cial/ethnic breakdown of participants was 40% white, 36% Hispanic, 19% African American, 4% Native Amer‐
ican, and 1% Asian. Of the inmates with mental illness who were included in this study, 56% were identified with 
a serious and pervasive disorder.  
Materials 
Assessment tools were selected to comprehensively cover the variety of psychological constructs associated 
with  AS  (e.g.,  Arrigo  &  Bullock,  2008;  Grassian,  1983;  Haney,  2003).  The  primary  constructs  assessed  in  this 
study  were  as  follows:  (1)  anxiety,  (2)  cognitive  impairment,  (3)  depression/hopelessness,  (4)  hostility/anger 
control, (5) hypersensitivity, (6) psychosis, (7) somatization, and (8) withdrawal/alienation. Additionally, malin‐
gering, self‐harm, trauma, and personality disorders were assessed.  
Research materials were selected to meet the following criteria:  (1) use of assessments with demonstrated 
reliability  and  validity,  (2)  use  of  multiple  sources  for  providing  information  (e.g.,  self‐report,  clinician  rat‐
ings, files), (3) use of multiple assessments of each construct of interest, (4) ability to use within the prison 
setting,  and  (5)  ease  of  administration,  including  no  specialized  equipment,  no  physical  contact,  length  of 
time, and appropriate reading level. 
The 12 self‐report instruments used in this study were: (1) Beck Hopelessness Scale, (2) Brief Symptom In‐
ventory, (3) Coolidge Correctional Inventory, (4) Deliberate Self‐Harm Inventory, (5) Personality Assessment 
Screener, (6) Prison Symptom Inventory, (7) Profile of Mood States, (8) Saint Louis University Mental Status, 
(9) State‐Trait Anxiety Inventory, (10) Structured Inventory of Malingered Symptomatology, (11) Trail Mak‐
ing Test, and (12) Trauma Symptom Inventory. 
In addition to self‐report assessments, ratings of psychological functioning were obtained from clinical staff 
and ratings of behavior in the housing unit were obtained from correctional staff. The Brief Psychiatric Rat‐
ing Scale (BPRS) was completed by clinical staff and the Prison Behavior Rating Scale (PBRS) was completed 
by correctional staff. 
Most  assessments  were  collected  at  each  testing  period,  although  personality  disorders,  self‐harm,  and 
trauma history were not. It was determined that personality and trauma history were relatively stable con‐
structs that needed to be assessed only once to limit the testing burden on study participants. Also, due to 

vi 

 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

the burden on already limited mental health resources, the BPRS was only administered at the first, third, 
and fifth testing intervals. 
Data from official records were collected primarily from the Department of Corrections Information System, 
which is an administrative database of offender data. Offender characteristics to include demographic histo‐
ry,  criminal  history  and  offense  data,  institutional  behavior,  and  needs  levels  were  electronically  down‐
loaded.  
Certain data elements were collected only for study participants during the course of their participation in 
the study. The following were collected and coded for the period of time between each testing interval for 
each  participant:  the  amount  of  time  spent  in  various  settings  (e.g.,  segregation,  GP,  hospital),  phone 
records,  and  mental  health  crisis  data.  Additionally,  activity  logs  from  paper  files  for  the  CSP  participants 
were collected and coded.  
Procedure 
Study enrollment began July 2007 and ended March 2009, with final testing of all participants completed in 
March 2010. The project operated under the approval of the institutional review board at the University of 
Colorado at Colorado Springs.  
The research team was notified of AS hearings by the case management supervisor at each facility and of 
SCCF placements by the clinician who scheduled the facility transfers. Notification typically occurred before 
the hearings or SCCF placement to give the field researcher maximal lead time. Researchers reviewed elec‐
tronic records to screen inmates for study eligibility.  
The field researcher was a female university employee who completed the full training academy and had a 
badge  that  permitted  her  unescorted  access  to  the  facilities.  In  advance  of  each  visit,  the  researcher  con‐
tacted prison security to arrange visits with specific inmates. All inmates were escorted by security staff to 
the visiting room, which contained a noncontact booth for inmates in AS or punitive segregation conditions. 
The researcher met individually with each inmate to review the consent form, which included the general 
purpose of the study, voluntary nature of participation, risks and benefits, and remuneration. Inmates were 
advised  that  the  purpose  of  the  study  was  to  learn  about  adjustment  to  prison  and  offenders  in  prisons 
across the state were participating in this study. 
At the time of consent, the initial test battery was administered. The field researcher instructed participants 
to read the directions for each test. Instructions were highlighted by researchers when there was an indica‐
tion on the test to respond with respect to a certain timeframe (e.g., in the past week). The researcher ad‐
ministered the timed tests, and she assisted if they had questions, most frequently with the definition of a 
word. The researcher collected the test packet immediately following its completion, so it was not ever han‐
dled by security staff.  
The  field  researcher  distributed  the  PBRS  to  housing  staff  at  each  testing  interval  and  collected  the  com‐
pleted forms upon return visits to the facility. Mental health clinicians were generally notified that a BPRS 
was needed a couple weeks prior to the researcher testing to give them time to complete the assessment.  
Participants’ data were kept in two separate databases. The eligibility database tracked the eligible pool of 
offenders, such as identifying information, current location, date of AS hearing or SCCF placement, expected 

 

vii 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

release date, mental health status and clinician approval, selection into study or reason for exclusion, and 
date  of  consent  or  refusal.  A  testing  schedule  for  study  participants  was  incorporated  into  the  database, 
which also had reporting  capabilities in order to manage the  project. A separate database tracked partici‐
pants’ responses to the standardized tests; no identifying information was included in this database other 
than a secure researcher‐assigned identification number. Both databases were stored on a secured server 
with access restricted to project researchers.  

FINDINGS 
The results of this study were largely inconsistent with our hypotheses and the bulk of literature that indi‐
cates AS is extremely detrimental to inmates with and without mental illness. We hypothesized that inmates 
in  segregation  would  experience  greater  psychological  deterioration  over  time  than  comparison  inmates, 
who  were  comprised  of  similar  offenders  confined  in  non‐segregation  prisons.  Consistent  with  other  re‐
search,  our  study  found  that  segregated  offenders  were  elevated  on  multiple  psychological  and  cognitive 
measures when compared to normative adult samples (Haney, 2003; Suedfeld, Ramirez, Deaton, & Baker‐
Brown, 1982). However, there were elevations among the comparison groups too, suggesting that high de‐
grees of psychological disturbances are not unique to the AS environment. The GP NMI group was the only 
one that was similar to the normative group on a number of scales.  
In examining change over time patterns, there was initial improvement in psychological well‐being across all 
study  groups,  with  the  bulk  of  the  improvements  occurring  between  the  first  and  second  testing  periods, 
followed  by  relative  stability  for  the  remainder  of  the  study.  On  only  one  measure  –  withdrawal  –  did  of‐
fenders worsen over time, but this finding was only true for the two NMI groups, so it is not attributable to 
AS. Even given the improvements that occurred within the study timeframe, the elevations in psychological 
and  cognitive  functioning  that  were  evident  at  the  start  of  the  study  remained  present  at  the  end  of  the 
study.  
Another hypothesis was that offenders with mental illness would deteriorate over time in AS at a rate more 
rapid and more extreme than for those without mental illness. Patterns indicated that the MI groups (CSP 
MI, GP MI, SCCF) tended to look similar to one another but were significantly elevated compared to the NMI 
groups (CSP NMI, GP NMI), regardless of their setting. For the AS offenders, the MI group scored worse than 
the NMI group on all self‐report measures except the Trails test and all staff measures except the PBRS Anti‐
Authority scale. In addition to the changes over time described above, PBRS scores decreased significantly 
for segregated inmates regardless of their mental health status, which would be an indicator that staff may 
be perceiving improvements, but the significant differences were from the first to the second assessment 
periods when the majority of participants changed facilities, which suggests this is perhaps a measurement 
error rather than a true improvement. As hypothesized there was a differential time effect for the MI and 
NMI groups on several composite measures (i.e., anxiety, hostility‐anger control, hypersensitivity, somatiza‐
tion), but the interactions were in the opposite direction of our hypothesis; on average, the CSP NMI group 
did not change while the CSP MI group improved. 
We stated that offenders in segregation would develop an array of psychological symptoms consistent with 
the SHU syndrome. As already discussed, all of the study groups, with the exception of the GP NMI group, 
showed symptoms that  were associated with the  SHU syndrome. These elevations were present from the 
start and were more serious for the mentally ill than non‐mentally ill. In classifying people as improving, de‐

viii 

 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

clining, or staying the same over time, the majority remained the same. There was a small percentage (7%) 
who  worsened  and  a  larger  proportion  (20%)  who  improved.  Therefore,  this  study  cannot  attribute  the 
presence of SHU symptoms to confinement in AS. The features of the SHU syndrome appear to describe the 
most disturbed offenders in prison, regardless of where they are housed. In fact, the group of offenders who 
were placed in a psychiatric care facility (SCCF) had the greatest degree of psychological disturbances and 
the greatest amount of negative change.  
Finally, in this study, we conducted some exploratory predictive analyses to determine if there were individ‐
ual  characteristics  that  could  identify  who  may  be  at  greater  risk  of  psychological  harm  from  segregation. 
There  were  no  individual  predictors  that  showed  strong  effects  for  predicting  change.  This  could  indicate 
that we did not have the correct predictors or that patterns of decompensation are individualized (i.e., not 
predictable), but it is more likely that the relative stability over time makes it difficult to predict change.  
A review of the findings warrants a discussion of plausible alternative explanations that might account for 
our results. The use of a repeated measures design enabled us to determine that change was occurring and 
in  which  direction.  Even  given  the  debate  about  whether  or  not  harmful  effects  resulted  from  AS,  it  was 
never suggested that inmates might improve as this study found. The presence of comparison groups avoids 
an attribution error; the changes, improvements in this case (i.e., 20%), are not due to segregation. These 
conclusions  replicate  those  drawn  by  Zinger  and  colleagues  (2001)  where  there  was  a  similar  lack  of  evi‐
dence of harm. These studies suffered criticism for high refusal rates, high attrition rates, small sample sizes, 
and short durations – limitations that were corrected in the present study (note, however, that no generali‐
zations should be made beyond the 1 year follow‐up period in this study). Furthermore, the use of reliable 
and valid standardized measures enabled the present research study to assess psychological functioning in 
an objective  manner.  Although the majority of these tests were  not normed for prisoner populations, the 
current reliability and validity findings increased our confidence in these measures.  

POLICY IMPLICATIONS 
Does this study legitimize the use of segregation with offenders, including those with serious and persistent 
mental  illness?  Because  this  study  may  not  generalize  to  other  prison  systems,  especially  those  that  have 
conditions of confinement dissimilar to CSP, it is not possible to conclude that AS is not detrimental for all 
offenders. Systems that are more restrictive and have fewer treatment and programming resources should 
not generalize these findings to their prisons. Replication is needed to understand how increased services, 
privileges, and out of cell time ameliorate the unintended consequences of AS, and research needs to inform 
prison systems about the standards and practices necessary to protect inmates in segregation from harmful 
psychological effects.  
It is also important to note that there may be other negative consequences of AS that we did not study. For 
example,  Lovell,  Johnson,  and  Cain  (2007)  found  that  inmates  released  directly  from  segregation  to  the 
streets had dramatically higher rates and severity of detected recidivism than AS inmates who first released 
to GP (but see Mears & Bales, 2009). We also did not study the degree to which AS met its purported goal of 
changing inmate behavior for the better over time. The only questions addressed by this study were related 
to  psychological  changes  over  time  in  segregation.  Thus,  we  make  no  empirical  or  value  judgments  about 
whether and to what degree the use of AS balances the benefits (e.g., a safer prison system) with costs (e.g., 
significant reductions in freedom).  

 

ix 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

It is impossible to ignore the extremely disproportionate rate at which inmates with serious mental illness 
are  assigned  to  AS  (Lovell,  2008;  Metzner  &  Fellner,  2010;  O’Keefe,  2008a),  which  has  to  some  degree 
“shocked the conscience” of the courts (see Jones ‘El v. Berge, 2001; Madrid v. Gomez, 1995; Ruiz v. John‐
son, 1999). In an era when prisons are expected to implement evidence‐based practices and to rehabilitate 
offenders who will be releasing back to the community, is it enough to avoid harm? Must we ask ourselves 
another question: what are the conditions required to improve inmates’ mental well‐being while in segrega‐
tion? Prison systems are held to a standard of treatment that is at least equivalent to community standards. 
It is likely that this most difficult segment of society has failed at all levels of community treatment and ear‐
lier criminal justice interventions, but the quest to treat and improve services for the most needy is an im‐
portant reality facing corrections agencies. 
Regarding their psychological functioning and levels of distress, these data suggest, although the differences 
were  small,  that  inmates  with  serious  mental  illness  are  less  likely  to  improve  in  segregation  and  are  less 
likely to get worse compared to mentally ill inmates in GP. We do not assume that the reasons for these ap‐
parently contradictory findings are the same. For example, it is possible that fewer inmates with mental ill‐
ness get worse because segregation is a safer and more structured environment. On the other hand, hypo‐
theses regarding their unlikeliness to improve include the significant limitations that segregation places on 
various types of therapeutic activities and services such as group therapy. Further, the data do not tell us 
which  aspects  of  AS  prevent  psychological  improvement  and  deterioration,  respectively,  among  inmates 
with mental illness. However, since prisons have a constitutional duty to respond to serious medical (includ‐
ing psychiatric) needs, the possibility that segregation may prevent improvement is cause for concern and 
further study.  
There  remain  significant  implications  for  mental  health  staff  who  work  in  prison  systems  that  permit  the 
placement of mentally ill in long‐term segregation. It is critical for mental health staff to screen and assess 
offenders prior to AS placement to determine their vulnerability to harm that might occur as a result of their 
segregation.  While  in  segregation,  it  is  important  that  the  mental  status  of  all  offenders  be  assessed  on  a 
frequent, regular basis through rounds and individual sessions. Prison systems need to have a range of con‐
finement options, such that offenders who are at risk of or are showing signs of decompensation can be re‐
moved from segregation and placed in an alternative high security environment that permits greater out of 
cell time and interaction with others.  
Other  systems  have  rejected  confinement  models  that  isolated  offenders  and  held  them  in  extremely  re‐
strictive spaces. Even if the segregation models of the early 1900’s and the state psychiatric hospitals of the 
mid‐19th century are viewed as “primitive” compared to modern‐day AS facilities, it is important to examine 
and understand why these models failed and were ultimately dismantled. Although there are a number of 
researchers who predict that there is no end in sight to the supermax model (King, 1999; Mears, 2008; Pizar‐
ro & Narag, 2008; Pizarro & Stenius, 2004), they have also raised empirical questions regarding their effica‐
cy. Questions about the efficacy of AS will be asked until more is known about whether the use of AS in pris‐
on systems improves conditions for the rest of the system, whether and how they improve inmate behavior 
within and beyond the prison walls, whether they are cost‐effective, whether they increase risks to public 
safety, and whether there are settings or individuals that are prone to psychological deterioration.  

x 

 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 

INTRODUCTION 
One of the most widely debated topics in the field of corrections – the use of long‐term administrative se‐
gregation (AS) – has suffered from a lack of empirical research. The placement of offenders in AS environ‐
ments,  particularly  those  with  serious  mental  illness,  has  been  a  point  of  contention.  Critics  have  argued 
that  the  conditions  of  AS  confinement  exacerbate  symptoms  of  mental  illness  and  create  mental  illness 
where none previously existed. The use of AS across the country has persisted as a corrections management 
tool despite litigation, although in many states, the placement of mentally ill into AS is no longer permitted. 
Empirical research has had little to offer this debate; the scant empirical research conducted to date suffers 
from research bias and serious methodological flaws.  
Now  decades  after  the  deinstitutionalization  of  states’  mental  health  hospitals,  corrections  agencies  have 
seen a surge of offenders with serious mental illness in their prisons. The rate of serious mental illness in the 
community  is  6%  (National  Institute  of  Mental  Health,  2010).  Among  the  incarcerated,  the  rate  of  serious 
mental illness is tripled at about 18% (Ditton, 1999; O’Keefe & Schnell, 2008). A similar phenomenon is oc‐
curring within prisons, whereby a disproportionate rate of mentally ill are found within AS, estimated to be 
50% higher than the rate within the general prison population (O’Keefe, 2008a). It is not known the extent 
to which this difference is caused by the AS environment. Researchers have been unable to settle the ques‐
tion of whether these high rates of mental illness are caused by AS relative to the general prison population 
or whether there is a selection bias such that offenders with mental illness, unable to adapt to general pris‐
on settings, are placed in AS at higher rates. This study seeks to advance the literature in this regard.  

CHARACTERISTICS OF LONG‐TERM SEGREGATION 
 “Supermax”  is  the  popular  term  used  to  describe  the  technologically  advanced,  supermaximum  security 
prisons designed for single‐cell occupancy that were rapidly being constructed across the nation during the 
1990’s. Even when new construction was not possible, existing prisons were retrofitted to conform to this 
new model.  Therefore, a supermax facility may refer to an entire facility or a distinct unit  within a facility 
(National Institute of Corrections, 1997). Although there was a virtual explosion of supermax facilities over 
the past two decades, similar units have operated on a smaller scale for decades (Zinger, Wichman, & An‐
drews, 2001).  
The modern‐day supermax model is traced back to the U.S. Penitentiary in Marion, Illinois, that went into 
permanent lockdown status in 1983. Prior to Marion, the Federal Bureau of Prisons operated solitary con‐
finement at the Alcatraz Island Prison until it closed in 1963. History points to even earlier uses of solitary 
confinement including Pennsylvania’s Eastern State Penitentiary, which opened in 1829 and was later mod‐
eled in European prisons (Smith, 2008). However, these early models featured such extreme social isolation 
and sensory deprivation (Cohen, 2008) and were so primitive that there is little comparison between them 
and today’s modern supermaxes (National Institute of Corrections, 1999).  
Across prison systems, different terms are used to describe the same concept: administrative segregation or 
AS, control units, security housing units or SHUs, and security controls unit (Haney, 2003; NIC, 1999). In Col‐
orado, it is known as AS. Just as the names vary, so do the conditions. However, the defining feature that is 
frequently associated with this model is single‐cell confinement for 23 hr per day, with 1 hr allowed out of 
cell for showers and exercise. AS is differentiated from punitive or disciplinary segregation, which is a time‐

INTRODUCTION 

1 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
limited punishment enforced for a prison violation pursuant a full due process hearing; placement in AS is an 
administrative decision that often extends for an indefinite time period.  
AS  prisons  are  costly  to  build  and  operate  due  to  costs  associated  with  high  security  that  include  single‐
occupancy cells, high staff to inmate ratios, and technology (Mears & Bales, 2009). Because inmate move‐
ment requires multiple restraints and staff, many services are provided at the cell door, including meals, li‐
brary, mental health services, and programs. Newer AS facilities are equipped with advanced technological 
equipment,  which  enables  delivery  of even  more  services  to  inmates  in  their  cells  (e.g.,  visitation  through 
videoconferencing)  or  within  the  facility  (e.g.,  medical  and  dental  procedures).  Although  technological 
equipment is designed and used to reduce security breaches, it also increases the degree of isolation expe‐
rienced by inmates.  
It is difficult to establish the number of inmates held in AS nationally. In 1999, King estimated that 1.8% of all 
state prisoners were housed in AS. Although prevalence estimates are higher now than in 1999, prison sys‐
tems under‐report the actual use of AS, likely due to the negative connotation associated with the supermax 
label used in national reporting (Naday, Freilich, & Mellow, 2008). For example, the Federal Bureau of Pris‐
ons reported no inmates in AS, protective custody, or supermax beds in 2008 (American Correctional Asso‐
ciation, 2009), which is inaccurate. Additionally, states reported drastically different numbers of offenders in 
AS from year to year (see Naday et al., 2008). Given these limitations, it is estimated that at least 3.2% of all 
state prisoners in 2008 were housed in AS or protective custody (American Correctional Association, 2009), 
although this appears to be an under‐estimation of the true prevalence rates.  

CRITICISMS OF THE AS MODEL 
The use of AS has sparked a controversy resulting in considerable criticism of the prison system and its ad‐
ministrators. The limited number of research studies and the inadequacies of existing research on AS have 
only fueled the controversy. Numerous researchers and forensic professionals have called for more research 
to examine whether evidence based practices are in place and to examine whether harm is being done by 
confining inmates to segregation (Kurki & Morris, 2001; Lovell et al., 2007; Mears, 2008; Metzner & Dvoskin, 
2006;  Pizarro  &  Narag,  2008),  but  the  topics  and  setting  are  difficult  ones  in  which  to  conduct  research 
(Mears & Watson, 2006; Naday et al., 2008).  
One criticism has been the lack of evidence that segregation has achieved its intended goal of reducing vi‐
olence  in  the  prison  system  (Kurki  &  Morris,  2001;  Mears,  2008).  There  is  some  literature  to  suggest  that 
wardens and prison systems find this model to be effective in reducing violence and increasing order within 
the larger prison system (Atherton, 2001; Mears & Watson, 2006; Ward & Werlich, 2003). However, these 
studies lack the appropriate statistical controls to assert that the improvements are measurable and attri‐
butable to AS rather than merely perceptions of wardens or the result of other management controls also 
put into place at the same time. In an empirical study of institutional violence in three states, Briggs, Sundt, 
and  Castellano  (2003)  did  not  find  that  AS  reduced  inmate‐on‐inmate  violence.  However,  in  a  follow‐up 
study,  Sundt,  Castellano  and  Briggs  (2008)  found  that  permanent  reductions  in  inmate‐on‐staff  violence 
were attributable to the opening of an AS prison in Illinois.  
Corrections departments have been moving towards evidence‐based models and practices to improve the 
rehabilitation  opportunities  for  offenders.  These  practices  include  standardized  assessments,  matching  of‐
fender  needs  to  services,  cognitive‐behavioral  programs,  re‐entry  services,  structured  decision  making 

2 

INTRODUCTION 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
guidelines, and intensive treatment programs such as therapeutic communities. By endorsing an administra‐
tive action to determine placement of inmates into AS, corrections agencies have moved away from the evi‐
dence‐based risk and classification instruments in favor of more subjective decisions. This criticism applies to 
both the decision to place inmates in AS and their continuation in AS (Human Rights Watch, 2000; O’Keefe, 
2008b; Pizarro & Narag, 2008).  
An emerging concern is the return of offenders from AS to society, which may occur with little or no step‐
down process such that offenders are released directly to the streets from 23/7 confinement. Although the 
adjustment  required  for  offenders  to  adapt  to  rapid  and  extreme  socialization  changes  is  of  concern,  the 
issue of public safety is perhaps of even greater concern. Research has indicated that AS inmates have high‐
er recidivism rates than non‐AS offenders (Mears & Bales, 2009; Motiuk & Blanchette, 2001; O’Keefe, 2005), 
but this is likely due to the selection effects of who is confined to AS. When matching procedures were en‐
gaged, no differences in overall recidivism rates were found between AS and matched non‐AS inmates (Lo‐
vell et al., 2007; Mears & Bales, 2009). Mears and Bales (2009) found a small, but significant difference when 
violent recidivism was the outcome measure rather than general recidivism; 24.2% of AS inmates had a vio‐
lent re‐offense compared to 20.5% of matched non‐AS inmates. Lovell et al. (2007) found that inmates who 
released directly from AS had a higher recidivism rate than matched offenders who transitioned from AS to 
a lower security facility prior to release. In contrast, Mears and Bales (2009) found neither a recency effect 
(i.e., amount of time that elapsed between AS confinement and release) nor an exposure effect (i.e., total 
amount of time spent in AS confinement) on recidivism rates.  
Human rights concerns are tantamount to a discussion of the criticisms of the AS model. The use of AS has 
been  called  a  human  rights  violation,  and  some  have  even  labeled  it  torture  (Gawande,  2009;  Metzner  & 
Fellner, 2010). Many find the conditions of solitary confinement to be excessively harsh and inhumane (Co‐
hen, 2008; Haney, 2003, 2008; Human Rights Watch, 1997, 1999, 2000; King, 1999; Kupers, 2008; Kurki & 
Morris, 2001; Toch, 2001). Specifically, the lack of treatment, programs, and activities to engage the mind; 
the restricted personal contact;  lack of control over light and sound; lack of windows; and little or no access 
to the outdoors are considered to be more extreme than is required for the safe operation of prisons. Addi‐
tionally,  when  people  are  held  in  highly  restrictive  environments  where  they  have  little  control  over  their 
life, there is a greater opportunity for staff to inflict abuses upon those confined within (Haney, 2008; Hu‐
man Rights Watch, 2000; Kurki & Morris, 2001). 
The most significant issue is the question of whether prisoners are able to psychologically adapt to the con‐
ditions of AS. There is concern that mentally healthy individuals will decompensate in segregation, but re‐
cent discussions have centered on the placement of offenders with mental illness in such environments. Be‐
cause the harmful effects of AS is the central focus of this study, we will examine the evidence as it is availa‐
ble both in case law and in the research literature.  

CASE LAW REVIEW 
As is the case with many important issues that affect the correctional system, conditions of AS confinement 
have been challenged in U.S. courts. In a pivotal First Amendment case heard in the Supreme Court, Turner 
v.  Safley  (1987)  set  a  standard  for  lower  courts  to  evaluate  the  claims  of  prisoners  such  that  deference  is 
given  to  prison  administrators  to  set  policies  to  ensure  the  safe  operation  of  their  prisons.  Although  the 
Court’s decision does not prevent inmates from making claims against AS confinement, it limits the scope of 
claims that they might successfully litigate to conditions that are needlessly harsh or unreasonable (Pizarro 
INTRODUCTION 

3 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
& Narag, 2008). Additionally, the Prison Reform Litigation Act of 1996 was enacted to restrict the filing of 
prisoners’  cases  in  federal  court.  Consequently,  most  of  the  case  law  surrounding  AS  has  been  on  the 
grounds of a Fourteenth or Eighth Amendment violation (Collins, 2004).  
Fourteenth Amendment 
Under the Fourteenth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution, the state must adhere to certain procedures in 
deciding to deprive inmates of their liberty interest (Collins, 2004). In Sandin v. Conner (1995), it was deter‐
mined that a liberty interest is created only when there is an “atypical and significant deprivation in relation 
to the normal incidents of prison life.” In such cases, certain due process procedures are required. 
Segregation that does not pose an atypical and significant hardship is not subject to due process, including 
such confinement that may occur during a period of investigation into inmates’ misconduct (Jones v. Baker, 
1998). However, in Wilkinson v. Austin (2005), it was decided that the plaintiffs’ due process and liberty in‐
terest  had  been  violated  because  the  combination  of  conditions  were  significantly  more  restrictive  than 
other  Ohio  state  correctional  facilities  (e.g.,  isolation,  lack  of  control  over  heating  and  lighting,  no  outside 
recreation) and because of the length of confinement. The court upheld the Hewitt v. Helms (1983) decision 
that  these  inmates  were  entitled  to  minimal  procedural  requirements,  specifically  timely  notice  of  an  AS 
evidentiary hearing, reason for confinement, and sufficient opportunity for response.  
Extended confinement in segregation without a review hearing was also determined to be a violation of the 
Fourteenth Amendment. A New York court found that periodic review of inmates’ continued need for such 
confinement is required (McClary v. Kelly, 1998).  
Eighth Amendment 
The Eighth Amendment ensures prisoners protection from cruel and unusual punishment. Because this con‐
cept is subjective, the Supreme Court has established the following standards:  
(a) shocks the conscience of the Court, (b) violates the evolving standards of decency of a ci‐
vilized society, (c) punishment that is disproportionate to the offense, and (d) involves the 
wanton and unnecessary infliction of pain (Collins, 2004, p. 106).  
In examining the conditions of confinement, the totality of circumstances must be weighed; although each 
individual condition might not be a violation, the combination of conditions might constitute one. Further‐
more, prison officials must demonstrate “deliberate indifference” to a prisoner’s basic human need in order 
for there to be an Eighth Amendment violation. 
The use of prolonged segregation was tested in three significant cases in California (Madrid v. Gomez, 1995), 
Texas  (Ruiz  v.  Johnson,  1999),  and  Wisconsin  (Jones  ‘El  v.  Berge,  2001).  Long‐term  segregation  was  not 
deemed  a  violation,  except  in  the  case  of  inmates  with  serious  mental  illness  where  extended  stays  were 
ruled unconstitutional. In Madrid v. Gomez (1995), not only was it ruled cruel and unusual punishment to 
place mentally ill inmates in the SHU, those at reasonably high risk of suffering mental illness as a result of 
SHU conditions were also restricted. Explicit in these cases is the requirement of correctional mental health 
staff to screen, assess, and monitor offenders for mental illness or emerging symptoms resulting from their 
placement in segregation.  
It is also significant to note that in a number of states, settlement cases have also prevented or mitigated 
the placement of inmates with serious mental illness into long‐term segregation. These states include Ohio, 

4 

INTRODUCTION 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Connecticut, Indiana, New Mexico, New York, and Mississippi. Other cases, in states such as New Jersey and 
Florida, have led to agreements to modify the terms under which prisoners with mental illness can be put or 
kept in segregation (Jamie Fellner, personal communication, June 10, 2010).  

RESEARCH REVIEW 
There  exists  a  large  body  of  peer‐reviewed  literature  surrounding  long‐term  segregation  and  solitary  con‐
finement. Many of these publications are literature reviews, theoretical articles, and case studies; few meet 
the  American  Psychological  Association  (2009)  standard  of  empirical  study  article  defined  as  reporting  on 
original research or presenting new data analyses not addressed in previous reports, whether qualitative or 
quantitative. For example, in the 2008 special edition of The Disturbed Offender in Confinement published by 
Criminal Justice and Behavior, many of the nine articles focused on AS or other types of high security set‐
tings but only one (Lovell, 2008) presented an empirical study. Also in 2008, The Prison Journal released a 
special issue entitled Supermax Prisons. Only two of the eight articles (Sundt et al., 2008; O’Keefe, 2008b) 
meet the American Psychological Association standard for empirical research  (2009). The large number of 
articles and corresponding lack of empirical research reinforce this as an important area of forensic psychia‐
try in which it is very difficult to conduct viable research.  
The entire body of literature has been critical to advancing our understanding of AS confinement and its re‐
lated issues. We relied on this literature to shape our hypotheses and research design in the present study. 
The case study research in particular has been useful to illustrate problems that might be attributed to AS 
(i.e.,  serious  psychological  harm)  and  highlight  the  need  for  research  (see  Benjamin  &  Lux,  1975;  Human 
Rights Watch, 1997, 1999; King, 1999; Kurki & Morris, 2001; Rhodes, 2004). However, there are serious limi‐
tations with case studies. Small sample sizes, as are the norm in case studies, mean findings may not gene‐
ralize to all, or even most, segregated offenders. Particularly concerning is that sampling procedures are of‐
ten not discussed, suggesting that special care was not taken to select a representative sample. Additionally, 
these  approaches  do  not  provide  a  relative  comparison  of  the  participants’  behavior  in  other  settings;  in‐
mates who report serious psychological difficulties in segregation may experience those same problems in 
other prison settings or in society. Because we are interested in conducting an empirical study, our review of 
the research focuses on other empirical studies of the psychological effects of AS along with several key ar‐
ticles that informed our selection of psychological measures.  
The SHU Syndrome 
In 1983, Dr. Grassian described the psychopathological features resulting from AS that he believed to form a 
clinical syndrome, which later became known as the SHU syndrome in the wake of Madrid v. Gomez (1995) 
case. He interviewed 14 plaintiffs in a conditions‐of‐confinement lawsuit and described his clinical observa‐
tions resulting from those interviews. Grassian noted perceptual changes, affective disturbances, cognitive 
difficulties, disturbing thought content, and impulse control problems that immediately subsided following 
release from such confinement. In more recent research, Haney (2003) found elevated symptoms of psycho‐
logical  trauma  (e.g.,  anxiety,  headaches,  impending  nervous  breakdown,  lethargy)  and  psychopathological 
features  (e.g.,  ruminations,  social  withdrawal,  irrational  anger)  among  100  SHU  prisoners  as  compared  to 
national  probability  samples.  This  constellation  of  symptoms  composes  the  primary  features  of  what  has 
been coined the SHU syndrome.  
 

INTRODUCTION 

5 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Quantitative Research 
Well‐designed  quantitative  studies,  although  often  not  as  rich  in  detail  as  case  studies  or  qualitative  re‐
search,  can  provide  information  about  the  impact  of  segregation  on  psychological  well‐being  through  the 
use of randomly sampled participants, representative samples, comparison groups, objective data collection 
strategies,  standardized  procedures,  and  analytical  strategies  that  account  for  random  error.  Research  on 
the effects of AS have been criticized for lacking these quality components that allow one to rule out plausi‐
ble alternative explanations (Arrigo & Bullock, 2008; Metzner & Dvoskin, 2006; Pizarro & Narag, 2008; Zinger 
et al., 2001). 
A  key  component  that  distinguishes  research  from  demonstrations  is  the  use  of  control  or  comparison 
groups. Because of the lack of a comparison group, some frequently cited studies are actually demonstra‐
tions of the potential impacts of AS (e.g., Brodsky & Scogin, 1988; Haney, 1993; Grassian, 1983). In the sim‐
plest research design, a study will compare a “treated” group to a control or comparison group to determine 
if the groups are different on the variable of interest. In a pure experimental design where participants are 
randomly assigned to conditions (e.g., segregation, general prison population), differences between groups 
would indicate the impact of segregation on the outcome variable; however in applied studies where ran‐
dom assignment to conditions is not feasible, the differences between the segregation group and a compari‐
son  group  may  be  due  to  segregation  or  to  other  uncontrolled  factors.  The  quality  of  the  comparison  de‐
pends on the similarity between the control/comparison group and the experimental/treated group.  
Several quantitative studies have used comparison groups to explore the impact of segregation on psycho‐
logical outcomes. Several of these studies have been experimental in nature in that inmates who volunteer 
to be randomly assigned to either segregation or comparison conditions for a short period of time (e.g., Ec‐
clestone,  Gendreau,  &  Knox,  1974;  Gendreau  &  Bonta,  1984;  Gendreau,  Freedman,  Wilde,  &  Scott,  1968, 
1972; Gendreau, McLean, Parsons, Drake, & Ecclestone, 1970). These studies tend to show little impact of 
segregation  on  mental  well‐being  but  can  be  criticized  for  lacking  ecological  validity  by  using  participants 
who  volunteered  to  be  placed  in  segregation,  using  small  samples  sizes,  and  for  being  short‐term,  all  of 
which do not match the current reality of how AS exists in U.S. prisons today. To demonstrate ecological va‐
lidity, conditions under investigation should reflect real life conditions. Similarly, comparisons to prisoners of 
war or use of college students and inmate volunteers, lacks the ecological validity necessary to generalize 
the findings to inmates in segregation.  
Cross‐Sectional Designs 

 

Non‐experimental research, which may demonstrate more ecological validity, have used a variety of com‐
parison  groups  including  general,  non‐inmate  populations  and  norms  (e.g.,  Haney,  2003;  Hodgins  &  Côté, 
1991; Suedfeld et al., 1982), general population prisoners (e.g., Hodgins & Côté, 1991), and inmates in dif‐
ferent security levels who report being in segregation or not ever experiencing segregation (Suedfeld et al., 
1982). Most, although  not all, of these studies  concluded  that  inmates in AS  demonstrate higher levels of 
psychological distress. Because the quality of the conclusions depends on the similarity between the com‐
parison group and the AS group, these cross‐sectional studies lack the ability to attribute these differences 
to the conditions of confinement. In these studies, it is not possible to rule out alternative explanations due 
to  selection  bias  and  potential  pre‐existing  differences,  including  psychological  differences  that  may  have 
existed prior to entering AS (i.e., there has been an inability to establish the time precedence between AS 

6 

INTRODUCTION 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
and psychological well‐being). An improved design  strategy is  to select a comparison group that has been 
matched to the segregation group on important variables (e.g., Lovell et al., 2007; Mears & Bales, 2009).  
Longitudinal Designs 
In order to truly understand how AS impacts the well‐being of inmates, an improvement over cross‐sectional 
design strategies with a comparison group is to study how inmates change over time using a longitudinal (or 
repeated  measures)  design.  Studying  intra‐individual  change  allows  for  better  understanding  on  whether 
change occurs as well as explication of how change occurs. In longitudinal designs, individuals serve as their 
own  control  group,  and  comparisons  from  baseline  allow  one  to  see  how  change  is  occurring.  Adding  a 
comparison  group  in  a  longitudinal  design  will  allow  one  to  rule  out  additional  alternative  explanations 
when change is (or is not) occurring.  
There have been few longitudinal studies about the effects of segregation. Early studies by Gendreau and 
colleagues  (Ecclestone  et  al.,  1974;  Gendreau  &  Bonta,  1984;  Gendreau  et  al.,  1968,  1970,  1972)  used  re‐
peated measures experimental designs over periods of up to 10 days to explore the effects of segregation 
on  psychological  and  physiological  measures.  Few  negative  impacts  of  segregation  were  found  over  these 
brief  time  periods.  Although  use  of  a  repeated  measures  experimental  paradigm  improves  over  cross‐
sectional  studies  which  may  have  selection  bias  issues,  the  short  confinement  periods  are  unrealistic  for 
providing information on the effects of segregation as it is currently being used in U.S. prisons.  
Only two recent studies were found that followed inmates for longer time periods after placement in segre‐
gation (Andersen et al., 2000; Andersen, Sestoft, Lillebaek, Gabrielsen, & Hemmingsen, 2003; Zinger et al., 
2001). Andersen et al.  (2000) studied participants over a 4 month period,  but the majority of participants 
had data for less than a month. Zinger et al. (2001) followed inmates over a 60 day period. Both of these 
studies had high attrition rates (usually due to release from segregation), leading to a small percentage of 
participants who had complete data. Attrition is a major problem in longitudinal designs both for generali‐
zability issues (i.e., are the participants who remain different from those who drop out) as well as analysis 
problems  for  those  methodologies  which  require  complete  data  from  all  participants  (e.g.,  analysis  of  va‐
riance techniques). Newer methodologies developed for studying intra‐individual change are less impacted 
by attrition rates. Although conclusions from these studies are limited by methodological weaknesses, both 
Andersen et al. (2000) and Zinger et al. (2001) demonstrated that segregated populations have more psy‐
chological disorders at the start than comparison subjects. However, these two studies provide conflicting 
evidence on whether conditions get worse over time. Thus, further longitudinal studies are needed to sort 
out these discrepancies and understand the long‐term impacts of segregation. 

THE COLORADO SYSTEM 
In Colorado at the time of this study, there were four designated AS facilities. Colorado State Penitentiary 
(CSP) opened in 1993 as a 756‐bed male AS facility in its entirety. At the Sterling Correctional Facility, 192 of 
its 2,545 beds were constructed to house male AS inmates in three units that are separate from the rest of 
the facility. The San Carlos Correctional Facility (SCCF) is a male acute care psychiatric prison, with nine units 
of varying security levels. One 26‐bed unit at SCCF is designated for AS classified inmates. Generally, AS at 
SCCF  is  reserved  for  inmates  already  housed  at  SCCF  needing  high  security  or  for  inmates  in  AS  at  CSP  or 
Sterling  Correctional  Facility  whose  psychiatric  needs  exceed  those  available  at  their  current  facility.  The 
fourth  AS  facility  is  a  24‐bed  unit  located  at  the  multi‐custody  Denver  Women’s  Correctional  Facility.  Be‐

INTRODUCTION 

7 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
cause it houses the largest number of AS inmates and no other custody levels, CSP was the only AS site in‐
cluded in this study.  
The  Colorado  Department  of  Corrections  (CDOC)  had  25  state  and  7  private  prisons  that  managed  19,279 
inmates as of June 30, 2007, which marked the start of data collection. There are five security levels – mini‐
mum, minimum‐restrictive, medium, close, and AS – to which offenders are assigned. CDOC uses a standar‐
dized, objective classification instrument that was developed specifically for the management of Colorado’s 
inmate population (Austin, Alexander,  Anuskiewicz,  & Chin, 1995). The  classification instrument is used to 
assign inmates to minimum through close security levels. However, AS is a long‐term segregation placement 
for inmates who display violent, dangerous, and disruptive behaviors and placement is determined through 
an administrative action that is separate and distinct from both the usual classification system and the dis‐
ciplinary  system.  Although  disciplinary  infractions  may  affect  classification  at  all  levels,  the  disciplinary 
process is a punitive response to a finding of guilt for an institutional rule violation and may result in punitive 
segregation, which can extend up to 60 days. Therefore, punitive segregation is of short duration used for 
punishment and AS is of long duration used for management purposes.  
The administrative action to classify an offender to AS begins with a hearing, frequently following either a se‐
rious  violation  or  a  series  of  less  serious  infractions.  Colorado  does  not  house  protective  custody  inmates; 
therefore,  no  AS  placements  occur  at  the  request  of  inmates.  Also,  during  the  study,  newly  arrived  inmates 
were not placed directly into AS upon intake into DOC except in rare cases for violent behavior in county jail or 
for an interstate compact case transferred from AS in another prison system. Although the disciplinary system 
only allows for punitive segregation following a finding of guilt, pre‐hearing segregation (removal from popula‐
tion) may occur immediately following a serious incident for the safety and security of the facility. Therefore, in 
the time leading up to and during their AS hearing, inmates have typically been in segregation.  
AS Offenders in Punitive Segregation 
All facilities across the state of Colorado have punitive segregation beds with the exception of CSP and min‐
imum security facilities. Minimum custody offenders are transported to a higher security facility to complete 
their punitive segregation time. When offenders are placed in punitive segregation, they are removed from 
the general population (GP) and taken to an isolated part of the facility to be placed in a single cell. Punitive 
segregation  offenders  remain  in  their  cell  for  23  to  24  hours  a  day,  only  coming  out  for  recreation  and 
showers, both of which are located within the living unit. Therefore, most do not leave the unit during their 
segregation  time.  Services  including  meals,  library,  laundry,  and  even  medical  and  mental  health  appoint‐
ments occur at the cell door. If a situation warrants an offender to be out of cell, the offender is placed in 
full‐restraints and escorted to a room within the unit where he or she can meet with staff privately. Many 
offenders do not like being taken out of their cell unless absolutely necessary because of the use of full re‐
straints. Additionally, they may not like leaving their cell because officers may take the opportunity to search 
the cell for contraband. 
Due to the disciplinary nature of punitive segregation, offenders are stripped of most privileges during their 
stay. Punitive segregation inmates are neither allowed to work nor are they permitted to participate in pro‐
grams or education. Furthermore, their televisions are removed, and they cannot order canteen beyond es‐
sential hygiene items.   

8 

INTRODUCTION 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Punitive segregation is a highly restrictive environment, only intended to be used for a short period of time. 
Once reclassified to AS, offenders may remain in a punitive segregation bed while waiting for an AS bed to 
become available. This can be problematic as GP facilities are not designed to house offenders in long‐term 
segregation  and  the  small  number  of  punitive  segregation  beds  at  each  GP  facility  can  fill  up  quickly.  Fur‐
thermore, while punitive segregation offenders are not afforded privileges, AS offenders are granted limited 
privileges such as visiting, which happens outside of the unit. Visitation is labor intensive because it requires 
escort by two correctional staff. In addition, while being held at an AS facility, offenders who behave well 
and complete their required programming and education are able to progress through a step program whe‐
reby they earn more phone sessions, visiting time, and privileges (e.g., TV, canteen). Only two punitive se‐
gregation facilities offer a step program for privileges, and there are none that provide the opportunity for 
programming or education. This means that while AS offenders are held in a punitive segregation bed, they 
are unable to begin working their way toward leaving segregation. 
CSP Conditions of Confinement 
Once  an  AS  offender  is  moved  from  a  GP  facility  and  assigned  to  CSP,  he  is  transported  to  CSP  where  he 
completes his AS time. Offenders are taken into CSP through intake, which is located on the lowest level of 
the facility. While in intake, offenders are placed in a holding cell that is similar to their permanent cell. Dur‐
ing this time, the offender watches an orientation video that outlines what he can expect and what is ex‐
pected of him during his time at CSP. He also has a brief visit from mental health, conducted at the cell door. 
While the offender is going through orientation, property staff assesses his belongings to ensure that no un‐
allowable  items  enter  with  the  offender,  as  they  are  permitted  fewer  property  items  than  in  GP  facilities. 
This also prevents dangerous contraband such as drugs or weapons from entering the facility. Once the of‐
fender has completed orientation, usually within the first few hours, he is escorted to his permanent cell in a 
different area of the facility.  
Physical Environment. CSP has six identical pods, or living units. When the offender enters the pod, he is es‐
corted down a long hallway that opens into a circular area. In the center of the area is a tower with an office 
for housing unit staff on the lower level and the pod’s control center on the upper level. Officers manning 
the control center operate all doors or sliders into the pod, including those to offenders’ cells. Correctional 
staff standing in either the lower or upper levels of the tower can see into all eight of the day halls. Each day 
hall contains 15 to 16 offender cells separated onto two tiers with each tier having 7 or 8 cells, a shower, 
and a recreation room.  
The cells in CSP are 80 square feet with 35 square feet of unencumbered floor space and contain a bunk, 
toilet, sink, desk, and stool. Each of these items is made of metal and is mounted to the wall or floor for se‐
curity. Every cell has a 5” x 45” window on the exterior wall above the offender’s bunk through which the 
offender can see outside. There is also a window on the cell door that faces the day hall. Depending on the 
pod, the window is either 3.5” x 20.5” or 5” x 15”. Neither of these windows opens, which precludes the of‐
fender from receiving outside air while in his cell.  
Per CSP policy, offenders wanting to participate in recreation are generally permitted at least one hour five 
times per week (as well as to shower for 15 minutes three times per week which generally coincides with an 
offer to exercise), assuming that there are no facility occurrences disrupting this schedule. When an offend‐
er is offered recreation and chooses to participate, he is placed in full‐restraints and escorted from his cell to 
the recreation room at the end of the tier. The recreation room is a 90‐square foot cell that contains a pull‐
INTRODUCTION 

9 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
up bar mounted to the wall. No other exercise equipment is allowed. The only opportunity offenders have 
to receive fresh outside air is through two 5” x 60” grated windows on the exterior wall of the recreation 
room. On the interior, a glass wall faces the V‐shaped day hall, so the offender in recreation is fully visible. 
Though prohibited by the facility, an offender in the recreation room may call out exercises to other offend‐
ers who in turn workout in their cells.  
There are light and sound standards for CSP. Standards for CSP require that ambient sound does not exceed 
70dBA during the day or 45dBA at night. A sound measurement of offender housing units at CSP, on a single 
day, returned an average of 55dBA at 7:50 AM and 42dBA at 10:40 PM. Although staff attempt to regulate 
the ambient sound of the facility, it can be difficult to regulate the noise level of 756 offenders; these mea‐
surements do not reflect periods of sound elevations produced by inmates’ yelling and banging. Additional‐
ly, each offender is entitled to at least 20 foot‐candles of light in the desk area of his cell. A light measure‐
ment of offender cells returned an average of 55 foot‐candles of light in offenders’ cells. Offenders have two 
32‐watt lights over the desk in each cell that they are able to control. In addition, each cell contains a 7‐watt 
security light underneath the desk that stays on 24 hours per day.      
Interpersonal Communication. Each cell has an intercom system through which correctional officers can con‐
tact each offender from the unit’s control center. Officers use the intercom system to ask prisoners ques‐
tions such as whether or not they want to attend recreation or take a shower. They also use the intercom to 
inform inmates when they will be leaving their cell for such things as a mental health visit, a family or friend 
visit, or if the offender will be escorted to another part of the facility or off grounds. Conversely, inmates can 
use  the  intercom  system  by  pushing  a  button  in  their  cell  to  contact  staff,  which  they  may  do  to  request 
items (e.g., razor, toilet paper) or simply to chat. Staff also has the ability to monitor conversations using the 
intercom system. 
While the intercom system provides a means for correctional staff and offenders to communicate with each 
other relatively easily, it does not afford offenders the opportunity to communicate with one another. Many 
offenders at CSP have become skilled in sign language. Since each day hall is V‐shaped and cell doors have 
windows, offenders are able to communicate with each other using sign language. This aids in keeping the 
noise level down in the day hall and gives inmates the opportunity to speak to each other without the risk of 
staff overhearing. At times, however, many inmates simply yell through their cell door so that other offend‐
ers can hear. When this happens, the day hall can become very noisy.  
Due to the safety concerns of the facility and the fact that moving an AS offender from his cell is staff inten‐
sive, offenders in AS receive many services at their cell door. At CSP, officers make rounds every 30 minutes 
to  do  a  visual  check  into  the  cell  of  every  offender.  Mental  health  clinicians  are  required  to  do  monthly 
rounds as well. During these rounds, clinicians go to the cell door of every offender in their assigned pod and 
check in with the inmate to see how he is doing. If the offender is well, the clinician moves on; however, if 
the clinician feels the offender needs follow‐up, he or she will schedule an appointment with the offender 
for a later time. This appointment will be conducted in the visiting room, not cell side. In addition to rounds, 
offenders  receive  their  library  service and  educational  services  at  their  cell  door.  Once  a  week,  a  librarian 
picks up library kites, or requests, and distributes books and magazines to offenders who put in a kite the 
previous  week.  When  an  offender  is  participating  in  programming  or  education,  the  teacher  or  counselor 
distributes homework to each inmate through the cell door and also collects completed assignments in the 
same manner.  

10 

INTRODUCTION 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Mental  Health  Services.  In  addition  to  mental  health  services  received  cell‐side,  offenders  who  are  diag‐
nosed with a mental illness receive more in‐depth mental health services. Offenders with mental illness who 
are  stable  are  offered  a  one‐on‐one  session  at  least  once  every  90  days.  Those  with  acute  mental  health 
needs  are  required  to  be  seen  at  least  once  every  30  days.  Although  there  are  requirements  on  mental 
health staff to schedule appointments, offenders may refuse these appointments. Conversely, if an offender 
feels his mental health status has changed since his last monthly round, he may put in a request to see a cli‐
nician sooner than scheduled. If necessary, clinicians will schedule an offender for a mental health session 
for 1 to 2 hours per week as they are available; this is infrequent but most likely to occur following a crisis 
event.  Additionally,  if  a  mental  health  clinician  feels  a  prisoner  requires  psychotropic  medication,  an  ap‐
pointment is made for him to meet with a psychiatrist. This visit may happen in a noncontact visiting booth 
or via teleconference. 
Mental health appointments occur in a noncontact booth in the visiting room, unless the offender has de‐
clared a mental health emergency. If an offender has threatened self‐harm, he is often taken to intake and 
placed in a special observation cell where he is stripped of his belongings and can easily be observed by staff 
for his safety and the safety of staff. An offender is kept in the observation cell until the clinician can make a 
reasonable  assumption  that  the  offender  no  longer  plans  to  self‐harm  or  for  72  hours,  whichever  comes 
first.  If  the  clinician  determines  the  offender  needs  to  be  observed  beyond  72  hours,  approval  is  needed 
from administrators and a mental health supervisor outside of the facility. Offenders who remain in a men‐
tal health crisis situation beyond the three to five day window are then sent to the infirmary at a different 
facility. There are generally four to six mental health clinicians who are responsible for managing the mental 
health needs of offenders at CSP. When the facility is fully staffed with six clinicians, each is assigned to a 
pod of 126 offenders, but when there are vacant positions, clinicians are required to cover their pod’s men‐
tal health needs and split an additional pod with another clinician.  
Quality of Life Program. When an offender arrives at CSP, his length of stay is indeterminate because it is 
based upon his behavior and ability to comply with programming requirements. The average length of stay 
at CSP is two years (O’Keefe, 2005). CSP provides incentive‐based behavior modification and cognitive pro‐
grams.  Every  offender  must  successfully  complete  three  cognitive  classes  with  each  lasting  three  months. 
Successful completion of the required programming along with modeling appropriate behavior is the prima‐
ry way for an offender to work his way out of CSP. The goal of these programs is to provide offenders with 
tools so they may be successfully reintegrated into lower security prisons.  
CSP’s  incentive‐based  programming  consists  of  three  quality  of  life  (QOL)  levels.  Each  level  brings  with  it 
more  privileges;  however,  these  privileges  must  be  earned  by  the  offender  through  appropriate  behavior 
and compliance with CSP rules. Each level has a prescribed minimum number of days: 7 for level one, 90 for 
level two, and 90 for level three. Because offenders are required to complete three 90‐day cognitive courses 
and there are often program waitlists that may result in an offender staying on levels two or three for longer 
than 90 days, the total program length is expected to last a minimum of one year. Additionally, offenders 
who misbehave may be regressed through the levels, extending their time in the program.  
QOL level one is much like punitive segregation in that offenders are not permitted to have a television or to 
participate in programs or work. Furthermore, offenders at this level are only allowed one 20‐minute phone 
session and one 2‐hour noncontact visit per month, should they remain at level one for that length of time. 
They are able to order items from the canteen at a maximum of $10 per week. Though limited in compari‐

INTRODUCTION 

11 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
son to what GP offenders are able to buy, offenders at CSP have a variety of food, hygiene, faith, and per‐
sonal items available for purchase. Additionally, AS inmates are permitted three library books at any given 
time. All other property must fit inside a 2 cubic feet duffle bag; however, as long as the property can fit in 
the  bag,  they  are  allowed  two  personal  books,  two  magazines,  and  one  newspaper.  Other  items  that  of‐
fenders at this level may have are photographs and an address book.  
Level one offenders are automatically reviewed on their seventh day by the unit sergeant. Unless they re‐
ceived a negative write‐up or report, offenders automatically progress to level two after seven days. Those 
who do not progress are extended another seven days until their next review.  
Inmates become eligible for cognitive classes when they have been elevated to QOL level two. Offenders at 
this level are allowed a television, and if they are indigent and unable to afford one, the facility will loan one 
to  them.  This  is  beneficial  as  CSP  provides  some  of  their  programs  and  recreational  activities  through  the 
television.  Offenders  also  receive  20  television  channels  that  they  are  able  to  control  from  their  cell  and 
view at their leisure 24 hours per day. Also available through the television is a music channel that plays at 
designated  times  and  rotates  through  music  genres.  Additionally,  offenders  have  the  opportunity  to  play 
bingo  on  a  monthly  basis.  The  bingo  numbers  are  selected  and  aired  over  closed  circuit  TV  at  the  facility. 
Offenders who wish to participate in Bingo receive six board games and are awarded a candy bar for each 
verified bingo.  
In addition to programming received through their television, offenders at this level are permitted art sup‐
plies (colored pencils, art paper, drawing patterns, and coloring pictures), games (solitaire and kings table), 
puzzles  (crossword,  word  fill‐ins,  word  search,  and  Sudoku),  and  pamphlets  for  in‐cell  exercises  offenders 
(push‐ups,  stretching,  and  isometrics).  Offenders  may  request  a  new  supply  of  colored  pencils  every  six 
months and are able to receive four new sheets of art paper and new puzzles on a weekly basis.  
At level two, offenders are permitted to increase their weekly canteen order to $20 and have an increase in 
both their phone privileges, to two 20‐minute phone sessions per month, and their visiting privileges, to two 
2‐hour  noncontact  visits  per  month.  However,  offenders  at  this  level  remain  unable  to  work.  Once  an  of‐
fender has completed a minimum of 90 days on level two, has been compliant with programming, has not 
had any negative write‐ups for at least 90 days, has had appropriate interaction with staff, and has sustained 
suitable cell conditions, he may be progressed to QOL level three. Offenders’ case manager initiates the pa‐
perwork for a level progression, which requires approval by the housing captain.  
Arguably one of the most important benefits of QOL level three is an offender’s ability to have more contact 
with friends and family. While offenders’ visits remain noncontact, they are increased to four 3‐hour visits 
per month and four 20‐minute phone sessions. Offenders are also permitted to order as much as $25 worth 
of  canteen  per  week.  One  additional  benefit  is  that  offenders  may  now  be  eligible  to  work  as  a  porter  or 
barber. There are 54 positions available to offenders at CSP. Benefits to being offered a job position include 
the  ability  to  earn  money,  increased  time  out  of  their  cell,  and  two  additional  phone  sessions  per  month. 
However, simply being at QOL level three does not automatically qualify an offender for a job. If intelligence 
officers feel the offender is a threat to the facility, he will not be permitted to work as a porter or barber. A 
QOL level three inmate may be deemed a continued threat due to an institutional history of assaultive be‐
havior or from intelligence that suggests he may use the opportunity to intimidate or pass gang information 
or contraband to other offenders. There are no time limits restricting how long an offender can be in a job 
position  and  there  is  a  waitlist  of  offenders  who  have  put  in  a  request  to  work;  however,  because  of  the 
12 

INTRODUCTION 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
progression of offenders out of CSP and offenders who their work privilege, the same 54 offenders are not 
usually working for more than a couple of months. 
The  restrictions  inherent  in  AS  diminish  staff’s  ability  to  impose  traditional  sanctions  for  institutional  rule 
violations. Offenders in GP who are found guilty of a rule violation can receive a maximum of 60 days in pu‐
nitive segregation or up to 180 days in loss of privileges (e.g., TV, canteen, visiting). Offenders in AS are re‐
quired to follow the same institutional rules as GP offenders; however, because AS offenders are already in 
segregation  for  an  indeterminate  amount  of  time,  they  cannot  receive  additional  segregation  time  as  pu‐
nishment. They can still lose privileges and be regressed through the QOL system. Sanctions are tailored to 
the seriousness of the infraction.  
Offenders who engage in minor rule violations may initially receive a warning that is documented in a chro‐
nological record report. If the behavior continues, the offender may lose a privilege for a short amount of 
time (e.g., three days) without losing a QOL level. For example, this may happen if an offender covers the 
security light in his cell to make it darker for sleeping. This may also happen if an offender is caught “rat lin‐
ing” or “fishing,” which are forms of communication or exchange of items between offenders locked in their 
cells. 
When an offender in AS violates a serious institutional rule, the officer initiates documentation on which he 
may recommend that the offender be regressed to a lower QOL level. This recommendation is approved or 
denied by a housing lieutenant. In general, if the lieutenant approves the offender’s level regression, he is 
dropped one level. This process is kept separate from the disciplinary process, which may or may not result 
in a guilty finding, in order to have an immediate response to an offender’s negative behavior. The discipli‐
nary process can be lengthy because of due process requirements, but he may also receive a loss of privileg‐
es sanction through the disciplinary process. 
Regardless of the offender’s level, if he engages in behavior that dangerously disrupts the operation of the 
facility, he will be placed on special controls in the intake unit where he can be carefully monitored. This of‐
ten happens during what is referred to as a use of force incident, which is any time an officer uses any level 
of  force  against  an  offender.  A  use  of  force  incident  generally  occurs  when  an  offender  assaults  a  staff 
member or refuses to comply with a lawful order (e.g., refuses to be restrained for escort). An officer’s re‐
sponse  can  include  the  use  of simple  pressure  point  tactics,  the  use  of  agents  such  as  oleoresin  capsicum 
(OC), or a forced cell extraction of the offender. During both fiscal years 2008 and 2009, CSP had an average 
of seven use of force incidents per month. Upon an offender’s return to his cell, he will automatically begin 
at QOL level one again. Though the offender will not be required to retake any of the cognitive classes that 
he has already completed, he will be terminated from any classes in which he is currently enrolled and will 
be required to begin his process through the QOL levels again. Additional sanctions may be imposed through 
the disciplinary process.  
Offenders who have difficulty progressing through the QOL level system may require special consideration. 
Offenders in segregation can accumulate a high number of sanctions through behaviors such as breaking the 
sprinkler head in their cells or overflowing the toilet in their cells, causing flooding on the tier. It is difficult to 
manage and change the behavior of offenders who have so many sanctions that there is no tangible incen‐
tive  to  improve  their  behavior.  When  this  is  the  case,  case  managers  and  housing  staff  enact  a  behavior 
management plan. In a behavior management plan, case managers and correctional staff will use one privi‐

INTRODUCTION 

13 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
lege (e.g., TV) that is highly valuable to the offender as an incentive. If the offender can behave well for a 
short period of time (generally 7 to 10 days), he may receive a television despite his loss of privilege status.  
When an offender has been at level three for at least 90 days with good behavior and has successfully com‐
pleted the requirements of the program, he is interviewed for progression out of CSP. A classification com‐
mittee must approve the decision to reclassify him to close custody, and then he is moved to the Centennial 
Correctional Facility when a bed becomes available, where he continues to work toward completing his rein‐
tegration programming. It is less common that an offender transitions out of CSP any other way; however, 
offenders do sometimes parole from CSP or release when they reach the end of their sentence  while in AS. 
Additionally, an offender may be released from AS based on a warden’s review. An offender may receive a 
warden’s review if he has been in CSP for more than two years but has been unable to progress out of CSP. 
If it is felt that the offender no longer needs to be in CSP, he may be released back to GP without transition‐
ing through Centennial Correctional Facility.      
Progressive Reintegration Opportunity (PRO) Unit. At the Centennial Correctional Facility, there is a contin‐
ued focus on behavior modification and cognitive programs to transition disruptive offenders to less secure 
environments.  Most  offenders  complete  QOL  levels  four  through  six  in  the  PRO  unit.  Upon  transfer  from 
CSP, offenders are reclassified from AS to close custody, the next highest custody level. Upon arrival, little is 
different for the newly classified close custody offenders; however, as offenders work their way through the 
PRO  unit  levels,  they  work  toward  contact  visits  with  friends  and  family  and  are  eventually  allowed 
recreation time in the gym with other inmates. Ultimately, offenders who are successful in completing all six 
QOL levels are released back to GP.  
Offenders with Mental Illness (OMI) Management Program. During the course of the research project, the 
OMI management program was opened at Centennial Correctional Facility. In addition to the PRO unit, the 
OMI  program was designed to be a transitional program from CSP specifically for prisoners with a mental 
illness. Offenders are selected for the OMI program by a multi‐disciplinary committee and must be approved 
for reclassification as a close custody inmate. In order to be considered for transfer to the program, offend‐
ers  must  have  been  in  AS  for  a  minimum  of  six  months,  enrolled  in  a  cognitive  program,  have  a  mental 
health disorder, and be actively working with a mental health clinician. 
Upon transfer to the OMI program, inmates are automatically placed in the intermediate program level. The 
OMI program has three levels: high, intermediate, and low. High is the most restrictive level with low the 
least. Depending on the individual’s behavior, he can be moved to high or low levels. The program focuses 
on  treatment  and  socialization.  Offenders  in  this  program  work  their  way  toward  earning  more  privileges 
than are available in AS, contact visits with friends and family, and recreation in the gym with other inmates, 
much like PRO unit offenders do; however, the OMI program has the added benefit of group therapy. Initial‐
ly, offenders are afforded the opportunity to participate in group therapy by being tethered to a special ta‐
ble. As offenders progress through the program, they are eventually allowed in groups of eight untethered 
inmates.  The  goal  is  to  transition  offenders  to  GP  or  the  community  although  placements  in  the  program 
may be long term.            
San Carlos Correctional Facility (SCCF) 
SCCF  is  a  255‐bed  special  needs  prison  designed  to  stabilize  and  treat  offenders  with  the  most  acute  psy‐
chiatric symptoms or with developmental disabilities who are at risk for self injury as a result of their illness 

14 

INTRODUCTION 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
and  who  have  shown  a  substantial  impairment  in  their  ability  to  function  at  another  correctional  facility. 
SCCF houses inmates at all five custody levels. SCCF is unique in that offenders of all custody levels live and 
interact with one another on their living unit, with the exception of AS offenders who are housed in a sepa‐
rate unit. 
All offenders who arrive at SCCF are processed through the intake/assessment unit. New arrivals are inter‐
viewed by both the mental health clinician assigned to the  unit and a  psychiatrist. New offenders are  not 
permitted interaction with other inmates for the first 72 hours. If after 72 hours, clinicians and correctional 
staff feel the offender can reasonably interact with other offenders, he will be allowed in the day hall with as 
many as five other inmates. Offenders on the intake unit are permitted out of their cell in the day hall for at 
least one hour a day, five days per week. During this time, they have open access to the phones and show‐
ers. 
Offenders  typically  progress  through  the  programming  levels  as  their  mental  health  status  improves.  Of‐
fenders are continually monitored by a psychiatrist with an appointment every 30 days for the most severe 
offenders  or  every  60  days  for  those  who  are  progressing  well.  One‐on‐one  sessions  occur  with  a  mental 
health clinician as needed and are not scheduled on a regular basis; however, there is a clinician assigned to 
each unit, with each unit housing fewer than 30 inmates.       
As an offender continues to progress through the facility, he will work his way towards open access to the 
day hall, phones, and shower. As he progresses through the facility he will then be allowed out with seven 
inmates and then fifteen, eventually earning all day open access. Those who have progressed to the lowest 
levels are also permitted one hour of recreation five days per week in the yard or gym plus three hours per 
week at the library. Additionally, they are able to participate in group therapy sessions, which happen once 
or twice a week depending on the topic. Group therapy subjects include anger management, understanding 
one’s mental illness, and other related topics. Once mental health, psychiatric, and correctional staff deter‐
mine that the offender has improved enough to function in GP, he is then transferred to a facility at his cus‐
tody level.               

PURPOSE OF PRESENT STUDY 
The broad purpose of the project was to evaluate the psychological effects of long‐term segregation on of‐
fenders, particularly those with mental illness. This study examined conditions as they existed in the Colora‐
do prison system with respect to AS, using CSP as the AS study facility. Only males were included because 
females represent 2% of Colorado’s AS population. We did not assign inmates to segregation, but studied 
those  conditions  as  they  naturally  occurred.  The  following  were  the  primary  goals  and  hypotheses  of  the 
grant.  
Goal 1: To determine which, if any, psychological domains are affected, and in which direction, by the differ‐
ent prison environments. A multitude of psychological dimensions were examined, drawing from those most 
often  cited  in  the  literature.  The  broad  constructs  of  interest  were  depression/hopelessness,  anxiety,  psy‐
chosis, withdrawal and alienation, hostility and anger control, somatization, hypersensitivity, and cognitive 
impairment. We hypothesized that offenders in segregation would develop an array of psychological symp‐
toms consistent with the SHU syndrome, with elevations across the eight constructs.  

INTRODUCTION 

15 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Goal  2:  To  assess  whether  offenders  with  mental  illness  decompensate  differentially  from  those  without 
mental illness. We were particularly interested in whether long‐term segregation had a differential impact 
based on the presence of mental illness in offenders. We sought answers to the following questions: Does 
AS  exacerbate  symptoms  in  offenders  with  mental  illness?  Does  AS  create  symptoms  of  mental  illness  in 
those who did not exhibit any at placement? It was hypothesized that offenders with and without mental 
illness  would  deteriorate  over  time,  but  the  rate  at  which  it  occurred  would  be  more  rapid  and  more  ex‐
treme for the mentally ill. 
Goal 3: To compare the impact of long‐term segregation against the general prison setting and a psychiatric 
care prison. In this study, the psychological and behavioral symptoms of offenders in AS were compared to 
similar offenders who were sent to SCCF or returned to the general prison population pursuant an AS hear‐
ing. This study used a repeated measures design over the course of a year to explore whether psychological 
distress was attributable to the various prison environments. It was hypothesized that inmates in segrega‐
tion would experience greater psychological deterioration over time than the comparison groups. 
This study also included an examination of individual characteristics such as mental health status, personali‐
ty, and trauma history to determine if certain factors could predict patterns of change. The prediction ana‐
lyses were exploratory in nature and we did not formulate a hypothesis about the variables that might pre‐
dict differential rates of psychological decompensation.  
         

16 

INTRODUCTION 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 

METHOD 
GROUP ASSIGNMENT 
Study participants included male inmates placed in AS and comparison inmates in the GP. Placement into AS or 
GP conditions occurred as a function of routine CDOC operations, pending the outcome of their AS hearing, with‐
out involvement of the researchers. Inmates were identified as study candidates at the point the offenders were 
notified that they would have an AS hearing. Oftentimes, it was unknown whether a particular inmate would be 
placed in AS or returned to GP at the time of his study consent; approximately 10% of hearings do not result in AS 
placement. For the purposes of this study, all study participants classified to AS were waitlisted for and placed in 
CSP (as opposed to Sterling Correctional Facility). Inmates who returned to GP following an AS hearing were as‐
sumed to be as similar as possible to AS inmates and, therefore, comprised the comparison groups. Comparison 
participants also included inmates targeted for a diversionary program that identified inmates at high risk of AS 
placement  due  to  their  disruptive  behavior.  This  program  discontinued  shortly  after  the  study  commenced, 
hence few participants were identified through this method.  
Inmates in both of these settings (CSP, GP) were divided into two groups – offenders with mental illness (MI) and 
with no mental illness (NMI). There are fewer inmates with mental illness than without, but because both sub‐
groups were of equal interest to this study, separate groups enabled over‐selection of inmates with mental ill‐
ness. All offenders are rated on a psychological needs level by trained clinicians upon intake into CDOC and pe‐
riodically during their incarceration as warranted. The psychological needs level has a 5‐point rating, where high‐
er values indicate the need for more intensive services, and a qualifier code that indicates whether the offender 
has a serious and persistent mental disorder. Most inmates rated 3 through 5 have an Axis I diagnosis, although 
certain Axis II diagnoses may infrequently warrant this rating (e.g., borderline, schizotypal). Disorders that typical‐
ly qualify as serious and pervasive are mood disorders including major depression, other depressive disorders, 
dysthymic, and bipolar disorders; psychotic disorders including schizophrenic, paranoid, delusional, and schizoph‐
reniform  disorders;  dissociative  identity  disorder;  and  posttraumatic  stress  disorder.  In  this  study,  inmates  as‐
sessed with a psychological needs level of 3 through 5 were defined as MI and levels 1 or 2 were defined as NMI.  
A third comparison group was included. This group included inmates with severe mental health problems placed 
in SCCF. Of the inmates placed in SCCF, only those with patterns of prison misbehavior, as measured by discipli‐
nary violations, were included in the study. However, inmates placed into AS at SCCF were excluded because of 
the small number and because many had transferred from AS at CSP or Sterling Correctional Facility, where the 
effects of the earlier placement would be unknown. The purpose of the SCCF comparison group was to study in‐
mates with serious mental illness and behavioral problems who were managed in a psychiatric prison setting.  
Figure 1 illustrates the number of offenders who were eligible for the study and details the selection of offenders 
within each of the five study groups. Given that the purpose of this project was to study long‐term segregation, 
inmates  projected  to  release  from  prison  before  administration  of  the  final  testing  session  were  excluded.  In‐
mates were also excluded if they could not read English or if their reading level was not high enough (roughly 
eighth grade) to complete the battery of tests. SCCF inmates were excluded if they did not have significant discip‐
linary violations in their history. Infrequently, offenders were excluded for other reasons such as being an inter‐
state compact offender, being the suspect in a high‐profile murder investigation (as reason for AS placement), or 
a visual impairment prohibiting them from reading. Finally, inmates were sampled as a matter of convenience. 
Because this project funded only one field researcher, participants were selected based on their proximity by ei‐
ther timing or location to others who could be included in this study.  

METHOD 

17 

18 
1 Other

10 Other

16 Location

9 Other

28 Violation
H istory

78 Sentence
Length

Approached Inmate to
Participate in Study

71

17

15 Other

7 Other

10 Location

51 Sentence
Length

203 MI

203 Placed in
SCCF

Not Selected

125 Location

17 Location

22 Sentence
Length

220 Return to GP or
diversion placement

88

73 Sentence
Length

■ 64 Sentence
Length

664 Decision to Ad
Seg

884 Ad Seg hearing or
diversion placement

# Eligible

Excluded from Participating

Mental Illness Designation

CDOC Decision

At Risk of Ad Seg Placement

Figure 1. Eligibility and Selection of Study Participants

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 

METHOD 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 

PARTICIPANTS 
Figure  2  details  the  flow  of  participants  through  the  study,  including  an  account  of  how  many  offenders 
completed the testing at each interval. A total of 302 male inmates were approached to participate in the 
study.  Thirty  refused  to  participate.  Two  more  offenders  were  considered  a  passive  refusal  and  were  re‐
moved  for  inappropriate  sexual  behavior  towards  the  researcher  during  the  first  testing  session.  An  addi‐
tional 23 offenders later withdrew their consent, although the data collected to the point of their withdraw‐
al was used. In addition to refusals and withdrawals, 10 inmates released prior to the end of the study due 
to discretionary releases by the Parole Board and one GP participant died of a drug overdose.  
Five testing sessions were initially established at 3‐month intervals, beginning with the date of consent and 
initial administration. Therefore, tests were scheduled at 3 months, 6 months, 9 months and 12 months af‐
ter the baseline assessment. However, this schedule was problematic for the CSP groups. When the study 
began, there was a 3‐month average wait for inmates to be transferred to CSP due to a shortage of AS beds. 
While on the waitlist, AS inmates were held in a punitive segregation bed at their originating facility. It was 
determined that the primary goal was to study inmates in a single long‐term segregation facility (CSP) to lim‐
it confounding variables and that therefore the baseline measure should be collected upon placement into 
CSP. However, it was also recognized that significant changes could occur while inmates were held in segre‐
gation at their originating facility. Therefore, a “pre‐baseline” measure was collected as close to the AS hear‐
ing as possible, which meant that the CSP groups completed six test intervals rather than five. The time be‐
tween the pre‐baseline and baseline measure varied according to how long the inmate was on the waitlist. 
The median  time between pre and  baseline tests was 99 days, although eight offenders were moved into 
CSP  so  quickly  that  they  did  not  have  a  pre‐baseline  measure.  In  the  analyses,  tests  were  aligned  across 
groups according to the test number, such that the CSP groups had an additional test at the end rather than 
at the beginning.  
Participants’ ages ranged from 17 to 59 at the time of consent, with a mean age of 31.8 (SD = 9.1). The ra‐
cial/ethnic breakdown of participants was 40% white, 36% Hispanic, 19% African American, 4% Native Amer‐
ican, and 1% Asian. Of the inmates with mental illness who were included in this study, 56% were identified with 
a serious and pervasive disorder. Other participant characteristics are described in greater detail in the results 
section,  including  comparisons  of  study  samples  to  eligible  pools  and  comparisons  of  refusers  to  partici‐
pants. 

MATERIALS 
Assessment tools were selected to comprehensively cover the variety of psychological constructs associated 
with AS (e.g., Arrigo & Bullock, 2008; Grassian, 1983; Haney, 2003). The primary constructs assessed in this 
study were as follows: (1) anxiety, (2) cognitive impairment, (3) depression/hopelessness, (4) hostility/anger 
control, (5) hypersensitivity, (6) psychosis, (7) somatization, and (8) withdrawal/alienation. Additionally, ma‐
lingering, self‐harm, trauma, and personality disorders were assessed.  
Research materials were selected to meet the following criteria:  (1) use of assessments with demonstrated 
reliability  and  validity,  (2)  use  of  multiple  sources  for  providing  information  (e.g.,  self‐report,  clinician  rat‐
ings, files), (3) use of multiple assessments of each construct of interest, (4) ability to use within the prison 
setting, and (5) ease of administration, including no specialized equipment, no physical contact, short length 
of time, and appropriate reading level.  
METHOD 

19 

20 

Test 6

Test 5

Test 4

Test 3

Test 2

Completed Test 1

Consented &

1 Released

51 Completed

2 Withdrew

2 Missed Test

2 no pre-baseline

54 Completed

56 Completed

2 Withdrew

1 Withdrew

56 Completed

56 Completed

1 Released

1 Withdrew

1 Missed Test

29 Completed

1 Withdrew

2 Released/Died

29 Completed

1 Withdrew

32 Completed

1 Released

38 Completed

1 Released

1 Withdrew

39 Completed

41 Completed

1 Released

2 Withdrew

59 Completed

1 Released

3 Withdrew

1 Missed Test

61 Completed

2 Missed Test

64 Completed

4 Refused

67 Consented

SCCF (n = 71)

57 Completed

2 Withdrew

41 Completed

11 Refused

43 Consented

GP NMI (n = 54)

1 Withdrew

1 Missed Test

32 Completed

0 Refused OF

33 Consented

GP MI (n = 33)

3 Withdrew

1 Missed Test

59 Completed

60 Completed

1 Withdrew

1 Missed Test

60 Completed

2 Withdrew

62 Completed

12 Refused

63 Consented

64 Consented
5 Refused

CSP NMI (n = 75)

(N = 302)

Approached to Participate in Study

CSP MI (n = 69)

6 no pre-baseline

Figure 2. Flow of Participants through Study

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 

METHOD 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
After selection of the self‐report assessments was complete, there remained several areas of interest (e.g., 
panic  disorder,  hypersensitivity  to  external  stimuli,  physical  hygiene)  for  which  there  was  no  established 
measure that met our criteria. In conjunction with the study advisory board, the research team developed a 
39‐item  instrument  to  assess  these  areas.  This  instrument,  called  the  Prison  Symptom  Inventory  (PSI),  is 
shown in Appendix A.  
In addition to self‐report assessments, ratings of psychological functioning were obtained from clinical staff 
and ratings of behavior in the housing unit were obtained from correctional staff. Official record data were 
also  gathered  from  electronic  and  paper  files.  This  section  summarizes  information  for  self‐report  assess‐
ments, staff ratings, and behavioral data. Complete descriptions of the individual measures and their known 
psychometric properties from past research and for the current study are provided in Appendix B. Additional 
analyses of the psychometric properties of the PSI are presented in Appendix C.  

METHOD 

C

C
C
C

I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I

I

Trauma 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Self‐Harm 

 
 
 
 
 
 
C 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
I 

Personality     
Disorder 

Malingering 

Somatization 

Psychosis 

I

Withdrawal –
Alienation 

Beck Hopelessness Scale (BHS) 
Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) 
Activity  
Anxious‐Depressed 
Hostility/Suspiciousness
Thought Disorder 
Withdrawal  
Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI) 
Anxiety 
Depression 
Hostility 
Interpersonal Sensitivity 
Obsessive‐Compulsive 
Paranoid Ideation 
Phobic Anxiety 
Psychoticism 
Somatization  
Coolidge Correctional Inventory (CCI) 
Deliberate Self‐Harm Inventory (DSHI) 
Personality Assessment Screener (PAS) 
Acting Out 
Alienation 

Hypersensitivity 

Anxiety 

Table 1. Assessments and Constructs 
 

Cognitive             
Impairment 
Depression –  
Hopelessness 
Hostility – Anger 
Control 

Data  were  collected  directly  from  participants  on  12  self‐report  assessments  (ten  paper‐and‐pencil  tests, 
two administered by the researcher) to assess 12 different constructs. Table 1 provides a list of the assess‐
ment tools for each construct. Most assessments were collected at each testing period, although personality 
disorders, self‐harm, and trauma history were not collected at all time periods. It was determined that per‐
sonality and trauma history were relatively stable constructs that needed to be assessed only once to limit 
the  testing  burden  on  study  participants.  Also,  due  to  the  burden  on  already  limited  mental  health  re‐
sources, the BPRS was only administered at the first, third, and fifth testing intervals. 

I
I

21 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
 

I
I
I
I
I
I
O
O
O

I
I
I
I
I
R

R

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 

 
 

Trauma 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
I 

Self‐Harm 

Withdrawal –
Alienation 

Somatization 

Psychosis 

I

Personality     
Disorder 

 
 
 
I 
 
 
 
 
 
O 
 
 
I 
 
 
 
 
 
 
I 
 
 
I 
I 
 

Malingering 

Anger Control 
Health Problems  
Hostile Control 
Negative Affect 
Psychotic Features 
Social Withdrawal 
Suicidal Thinking 
Prison Behavior Rating Scale (PBRS) 
Anti‐Authority 
Anxious‐Depressed 
Dull‐Confused 
Prison Symptom Inventory (PSI) 
Panic Disorder 
Hypersensitivity/External Stimuli 
Physical Symptoms 
Profile of Mood States (POMS) 
Anger‐Hostility 
Depression‐Dejection 
Fatigue‐Inertia 
Tension‐Anxiety 
St Louis Univ Memory Scale (SLUMS) 
State‐Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) 
State Anxiety  
Trait Anxiety  
Structured Inventory of Malingered 
Symptomatology (SIMS) 
Trail Making Test (TMT) 
Trauma Symptom Inventory (TSI) 

Hypersensitivity 

Anxiety 

 

Cognitive             
Impairment 
Depression –  
Hopelessness 
Hostility – Anger 
Control 

 

I

Note. C = Clinician rating; I = Inmate self‐report; O = Officer rating; R = Researcher administered. Shaded tests not administered at 
every testing interval.  

 
Self‐Report Assessments 
A composite score was developed for seven of the eight primary constructs by standardizing scores from the 
scales  on  the  self‐report  assessments.  Standardized  scores  were  used  so  that  comparisons  between  con‐
structs could be made more easily and to create a single measure for constructs assessed by multiple self‐
report  assessments.  Scores  were  standardized  by  centering  on  the  mean  of  the  entire  sample  at  the  first 
assessment and dividing by the standard deviation. A composite score was computed by standardizing each 
assessment  and  averaging  the  standardized  scores  across  the  individual  assessments  as  the  composite 
score. Reliabilities for these composites are presented in the discussion of each construct.  
Anxiety  Construct.  Anxiety  was  measured  by  eight  self‐report  variables  assessed  at  each  time  period.  The 
self‐report measures used to create the anxiety composite score were the State and Trait subscales from the 
State‐Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI; Spielberger, Gorsuch, & Lushene, 1970); the Obsessive‐Compulsive, An‐
xiety, and Phobic Anxiety subscales from the Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI; Derogatis, 1993); the Negative 

22 

METHOD 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Affect subscale from the Personality Assessment Screener (PAS; Morey, 1997); the Tension‐Anxiety subscale 
from the Profile of Mood States (POMS; McNair, Lorr, & Droppleman, 1992); and the Panic Disorder subscale 
from the PSI. The following PSI items were included on the Panic Disorder subscale: 2, 6, 10, 13, 16, 17, 20, 
25, and 30.  
Internal consistency reliabilities were computed for each assessment period for the entire sample. The mean 
Cronbach’s  alpha  across  individual  anxiety  measures  and  time  periods  was  .87  (range  =  .60  to  .95).  The 
Cronbach’s alphas for the composite ranged between .89 and .91 for the six time periods. Reliabilities were 
similar across testing intervals, and they were similar to internal consistency estimates from normative sam‐
ples. Test‐retest correlations between sequential time periods ranged between .49 and .86 (M = .76) indicat‐
ing  reasonable  stability  over  3  month  assessment  periods.  The  validity  coefficients  between  self‐
assessments of the anxiety construct indicated evidence for convergent validity, with correlations between 
measures ranging from .36 to .85 (M = .65) across all time periods.  
Cognitive Impairment Construct. Cognitive impairment was assessed by two individually administered tests. 
The Saint Louis University Memory Scale (SLUMS; Tariq, Tumosa, Chibnall, Perry, & Morely, 2006) was used 
to assess orientation, memory, attention, and executive function. The SLUMS is an 11‐item scale and yields a 
single  total  score  ranging  from  0  to  30,  where  higher  scores  indicate  stronger  cognitive  abilities.  The  Trail 
Making Test (TMT; Reitan, 1958) was used to assess attention. The time required to complete the A (con‐
nect sequential numbers) and B (connect alternating numbers and letters) tasks were collected, and the ra‐
tio of times (B/A) was used as the attention measure in subsequent analyses.  
The SLUMS demonstrated low internal consistency with a mean Cronbach’s alpha of .52 across groups and 
time  periods  (range  =  .48  to  .60).  We  could  not  find  comparative  information  on  this  newly  developed 
measure. Because this is a multidimensional measure of cognitive function, internal consistency may not be 
the correct assessment of quality. The correlations between sequential time periods ranged from .38 to .84 
(M = .67), indicating good test‐retest reliability. The Trails B/A ratio and SLUMS total score were negatively 
correlated (range = ‐.17 to ‐.31), as would be expected because the tests are scaled in opposite directions; 
however, these correlations are fairly small, indicating that these two measures are assessing different cog‐
nitive functions. Because of the weak correlations between the SLUMS and TMT, each of these assessments 
was  used  individually  to  assess  cognitive  impairment  rather  than  combining  them  to  yield  a  composite 
score. 
Depression‐Hopelessness  Construct.  The  depression‐hopelessness  construct  was  assessed  using  five  self‐
report measures. The scales used to create this construct were the Beck Hopelessness Scale (BHS; Beck & 
Steer, 1993), the BSI Depression subscale (Derogatis, 1993), the  PAS Negative Affect and Suicidal  Thinking 
subscales (Morey, 1997), and the POMS Depression‐Dejection subscale (McNair et al., 1992).  
Internal consistency reliabilities were computed for each assessment period for the entire sample. The mean 
Cronbach’s alpha across depression measures and time periods was .87 (range = .60 to .96). The Cronbach’s 
alpha for the composite ranged between .71 and .77 (M = .75) for the six time periods. Internal consistency 
estimates for the subscales were similar to reliabilities from normative data. The test‐retest correlations for 
the depression‐hopelessness composite were strong (M =  .76, range = .57  to .90) indicating good stability 
over time. The validity coefficients between self‐assessments of the depression‐hopelessness construct indi‐
cated good convergent validity with estimates ranging from .35 to .89 (M = .60) across all measures and time 
periods.  
METHOD 

23 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Hostility‐Anger Control Construct. The hostility‐anger control composite was assessed using five self‐report 
measures:  the  BSI  Hostility  subscale  (Derogatis,  1993);  the  Anger  Control,  Hostile  Control,  and  Acting  Out 
subscales on the PAS (Morey, 1997); and the POMS Anger‐Hostility subscale (McNair et al., 1992).  
Internal  consistency  reliabilities  were  computed  for  each  scale  at  each  assessment  period  for  the  entire 
sample and a mean Cronbach’s alpha of .62 (range = .27 to .94) was obtained. The Cronbach’s alphas for the 
composite ranged between .54 and .61 (M = .57) for the six time periods. Although these reliabilities were 
lower than expected, the smaller internal consistency estimates were for the scales with a small number of 
items (i.e., PAS subscales with two items) and these reliability estimates are similar to other literature. The 
correlations  between  sequential  time  periods  ranged  between  .56  and  .84  (M  =  .75)  and  suggest  that  the 
hostility composite is stable over 3 month periods. The validity coefficients between self‐assessments of the 
hostility‐anger control construct were quite variable with validity coefficients ranging between .11 and .84 
(M =.42) across all measures and time periods; it was the PAS Acting Out and Hostile Control subscales that 
tended to have lower correlations for this composite. These lower correlations along with the lower compo‐
site internal consistency estimates suggest a potential multidimensional construct. Because the composite 
was stable and the different aspects of hostility‐anger control were relevant to this study, all subscales were 
kept  together  for  the  composite  measure.  Analyses  were  conducted  without  the  PAS  subscales  and  the 
overall study results did not change substantially (results available from the authors upon request), thus all 
measures were included as part of the composite.  
Hypersensitivity Construct. The hypersensitivity construct was measured by two self‐report measures—the 
Hypersensitivity to External Stimulus subscale of the PSI and the Interpersonal Sensitivity subscale of the BSI 
(Derogatis, 1993). Items 1, 7, 31, 34, and 37 were included on the PSI Hypersensitivity to External Stimulus 
subscale. This composite is assessing two different aspects of hypersensitivity—environmental and interper‐
sonal.  
Internal  consistency  reliabilities  computed  for  each  scale  at  each  assessment  period  for  the  entire  sample 
indicated highly variable internal consistency estimates (.22 to .86) with a mean estimate of .56. However, 
examination of each scale showed that the BSI had strong internal consistency estimates (.71 to .86) whereas 
the PSI has low estimates (.22 to .39). The PSI was created by the researchers and its purpose was to capture 
variables not measured by existing measures, thus it may not be a homogeneous construct. Although inter‐
nal consistency estimates of the composite were low (.47 to .61 with M = .53), the composite showed good 
test‐retest reliability (.21 to .80 with a mean of .63) and the correlations between these two subscales pro‐
vided evidence of convergent validity (range = .31 to .44); thus these scales were analyzed in the rest of the 
study as a composite variable. Analyses using each measure separately are available from the researchers 
upon request. 
Psychosis Construct. The psychosis construct was assessed by three self‐report measures. These included the 
Paranoid Ideation and Psychoticism subscales of the BSI (Derogatis, 1993) and the Psychotic Features subs‐
cale of the PAS (Morey, 1997).  
Internal consistency estimates for the subscales ranged between .62 and .83 (M = .77) and estimates for the 
composite ranged between .73 and .80 (M = .78) indicating adequate internal consistency estimates for this 
composite and its components. Internal consistency estimates for the subscales were similar to those found 
with normative samples. Test‐retest correlations between sequential time periods indicated strong stability 
over  time  (range  .52  to  .87  with  a  mean  correlation  of  .71).  The  validity  coefficients  between  self‐
24 

METHOD 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
assessments of the psychosis construct provided evidence of convergent validity, ranging between .35 and 
.79 (M = .63) across all measures and time periods.  
Somatization Construct. The somatization construct was measured by four self‐report assessments, includ‐
ing the Somatization subscale of the BSI (Derogatis, 1993), the Health Problems subscale of the PAS (Morey, 
1997), the POMS Fatigue‐Inertia subscale (McNair et al., 1992), and the Physical Symptoms subscale of the 
PSI. Items 5, 8, 11, 15, 19, 24, 27, and 28 were included on the PSI Physical Symptoms subscale.  
The mean Cronbach’s alpha across somatization measures and time periods was .79 (range = .56 to .94) and 
for the composite the mean alpha was .77 (range = .73 to .79). Test‐retest reliability estimates were strong 
with correlations ranging between .58 and .86 (M = .76). The correlations between the self‐assessments of 
the somatization construct indicated good convergent validity with coefficients ranging between .38 and .67 
(M = .54) across all measures and time periods.  
Withdrawal‐Alienation  Construct.  The  withdrawal‐alienation  construct  was  assessed  using  two  PAS  subs‐
cales—Alienation  and  Social  Withdrawal.  Internal  consistency  reliabilities  were  computed  for  each  assess‐
ment period for the entire sample and the median Cronbach’s alpha across withdrawal‐alienation measures 
and time periods was .75 (range = .69 to .83). The Cronbach’s alphas for the composite ranged between .62 
and .71 (M = .67) for the six time periods. Correlations between sequential time periods (range = .49 to .87; 
M = .68) indicated stability. Reliabilities were similar across testing intervals and were similar to reliabilities 
found in the normative samples. The correlations between the subscales used in the withdrawal‐alienation 
construct indicated good convergent validity with coefficients ranging between .45 and .55 (M = .51) across 
time periods.  
Malingering. The Structured Inventory of Malingered Symptomatology (SIMS; Widows & Smith, 2005) was 
used to assess malingering on mental health disorders. Scores on five subscales (Psychosis, Neurologic Im‐
pairment, Amnestic Disorders, Low Intelligence, and Affective Disorders) were obtained at each testing pe‐
riod. The SIMS was used in this study as one of the tools to determine if a participant’s responses may be 
truthful.  
The subscales of the SIMS tended to be positively correlated (range = .19 to .63; M = .51) with each other. 
The  median  Cronbach’s  alpha  across  malingering  subscales  and  time  periods  was  .76  (range  =  .50  to  .93). 
Lower  correlations  and  reliability  estimates  tended  to  be  with  the  Affective  Disorder  and  Low  Intelligence 
subscales.  
The SIMS manual provides cut‐off scores to suggest malingering on each of the subscales as well as a total 
score. The cut‐offs were scores greater than 1 for the Psychosis subscale and scores greater than 2 for the 
Neurological Impairments, Amnestic Disorders, Low Intelligence, and Affective Disorders subscales. The total 
SIMS scale cut‐off included scores greater than 14.  
Personality Disorders. The Coolidge Correctional Inventory (CCI; Coolidge, 2004) was utilized to identify per‐
sonality  disorders  among  individuals.  For  this  study,  the  CCI  was  used  to  assess  14  personality  disorders 
identified in the current and past American Psychiatric Association’s (1980, 2000) Diagnostic and Statistical 
Manuals (DSM): Antisocial, Avoidant, Borderline, Dependent, Depressive, Histrionic, Narcissistic, Obsessive‐
Compulsive,  Paranoid,  Passive‐Aggressive,  Sadistic,  Schizoid,  and  Schizotypal.  The  CCI  also  has  other  subs‐
cales to assess, among others, DSM Axis I variables, neuropsychological functioning, and response validity. 

METHOD 

25 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
For  this  study  we  also  used  the  CCI  measures  of  Axis  I  and  personality  disorders  (Axis  II).  These  variables 
have been hypothesized as potential predictors of the impact of segregation on psychological distress. Be‐
cause personality disorders are considered relatively stable constructs, this measure was given only at the 
baseline assessment period. Therefore, they were not included in the change over time measures. The me‐
dian Cronbach’s alpha across CCI subscales was. 75. The Cronbach’s alphas ranged between .46 and .88 for 
different subscales.  
Self‐Harm Construct. The Deliberate Self‐Harm Inventory (DSHI; Gratz, 2001) was used to assess the delibe‐
rate  self‐harm  history  at  the  initial  assessment.  The  data  obtained  from  the  DSHI  was  coded  to  provide  a 
quantitative severity rating based on the frequency of the self harming behavior and whether or not the be‐
havior resulted in hospitalization. This variable was considered to be a potential predictor of outcomes. The 
baseline assessment was used to assess lifetime history of self‐harm and each harming behavior was coded 
as having occurred in lifetime or not occurring. Scores were summed across the 17 items for a total score. 
This measure is meant to be given as an interview rather than a paper‐and‐pencil test; we modified to fit the 
testing situation. We had hoped to use this assessment as a repeated measure; however, misunderstanding 
of instructions did not allow for integrity of the data and only the lifetime assessment of self‐harm was used 
as a potential predictor of outcomes. The internal consistency estimate for the total score was .84 indicating 
that it is reasonable to sum the 17 indicators into a total score.  
Trauma. The Trauma Symptom Inventory (TSI; Briere, 1995) was used to assess the ongoing impact of trau‐
matic history. This measure was selected as a potential predictor of outcomes. This was administered once 
at  the  second  assessment  period.  Participants  use  a  4‐point  rating  scale  for  frequency  of  occurrence  (0  – 
never to 3 – often) of 100 events (e.g., flashbacks, wanting to cry, feeling jumpy) experienced within the last 
6 months. Scores are obtained on 3 validity scales and 10 clinical subscales. For this study, the total score 
was used. The Cronbach’s alpha for the total score was .97.  
Staff Ratings 
Two measures were completed by prison staff to assess the constructs of interest. The Brief Psychiatric Rat‐
ing Scale (BPRS; Ventura, Lukoff, Nuechterlein, Liberman, Green, & Shaner, 1993) was completed by clinical 
staff and the Prison Behavior Rating Scale (PBRS; Cooke, 1998) was completed by correctional officers and 
case managers.  
Clinician Ratings. The BPRS (Overall & Gorman, 1962) is a 24‐item scale most commonly used to assess pa‐
tients with psychiatric disorders. It is designed to assess rapidly changing symptoms (Lukoff, Nuechterlein, & 
Ventura, 1986; Ventura et al., 1993). It measures positive symptoms, general psychopathology, and affective 
symptoms. Some items can be rated after observation of the patient; others require clinical interview to ob‐
tain the patient’s self report information. Each of the 24 symptom constructs are rated on a 7‐point scale of 
severity ranging from 1 (not present) to 7 (extremely severe).  
Research has indicated that there are five factors: Thought Disorder, Withdrawal, Anxious‐Depressed, Hostil‐
ity‐Suspiciousness,  and  Activity  (Burger,  Calsyn,  Morse,  Klinkenberg,  &  Trusty,  1997;  Hedlund  &  Vieweg, 
1980).  The  BPRS  subscales  and  total  scores  demonstrated  low  internal  consistency  with  alpha  estimates 
ranging between .40 and .66 (M = .55); these estimates are lower than those found with normative samples. 
The correlations between sequential time periods ranged from .23 to .58 (M = .40), indicating moderate sta‐
bility over a 6 month period. The BPRS subscales had low correlations with self‐report measures of the same 

26 

METHOD 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
underlying  construct,  with  validity  correlations  ranging  between  .03  and  .49  among  the  corresponding 
measures and the average validity coefficients of the BPRS with all self‐report assessments at .28. The An‐
xious‐Depressed subscale had the strongest correlations with the self‐report measures and Withdrawal had 
the lowest. In general, the BPRS scales had low scores, indicating a possible floor effect (see means in results 
section) and impacting variability as well as relationships between measures.  
Correctional  Staff  Ratings.  The  PBRS  was  designed  to  assess  psychological  features  common  to  prison  life 
(Cooke, 1998). The instrument was developed for a British prison population. Therefore, some words that 
are not common in the U.S. were changed to be culturally appropriate (see Appendix A). Correctional staff 
rated 36 behaviors using a 4 point rating scale (0 – never/rarely; 1 – sometimes, 2 – often, 3 – most of the 
time) at each of the six time periods. There are three scales: Anti‐Authority, Anxious‐Depressed, and Dull‐
Confused. All items were  summed  to provide a total score. Internal consistencies were good for the PBRS 
scales  with  a  mean  Cronbach’s  alpha  across  groups  and  times  of  .93  (range  =  .90  to  .95)  for  the  Anti‐
Authority scale, .91 (range .90 to .95) for the Anxious‐Depressed scale, and .83 (range = .78 to .87) for the 
Dull‐Confused scale. Total score internal consistency estimates ranged from .94 to .95. Test–retest reliabili‐
ties  were  highly  variable  with  correlations  ranging  between  .08  and  .50.  Correlations  between  testing  pe‐
riods  were  lowest  from  first  to  second  assessments  and  tended  to  increase  over  time,  which  might  be  a 
function of familiarity. Correlations with self‐report measures tended to be highly variable and mostly small 
(‐.06 to .46), as they were with clinician ratings (.08 to .16). 
Official Records Data 
Data from official records were collected primarily from the Department of Corrections Information System 
(DCIS), which is an administrative database of offender data. Offender characteristics to include demograph‐
ic  history,  criminal  history  and  offense  data,  institutional  behavior,  and  needs  levels  were  electronically 
downloaded. Inmates are routinely processed through the diagnostic unit upon intake into prison, and data 
are  gathered  through  various  sources  including  arrest  and  pre‐sentence  investigation  records,  diagnostic 
interview, and pencil‐and‐paper tests.  
Two standardized tests administered to all inmates at the diagnostic unit were included in this study to de‐
scribe the population. These were the Level of Service Inventory – Revised (LSI‐R; Andrews & Bonta, 1995, 
2003) and the Tests of Adult Basic Education (TABE; CTB/McGraw‐Hill, 1994). The LSI‐R is a semi‐structured 
interview tool that assesses criminal risk, with information verified through official records. The LSI‐R total 
score ranges from 0 to 54 and is used to assign the level of supervision for community‐based offenders and 
to determine allocation of services (Motiuk, Motiuk, & Bonta, 1992). The LSI‐R showed moderately strong 
predictive  validity  (r  =  .31)  for  1‐year  recidivism  rates  with  Colorado  parolees  (O’Keefe,  Klebe,  &  Hromas, 
1998). The TABE is designed to measure adult proficiency in reading, mathematics, language, and spelling. It 
gives the information needed to place learners in the appropriate lessons for their particular skill deficien‐
cies. Final scoring of the tests can yield grade equivalent scores. The correlation between the TABE total bat‐
tery score and the GED average score was .63 (CTB/McGraw‐Hill, 2004).  
Resulting  from  the  diagnostic  assessment  process  are  ratings  across  different  needs  levels,  including  aca‐
demic, vocational, sex offender, substance abuse, medical, psychological, intellectual disabilities, assaultive‐
ness, and self‐destruction. Each level is rated on a 5‐point scale, where scores of 3 through 5 indicate prob‐
lem areas. Similar to the other scales, a psychological rating of 3 or greater indicates the need for mental 
health services. Levels may be reevaluated during an offender’s incarceration.  
METHOD 

27 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Institutional behavior, such as disciplinary violations and involvement in gangs, are recorded electronically 
over the course of an offender’s incarceration. Disciplinary violations are grouped into three categories ac‐
cording to their seriousness. Because patterns were similar when analyzing either violation type or total vi‐
olations, only totals are reported. There are three levels of gang involvement: member, associate, and sus‐
pect.  Levels  are  ascertained  by  field  intelligence  officers  who  rate  offenders’  involvement  across  11  items 
(e.g., self admission, moniker, gang tattoos, identification by law enforcement). Each item carries a weight 
ranging from 5 to 20 points, and summative scores determine the degree of gang membership or involve‐
ment.  To  clearly  delineate  offenders  actively  involved  in  gangs,  only  those  scored  as  gang  member  were 
considered to have gang involvement in the following analyses.  
Certain data elements were collected only for study participants during the course of their participation in 
the study. The following were collected and coded for the period of time between each testing interval for 
each  participant:  the  amount  of  time  spent  in  various  settings  (e.g.,  segregation,  GP,  hospital),  phone 
records,  and  mental  health  crisis  data.  Additionally,  activity  logs  from  paper  files  for  the  CSP  participants 
were collected and coded.  
Phone  records  were  received  electronically  from  the  Colorado  Inmate  Phone  System  (CIPS).  From  these 
records, researchers coded the number of phone calls attempted, the number of calls completed, and the 
time spent on the phone across all calls.  
Mental health staff is required to make a written report in DCIS following any unscheduled mental health 
visit  or  crisis.  All  reports  completed  for  participants  during  their  participation  in  the  study  were  reviewed 
and coded by researchers on a 3‐point self‐harm scale (1 – ideation, 2 – self‐harm behavior, 3 – attempted 
suicide) and whether or not there was a report of a psychotic symptom during the crisis.  
Pod activity records are kept by CSP correctional staff and are updated on a daily basis to provide informa‐
tion on an offender’s time outside of his cell for shower, exercise, and porter duties. These forms also track 
the number of times each offender refused or was not offered these activities. Data were coded to reflect a 
refusal or an activity not offered on a specific day as well as the actual amount of time the offender spent 
participating  in  the  activity.  When  the  records  were  unclear  or  no  information  was  recorded  on  a  specific 
day, it was coded as unknown. Researchers coded the pod activity sheets for each offender between each 
testing  interval  and  summed  for  the  number  of  refusals,  days  an  activity  was  not  offered,  unknowns,  and 
average time spent for shower and exercise activities. 

PROCEDURES 
Study enrollment began July 2007 and ended March 2009, with final testing of all participants completed in 
March 2010. The project operated under the approval of the institutional review board at the University of 
Colorado at Colorado Springs (UCCS).  
The research team was notified of AS hearings by the case management supervisor at each facility and of 
SCCF placements by the clinician who scheduled the facility transfers. Notification typically occurred before 
the hearings or SCCF placement to give the field researcher maximal lead time. Researchers reviewed elec‐
tronic records to screen inmates for study eligibility.  
Per the UCCS institutional review board, a stipulation was added to provide greater protection to inmates 
with mental illness. Before consenting them, researchers were required to contact mental health staff, who 
28 

METHOD 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
in turn were  asked to assess whether  the offender  would be able to understand the  consent form and to 
weigh the study risks against the benefits. Other than the SCCF group, there were rarely issues. However, it 
was not uncommon for the SCCF clinician to wait several days or even occasionally weeks for a new arrival 
to stabilize prior to giving researchers approval to consent participants; these inmates were then included in 
the study. Two inmates were excluded from the study because clinicians did not believe they had the capaci‐
ty to fully understand the consent process; both were SCCF inmates.  
The field researcher was a female university employee who completed the full CDOC training academy and 
had a CDOC badge that permitted her unescorted access to the facilities. In advance of each visit, the field 
researcher  contacted  prison  security  to  arrange  visits  with  specific  inmates.  All  inmates  were  escorted  by 
security staff to the visiting room, which contained a noncontact booth for inmates in AS or punitive segre‐
gation conditions. The field researcher met individually with each inmate to review the consent form, which 
included the general purpose of the study, voluntary nature of participation, risks and benefits, and remune‐
ration. Inmates were advised that the purpose of the study was to learn about their adjustment to prison 
and offenders in prisons across the state were being included in this study. Inmates who agreed to partici‐
pate were given $10 for each testing interval. Although this amount may at first seem high for AS inmates 
who do not have an opportunity to earn income, it was important that AS inmates were compensated at the 
same  rate  as  GP  inmates  since  the  activities  were  exactly  the  same.  Additionally,  all  deposits  into  inmate 
bank  accounts  were  subject  to  a  30%  restitution  recovery  fee  and  deposits  to  inmates  with  negative  bal‐
ances (common among AS inmates) were subject to a 50% reduction of the deposited amount. Therefore, 
actual payments ranged from $2 to $7.  
Inmates were screened for their native language and reading abilities. Although this was done when deter‐
mining study eligibility, the field researcher further assessed them at the time of consent. The testing bat‐
tery was not available in alternative languages and it was determined that using interpreters could negative‐
ly impact the validity of the tests. However, the field researcher attempted to include inmates with border‐
line English or reading skills by helping them to understand difficult words. Eighteen inmates across the five 
study groups were specifically excluded from the study for lacking adequate language or reading abilities.  
At the time of consent, the initial test battery was administered. The field researcher instructed participants 
to read the directions for each test. Instructions were highlighted by researchers when there was an indica‐
tion on the test to respond with respect to a certain timeframe (e.g., in the past week). The field researcher 
administered the timed TMT and the SLUMS tests, and she assisted if they had questions, most frequently 
with the definition of a word. The researcher collected the test packet immediately following its completion, 
so it was not ever handled by security staff. At the same time, she visually scanned the packet before the 
inmate was returned to his cell to ensure that he had not inadvertently skipped a test or section of items.  
Prior to leaving the facility, the researcher conducted a further review of inmates’ responses for indications 
of  intent  to  harm  self  or  others.  There  were  no  items  that  assessed  intent  to  harm  others,  but  numerous 
items  were  identified  as  potential  indicators  of  suicide  ideation.  Participants  were  notified  at  the  time  of 
consent that  confidentiality would be broken if they responded affirmatively to any of these items. When 
participants endorsed a suicidal item, the field researcher notified mental health staff and the principal in‐
vestigator immediately. Mental health staff then followed up with each case following notification to assess 
the seriousness or intent to self‐harm. There were no participant suicides during the course of the study.  

METHOD 

29 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
The  field  researcher  distributed  the  PBRS  to  housing  staff  at  each  testing  interval  and  collected  the  com‐
pleted forms upon return visits to the facility. Mental health clinicians were generally notified that a BPRS 
was needed a couple weeks prior to the researcher testing to give them time to complete the assessment.  
In the CSP groups, 18 out of 127 participants were consented and tested prior to their AS hearing. On aver‐
age,  CSP  participants  completed  their  initial  test  7  days  (SD  =  7.3)  after  their  AS  hearing.  Thirteen  partici‐
pants  in  the  GP  groups  were  selected  from  the  diversion  program  (for  being  at  risk  of  AS placement)  and 
seven were tested prior to an AS hearing. On average, however, GP participants were tested 16 days (SD = 
18.9) after their hearing or placement into the diversion program. At the time of consent and the initial test‐
ing, 43% of inmates had been confined in segregation (40% in AS groups and 3% in GP groups) for an aver‐
age of 18.2 days (SD = 18.1). SCCF participants were tested within 13 days of placement on average (SD = 
8.9).  
Participants’ data were kept in two separate databases. The eligibility database tracked the eligible pool of 
offenders, such as identifying information, current location, date of AS hearing or SCCF placement, expected 
release date, psychiatric status and clinician approval, selection into study or reason for exclusion, and date 
of consent or refusal. A testing schedule for study participants was incorporated into the database, which 
also  had  reporting  capabilities  in  order  to  manage  the  project.  A  separate  database  tracked  participants’ 
responses to the standardized tests; no identifying information was included in this database other than a 
secure  researcher‐assigned  identification  number.  Both  databases  were  stored  on  a  secured  server  with 
access restricted to the project researchers.  

30 

METHOD 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 

RESULTS 
DATA ANALYSIS PLAN 
We first present results that speak to the quality of the research design, addressing issues concerning sam‐
pling and group representativeness; comparing those who participated fully, partially, or refused to partici‐
pate; evaluating the fidelity to confinement conditions; and examining the validity of self‐report responses. 
Following  these  analyses,  we  present  results  addressing  the  hypotheses  of  interest.  This  study  had  three 
goals and related hypotheses:  
•

To determine which, if any, psychological domains are affected, and in which direction, by the different 
prison environments; it was hypothesized that offenders in segregation would develop an array of psy‐
chological  symptoms  consistent  with  the  SHU  syndrome,  characterized  by  elevations  across  the  eight 
constructs. 

•

To assess whether offenders with mental illness decompensate differentially from those without mental 
illness in AS by testing the hypothesis that both groups will get worse over time but that the rate of de‐
terioration would be greater for the mentally ill.  

•

To compare the impact of AS against other prison conditions by testing the hypothesis that inmates in 
segregation experience greater psychological deterioration over time compared to inmates in other con‐
finement conditions. 

To test the first hypothesis, one sample t‐tests are completed to see if study groups are significantly differ‐
ent from normative data on the study measures at each time period. 
To test the second hypothesis, analysis of variance statistical techniques are used to assess if the AS groups 
have differential change over time. Comparisons are made on mean change over time for each construct for 
the mentally ill and non‐mentally ill groups in AS confinement conditions.  
To test the third hypothesis, analysis of variance statistical methods are used to assess mean change over 
time and groups for each construct of interest. In particular, it is of interest to determine whether there is a 
significant  interaction  between  time  and  group  to  indicate  that  there  is  differential  change  over  time  de‐
pending on condition of confinement. An analysis is completed for those with different mental illness status. 
That is, the mentally ill group in AS is compared to the mentally ill groups in the general prison and in the 
psychiatric  prison,  whereas  the  non‐mentally  ill  in  AS  are  compared  to  the  non‐mentally  ill  in  the  general 
prison population.  
Mean difference statistical results for all three analyses are supplemented with effect size measures assess‐
ing  proportion  of  variance  accounted  for  by  the  time  and  group  variables.  Significant  main  effects  will  be 
further  investigated  using  pairwise  comparisons  to  explore  group  differences  and  comparisons  between 
means  at  consecutive  time  periods  to  explore  time  effects.  If  there  is  a  statistically  significant  interaction, 
simple  main  effects  exploring  change  over  time  for  each  group  will  be  completed.  All  statistical  tests  are 
completed at the .05 significance level.  
In  addition  to  the  analysis  of  variance  methods  to  explore  mean  change  over  time,  regression  analysis  is 
used to predict change over time using individual variables as potential predictors. Change over time is as‐
sessed by computing an individual slope estimate for each person on each construct of interest. Predictors 
RESULTS 

31 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
include demographic variables, criminal history variables, personality variables, and confinement conditions. 
Within each section we describe the data analytical tools used to complete the analyses.  

SAMPLING 
Group Representativeness 
Because random assignment procedures were not engaged, comparisons of offender characteristics across 
variables routinely collected in DCIS were conducted between eligible inmates and study participants to de‐
termine the study sample’s representativeness (see Table 2). Some data are dynamic and, therefore, these 
data represent those that were current for each offender at the point of his eligibility for the study. The in‐
stitutional behavior measures of disciplinary violations and prior AS placement were collected over their en‐
tire incarceration up to study eligibility.  
Table 2. Representativeness of CSP Study Groups to Eligible Pool  
CSP MI
 
Sample 
Eligible Pool
p
 
Demographics 
(n = 64) 
(n = 232)
Mean age (SD) 
 31.2  (9.7) 
32.1 (9.2)
n.s.
Ethnicity/Race 
 
n.s.
White 
41% 
45%
Hispanic 
33% 
32%
African American 
19% 
17%
Other 
8% 
6%
High school achievement 
 
n.s.
HS diploma 
12% 
12%
HS equivalency 
51% 
45%
Neither 
37% 
43%
Test of Adult Basic Education 
 
Mean reading score (SD) 
  8.7  (3.6) 
8.0 (3.6)
n.s.
Mean math score (SD) 
  6.7  (2.5) 
6.3 (2.8)
n.s.
Mean language score (SD) 
  7.7  (4.0) 
7.1 (4.1)
n.s.
Mean total score (SD) 
  7.7  (3.5) 
7.1 (3.5)
n.s.
Sentence and Criminal History   
Mean prior incarcerations (SD)   .5  (0.9) 
.5 (0.9)
n.s.
Mean felony class 1 – 6 (SD) 
  3.4  (1.1) 
3.7 (1.1)
.02
Mean LSI‐R (SD) 
 35.3  (7.4) 
34.8 (6.9)
n.s.
% Sentenced for violent crime 
67% 
54%
.03
Institutional Behavior 
 
Mean # disc. violations (SD) 
22.0 (27.5) 
20.7 (20.1)
n.s.
% Prior AS placement 
38% 
38%
n.s.
% Gang member 
30% 
33%
n.s.
Need Levels (% scored 3‐5) 
 
% Academic 
42% 
45%
n.s.
% Vocational 
83% 
82%
n.s.
% Medical 
23% 
17%
n.s.
% Substance abuse 
83% 
80%
n.s.
% Sex offender 
44% 
33%
n.s.
% Intellectual disability 
11% 
10%
n.s.
% Anger 
69% 
61%
n.s.
% Self‐destruction 
34% 
25%
n.s.

32 

CSP NMI 
Sample
Eligible Pool 
(n = 63)
(n = 432) 
30.0 (9.9)
30.4  (8.5) 
19%
54%
22%
5%

p
 
n.s.
n.s.

(3.3)
(2.5)
(3.8)
(3.4)

27% 
55% 
16% 
2% 
 
13% 
58% 
30% 
 
8.6  (3.6) 
7.2  (3.0) 
7.6  (3.9) 
7.8  (3.5) 

.4  (0.8)
3.2 (1.1)
33.1 (5.8)
70%

.4  (0.7) 
3.5  (1.1) 
33.0  (6.6) 
59% 

n.s.
n.s.
n.s.
n.s.

13.2(10.8)
32%
43%

13.9 (14.1) 
29% 
45% 

n.s.
n.s.
n.s.

41%
87%
10%
71%
30%
3%
70%
10%

37% 
83% 
9% 
81% 
22% 
3% 
64% 
9% 

n.s.
n.s.
n.s.
n.s.
n.s.
n.s.
n.s.
n.s.

10%
54%
36%
7.8
6.7
7.2
7.4

n.s.

n.s.
n.s.
n.s.
n.s.

RESULTS 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Nonparametric chi‐square and t test analyses were conducted for both sets of group comparisons. There were 
no differences between the CSP NMI study sample and eligible pool. The only difference for the CSP MI group 
was that study participants had a more serious felony offense, as measured by felony class (class 1 is most se‐
rious and class 6 is least) and percent with a violent crime, than individuals in the eligible pool.  
Refusals  
The field researcher asked inmates who refused to participate or who withdrew their consent for their reasons. 
Half of them gave no reason for doing so. Of those who listed their reasons, 10 inmates stated general disinter‐
est, 6 were skeptical of the research, 4 feared retaliation from their gang or other inmates for participating, 3 
listed  monetary  reasons,  and  3  expected  imminent  release  due  to  an  appeal.  Chi‐square  analyses  and  t‐tests 
were conducted between study participants and inmates who refused to participate in the study or withdrew 
their consent to determine if significant differences existed (see Table 3). The only measured difference between 
the two groups was that participants had higher LSI‐R scores, which indicates higher recidivism risk.  
Table 3. Comparison of Refusals to Study Participants 
Refusals
Participants
 
Demographics 
(n = 55)
(n = 247)
Mean age (SD) 
33.2 (10.5)
31.7 (8.9)
Ethnicity/Race 
 
White 
44% 
40%
Hispanic 
33% 
37%
African American 
20% 
18%
Other 
4% 
5%
High school achievement 
 
HS diploma 
23% 
13%
HS equivalency 
42% 
56%
Neither 
36% 
32%
Test of Adult Basic Education 
 
Mean reading score (SD) 
  8.2  (3.6)
8.5 (3.5)
Mean math score (SD) 
  7.1  (3.1)
6.6 (2.8)
Mean language score (SD) 
  7.9  (4.0)
7.3 (3.9)
Mean total score (SD) 
  7.8  (3.4)
7.5 (3.5)
Sentence and Criminal History   
Mean prior incarcerations (SD)    .3  (0.6)
.5 (0.8)
Mean felony class 1 – 6 (SD) 
  3.2  (1.1)
3.4 (1.1)
Mean LSI‐R (SD) 
 31.4  (7.4)
34.3 (7.3)
% Sentenced for violent crime 
70% 
60%
Institutional Behavior 
 
# Disciplinary violations 
16.9 (24.0)
15.8 (16.8)
% Prior AS placement 
26% 
23%
% Gang member 
22% 
28%
Need Levels (% scored 3‐5) 
 
% Academic 
42% 
39%
% Vocational 
87% 
83%
% Medical 
13% 
19%
% Substance abuse 
70% 
79%
% Sex offender 
35% 
31%
% Intellectual disability 
15% 
9%
% Anger 
72% 
60%
% Self‐destruction 
24% 
23%

RESULTS 

p
n.s.
n.s.

n.s.

n.s.
n.s.
n.s.
n.s.
n.s.
n.s.
.02
n.s.
n.s.
n.s.
n.s.
n.s.
n.s.
n.s.
n.s.
n.s.
n.s.
n.s.
n.s.

33 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Complete and Incomplete Testers 
There were 222 participants who completed all testing sessions of the study; thus only 18% of participants did 
not have all self‐report assessments for every time period. There were a number of reasons why participants did 
not  complete  all  testing  periods:  some  withdrew  their  consent,  others  were  paroled  before  the  end  of  the 
study, and some were not available for a specific testing interval (e.g., out to court for extended trial). There was 
not a significant differential incompletion rate across the five study groups, χ2(4, N = 270) = 3.71, p = .45, with 
incompletion rates of 25% for CSP MI, 16% for CSP NMI, 18% for GP NMI, 15% for GP MI, and 18% for SCCF. 
Comparisons were made between those who did and did not complete all assessments on demographic, back‐
ground  variables,  and  the  dependent  variables.  To  compute  a  score  on  the  dependent  variables,  the  mean 
across scores for available time periods was computed for the self‐report composites and cognitive variables. 
Table  4  provides  information  on  these  comparisons.  Participants  who  did  not  complete  the  entire  study  had 
significantly higher self‐destruction needs, higher mean hostility composite scores, and lower cognitive function 
as demonstrated by significantly lower scores on both measures of cognitive performance (SLUMS, Trails B/A).  
Table 4. Comparison of Incomplete to Complete Testers 
Incomplete
 
Demographics 
(n =48)
Mean age (SD) 
  31.4 (8.7)
Ethnicity/Race 
White 
49%
Hispanic 
34%
African American 
13%
Other 
4%
High school achievement 
HS diploma 
12%
HS equivalency 
57%
Neither 
31%
Test of Adult Basic Education 
Mean reading score (SD) 
  8.6 (3.5)
Mean math score (SD) 
  6.6 (2.8)
Mean language score (SD) 
  7.4 (3.9)
Mean total score (SD) 
  7.6 (3.5)
Sentence and Criminal History 
 
Mean prior incarcerations (SD)
  0.5 (0.8)
Mean felony class 1 – 6 (SD) 
  3.5 (1.1)
Mean LSI‐R (SD) 
  34.0 (7.5)
% Sentenced for violent crime 
65%
Institutional Behavior 
# Disciplinary violations 
  15.1 (15.4)
% Prior AS placement 
22%
% Gang member 
27%
Need Levels (% scored 3‐5) 
 
% Academic 
37%
% Vocational 
84%
% Medical 
18%
% Substance abuse 
78%
% Sex offender 
32%
% Intellectual disability 
9%
% Anger 
60%
% Self‐destruction 
21%

34 

Complete
(n =222)
34.1 (10.6)

p
n.s.
n.s.

39%
36%
20%
5%
n.s.
19%
44%
37%
7.7
7.1
7.5
7.4

(3.7)
(3.3)
(4.1)
(3.6)

n.s.
n.s.
n.s.
n.s.

0.4 (0.8)
3.2 (1.2)
33.3 (7.5)
61%

n.s.
n.s.
n.s.
n.s.

22.5 (28.8)
27%
29%

n.s.
n.s.
n.s.

43%
85%
15%
72%
30%
13%
64%
36%

n.s.
n.s.
n.s.
n.s.
n.s.
n.s.
n.s.
.04

RESULTS 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
 
Composites and Cognitive Measures 
Mean Anxiety (SD) 
Mean Depression‐Hopelessness (SD) 
Mean Hostility‐Anger Control (SD) 
Mean Hypersensitivity (SD) 
Mean Psychosis (SD) 
Mean Somatization (SD) 
Mean Withdrawal‐Alienation (SD) 
Mean SLUMS (SD) 
Mean Trails (SD) 

Incomplete
  ‐.18 (.72)
  ‐.16 (.73)
  ‐.16 (.57)
  ‐.13 (.68)
  ‐.18 (.75)
  ‐.15 (.69)
  ‐.22 (.63)
  23.18 (3.36)
  2.82 (0.75)

Complete

p

‐.08 (.80)
‐.01 (.76)
.02 (.65)
‐.12 (.77)
‐.06 (.73)
.06 (.82)
‐.03 (.70)
22.02 (3.76)
3.18 (1.12)

n.s.
n.s.
.05
n.s.
n.s.
n.s.
n.s.
.03
.01

The amount of complete data was higher on self‐report assessments (85%) than clinician ratings (76%) and 
correctional  staff  ratings  (57%).  There  were  significant  differences  in  groups’  completion  rates  for  clinician 
ratings with the MI groups having  more complete data (CSP  MI 70%, GP MI 76%, SCCF 75%) than the  NMI 
groups  (CSP  NMI  56%,  GP  NMI  58%).  There  were  also  significant  differences  between  completion  rates  for 
the correctional staff ratings with the GP groups having less complete data (GP NMI 47%, GP MI 49%) than 
the other three groups (CSP MI 64%, CSP NMI 75%, SCCF 61%). 
Group Fidelity to Conditions of Confinement  
Participants remained in their assigned group regardless of later placements throughout the prison system. 
Table 5 summarizes the locations of study participants by group and by testing interval (each interval is the 
period of time between two assessment periods).  
One of the challenges of applied research is the researchers’ lack of control over the independent variable, 
which in this case is the condition of confinement. Therefore, all offenders in AS were not confined in segre‐
gation for their entire period of participation in the study. Over the course of the study, 15 offenders in the 
CSP MI group were placed in the specialized OMI program; most completed at least three tests prior to the 
transfer. Some of the inmates placed in CSP were taken to county jail for a court appearance. Conversely, 
inmates  in  the  GP  groups may  have  at some  time  during  their  study  participation  been  placed  in  punitive 
segregation or even AS. There were five GP MI and four GP NMI participants who were placed in AS during 
the course of their segregation; the remainder of GP inmates who had time in segregation were in punitive 
segregation.  Seven  of  the  nine  GP  inmates  were  reclassified  to  AS  primarily  between  the  third  and  fourth 
assessment periods, one was reclassified after only two tests, and one was reclassified two days prior to his 
final test.  
Due to the contamination across groups, a separate set of analyses were conducted using only the “pure” 
cases,  which  included  those  who  only  experienced  a  single  condition  of  confinement  during  their  entire 
study participation. There were 26 pure cases in the CSP MI group, 39 in the CSP NMI group, 13 in the GP 
MI,  and  11  in  the  GP  NMI.  The  p  values  and  partial  eta‐squares  for  the  self‐report  composites  were  com‐
pared for these pure cases and the original study groups. The SCCF group was not included because those 
participants were expected to transfer from SCCF once stabilization occurred. A result would be considered 
different  if  both  the  p  value  changed  significance  and  the  effect  size  was  not  of  the  same  magnitude.  Be‐
cause of the smaller sample size in the pure group analysis, it might be possible for an effect of the same 
magnitude to no longer be statistically significant, thus we did not count this as a different result. The same 
pattern of results was found for both samples (total vs. pure) except on the hypersensitivity composite. For 

RESULTS 

35 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
this  variable,  there  was  a  significant  time  effect  for  the  entire  sample  (p  =  .001,  η2  =  .026)  demonstrating 
higher scores at the first assessment compared to all other periods but no significant time effect for the pure 
sample (p = .56, η2 = .009). As it does not appear that changing locations was a major explanation for the 
results, subsequent analyses included all offenders who participated in the study. (Complete statistical re‐
sults are available upon request from the authors.) 
Table 5. Number of Days by Location for each Group at each Testing Interval 
    Interval 1 
    Interval 2 
   Interval 3 
   Interval 4 
Group 
Location 
n  M (days) 
n M (days)
n M (days)
n M (days) 
CSP 
62 
19.8 
60
78.3
57
91.2
50
88.2 
Other seg 
56 
88.9 
2
4.5
2
9.5
0
‐‐ 
CSP MI 
SCCF 
1 
89.0 
0
‐‐
0
‐‐
1
69.0 
(n = 64) 
GP 
4 
43.8 
3
31.0
7
63.0
8
74.6 
Othera 
6 
32.0 
5
12.4
9
8.9
5
20.2 
CSP 
59 
14.2 
57
82.7
56
92.2
56
92.7 
Other seg 
57 
90.3 
2
3.5
2
43.0
0
‐‐ 
CSP NMI 
SCCF 
0 
‐‐ 
0
‐‐
0
‐‐
0
‐‐ 
(n = 63) 
GP 
4 
5.0 
0
‐‐
0
‐‐
0
‐‐ 
Othera 
5 
39.0 
5
8.4
2
15.5
4
1.8 
CSP 
0 
‐‐ 
0
‐‐
4
24.3
4
80.5 
Other seg 
9 
12.4 
7
23.0
9
34.2
6
30.7 
GP MI 
SCCF 
0 
‐‐ 
0
‐‐
0
‐‐
0
‐‐ 
(n = 33) 
GP 
32 
87.2 
32
89.9
27
84.8
25
88.8 
Othera 
0 
‐‐ 
3
1.0
1
1.0
1
11.0 
CSP 
0 
‐‐ 
0
‐‐
0
‐‐
0
‐‐ 
Other seg 
10 
39.8 
9
13.3
5
39.6
15
37.9 
GP NMI 
SCCF 
0 
‐‐ 
0
‐‐
0
‐‐
1
46.0 
(n = 43) 
GP 
41 
79.2 
41
89.1
39
85.3
35
83.7 
Othera 
2 
23.5 
4
11.5
2
12.5
2
2.5 
CSP 
0 
‐‐ 
0
‐‐
0
‐‐
1
53.0 
Other seg 
1 
37.0 
4
7.5
4
10.3
8
24.0 
SCCF 
SCCF 
64 
77.3 
54
79.1
40
92.4
34
80.6 
(n = 67) 
GP 
7 
26.6 
21
66.2
24
77.3
29
75.6 
a
Other  
5 
12.0 
6
32.5
3
39.7
6
9.7 

    Interval 5 
n  M (days)
44  83.0
2  10.5
1  71.0
15  75.7
5  14.2
54  91.4
0 
‐‐
0 
‐‐
3  62.3
1 
1.0
  ‐‐
  ‐‐
  ‐‐
  ‐‐
  ‐‐
  ‐‐
  ‐‐
  ‐‐
  ‐‐
  ‐‐
  ‐‐
  ‐‐
  ‐‐
  ‐‐
  ‐‐

Note. Individuals may have multiple locations within a study period, so the n’s within a group and interval can be larger than the 
group sample size.  
a
 Other included out to court (county jail), in custody of US Marshall, hospital or external medical, community placement, and time 
in transport.  

 

VALIDITY OF RESPONSES 
Most  of  the  assessments  used  in  this  study  were  self‐report  measures,  which  always  carry  the  risk  of  not 
being completed accurately by the participant. Because of this risk, several measures were collected to as‐
sess the validity of individual responses.  
During data collection and data entry, responses were scanned for abnormal pattern of responses (e.g., the 
same response selected for all items). Each person’s pattern of response was coded as potentially question‐
able or not. If the pattern was noticed during data collection, then the participant was questioned about his 
response pattern and asked to redo the test if he admitted to not being truthful. If the participant said he 
was being honest and the researcher still did not believe him, she marked the test as questionable. Overall, 
12% of participants had a questionable response pattern on any measure at any time period (see Table 6); 

36 

RESULTS 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
however, there were no differences between the number of questionable response patterns across groups, 
χ2(4, N = 270) = 3.87, p = .42.  
Table 6. Percentage of Participants with Questionable Response Patterns  
CSP MI  CSP NMI  GP MI 
GP NMI
   SCCF
All
 
Time 1 
5% 
0% 
6% 
0%
2%
2%
Time 2 
6% 
7% 
0% 
0%
3%
4%
Time 3 
3% 
5% 
3% 
5%
0%
3%
Time 4 
5% 
5% 
0% 
3%
0%
3%
Time 5 
4% 
7% 
0% 
10%
2%
5%
Time 6 
8% 
7% 
NA 
NA
   NA
8%

 
Potential  malingering  was  assessed  using  the  SIMS,  a  75‐item  screening  measure  for  detecting  feigned 
symptoms of psychopathology and cognitive functioning in clinical and forensic settings. A total score and 
scores on five subscales (i.e., Psychosis, Neurological Impairment, Amnestic Disorders, Low Intelligence, Af‐
fective  Disorders)  were  obtained.  The  SIMS  assesses  whether  respondents  endorse  atypical,  improbable, 
inconsistent,  or  illogical  symptoms.  Scores  above  the  cutoff  suggest  malingering  but  may  also  suggest  ge‐
nuine psychopathology. Eighty‐five percent of participants had at least one elevated score across the differ‐
ent subscales of the SIMS (see Table 7). The percentage of participants with elevated scores was significantly 
different across groups, χ2(4, N = 270) = 56.82, p < .001, with the MI groups (CSP MI 92%, SCCF 96%, GP MI 
97%) demonstrating more elevated scores than the NMI groups and with the CSP NMI group (86%) showing 
more elevations than the GP NMI group (49%). We also considered using a rule of removing participants if 
they  were  elevated  on  multiple  scales;  however,  multiple  elevations  within  a  time  period  were  still  high 
among the mentally ill groups (47% to 62%). Because elevated scores may actually reflect psychopathology, 
we did not eliminate anyone from the study based on this measure. The SIMS was administered to detect 
potential malingering and was not intended as an outcome measure, thus there are no further analyses with 
this measure (Appendix B provides summary statistics for the sample).  
We further examined response patterns within the main constructs of interest. Because multiple measures 
were used for each construct, we computed variability across standardized measures of the same construct 
in order to see if a person was responding in an inconsistent fashion (see Table 8). For example, inconsistent 
responses within the depression construct might entail a high score on the BHS but a low score on the BSI 
Depression scale, where one might expect the pattern of scores to be similar. If the variability score for a 
participant was greater than two standard deviations from the mean on any composite, responses were ex‐
amined. Approximately 17% of participants had a value greater than this cutoff. Different rates of inconsis‐
tent responses were found across the groups, χ2(4, N = 270) = 10.09, p = .04, with the lowest incidence of 
inconsistency for GP MI (9%), CSP NMI (10%), and GP NMI (12%) groups, and higher incidences for CSP MI 
(20%) and SCCF (27%) groups. 
To explore if results were influenced by participants with inconsistent or questionable responses, three sets 
of analyses comparing group differences on composite variables were completed using (1) all participants, 
(2) those who did not have a questionable response, and (3) those who did not have inconsistent responses. 
Removal of persons with questionable or inconsistent responses did not change the overall effects and re‐
sults, so all participants are used in the analyses for this report (full statistical results are available from the 
authors upon request). 

RESULTS 

37 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Table 7. Elevation on SIMS Scales  
 
CSP MI  CSP NMI 
Affective Disorders  
 
 
Time 1 
59% 
35% 
Time 2 
60% 
28% 
Time 3 
68% 
36% 
Time 4 
58% 
39% 
Time 5 
41% 
29% 
Time 6 
61% 
37% 
Neurological Impairment 
 
Time 1 
52% 
32% 
Time 2 
42% 
30% 
Time 3 
42% 
33% 
Time 4 
48% 
41% 
Time 5 
43% 
25% 
Time 6 
41% 
24% 
Psychosis 
 
 
Time 1 
47% 
29% 
Time 2 
50% 
22% 
Time 3 
53% 
24% 
Time 4 
52% 
23% 
Time 5 
39% 
18% 
Time 6 
39% 
18% 
Low Intelligence  
 
 
Time 1 
11% 
5% 
Time 2 
10% 
7% 
Time 3 
17% 
9% 
Time 4 
13% 
9% 
Time 5 
12% 
11% 
Time 6 
16% 
11% 
Amnestic Disorders 
 
 
Time 1 
20% 
2% 
Time 2 
26% 
5% 
Time 3 
23% 
5% 
Time 4 
22% 
7% 
Time 5 
16% 
5% 
Time 6 
16% 
4% 
Total Score 
 
 
Time 1 
50% 
29% 
Time 2 
50% 
22% 
Time 3 
57% 
26% 
Time 4 
52% 
27% 
Time 5 
41% 
27% 
Time 6 
45% 
24% 

GP MI

GP NMI

SCCF

All

55%
58%
62%
59%
55%
NA

16%
12%
17%
13%
13%
 NA

72%
69%
69%
59%
65%
NA

49%
47%
52%
47%
41%
48%

48%
42%
56%
45%
45%
NA

21%
17%
12%
10%
16%
 NA

67%
58%
56%
51%
46%
NA

46%
40%
40%
41%
35%
32%

46%
36%
38%
34%
28%
NA

7%
12%
15%
10%
10%
 NA

76%
69%
64%
61%
60%
NA

43%
41%
41%
39%
33%
29%

3%
12%
3%
10%
3%
NA

2%
2%
2%
8%
0%
 NA

12%
11%
13%
10%
9%
NA

7%
8%
10%
10%
8%
12%

21%
15%
12%
24%
17%
NA

2%
2%
0%
3%
0%
 NA

33%
40%
31%
30%
26%
NA

16%
20%
16%
18%
14%
9%

46%
48%
53%
48%
41%
NA

7%
10%
7%
10%
8%
 NA

78%
72%
60%
61%
53%
NA

44%
42%
42%
41%
35%
34%

 

38 

RESULTS 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Table 8. Potentially Inconsistent Responses within a Composite Score  
 
CSP MI  CSP NMI  GP MI
GP NMI
SCCF
All
Anxiety  
 
 
Time 1 
0% 
0% 
0%
0%
0%
0%
Time 2 
0% 
2% 
0%
0%
2%
1%
Time 3 
0% 
0% 
0%
0%
0%
0%
Time 4 
0% 
0% 
0%
0%
0%
0%
Time 5 
0% 
0% 
0%
0%
2%
0%
Time 6 
0% 
0% 
  NA
  NA
 NA
0%
Depression‐Hopelessness 
 
Time 1 
0% 
0% 
0%
0%
0%
0%
Time 2 
0% 
0% 
0%
0%
2%
0%
Time 3 
0% 
0% 
0%
0%
0%
0%
Time 4 
2% 
0% 
0%
0%
0%
0%
Time 5 
2% 
0% 
0%
0%
0%
0%
Time 6 
0% 
0% 
  NA
  NA
NA
0%
Hostility‐Anger Control 
 
Time 1 
5% 
0% 
0%
0%
2%
2%
Time 2 
6% 
2% 
0%
0%
3%
3%
Time 3 
3% 
4% 
0%
0%
3%
2%
Time 4 
5% 
2% 
0%
0%
5%
3%
Time 5 
5% 
4% 
0%
0%
2%
2%
Time 6 
0% 
2% 
  NA
  NA
NA
1%
Hypersensitivity  
 
 
Time 1 
8% 
3% 
9%
5%
12%
7%
Time 2 
6% 
2% 
9%
0%
8%
5%
Time 3 
5% 
4% 
9%
2%
12%
6%
Time 4 
9% 
7% 
7%
3%
12%
8%
Time 5 
4% 
2% 
10%
5%
9%
6%
Time 6 
12% 
2% 
  NA
  NA
NA
7%
Psychosis 
 
 
 
Time 1 
5% 
2% 
3%
0%
6%
3%
Time 2 
2% 
0% 
0%
0%
0%
0%
Time 3 
0% 
0% 
0%
2%
0%
0%
Time 4 
2% 
0% 
0%
0%
0%
0%
Time 5 
2% 
4% 
0%
0%
2%
2%
Time 6 
4% 
2% 
  NA
  NA
NA
3%
Somatization 
 
 
Time 1 
2% 
0% 
0%
2%
2%
1%
Time 2 
0% 
2% 
0%
0%
0%
<1%
Time 3 
7% 
2% 
0%
0%
0%
2%
Time 4 
3% 
2% 
0%
0%
0%
1%
Time 5 
2% 
2% 
3%
0%
0%
1%
Time 6 
0% 
0% 
  NA
  NA
NA
0%
Withdrawal‐Alienation   
 
Time 1 
2% 
2% 
0%
5%
4%
3%
Time 2 
2% 
3% 
0%
5%
3%
12%
Time 3 
2% 
4% 
6%
2%
2%
3%
Time 4 
0% 
2% 
0%
3%
2%
1%
Time 5 
4% 
2% 
0%
3%
2%
2%
Time 6 
6% 
4% 
  NA
  NA
NA
5%

 
 
RESULTS 

 

39 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 

OFFICIAL RECORD DATA 
Several sets of official record data were gathered and coded to use as potential outcomes or predictors of 
change. It was expected that CSP inmates might experience varying levels of isolation based on the amount 
of time spent at the different QOL levels, the amount of visits and phone contacts, and out of cell time for 
showers and recreation. In gathering QOL levels, however, data were obtained from two different sources 
that had conflicting information. Because of the quality of this data, it was not possible to code or use in this 
study. Following is a discussion of the other official record data gathered and coded.  
CIPS Data 
CIPS data were collected on the five study groups by testing interval in order to examine amounts of phone 
contact.  A  testing  interval  consisted  of  the  day  the  offender  tested  on  their  self‐report  measures  through 
the day before the next battery, generally three months. The following data were collected on each offender 
for  each  interval:  1)  total  number  of  calls  attempted,  2)  total  calls  completed  (i.e.,  offender  was  able  to 
reach another person), and 3) the average duration in minutes per week of all completed calls. A total of 75 
offenders did not have any calls during at least one time period. Though the CSP groups had one more test‐
ing interval than the other groups, summary statistics are presented only for the four common intervals for 
each group. Table 21 provides the mean number (and standard deviation) of total calls attempted, total calls 
completed, and average duration (minutes/week). 
Table 21. Mean (and SD) for Phone Call Data for each Time Interval by Study Group 
Group 
Measure 
Time 1 to 2
Time 2 to 3
Time 3 to 4 
Attempted  
  30.80  (57.72)
9.13 (10.11)
12.06 (14.53) 
CSP MI  
Completed  
  6.24  (13.11)
2.56 (2.65)
3.58
(4.40) 
(n = 55) 
Avg mins/wk 
  6.86  (15.17)
3.77 (4.17)
4.61
(5.89) 
Attempted  
  41.52  (80.14)
14.55 (15.94)
23.46 (76.43) 
CSP NMI 
Completed  
  11.11  (27.52)
3.68 (3.93)
6.86
(7.66) 
(n = 56) 
Avg mins/wk 
  12.54  (32.11)
5.26 (5.46)
9.22 (10.60) 
Attempted  
  86.03  (95.49)
129.45 (312.03)
102.31 (202.69) 
GP MI 
Completed  
  22.59  (42.72)
26.62 (59.33)
18.17 (28.94) 
(n = 29) 
Avg mins/wk 
  23.40  (38.42)
31.01 (75.21)
18.82 (32.40) 
Attempted  
 122.40  (131.74)
118.87 (137.45)
105.34 (136.08) 
GP NMI 
Completed  
  27.08  (40.75)
24.03 (27.15)
18.08 (33.38) 
(n = 38) 
Avg mins/wk 
  29.78  (47.09)
26.38 (30.26)
21.36 (39.62) 
Attempted  
  59.11  (80.98)
59.29 (76.43)
56.71 (88.29) 
SCCF 
Completed  
  14.41  (27.22)
15.36 (30.63)
13.07 (30.22) 
(n = 56) 
Avg mins/wk 
  15.85  (27.93)
13.94 (26.11)
11.39 (27.67) 

Time 4 to 5
  17.62  (20.94)
  5.47  (7.89)
  6.92  (3.20)
  20.75  (22.25)
  6.00  (6.38)
  7.96  (8.61)
 432.17  (641.45)
  97.69  (143.62)
 104.00  (159.71)
 496.63  (495.10)
  98.71  (119.22)
 105.40  (131.08)
 241.13  (325.30)
  58.12  (125.70)
  52.87  (111.57)

During the course of the project, important changes were made to the CIPS program. On July 1, 2008, the 
CIPS pricing was changed so that all offender calls generated from any CDOC facility dialing someone within 
the continental United States cost the same price. Previously, it was more costly for an offender to make a 
phone  call  to  someone  located  outside  of  Colorado.  Additionally,  in  July  of  2007,  one  trial  pod  at  CSP 
changed  how  offenders  were  able  to  access  the  phone  system  by  providing  cordless  phones  that  inmates 
were able to use in their cells. After the trial period ended, the remainder of the facility transitioned to the 
cordless phone system in July 2009. This change allowed prisoners at CSP to access phones more frequently. 
Prior to the introduction of the cordless phones, inmates were required to be escorted by two staff mem‐
bers from their cells  to the day hall where they would be tethered near  the  phone.  This  method is highly 

40 

RESULTS 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
staff intensive and because of other required staff duties, staff were not always able to escort offenders to 
the phone when requested.  
The changes in the CIPS program makes interpretation of change over time difficult; it also impacts group 
comparisons  because  group  assessments  did  not  occur  evenly  over  the  study  period  (e.g.,  because  there 
were a smaller number of potential CSP MI participants, we started data collection activities earlier for that 
group). Thus, further statistical analyses were not completed on these data because it is difficult to know to 
what causes any potential findings could be attributed. 
Pod Activity Data 
Pod activity data were collected on the two CSP groups. Pod activity data were gathered from records that 
housing  staff  at  CSP  keep  on  every offender  at  the  facility  to  track  offenders’  exercise  and  shower  habits. 
Researchers were provided access to this data for use in the study. Data were coded by testing interval (i.e., 
activities that occurred from one testing period until the next testing period). The following data were col‐
lected  on  each  offender:  1)  number  of  days  each  offender  refused  an  offer  to  exercise  and/or  shower,  2) 
number  of  days  each  offender  was  not  offered  exercise  and/or  shower,  3)  average  number  of  hours  per 
week an offender participated in exercise and/or shower, 4) the number of days the prisoner participated in 
exercise and/or shower, and 5) the number of unknowns for recreation and/or shower in that time period. 
Pod activity data also track an inmate’s work record, but because so few participants held jobs during the 
study period, this data was not included. Table 22 provides the mean number (and standard deviation) for 
each variable by group and testing interval.  
Table 22. Summary Statistics for Pod Activities (Exercise and Showers) 
Activity 
Interval: 
Time 2 to 3
Time 3 to 4
Time 4 to 5 
Exercise  Activity 
 
M 
SD
M
SD
M
SD 
Days refused 
26.02  12.43
29.52
16.38
30.18
17.47 
Days not offered 
1.85 
2.06
2.39
1.92
2.92
2.50 
CSP MI 
Hours per week 
0.71 
1.02
0.98
1.17
0.98
1.26 
(n = 61) 
Days of activity 
9.23  12.33
13.41
15.61
14.10
16.99 
Unknown 
43.95  12.08
47.69
12.59
46.30
15.34 
Days refused 
22.10  13.35
23.28
14.98
28.25
15.73 
Days not offered 
2.16 
2.05
2.80
1.78
2.69
2.16 
CSP NMI 
Hours per week 
1.41 
1.05
1.41
1.22
1.48
1.16 
(n = 61) 
Days of activity 
18.00  13.23
20.69
16.46
22.07
16.12 
Unknown 
41.49 
9.80
44.20
12.29
39.82
6.99 
Shower 
Activity 
 
M 
SD
M
SD
M
SD 
Days refused 
9.90  10.36
12.74
12.76
12.61
12.55 
Days not offered 
1.30 
1.54
1.61
1.57
1.90
2.01 
CSP MI 
Hours per week 
1.41 
0.59
1.43
0.65
1.37
0.68 
(n = 61) 
Days of activity 
36.07  14.61
39.69
17.01
39.49
19.06 
Unknown 
33.79  14.02
38.98
15.78
39.49
17.38 
Days refused 
6.82 
9.74
7.02
9.35
10.00
12.20 
Days not offered 
1.44 
1.36
1.77
1.43
1.93
1.97 
CSP NMI 
Hours per week 
1.75 
0.42
1.75
0.51
1.70
0.53 
(n = 61) 
Days of activity 
44.07 
9.77
48.95
12.58
48.70
12.80 
Unknown 
31.41 
6.13
33.23
8.46
32.18
5.02 

Time 5 to 6
  M
SD
29.74
19.38
3.28
3.54
1.00
1.19
14.54
17.17
46.1
23.34
29.48
16.08
4.59
5.27
1.68
1.24
23.66
17.39
37.39
9.47
  M
SD
12.28
12.97
2.34
3.14
1.22
0.64
36.44
18.91
42.59
26.65
10.36
10.69
3.52
5.09
1.73
0.58
50.13
14.92
31.1
7.19

 

RESULTS 

41 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Due to problems with coding this data, it was not felt that further analyses could be run. As was previously 
noted,  the  data  were  collected  from  records  that  CSP  staff  were  already  keeping  on  offenders  and  it  was 
often difficult to decipher and/or interpret the records. For example, if a variable was left blank it was not 
known  if  that  meant  the  offender  was  not  offered  the  activity  or  if  he  refused  to  participate  resulting  in 
much of the data being coded as unknown.  
Mental Health Crisis Data 
Any situation that is not a scheduled appointment and requires immediate psychological intervention is consi‐
dered  a  crisis  event;  crisis  events  are  documented  by  clinicians  in  DCIS.  For  this  study,  these  events  were  re‐
viewed and coded for whether there was self‐harming ideation or behavior and whether there was a report of an 
inmate experiencing at least one symptom commonly associated with psychosis. A total of 36 participants had a 
self‐harming ideation or behavior or a report of altered thought patterns commonly associated with psychosis 
(see Figures 29 and 30). The self‐harm data were coded into three categories to indicate a range from self‐harm 
ideation to suicide attempt. Psychotic symptoms were reported as a single category, but the researchers used a 
low standard in coding psychotic symptoms. If there was any mention of hallucinations or delusionary thoughts, 
even if not observed by the clinician or if denied by the offender, the crisis event was coded as having a psychotic 
symptom. For example, one participant had threatened self‐injurious behavior but also reported the presence of 
visual hallucinations in the past; this was also coded as a psychotic symptom even though the clinician stated that 
there was no evidence for psychosis. It should be noted that some events involved both symptoms of psychosis 
and self‐harming ideation/behaviors; therefore case numbers represent the same person on both graphs.  
There are several limitations of these data. These include that self‐harming ideation/behavior or psychotic symp‐
toms could have occurred without staff’s knowledge, offenders may have discussed or exhibited thoughts or be‐
haviors on these dimensions during regularly scheduled mental health appointments, and offenders’ self‐harming 
histories prior to study entry were unknown. For example, it was clear from the crisis notes that an individual 
with numerous crisis events had a long history of self‐harming behavior and SCCF placements prior to his enroll‐
ment  in  the  study;  this  is  not  reflected  in  the  data.  Furthermore,  the  reason  for  the  self‐harming  idea‐
tion/behavior  is  not  captured  in  the  graphed  data,  but  the  reasons  vary  widely.  As  an  example,  one  offender 
threatened suicide because he did not want to be removed from CSP to be placed in a new program for offenders 
with mental illness located at a lower security facility. In another example, one person reported self‐harming be‐
havior due to a recent automobile accident where several family members died. Therefore, without more infor‐
mation, it is not possible to attribute the reasons for their mental health crisis to their confinement setting.  
We were interested in including the crisis data as an outcome measure in the change over time analyses in order 
to determine if the occurrence of crises was impacted by confinement conditions, mental status, and time. Be‐
cause the number of participants who experienced a crisis event was so small, it was not possible to include this 
variable as an outcome measure in the change over time analyses. These data raise more questions than they 
provide answers; it was determined that further case study of participants’ mental health histories was outside 
the scope of the current research.  
 

42 

 

RESULTS 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Figure 29. Crisis Events by Individual Participants who had Self­Harming Ideation or Behavior 
•

36

Suicidal/self harm ideation
Self harming behavior
• Suicide attempt

•

35
34

•

33
32
31
30
29
28
27
26
17'
) 25
c 24
> 23
LLI
U) 22

20

SCCF
•

GP MI

12

CSP NMI

11

0

10
9

0

8

• •

CSP MI
0

•
•

0

• •

•
0

7

•

6

QS

5

CD
•

•
0

4

0

3

0

2

0

I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13

Months in Study

 
 

RESULTS 

 

43 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Figure 30. Crisis Events by Individual Participants who had a Psychotic Symptom 

363534-

•

3332313029282726^

•

Tij 25.5 24-

•

CD

•

uj
> 23-

••

(/)
_ 220

.r: 21U
.0 20'- 19 -

•
•
• •

(I) 18^
4...
C
0 17a.
z 16E
03 15a' 14>,
13-

SCCF
•

Cl) 12-

•

GP NMI

•
GP MI

1110•

9-

CSP MI

8^
76-

•

•
••

•

5-

• •

4•

3-

•

2-

•

1I
0

I
1

1
2

1
3

1
4

1
5

1
6

1
7

i
8

1
9

1
10

1
11

1
12

1
13

Months in study

 
 

44 

 

RESULTS 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 

GROUP COMPARISONS 
Offender Characteristics 
Study  groups  differed  from  each  other  at  entry  into  the  study  in  a  number  of  statistically  significant  ways 
(see Table 9). Some differences were consistent with their AS placement or the mental health needs of the 
groups. The two CSP groups were more likely to have a prior AS placement and to have higher anger needs. 
The three mentally ill groups (CSP MI, GP MI, SCCF) had higher needs for medical and intellectual disability 
services.  The  CSP  MI  and  SCCF  groups  had  higher  self  destruction  needs  and  were  less  likely  to  be  gang 
members.  The two GP groups had the lowest rates of sex offender treatment needs. Finally, ethnic/racial 
composition was different for each of the groups, with more whites in the GP MI and SCCF groups and more 
Hispanics in the CSP NMI group.  
Table 9. Study Group Comparisons on Offender Characteristics 
 
CSP MI
CSP NMI
GP MI
Demographics 
 
Mean age (SD) 
 31.2  (9.7)
30.0 (9.9)
30.2 (7.8)
Ethnicity/Race 
 
White 
41%
19%
52%
Hispanic 
33%
54%
39%
African American 
19%
22%
9%
Other 
8%
5%
0%
High school achievement 
 
HS diploma 
12%
10%
7%
HS equivalency 
51%
54%
58%
Neither 
37%
36%
36%
Test of Adult Basic Education 
 
Mean reading score (SD) 
  8.7  (3.6)
7.8 (3.3)
8.7 (3.0)
Mean math score (SD) 
  6.7  (2.5)
6.7 (2.5)
6.9 (2.6)
Mean language score (SD) 
  7.7  (4.0)
7.2 (3.8)
7.9 (3.5)
Mean total score (SD) 
  7.7  (3.5)
7.4 (3.4)
7.8 (3.0)
Sentence and Criminal History   
Mean prior incarcerations (SD)    0.5  (0.9)
0.4 (0.8)
0.4 (0.6)
Mean felony class 1 – 6 (SD) 
  3.4  (1.1)
3.1 (1.1)
3.6 (1.1)
Mean LSI‐R (SD) 
 35.3  (7.4)
33.1 (5.8)
35.4 (8.6)
% Sentenced for violent crime 
67%
70%
61%
Institutional Behavior 
 
# Disciplinary violations 
 22.0 (27.5)
13.2 (10.8)
17.2 (15.3)
% Prior AS placement 
38%
32%
27%
% Gang member 
30%
43%
21%
Need Levels (% scored 3‐5) 
 
% Academic 
42%
41%
39%
% Vocational 
83%
87%
88%
% Medical 
23%
10%
18%
% Substance abuse 
83%
71%
91%
% Sex offender 
44%
30%
24%
% Intellectual disability 
11%
3%
9%
% Anger 
69%
70%
56%
% Self‐destruction 
34%
10%
16%

GP NMI 
33.5 (7.5) 
40% 
33% 
26% 
2% 
 
18% 
63% 
20% 
 
10.2 (3.0) 
7.1 (3.3) 
7.8 (4.1) 
8.3 (3.8) 
0.5 (0.7) 
3.5 (1.0) 
31.8 (7.0) 
54% 
16.0 (15.5) 
19% 
33% 
26% 
77% 
7% 
78% 
14% 
0% 
51% 
10% 

SCCF
 
  33.9  (8.7)
 
55%
24%
15%
6%

p
n.s.
.01

n.s.
19%
50%
31%
  7.7  (3.7)
  6.5  (3.4)
  7.0  (4.2)
  7.1  (3.7)
 
  0.7  (0.9)
  3.6  (1.0)
  33.7  (8.5)
54%
 
14.2 (16.6)
0%
10%
 
40%
85%
27%
71%
37%
20%
52%
39%

.01
n.s.
n.s.
n.s.
n.s.
n.s.
n.s.
n.s.
n.s.
<.001
<.001
n.s.
n.s.
.02
n.s.
.02
.01
n.s.
<.001

 
 
RESULTS 

45 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 

NORMATIVE COMPARISONS 
Because we used standardized assessments, normative data were available to compare to the study groups. 
Normative means were based on non‐clinical male samples when available; a general adult sample was used 
if  a  male  sample  was  not  available.  If  only  clinical  sample  normative  data  were  available  then  those  were 
used. Figures 3 to 10 provide the means over time for the measures with total scores for each study group 
along with highlighted cutoff score ranges. Each graph shows the possible range of scores on the y axis. Fig‐
ures  3  to  10  are  presented  for  visual  reference  only;  analyses  are  conducted  in  later  sections.  Normative 
comparisons for subscales used in this study are available in Appendix B.  
Figure 3. Mean Scores over Time for the BHS Total Score by Group 
20

15

10
CD

—

0 ................ .
................................. .0.

,..,8

v-.

o_
n
o

E,

•

................ A
•

a

.-.

A. - - ..

._,_,..::;;Lluo.-Pri

.........

c

ra
aJ

2

0
Test 1

Test 2

Test 3

Test 4

Test 5

Minimal

0

0

0

0

0

Mild

4

4

4

4

4

Moderate

9

9

9

9

9

Severe

46 

.

15

15

15

15

15

—11—CSP MI

7.16

7.59

7.75

8.12

6.32

—M— CSP NMI

5.14

4.66

4.79

3.87

4.71

•• •k•• GP MI

7.09

5.56

5.38

5.62

4.22

••.A. • • GP NMI

2.26

2.35

2.56

2.60

1.58

• —0 • • SCCF

9.84

9.20

8.57

9.20

8.93

 

RESULTS 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Figure 4. Mean Scores over Time for the BSI Global Symptom Index by Group 
4
3.5
3
2.5
Mean Group Score

2
1.5
1
0.5
0

I
I

•

..............

...............k ..............
I

• .............. 4

A

V... -- ..............yi(

t

..............

■

■

K

Test 1

Test 2

Test 3

Test 4

Test 5

Low

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

Normal

0.06

0.06

0.06

0.06

0.06

Moderate

0.46

0.46

0.46

0.46

0.46

Severe

0.87

0.87

0.87

0.87

0.87

CSP MI

1.4

1.23

1.18

1.05

1.08

4.1
CSP NMI

0.82

0.58

0.62

0.64

0.61

•• .A• • GP MI

1.22

0.96

1.11

0.93

0.91

• • •)1(• •

GP NMI

0.50

0.37

0.36

0.31

0.27

SCCF

1.61

1.41

1.42

1.47

1.35

 

Figure 5. Mean Scores over Time for the PAS Total Score by Group  
60
50

Mean Group Score

40

..............
.....

30

..............

20
10
0

Test 1

Test 2

Test 3

Test 4

Test 5

Low/Normal

0

0

0

0

0

Mild/Moderate

16

16

16

16

16

Marked 

24

24

24

24

24

Extreme

45

45

45

45

45

CSP MI

31.9

32.4

31.7

31.2

30.1

..,CSP NMI

27.4

26.0

25.9

26.4

25.9

•• .A• • GP MI

32.5

30.5

31.0

28.5

29.0

•• ex • • GP NMI

23.8

23.2

23.0

22.2

22.5

••

35.8

34.2

34.1

34.4

33.6

• • SCCF

RESULTS 

 

47 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Figure 6. Mean Scores over Time for the POMS Total Score by Group  

168

Mean Group Score

118
68
18
‐32

•••

:

■ee •••••••••••

•••

•

•••*

Test 1

Test 2

Test 3

Test 4

Test 5

Low

‐32.00

‐32.00

‐32.00

‐32.00

‐32.00

Normal

‐16.00

‐16.00

‐16.00

‐16.00

‐16.00

Moderate

53.00

53.00

53.00

53.00

53.00

Severe

83.00

83.00

83.00

83.00

83.00

68.48

61.77

58.21

58.67

52.02

40.88

29.61

29.68

32.06

27.18

-.-,CSP MI
-.-CSP NMI
•••A••

GP MI

70.68

59.33

64.17

55.81

50.01

•••)K• •

GP NMI

23.99

12.73

13.78

10.44

8.92

77.31

71.07

67.40

71.07

68.43

• ••••• SCCF

 

Figure 7. Mean Scores over Time for the STAI State Anxiety Score by Group 
80
70
60

Mean Group Score

50

•

...

*

.
•

•

000000000000000

40
000000000000000000000000000000
X

X

30
20

Test 1

Test 2

Test 3

Test 4

Test 5

Low

20.00

20.00

20.00

20.00

20.00

Normal

25.32

25.32

25.32

25.32

25.32

Moderate

46.12

46.12

46.12

46.12

46.12

Severe

56.52

56.52

56.52

56.52

56.52

CSP MI

46.90

45.83

45.45

44.01

42.59

CSP NMI

42.05

38.43

37.39

37.50

37.46

•••A••

GP MI

47.64

44.53

47.29

45.08

43.77

•••X••

GP NMI

39.39

36.68

34.65

33.80

33.81

50.15

48.41

48.49

49.41

48.29

••••• SCCF

48 

00000000000000

 

RESULTS 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Figure 8. Mean Scores over Time for the STAI Trait Anxiety Score by Group 
80
70
60
O. 00000000000000

Mean Group Score

50

0

.

•

•

4. 0000
•

40

)K•••••

••

••••••••• •
X

X
W

30
20

Test 1

Test 2

Test 3

Test 4

Test 5

Low

20.00

20.00

20.00

20.00

20.00

Normal

25.70

25.70

25.70

25.70

25.70

Moderate

44.08

44.08

44.08

44.08

44.08

Severe

53.27

53.27

53.27

53.27

53.27

CSP MI

48.41

47.89

47.48

45.75

44.64

II

CSP NMI

42.78

38.77

38.40

39.26

38.70

GP MI

49.70

46.59

47.59

45.77

44.07

GP NMI

37.82

35.92

34.44

34.06

32.74

SCCF

54.45

52.64

51.50

52.76

52.27

Il

 
Figure 9. Mean Scores over Time for the SLUMS Total Score by Group 
30
25

 

••

K. ............. 0(

i

Mean Group Score

20
15
10
5
0

Test 1

Test 2

Test 3

Test 4

Test 5

Dementia

0

0

0

0

0

Mild NC Disorder

20

20

20

20

20

Normal

25

25

25

25

25

CSP MI

20.80

21.16

22.26

22.92

23.59

21.73

22.64

24.02

24.38

24.25

iMoCSP NMI
••.A••

GP MI

21.52

23.09

23.88

24.34

24.93

•••)1(••

GP NMI

23.38

24.12

24.49

24.79

24.82

SCCF

20.54

21.49

22.85

23.38

23.26

RESULTS 

 

49 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Figure 10. Mean Scores over Time for the Trails Task B Time (in Seconds) by Group  

125
105
a.........

Mean Group Score

85
65

...s....

000000
_

25
5
1

2

3

4

5

Normal

1

1

1

1

1

Impaired

97

97

97

97

97

84.70

77.74

75.42

71.63

69.43

CSP NMI

83.46

71.09

66.33

62.78

62.27

GP MI

82.47

66.31

66.11

58.29

54.98

GP NMI

68.94

70.63

63.41

56.78

58.81

SCCF

96.29

81.57

78.26

74.69

72.71

—.— CSP MI

50 

•••

)K

45

‐15

 

000000000 0000000000000000000

 

 

RESULTS 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
In this section, comparisons were made between each study groups’ mean and the normative mean using a 
one sample t test. One sample t tests indicated that, in general, scores were elevated above the normative 
data when entering the study and tended to stay that way for all groups except the GP NMI group. Table 10 
provides a visual representation of the significant differences by group at each time period on each meas‐
ure.  
Table 10. Significant Differences of Study Groups from Normative Means 
Norm  Norm 
Measure 
CSP MI 
CSP NMI 
GP MI 
Mean  Population 
Time Interval:  1  2  3 4 5 6 1 2 3 4 5 6 1 2 3 4 5 1 
BHS 
2.32  College 
   
 
Students 
BHS 
6.04  Psychiatric     
 
Adult 
BSI GSI 
0.25  Adult 
   
 
Males 
PAS  
16.66  Community     
 
Sample 
POMS  
14.80  Adult 
   
 
SLUMS 

25.70 

STAI‐S 

35.72 

STAI‐T 

34.89 

Trails 
B/A 

2.18 

Males 
Adult (<HS 
education) 
Working 
Adults 
Working 
Adults 
Adult (25 ‐ 
54 yrs old) 

GP NMI 

SCCF 

2  3  4  5  1 2 3 4 5
       
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Note. Red shading indicates that the group mean is significantly different from the normative mean in the direction of more psycho‐
logical or cognitive problems, whereas green shading indicates that the group mean is significantly better than the normative mean. 
No shading indicates the groups were statistically similar to the normative data. 

 
In addition to comparing group means to normative data, the percentage of participants within each group 
who  scored  in  the  elevated  range  of  a  measure  was  computed,  using  cutoff  scores  from  the  manual  for 
moderately severe and above when available or using the percentage scoring beyond two standard devia‐
tions from the mean. Table 11 presents this data.  
Table 11. Percentage of Participants Scoring above Cutoffs at Time 1  
Measure  “Abnormal” range  CSP MI  CSP NMI GP MI GP NMI
BHS 
≥ 9 
43% 
17% 
30% 
9% 
BSI GSI 
≥ 0.46 
28% 
5%
19%
0%
PAS  
≥ 16 
92% 
90%
90%
80%
POMS  
≥ 53 
58% 
36% 
66% 
18% 
STAI‐S 
≥ 46.12 
53% 
44%
62%
18%
STAI‐T 
≥ 44.08 
68% 
52%
66%
27%
SLUMS 
< 20 
36% 
24% 
28% 
18% 
Trails B/A 
≥ 3 
40% 
50%
53%
33%

SCCF
57% 
37%
98%
67% 
78%
84%
40% 
39%

 

RESULTS 

51 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 

CHANGE OVER TIME  
To  compare  change  over  time  on  the  psychological  measures,  three  sets  of  analyses  comparing  mean 
change over time were completed—comparisons between the two AS groups (CSP MI vs. CSP NMI) across 
the six time periods, comparisons of the NMI groups (CSP NMI vs. GP NMI) across the five common time pe‐
riods, and comparisons of the MI groups (CSP MI vs. SCCF vs. GP MI) across the five common time periods. 
Mixed  design  analysis  of  variance  was  used  to  analyze  the  data  for  all  participants  who  had  data  on  the 
composite scores. Huyn‐Feldt correction factors were used to adjust the degrees of freedom due to lack of 
sphericity for the within subject factors. Partial eta‐square, providing the percentage of variance explained, 
was used as an effect size measure (represented by η2 in the tables). An effect was considered small if it ac‐
counted for 1% to 5% of the variance, medium if it accounted for 6% to 14% of the variance, and large if it 
accounted for 15% or more of the variance. A significance level of .05 was used to determine a statistically 
significant  effect.  In  addition  to  mean  comparisons  over  time,  a  slopes  analysis  was  completed  in  which 
slopes were computed for each individual to represent rate of change over time and then comparisons were 
made between groups.  
As a reminder, higher scores on self‐report composites, Trails derived scores, correctional staff ratings, and 
clinician  ratings  indicate  worse  performance  (e.g.,  more  depression,  more  anxiety),  whereas  higher  scores 
indicate better cognitive performance on the SLUMS. Composites are standardized scores and indicate devi‐
ation from the first assessment period scores.  
Comparisons between CSP Groups  
A key purpose of the study was to compare segregated inmates with mental illness to those without mental 
illness to determine if AS has a differential impact on participants with different mental health needs. Partic‐
ipants  were  compared  across  the  six  time  periods.  The  first  assessment  was  completed  while  participants 
were awaiting a hearing for potential placement in AS. The second assessment occurred within 2 weeks of 
being placed in CSP. The third through sixth assessments were completed approximately every three months 
following placement in CSP, with the sixth assessment at one year post‐placement in CSP.  
Comparisons on Self‐Report Measures. Comparisons between the two CSP groups were made on the seven 
composite  scores  and  the  two  cognitive  measures.  The  summary  statistics  (mean  and  standard  deviation) 
for each group at each time period on the composites and cognitive measures are given in Table 12 and the 
inferential statistics (F values and partial eta‐squared) are given in Table 13. Across all seven mental health 
composites, the MI group scored statistically higher than the NMI group indicating that there was more psy‐
chological distress for the MI groups. The effect sizes for the differences between groups vary across com‐
posites  with  large  effects  for  anxiety,  depression‐hopelessness,  and  somatization  composites.  The  NMI 
group had significantly higher average scores on the SLUMS measure, although this was a small effect. There 
was no significant difference between the groups on the Trails derived score.  
 
 

52 

RESULTS 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Table 12. Summary Statistics on Self­Report Measures across 6 Time Periods for the Two CSP Groups 
Variable 
M1 
Anxiety 
 
CSP MI (n = 48) 
.30 
CSP NMI  (n = 53) 
‐.43 
Both Groups  
‐.06 
Depression‐Hopelessness  
CSP MI (n = 48) 
.20 
CSP NMI  (n = 53) 
‐.37 
Both Groups  
‐.09 
Hostility‐Anger Control  
CSP MI (n = 48) 
.20 
CSP NMI  (n = 53) 
‐.15 
Both Groups  
.03 
Hypersensitivity  
 
CSP MI (n = 48) 
.24 
CSP NMI  (n = 53) 
‐.21 
Both Groups  
.01 
Psychosis  
 
CSP MI (n = 48) 
.18 
CSP NMI  (n = 53) 
‐.26 
Both Groups  
‐.04 
Somatization  
 
CSP MI (n = 48) 
.23 
CSP NMI  (n = 53) 
‐.45 
Both Groups  
‐.11 
Withdrawal‐Alienation 
CSP MI (n = 48) 
.12 
CSP NMI  (n = 53) 
‐.31 
Both Groups  
‐.10 
SLUMS 
 
CSP MI (n = 48) 
20.75 
CSP NMI  (n = 53) 
21.85 
Both Groups  
21.30 
Trails B/A 
 
CSP MI (n = 48) 
2.98 
CSP NMI  (n = 53) 
3.10 
Both Groups  
3.04 
PBRS Anti‐authority 
CSP MI (n = 43) 
7.12 
CSP NMI  (n = 49) 
8.06 
Both Groups 
7.59 
PBRS Anxious‐Depressed 
CSP MI (n = 41) 
6.03 
CSP NMI  (n = 49) 
3.34 
Both Groups 
4.68 
PBRS  Dull‐Confused 
CSP MI (n = 42) 
4.45 
CSP NMI  (n = 47) 
1.91 
Both Groups 
3.18 
PBRS Total 
 
CSP MI (n = 41) 
17.73 
CSP NMI  (n = 49) 
13.33 
Both Groups 
15.53 

SD1 
 
.84 
.53 
.78 
 
.76 
.53 
.71 
 
.64 
.60 
.64 
 
.84 
.62 
.76 
 
.78 
.71 
.78 
 
.80 
.62 
.78 
 
.85 
.59 
.76 
 
5.59 
3.49 
4.62 
 
.95 
1.54 
1.30 
 
7.22 
7.44 
7.32 
 
6.21 
4.36 
5.42 
 
4.46 
2.42 
3.74 
 
16.22 
12.42 
14.36 

M2 

SD2 

M3 

SD3 

M4 

 

 

 

 

 

.19 
‐.58 
‐.19 
 
.08 
‐.46 
‐.19 
 
‐.01 
‐.35 
‐.18 
 
.15 
‐.53 
‐.19 
 
.06 
‐.50 
‐.22 
 
.12 
‐.54 
‐.21 
 
.37 
‐.15 
.11 
 
20.88 
22.55 
21.70 
 
2.61 
2.78 
2.70 
 
5.68 
5.56 
5.62 
 
3.05 
2.00 
2.52 
 
2.14 
1.32 
1.73 
 
11.32 
9.04 
10.18 

.83 
.56 
.80 
 
.72 
.58 
.70 
 
.63 
.52 
.60 
 
.88 
.67 
.84 
 
.78 
.61 
.75 
 
.79 
.64 
.78 
 
.89 
.84 
.90 
 
4.91 
3.64 
4.35 
 
1.07 
.79 
.92 
 
5.46 
6.41 
5.96 
 
3.95 
3.06 
3.51 
 
2.93 
2.16 
2.57 
 
10.35 
10.22 
10.29 

.20 
‐.55 
‐.18 
 
.09 
‐.46 
‐.18 
 
‐.01 
‐.25 
‐.13 
 
.23 
‐.42 
‐.10 
 
.17 
‐.46 
‐.15 
 
.22 
‐.48 
‐.13 
 
.29 
‐.17 
.06 
 
22.35 
24.04 
23.20 
 
2.61 
2.94 
2.77 
 
6.67 
4.00 
5.34 
 
3.44 
1.49 
2.46 
 
2.71 
.87 
1.79 
 
13.21 
6.47 
9.84 

.88 
.61 
.84 
 
.82 
.59 
.76 
 
.68 
.59 
.64 
 
.94 
.74 
.90 
 
.96 
.64 
.89 
 
.76 
.59 
.76 
 
.81 
.81 
.84 
 
4.72 
3.28 
4.10 
 
.88 
1.02 
.97 
 
7.78 
4.95 
6.53 
 
4.53 
2.51 
3.68 
 
3.15 
1.21 
2.49 
 
13.72 
7.63 
11.29 

.03 
‐.54 
‐.25 
 
.07 
‐.48 
‐.21 
 
‐.07 
‐.24 
‐.15 
 
.02 
‐.30 
‐.14 
 
‐.10 
‐.40 
‐.25 
 
.05 
‐.48 
‐.21 
 
.33 
‐.02 
.16 
 
22.75 
24.40 
23.57 
 
2.44 
2.44 
2.64 
 
3.40 
4.41 
3.91 
 
2.66 
1.61 
2.14 
 
2.82 
1.02 
1.92 
 
9.42 
7.13 
8.28 

SD4 
 
.89 
.60 
.80 
 
.87 
.56 
.77 
 
.74 
.59 
.69 
 
.89 
.75 
.83 
 
.88 
.70 
.80 
 
.77 
.55 
.71 
 
.81 
.82 
.83 
 
4.50 
2.94 
3.83 
 
.98 
.98 
1.05 
 
5.04 
4.87 
4.95 
 
3.37 
3.45 
3.44 
 
3.70 
1.50 
2.89 
 
9.94 
7.63 
8.78 

M5 

SD5 

M6 

SD6 

 

 

 

 

‐.05 
‐.58 
‐.32 
 
‐.09 
‐.50 
‐.30 
 
‐.07 
‐.25 
‐.16 
 
.02 
‐.37 
‐.18 
 
.06 
‐.42 
‐.18 
 
‐.03 
‐.53 
‐.28 
 
.14 
‐.08 
.03 
 
23.60 
24.34 
23.97 
 
2.58 
2.58 
2.59 
 
4.68 
3.20 
3.94 
 
2.67 
1.77 
2.22 
 
2.24 
1.05 
1.64 
 
9.60 
6.32 
7.96 

.88 
.58 
.78 
 
.82 
.57 
.73 
 
.73 
.62 
.67 
 
.84 
.72 
.80 
 
.97 
.75 
.89 
 
.83 
.61 
.76 
 
.79 
.85 
.82 
 
4.07 
3.23 
3.65 
 
.60 
.60 
.74 
 
6.68 
4.45 
5.62 
 
3.83 
3.31 
3.56 
 
3.03 
1.59 
2.44 
 
11.34 
7.41 
9.49 

‐.17 
‐.60 
‐.38 
 
‐.17 
‐.56 
‐.37 
 
‐.19 
‐.23 
‐.21 
 
‐.07 
‐.40 
‐.23 
 
‐.09 
‐.46 
‐.27 
 
‐.16 
‐.55 
‐.36 
 
.18 
‐.04 
.07 
 
23.85 
25.26 
24.56 
 
2.34 
2.70 
2.52 
 
3.70 
2.52 
3.11 
 
2.90 
1.51 
2.21 
 
2.42 
1.38 
1.90 
 
8.57 
5.42 
6.99 

.78 
.59 
.72 
 
.73 
.55 
.67 
 
.74 
.68 
.70 
 
.80 
.65 
.74 
 
.91 
.64 
.80 
 
.69 
.60 
.67 
 
.85 
.78 
.82 
 
4.58 
2.90 
3.84 
 
.74 
.88 
.84 
 
5.02 
4.46 
4.74 
 
3.75 
2.96 
3.93 
 
3.03 
2.68 
2.88 
 
9.80 
8.31 
9.10 

 

RESULTS 

53 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Table 13. F Statistics and Partial η2 Comparing AS Groups across 6 Time Periods 
Variable 
Self‐Report  
Anxiety 
Depression‐
Hopelessness  
Hostility‐Anger 
Control 
Hypersensitivity 
Psychosis  
Somatization 
Withdrawal‐
Alienation  
SLUMS 
Trails B/A 

Staff Report 
PBRS Anti‐
Authority 
PBRS Anxious‐
Depressed 
PBRS Dull‐
Confused 
PBRS Total 
BPRS Activity 
BPRS Anxious‐
Depressed 
BPRS Hostility‐
Suspiciousness 
BPRS Thought 
Disorders 
BPRS Withdrawal 
BPRS Total 

Group Main Effect 

Time Main Effect 

 
2
F(1, 99) = 25.85, p < .001, η  = .21 

F(3.98, 393.87) = 8.13, p < .001, η = .08

2

F(1, 99) = 18.86, p < .001, η  = .16 
2

F(1, 99) = 4.08, p = .05, η  = .04 
2

F(1, 99) = 14.03, p < .001, η  = .12 
2
F(1, 99) = 13.51, p < .001, η  = .12 
2
F(1, 99) = 23.63, p < .001, η  = .19 
2

F(1, 99) = 7.10, p = .01, η  = .07 
2

F(1, 99) = 3.99, p = .05, η  = .04 
2
F(1, 91) = 2.74, p = .10, η  = .03 
 
2

F(1, 90) = .62, p = .43, η  = .01 
2

F(1, 88) = 9.46, p = .003, η  = .10 
2

F(1, 87) = 27.08, p < .001, η  = .24 
2

F(1, 88) = 7.28, p = .01, η  = .08 
2
F(1, 82) = 14.04, p < .001, η  = .15 

Interaction Effect 
2

F(3.98, 393.87) = 2.97, p = .02, η = .03

2

F(4.10, 405.75) = 1.12, p = .35, η  = .01 

2

F(4.08, 403.72) = 2.37, p = .05, η  = .02 

F(4.10, 405.75) = 6.21, p < .001, η  = .06 
F(4.08, 403.72) = 4.58, p = .001, η  = .04 
2

F(4.81, 476.08) = 2.91, p = .02, η  = .03 
2
F(4.34, 430.18) = 2.79, p = .02, η = .03
2
F(4.34, 429.69) = 6.04, p < .001, η = .06
2

F(4.74, 469.56) = 3.62, p = .004, η  = .04 
2

F(4.56, 451.82) = 31.78, p < .001, η = .24
2
F(4.14, 376.44) = 4.91, p = .001, η = .05

2

F(4.74, 469.56) = 1.93, p = .09, η  = .02 
2

F(4.56, 451.82) = .71, p = .60, η = .01
2
F(4.14, 376.44) = .81, p = .52, η = .01

F(4.30, 378.62) = .96, p = .44, η  = .01 

2

F(3.90, 339.21) = 1.32, p = .26, η  = .02 

2

F(3.97, 349.18) = .75, p = .56, η = .01
2
F(1.55, 127.12) = .01, p = .99, η < .001

F(3.90, 339.21) = 4.28, p = .002, η  = .05 
F(3.97, 349.18) = 9.84, p < .001, η = .10
2
F(1.55, 127.12) = 2.46, p = .10, η = .03

F(1.56, 128.19) = 7.93, p = .002, η  = .09 

2

F(1.77, 145.16) = .33, p = .69, η  = .004 

2

F(1.99, 163.04) = .81, p = .45, η = .01
2
F(1.84, 151.31) = 2.82, p = .06, η = .03

F(1, 82) = 10.15, p = .002, η  = .11 
2
F(1, 82) = 36.90, p < .001, η  = .31 

2

F(4.81, 476.08) = 2.50, p = .03, η  = .02 
2
F(4.34, 430.18) = 1.49, p = .20, η = .02
2
F(4.34, 429.69) = 2.84, p = .02, η = .03

2

F(4.30, 378.62) = 7.63, p < .001, η  = .08 

2

F(1, 82) = 21.05, p < .001, η  = .20 

2

F(4.02, 361.54) = 1.80, p = .13, η  = .02 

F(2, 163.57) = .91, p = .40, η  = .01 

F(1, 82) = 18.12, p < .001, η  = .18 

2

2

F(4.02, 361.54) = 8.87, p = .001, η  = .09 

2

F(1, 82) = 19.34, p < .001, η  = .19 

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

F(2, 163.57) = 2.16, p = .12, η  = .03 
2

F(1.56, 128.19) = 1.71, p = .19, η  = .02 

2

F(1.77, 145.16) = .59, p = .54, η  = .01 

2

2

F(1.99, 163.04) = .17, p = .84, η = .002
2
F(1.84, 151.31) = 1.34, p = .26, η = .02

2

 
There  were  significant  main  effects  of  time  on  all  variables;  however,  the  results  do  not  support  the  pre‐
dicted hypothesis of significant decline in psychological well‐being over time. Figure 11 provides the mean 
change over time for each composite. The only variable showing decreased functioning over time was the 
withdrawal‐alienation composite. Time 4 (6 months incarcerated in CSP) revealed the highest levels of with‐
drawal‐alienation,  followed  by  a  significant  decline  from  time  4  to  time  5.  For  the  other  psychological  va‐
riables, there was improved functioning over time; however, when comparing sequential time periods, the 
majority  of  the  variables  (i.e.,  anxiety,  depression‐hopelessness,  hostility‐anger  control,  hypersensitivity, 
psychosis) only showed statistically significant improvement from the first to the second assessment period. 
The  exception  to  this  basic  pattern  was  for  the  somatization  composite  where  statistically  significant  im‐
provement occurred between periods 5 and 6. For the cognitive variables there were also significant time 
effects. The Trails derived score showed significant improvement from the first assessment to the second. 
The SLUMS showed significant improvements in cognitive performance between times 2 and 3 and between 
times 5 and 6.  
 

54 

RESULTS 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Figure 11. Mean Scores over Time for the 7 Composites Summarized across the CSP Groups 

1.00 - —0—Anxiety
0.80 0.60

Hostility-Anger Control
—0— Psychosis
—0—Withdrawal-Alienation

—M— Depression-Hopelessness
—0—Hypersensitivity
—0—Somatization

0.40 0.20 -

A 0.00 -0.20 rF

-0.40 -0.50 -0.s0 -1.00
1

2

3

4

5

Time

 
 
Although there were significant changes across time for all variables, we were particularly interested in the 
group by time interaction to determine if there was differential change across times based on mental health 
status. There were statistically significant interactions for the anxiety, hostility‐anger, hypersensitivity, and 
somatization  composites.  Figures  12  to  15  provide  graphical  representations  of  these  interactions.  To  fur‐
ther understand these interactions, simple main effects of time were examined for each group using Bonfer‐
roni pairwise comparisons of time periods.  
 
 
 

RESULTS 

55 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
For  the  anxiety  composite,  the  CSP  NMI  group  showed  no  significant  change  over  time,  but  the  CSP  MI 
group did. Mean scores at the fourth, fifth and sixth assessments were significantly lower than means at the 
first three assessment periods, and the sixth assessment mean was significantly lower than the mean at the 
fourth assessment.  
 
Figure 12. Mean Scores over Time for the Anxiety Composite for each CSP Group 

1.00
C SP MI (n= 48)
--M-- (SP NMI (1I = 53)

0.50 0.40 0.20 0.00 -0.20 -

T

-0.40 -0.60 -0.30 -1.00
1

2

3

4

5

6

Time
 

 

 

For  the  hostility‐anger  control  composite,  the  CSP  NMI  group  showed  no  significant  change  over  time.  In 
contrast,  the  CSP  MI  group  showed  significant  improvement  over  time  with  mean  hostility‐anger  control 
scores significantly elevated at the first assessment compared to all other time periods and the last assess‐
ment period significantly lower than the first three assessment periods.  
Figure 13. Mean Scores over Time for the Hostility­Anger Control Composite for each CSP Group 

1.00 0.80 -

—•—05P MI (n = 48)

0.50 -

--.--05P NMI

(n = 53)

0.40 0.20 0.00 x

-0.20 -

-----411

-0.40 -0.50 -0.30 -1.00
1

2

3

4

5

Thee
 
 

56 

RESULTS 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
For  the  hypersensitivity  composite,  both  groups  demonstrated  significant  change  over  time.  The  CSP  NMI 
group showed significant improvement from time 1 to time 2 but then scores worsened over time so that 
scores at the fourth assessment were significantly worse than the scores at the second period. For the CSP 
MI group, there was a significant decline in scores from the first to the second assessment periods, then an 
increase in scores with an elevation occurring at time 3 (compared to time 2), and then a significant decline 
in scores at the fourth assessment period. 
 
Figure 14. Mean Scores over Time for the Hypersensitivity Composite for each CSP Group 

1.00 .II. CSP MI (n= 48)
...•F CSP NMI (n = 53)

0.80 E 0.50 -

A
m

0.40 -

1
c2
i

0.20 0.00 -

-0.20 -0.40 -

iww wwww

-0.60 -0.80 -1.00
1

2

3

4

5

5

Time

 
 
For the somatization composite, there was significant change over time for the CSP MI group but not for the 
CSP NMI group. Significant decreases in scores occurred from the third to the fourth assessment periods and 
from the fifth to the sixth periods. 
 
Figure 15. Mean Scores over Time for the Somatization Composite for each CSP Group 

1.00
S CSP MI (n= 48)
...F..C.SF' NMI (11 =53)

0.80
0.50
2 0.40
c,§ 0.20
1 0.00
E -0.20

8
:-OAO

.....

i -0.50
-0.30
-1.00
1

3

4
Time

RESULTS 

5
 

57 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Comparisons on Staff Report Measures. In addition to self‐report measures, data were collected from cor‐
rectional staff using the PBRS and from clinicians using the BPRS. The PBRS was given at each of the 6 as‐
sessment periods whereas the BPRS  was given at 6 month intervals so that there were only three assess‐
ments.  Table  12  provides  the  means  and  standard  deviations  for  the  PBRS  scores,  Table  14  provides  the 
summary statistics for the three BPRS assessments, and the inferential results for both variables are in Table 
13.  
Table 14. Summary Statistics on BPRS Scales across 3 Time Periods for All Study Groups 
BPRS Subscale 
M1  
SD1 
M3
SD3
M5
SD5
Activity 
 
 
CSP MI (n = 49) 
6.39  1.72 
6.08 1.74
6.00 1.53
CSP NMI (n = 35) 
5.60  1.14 
5.26
.74
5.20
.53
GP MI (n = 25) 
6.40  1.63 
5.88 1.20
6.04 1.59
GP NMI  (n = 25) 
5.64  1.25 
5.36
.86
5.28
.54
SCCF (n = 55) 
6.85  2.67 
6.45 1.48
6.24 1.98
Anxious‐Depressed 
  
  
CSP MI (n = 49) 
9.51  3.11 
9.35 2.93
8.47 3.02
CSP NMI (n = 35) 
7.37  2.07 
6.74 2.24
7.42 3.14
GP MI (n = 25) 
8.68  3.13 
7.96 2.47
8.40 2.31
GP NMI  (n = 25) 
6.68  1.77 
6.52 1.83
6.08 1.78
SCCF (n = 55) 
10.54  3.28 
8.87 2.65
8.85 2.98
Hostility‐Suspiciousness 
  
  
CSP MI (n = 49) 
5.51  2.42 
5.35 2.80
4.41 1.94
CSP NMI (n = 35) 
4.17  1.99 
3.37
.69
3.31
.68
GP MI (n = 25) 
4.84  1.84 
4.52 2.29
4.36 1.93
GP NMI  (n = 25) 
3.96  1.97 
3.60 1.53
3.72 1.67
SCCF (n = 55) 
5.53  3.01 
4.51 1.91
4.64 2.12
Thought Disorder 
  
  
CSP MI (n = 49) 
6.53  2.34 
6.71 2.18
6.35 2.24
CSP NMI (n = 35) 
5.43  1.04 
5.14
.43
5.23
.55
GP MI (n = 25) 
5.64 
.99 
5.40
.91
5.24
.91
GP NMI  (n = 25) 
5.20 
.50 
5.04
.20
5.44 1.44
SCCF (n = 55) 
8.40  3.55 
6.49 1.91
5.24
.83
Withdrawal 
  
  
CSP MI (n = 49) 
7.59  1.63 
7.67 1.98
7.39 1.50
CSP NMI (n = 35) 
6.68 
.99 
7.00 1.37
6.71 1.82
GP MI (n = 25) 
7.00  1.55 
6.80 1.32
7.16 1.34
GP NMI  (n = 25) 
6.44 
.65 
6.20
.50
6.32
.80
SCCF (n = 55) 
8.56  2.48 
7.69 1.75
7.53 1.49
Total 
  
  
CSP MI (n = 49) 
35.53  7.19 
35.16 8.90
32.61 6.81
CSP NMI (n = 35) 
29.26  4.85 
27.51 3.71
27.89 4.92
GP MI (n = 25) 
32.56  5.86 
30.56 4.98
31.20 4.17
GP NMI  (n = 25) 
27.92  4.81 
26.72 3.23
26.84 3.75
SCCF (n = 55) 
39.89  9.97 
34.02 5.55
33.84 6.80
 

For  the  correctional  staff  ratings,  there  were  statistically  significant  group  differences  on  the  Anxious‐
Depressed, Dull‐Confused, and Total scales with the CSP MI group scoring significantly higher on each subs‐
cale compared to the NMI group. There were significant changes across time for both groups with the first 
assessment  showing  higher  ratings  compared  to  the  second  assessment  period  ratings  on  all  PBRS  scales. 
Additionally,  there  was  a  statistically  significant  drop  in  Anti‐Authority  scores  from  the  third  rating  to  the 

58 

RESULTS 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
fourth rating. There were no group by time interactions, indicating that change over time was the same for 
the two CSP groups. 
As might be expected, the CSP MI group was elevated on each of the clinical rating scales of the BPRS com‐
pared to the CSP NMI group. There was only significant change across time on the Hostility‐Suspiciousness 
subscale with scores at the last time period (M = 3.86, SE = .17) significantly lower than the first (M = 4.84, 
SE = .25) and middle assessment (M = 4.36, SE = .24) period means. There were no statistically significant 
group by time interaction effects.  
Comparisons between NMI Groups  
A significant advantage of this study is the use of comparison groups to determine if the CSP groups change 
over  time  differentially  compared  to  similar  groups  of  inmates  who  are  not  placed  in  AS.  In  the  following 
analyses,  participants  without  mental  health  issues  are  compared  in  order  to  determine  if  those  in  AS 
change over time on  the  measures differentially  compared to  those in the general prison population  (CSP 
NMI vs. GP NMI). (A later section compares the participants who have been identified as mentally ill.) The 
groups are compared on the five common time assessments. Mixed design analysis of variance was used to 
compare change across time and between groups.  
Comparisons on Self‐Report Measures. The summary statistics for the groups are provided in Table 15 and 
the  analysis  of  variance  results  and  effect  sizes  are  provided  in  Table  16.  For  anxiety,  depression‐
hopelessness, hostility‐anger control, hypersensitivity, psychosis, and somatization composites, there were 
statistically significant group differences between the groups with the CSP NMI scoring significantly higher 
than  the  GP  NMI  group.  For  the  withdrawal‐alienation  composite,  the  SLUMS  cognitive  measure,  and  the 
Trails derived score, there were no statistically significant differences between groups.  

RESULTS 

59 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Table 15. Summary Statistics on Measures across 5 Time Periods for the NMI Groups 
Variable 
Anxiety  
CSP NMI  (n = 55) 
GP NMI (n = 38) 
Depression‐Hopelessness   
CSP NMI  (n = 55) 
GP NMI (n = 38) 
Hostility‐Anger Control  
CSP NMI  (n = 55) 
GP NMI (n = 38) 
Hypersensitivity 
CSP NMI  (n = 55) 
GP NMI (n = 38) 
Psychosis 
CSP NMI  (n = 55) 
GP NMI (n = 38) 
Somatization 
CSP NMI  (n = 55) 
GP NMI (n = 38) 
Withdrawal‐Alienation 
CSP NMI  (n = 55) 
GP NMI (n = 38) 
SLUMS  
CSP NMI  (n = 55) 
GP NMI (n = 38) 
Trails B/A 
CSP NMI  (n = 55) 
GP NMI (n = 38) 
PBRS Anti‐authority 
CSP NMI (n = 51) 
GP NMI  (n = 22) 
PBRS Anxious‐Depressed 
CSP NMI (n = 51) 
GP NMI  (n = 20) 
PBRS Dull‐Confused 
CSP NMI (n = 49) 
GP NMI  (n = 20) 
PBRS Total 
CSP NMI (n = 51) 
GP NMI  (n = 20) 

M1  
SD1 
  
  
‐.44 
.53 
‐.71 
.47 
  
  
‐.39 
.52 
‐.73 
.35 
  
  
‐.13 
.61 
‐.34 
.49 
  
  
‐.25 
.65 
‐.50 
.68 
  
  
‐.28 
.71 
‐.60 
.72 
  
  
‐.46 
.62 
‐.61 
.51 
  
  
‐.30 
.60 
‐.45 
.78 
  
  
21.74 
3.46 
23.16 
3.97 
  
  
3.11 
1.52 
2.82 
.82 
  
  
7.75 
7.75 
5.58 
7.23 
  
  
3.21 
4.32 
2.70 
3.66 
  
  
1.84 
2.40 
1.71 
2.13 
  
  
12.81  12.44 
10.22  12.32 

M2  

SD2 

M3  

SD3 

M4  

‐.59
‐.82

.56
.40

‐.56
‐.85

.60
.40

‐.55
‐.86

‐.47
‐.82

.57
.34

‐.47
‐.84

.58
.39

‐.50
‐.81

‐.34
‐.45

.52
.47

‐.23
‐.48

.59
.54

‐.23
‐.54

‐.54
‐.66

.66
.62

‐.44
‐.73

.74
.68

‐.31
‐.64

‐.51
‐.81

.60
.53

‐.47
‐.81

.63
.64

‐.41
‐.77

‐.56
‐.77

.63
.41

‐.50
‐.77

.63
.41

‐.50
‐.72

‐.12
‐.32

.85
.68

‐.15
‐.42

.82
.70

.00
‐.32

22.53
23.92

3.66
3.26

23.98
24.47

3.30
3.55

24.34
24.71

2.84
3.07

.93
1.64

3.00
2.90

1.22
1.04

2.88
2.65

5.46
7.02

6.30
5.41

3.92
6.69

4.87
7.24

4.38
7.75

1.92 
2.80

3.02 
3.49

1.43 
3.69

2.48 
3.90

1.55 
3.86

1.26
1.62

2.13
1.77

.86
.09

1.19
2.08

.98
2.10

8.80
11.39

10.09
7.23

6.31
12.82

7.52
11.48

6.99
13.52

SD4 
  
.59 
.35 

M5  
  
‐.58 
‐.88 

SD5

.55 
.29 
  
.64 
.50 
  
.75 
.51 
  
.69 
.53 
  
.56 
.49 
  
.82 
.83 
  
3.05 
3.69 
  
1.14 
.76 
  
4.79 
5.91 
  
4.40 
5.28 
  
1.48 
2.65 
  
7.51 
10.98 

.50 
‐.85 
  
‐.24 
‐.50 
  
‐.36 
‐.73 
  
‐.40 
‐.86 
  
‐.52 
‐.76 
  
‐.07 
‐.32 
  
24.18 
24.82 
  
2.71 
2.80 
  
3.40 
7.93 
  
1.84 
3.10 
  
1.12 
2.07 
  
6.64 
13.55 

.57
.30

.58
.40

 

.64
.51
.72
.56
.75
.64
.62
.49
.84
.80
3.33
3.24
1.02
.95
4.48
6.92
3.27
4.05
1.60
2.83
7.47
11.77

 

60 

RESULTS 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Table 16. F Statistics and Partial η2 Comparing NMI Groups across 5 Time Periods 
Variable 
Self‐Report  
Anxiety  
Depression‐
Hopelessness  
Hostility‐Anger 
Control  
Hypersensitivity  
Psychosis  
Somatization  
Withdrawal‐
Alienation  
SLUMS 
Trails B/A 

Staff Report 
PBRS Anti‐
Authority 
PBRS Anxious‐
Depressed 
PBRS Dull‐
Confused 
PBRS Total  
BPRS Activity 
BPRS Anxious‐
Depressed 
BPRS Hostility‐
Suspiciousness 
BPRS Thought 
Disorder 
BPRS Withdrawal 
BPRS Total  

Group Main Effect 

Time Main Effect 

 
2
F(1, 91) = 8.74, p = .004, η  = .09

F(3.03, 275.73) = 4.52, p = .004, η = .05

F(3.03, 275.73) = .28, p = .84, η = .003

F(3.86, 351.74) = 4.74, p = .001, η2 = .05 

F(3.86, 351.74) = 1.45, p = .22, η  = .02 

2

F(1, 91) = 15.24, p < .001, η  = .14 

Interaction Effect 
2 

2

F(3.50, 318.75) = 2.77, p = .03, η  = .03 

2

F(3.79, 345.07) = 4.70, p = .001, η  = .05 
2
F(3.09, 281.17) = 5.11, p = .001, η = .05
2
F(3.43, 312.15) = 2.42, p = .06, η = .03

2

F(3.88, 352.78) = 3.49, p = .01, η  = .04 

2

F(3.77, 343.26) = 15.33, p < .001, η = .14
2
F(3.53, 303.21) = 1.25, p = .29, η = .01

2

F(3.43, 243.59) = .60, p = .64, η  = .01 

2

F(3.62, 249.81) = .30, p = .86, η  = .004 

2

F(3.59, 240.56) = .23, p = .91, η  = .003 

2

F(3.37, 232.76) = .40, p = .77, η = .01
2
F(1.43, 83.11) = 4.60, p = .01, η = .07

2

F(1.76, 101.84) = .81, p = .43, η  = .01 

F(1, 91) = 4.69, p = .03, η  = .05 
F(1, 91) = 5.18, p = .02, η  = .05 
2
F(1, 91) = 8.67, p = .004, η  = .09
2
F(1, 91) = 4.75, p = .03, η  = .05
F(1, 91) = 2.79, p = .10, η  = .03 
F(1, 91) = 2.09, p = .15, η  = .02
2
F(1, 86) = .13, p = .72, η  = .001
 
F(1, 71) = 4.67, p = .03, η  = .06 
F(1, 69) = 4.63, p = .04, η  = .06 
F(1, 67) = 7.61, p = .01, η  = .10 
F(1, 69) = 6.54, p = .01, η  = .09
2
F(1, 58) = .19, p = .67, η  = .003
F(1, 58) = 2.66, p = .11, η  = .04 

2

2

2

2

2

F(3.88, 352.78) = .52, p = .72, η  = .01 
2

F(3.77, 343.26) = 1.17, p = .32, η = .01
2
F(3.53, 303.21) = 1.29, p = .28, η = .02

F(3.62, 249.81) = 1.92, p = .12, η  = .03 

2

F(3.59, 240.56) = 1.45, p = .22, η  = .02 

2

F(3.37, 232.76) = 3.22, p = .02, η = .04
2
F(1.43, 83.11) = .03, p = .93, η < .001

2

F(1.76, 101.84) = 1.59, p = .21, η  = .03 

2

F(1.47, 85.54) = 1.15, p = .31, η  = .02 

F(1.89, 109.66) = 2.54, p = .09, η  = .04 

2

2

F(3.79, 345.07) = 1.21, p = .31, η  = .01 
2
F(3.09, 281.17) = .65, p = .59, η = .01
2
F(3.43, 312.15) = .69, p = .58, η = .01

2

2

F(1, 58) = 5.95, p = .02, η  = .09
2
F(1, 58) = 1.35, p = .25, η  = .02

2

F(3.50, 318.75) = .13, p = .96, η  = .001 

F(3.43, 243.59) = 3.64, p = .01, η  = .05 

F(1.47, 85.54) = 4.83, p = .02, η  = .08 

F(1, 58) = .07, p = .78, η  = .001 

2

2

2

F(1, 58) = .22, p = .64, η  = .004 

2

2

2

F(1.73, 100.26) = .08, p = .90, η = .001
2
F(1.83, 106.28) = 3.69, p = .03, η = .06

2

2

2
2

2

2

2

F(1.89, 109.66) = 1.79, p = .17, η  = .03 
2

F(1.73, 100.26) = .97, p = .37, η = .02
2
F(1.83, 106.28) = .11, p = .88, η = .002

 
For all variables except the somatization composite and Trails derived score, there were statistically signifi‐
cant  changes  across  time;  however,  there  were  not  any  significant  group  by  time  interactions,  indicating 
that the two groups changed similarly across time. Figure 16 gives the mean change over time on the com‐
posites (summarized across the two NMI groups). For all composite variables except withdrawal‐alienation, 
the  pattern  of  change  was  the  same  when  examining  differences  between  sequential  time  periods.  There 
were statistically significant improvements in reported psychological well‐being from the first to the second 
assessment but no other significant differences between time periods. The withdrawal‐alienation composite 
was the only variable that showed significantly higher scores over time, with statistically significant change 
on average from the first to second assessments and from the third to the fourth assessments. The SLUMS 
also showed change across time with significant improvement from the first (M = 22.45, SE = .39) to second 
(M = 23.22, SE = .27) assessment and from the second to third (M = 24.23, SE = .36) assessment.  
 

RESULTS 

61 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Figure 16. Mean Scores over Time for the 7 Composites Summarized across the NMI Groups 
1.00
0.80

—.—Anxiety
Hostility-Anger Control
—•—Psychosis
—•—Withdrawal-Alienation

—M—Depresslon-Hopelessness
—Hypersensitivity
—0—Somatizaton

0.60
0.40
0.20
0.00
-0.20
-0.40
-0.60
-0.80
-1.00
1

3
Time

4

5

 

 
Comparisons  on  Staff  Report  Measures.  The  summary  statistics  for  the  correctional  officer  ratings  on  the 
PBRS  are  given  in  Table  15,  the  summary  statistics  for  the  clinician  ratings  are  given  in  Table  14,  and  the 
analysis of variance results for the staff report comparisons are given in Table 16.  
For the correctional officer ratings, there are significant group differences on all four PBRS scales. When av‐
eraged over time, the CSP NMI group scored significantly lower than the GP NMI group on each of the four 
scales. There were no significant main effects of time on any of the scales and no significant interaction ef‐
fects for the Anxious‐Depressed or Dull‐Confused scales; however, there were significant interaction effects 
for Anti‐Authority and Total scales. These interactions are displayed in Figures 17 and 18. For both scales, 
the  same  basic  pattern  occurs  with  the  CSP  NMI  scores  tending  to  decrease  across  time  with  significant 
drops from the first to the second assessment and with the GP NMI scores showing no significant change 
across time (although scores tend to increase).  
 

62 

RESULTS 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Figure 17. Mean Scores over Time for the PBRS Anti­Authority Subscale for each NMI Group 

21 —4—GP NMI (n = 22)
—--05P NMI (n = 51)

18 -

1 15
1

1 12 -

3

t

•--------*

t

S........il. ...... ..5 ......se

i
1

2

3

4

5

Time

 
Figure 18. Mean Scores over Time for the PBRS Total Scale for each NMI Group 

 

21
--•—.GP NMI (n = 20)
--M--05P NMI (n = 51)

.s...

ophouswIl<
IIAT41
.18....

1.1.1.1.1.1.1.1.°411

".. ....... .

uhuis qh

1

1

•

1

2

3

4

5

Time

 
 
For  the  clinician  ratings,  there  was  a  significant  group  difference  on  the  Withdrawal  subscale  of  the  BPRS 
with the CSP NMI group (M = 6.80, SE = .13) rated significantly higher compared to the GP NMI group (M = 
6.32, SE = .15). No other BPRS subscales had statistically significant group differences. There were significant 
time effects on Activity, Hostility‐Suspiciousness, and Total scores but no significant interaction effects for 
any of the BPRS subscales. For the Activity subscale, ratings at the first assessment (M = 5.62, SE = .16) were 
significantly higher than ratings at the third assessment (M = 5.24, SE = .10) but not different from ratings at 

RESULTS 

63 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
the second assessment (M = 5.24, SE = .07). For the Hostility‐Suspiciousness subscale, the ratings at the first 
assessment (M = 7.03, SE = .26) were significantly greater than ratings at the second (M = 6.63, SE = .27) and 
the third (M  = 6.75, SE = .35) assessment periods. The total score showed this same pattern with first  as‐
sessment (M = 28.59, SE = .63) ratings significantly higher than second (M = 27.12, SE = .47) and third (M = 
27.36, SE = .59) periods.  
Comparisons between MI Groups 
In the following analyses, the three groups with participants identified as mentally ill are compared. Like the 
comparisons between the NMI groups, there is a CSP MI group and a GP MI group plus a third group of in‐
mates who have been placed in a psychiatric treatment facility (SCCF). Analyses were completed on the five 
common time periods using mixed design analysis of variance techniques.  
Comparisons on Self‐Report Measures. The summary statistics for the groups are provided in Table 17 and 
the analysis of variance results and effect sizes are provided in Table 18. Significant group differences were 
found on the anxiety, depression‐hopelessness, psychosis, somatization, and withdrawal‐alienation compo‐
sites. Using Bonferroni corrected pairwise comparisons, the SCCF group was always significantly higher than 
the GP MI group on these composites. Additionally, the SCCF group was significantly higher than the CSP MI 
group for the depression‐hopelessness, psychosis, and withdrawal‐alienation composites but not significant‐
ly different for anxiety and somatization composites. The GP MI and CSP MI groups did not show any statis‐
tically significant mean differences although the CSP MI group always had a higher mean. There were not 
significant group differences on the hostility‐anger control and hypersensitivity composites or on the cogni‐
tive measures (SLUMS and Trails derived). 

64 

RESULTS 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Table 17. Summary Statistics on Measures across 5 Time Periods for the MI Groups  
Variable 
M1 
Anxiety  
 
CSP MI (n = 55) 
.26 
GP MI  (n = 28) 
.11 
SCCF (n = 55) 
.51 
Depression‐Hopelessness   
CSP MI (n = 55) 
.19 
GP MI  (n = 28) 
.00 
SCCF (n = 55) 
.64 
Hostility‐Anger Control  
  
CSP MI (n = 55) 
.20 
GP MI  (n = 28) 
.11 
SCCF (n = 55) 
.02 
Hypersensitivity 
  
CSP MI (n = 55) 
.16 
GP MI  (n = 28) 
.13 
SCCF (n = 55) 
.32 
Psychosis  
  
CSP MI (n = 55) 
.16 
GP MI  (n = 28) 
.02 
SCCF (n = 55) 
.46 
Somatization  
  
CSP MI (n = 55) 
.23 
GP MI  (n = 28) 
.07 
SCCF (n = 55) 
.46 
Withdrawal‐Alienation  
  
CSP MI (n = 55) 
.15 
GP MI  (n = 28) 
.08 
SCCF (n = 55) 
.43 
SLUMS  
  
CSP MI (n = 55) 
20.80 
GP MI  (n = 28) 
21.36 
SCCF (n = 55) 
20.96 
PBRS Trails B/A 
  
CSP MI (n = 55) 
2.99 
GP MI  (n = 28) 
3.23 
SCCF (n = 55) 
2.97 
PBRS Anti‐Authority 
  
CSP MI (n = 50) 
7.04 
GP MI (n = 16) 
5.31 
SCCF (n = 41) 
2.85 
PBRS Anxious‐Depressed  
CSP MI (n = 49) 
5.96 
GP MI (n = 16) 
2.31 
SCCF (n = 41) 
5.15 
PBRS Dull‐Confused 
  
CSP MI (n = 49) 
3.94 
GP MI (n = 16) 
1.69 
SCCF (n = 41) 
3.50 
PBRS Total 
  
CSP MI (n = 49) 
17.30 
GP MI (n = 16) 
9.38 
Both Groups 
11.70 

RESULTS 

SD1 
 
.84 
.77 
.71 
  
.78 
.76 
.89 
  
.67 
.68 
.69 
  
.85 
.92 
.78 
  
.80 
.80 
.84 
  
.82 
.71 
.67 
  
.83 
.88 
.83 
  
5.44 
4.18 
3.55 
  
1.04 
1.30 
1.16 
  
6.96 
4.61 
5.60 
  
6.58 
3.53 
4.77 
  
4.32 
2.15 
3.92 
  
15.89 
9.62 
13.46 

M2 
 

SD2 
 

.14 
‐.09 
.35 
  
.07 
‐.19 
.47 
  
.00 
.01 
‐.08 
  
.08 
‐.02 
.17 
  
.04 
‐.29 
.31 
  
.14 
‐.10 
.40 
  
.34 
.03 
.53 
  
21.20 
23.11 
21.81 
  
2.74 
2.81 
2.95 
  
6.66 
6.48 
4.00 
  
3.86 
4.32 
5.43 
  
2.71 
2.50 
3.54 
  
13.63 
12.35 
13.26 

M3 
 

.82 
.65 
.81 
  
.74 
.62 
.93 
  
.67 
.65 
.73 
  
.87 
.71 
.78 
  
.78 
.73 
.94 
  
.83 
.65 
.68 
  
.88 
.78 
.75 
  
4.86 
3.66 
4.24 
  
1.15 
.68 
1.13 
  
6.34 
5.05 
4.73 
  
5.23 
6.30 
5.05 
  
3.57 
3.14 
2.85 
  
13.63 
12.68 
10.59 

.12 
‐.06 
.27 
  
.04 
‐.18 
.35 
  
‐.03 
‐.04 
‐.09 
  
.11 
.60 
.14 
  
.09 
‐.31 
.31 
  
.21 
‐.03 
.29 
  
.25 
.12 
.56 
  
22.27 
23.71 
23.11 
  
2.67 
2.75 
2.90 
  
6.75 
8.58 
3.51 
  
3.45 
5.00 
5.06 
  
2.63 
2.62 
3.16 
  
13.22 
16.28 
11.97 

SD3 
 

M4 
 

.86 
.59 
.88 
  
.80 
.53 
.98 
  
.69 
.58 
.65 
  
.94 
.65 
.91 
  
.95 
.65 
.88 
  
.79 
.83 
.81 
  
.83 
.68 
.75 
  
4.68 
2.99 
4.37 
  
.89 
.85 
1.16 
  
7.60 
10.14 
4.18 
  
4.31 
4.63 
4.46 
  
3.04 
3.28 
2.94 
  
13.25 
15.04 
9.31 

SD4 
 

‐.01 
‐.20 
.32 
  
.03 
‐.22 
.39 
  
‐.09 
‐.08 
‐.05 
  
‐.08 
‐.14 
.20 
  
‐.14 
‐.46 
.33 
  
.09 
‐.24 
.30 
  
.30 
‐.06 
.50 
  
22.84 
24.32 
23.52 
  
2.60 
2.76 
2.80 
  
3.56 
7.00 
5.67 
  
2.94 
2.89 
6.84 
  
2.82 
1.81 
4.20 
  
9.20 
11.72 
16.99 

M5 
 

.86 
.56 
.86 
  
.84 
.59 
.95 
  
.74 
.58 
.79 
  
.90 
.66 
.77 
  
.87 
.52 
.95 
  
.81 
.53 
.83 
  
.81 
.71 
.75 
  
4.38 
3.73 
4.07 
  
1.05 
.87 
.98 
  
5.40 
6.75 
6.64 
  
3.44 
3.83 
6.35 
  
3.64 
2.95 
3.99 
  
9.89 
11.77 
15.90 

SD5 
 

‐.10 
‐.22 
.21 
  
‐.11 
‐.30 
.33 
  
‐.12 
‐.08 
‐.10 
  
‐.05 
‐.11 
.20 
  
‐.02 
‐.39 
.22 
  
‐.01 
‐.14 
.31 
  
.18 
‐.02 
.55 
  
23.51 
24.96 
23.35 
  
2.67 
2.62 
2.74 
  
4.64 
7.56 
5.70 
  
2.88 
3.62 
6.82 
  
2.26 
1.25 
4.30 
  
9.93 
12.44 
17.22 

.86 
.61 
.76 
  
.81 
.54 
.86 
  
.72 
.55 
.71 
  
.81 
.69 
.75 
  
.94 
.64 
.86 
  
.85 
.59 
.76 
  
.80 
.62 
.73 
  
4.03 
3.29 
4.04 
  
.76 
.92 
1.29 
  
6.35 
9.77 
6.94 
  
3.90 
5.20 
6.01 
  
3.12 
1.95 
4.24 
  
10.98 
15.05 
15.58 

65 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Table 18. F Statistics and Partial η2 Comparing MI Groups across 5 Time Periods 
Variable 
Self‐Report  

Group Main Effect 
 

Anxiety  
Depression‐
Hopelessness  
Hostility‐Anger 
Control  
Hypersensitivity  
Psychosis  
Somatization  
Withdrawal‐
Alienation  
SLUMS 
Trails B/A 

F(2, 135) = 3.97, p = .02, η  = .06 

F(3.67, 495.07) = 9.11, p < .001, η = .06

F(2, 135) = 8.44, p < .001, η2 = .11 

F(3.52, 475.64) = 6.76, p < .001, η  = .05 

Staff Report 
PBRS Anti‐
Authority 
PBRS Anxious‐
Depression 
PBRS Dull‐
Confused 
PBRS Total  
BPRS Activity 
BPRS Anxious‐
Depressed 
BPRS Hostility‐
Suspiciousness 
BPRS Thought 
Disorder 
BPRS Withdrawal 
BPRS Total  

Time Main Effect 
 
2

2

F(2, 135) = .13, p = .88, η  = .002 

Interaction Effect 
 
2

F(7.34, 495.07) = .42, p = .90, η = .01

2

F(7.04, 475.64)  = .24, p =.98, η  = .004  

2

F(6.90, 465.81) = .70, p = .67, η = .01 

F(3.45, 465.81) = 5.49, p = .001, η  = .04 

2

F(3.92, 529.43) = 2.80, p = .02, η = .02
2
F(3.82, 148.17) = 6.55, p < .001, η = .05
2
F(3.87, 522.39) = 4.83, p = .001, η = .04

2

F(4.00, 539.26) = .79, p = .53, η  = .01 

F(2, 135) = 1.41, p = .25, η  = .02 
2
F(2, 135) = 7.28, p = .001, η  = .10 
2
F(2, 135) = 4.26, p = .02, η  = .06 
F(2, 135) = 5.51, p = .01, η  = .08 
2

F(2, 134) = 1.32 p = .27, η  = .02 
2
F(2, 128) = .47, p = .63, η  = .01 
 
2

F(2, 104) = 2.56, p = .08, η  = .05 
2

F(2, 103) = 5.92, p = .004, η  = .10 
2

F(2, 103) = 5.03, p = .01, η  = .09 
2

F(2, 103) = .40, p = .67, η  = .01 
2
F(2, 126) = 1.36, p = .26, η  = .02 
2

F(2, 126) = 2.32, p = .10, η  = .04 
2

F(2, 126) = .73, p = .48, η  = .01 
2

F(2, 126) = 9.91, p < .001, η  = .14 
2

F(2, 126) = 5.46, p = .005, η  = .08 
2
F(2, 126) = 7.10, p = .001, η  = .10 

2

2

2

F(3.69, 494.42) = 28.64, p < .001, η = .18
2
F(4, 512) = 4.50, p = .001, η = .03

2
2

2 
2

F(7.84, 529.43) = .62, p = .76, η = .01
2
F(7.66, 148.17) = .97, p = .46, η = .01
2
F(7.74, 522.39) = .89, p = .52, η = .01
2

F(7.99, 539.26) = .77, p = .63, η  = .01 
2

F(7.38, 494.42) = .76, p = .63, η = .01
2
F(8, 512) = .62, p = .76, η  = .01

2

F(7.17, 372.72) = 3.30, p = .002, η  = .06 

2

F(7.25, 373.16) = 2.97, p = .004, η  = .05 

2

F(6.91, 355.98) = 1.38, p = .21, η  = .03 

2

F(6.85, 352.95) = 3.46, p = .001, η = .06
2
F(3.63, 228.85) = .16, p = .95, η = .003

F(3.58, 372.72) = .63, p = .62, η  = .01 
F(3.62, 373.16) = .06, p = .99, η  = .001 
F(3.46, 355.98) = .23, p = .90, η  = .002 
F(3.43, 352.95) = .13, p = .96, η = .001
2
F(1.82, 228.85) = 2.78, p = .07, η = .02
2

F(2, 252) = 5.15, p = .01, η  = .04 

2

2

2

2

2

F(4, 252) = 1.66, p = .16, η  = .03 

2

F(3.84, 242.10) = 1.31, p = .27, η  = .02 

2

F(3.23, 203.27) = 4.54, p = .003, η  = .07 

F(1.92, 242.10) = 5.40, p = .01, η  = .04 
F(1.61, 203.27) = 5.50, p = .01, η  = .04 
2

F(1.99, 250.81) = 1.76, p = .17, η = .01
2
F(1.85, 232.85) = 8.94, p < .001, η = .07

2

2

2

F(3.98, 250.81) = 2.02, p = .09, η = .03
2
F(3.70, 232.85) = 2.95, p = .02, η = .04

 
There were significant changes across times for all composites except the withdrawal‐alienation composite. 
The  hostility‐anger  control  composite  also  showed  a  significant  interaction  indicating  differential  change 
across  time  between  groups.  Figure  19  provides  the  mean  plot  demonstrating  change  across  time  for  the 
five composites that had a significant time effect but no interaction effect. For the anxiety and depression‐
hopelessness composites, there were significant decreases in mean scores from the first to second assess‐
ment periods. For the psychosis and somatization composites, there were significant decreases in mean rat‐
ings from the first to second and from the third to fourth assessment periods. The hypersensitivity compo‐
site  had  a  significant  time  effect,  but  the  comparison  of  sequential  time  periods  showed  no  significant 
change (pairwise comparisons indicated that the first assessment mean was significantly higher than mean 
scores at the fourth and fifth periods).  
 

66 

RESULTS 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Figure 19. Mean Scores for the 7 Composites over Time Summarized across MI Groups 
Anxiety

Depression‐Hopelessness

.1 , Hypersensitivity

Psychosis

Hostility‐Anger
.111 Somatization

Mean Composite Score

Withdrawal‐Alienation
,.
0.35
0.3
0.25
0.2
0.15
0.1
0.05
0
‐0.05
‐0.1
‐0.15

-

....
.....,...,..
.:

-

1

2

3

4

5

Assessment Period

 
 
For  the  SLUMS  cognitive  assessment,  there  were  significant  increases  in  performance  from  the  first  (M  = 
21.04, SE = .40) to second (M = 22.04, SE = .39) and from the second to third (M = 23.03, SE = .38) assess‐
ment  periods.  For  the  Trails  derived  score  there  were  significant  improvements  in  performance  from  the 
first (M = 3.08, SE = .10) to second (M = 2.83, SE = .10) assessment periods (indicated by a decrease in mean 
scores).  
The significant interaction for the hostility‐anger control composite is graphed in Figure 20. There was signif‐
icant change over time for the CSP MI group with time 1 scores significantly higher than all other assessment 
periods. There were not significant changes over time for the SCCF and GP MI groups.  

RESULTS 

67 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Figure 20. Mean Change over Time on the Hostility­Anger Control Composite for each MI Group 

1.0
tCSP MI (n = 55)
—M—GP MI (n = 28)
—A-5CCF(n = 55)

0.3
E

A

A

0.6
0.4

1 0.2
a 0.0

i

li

-0.2

llimm.--.N•diaimi,_. —__7_1

-0.4
-0.6
-0.8
-1.0
1

2

3

4

5

Time

 
 
Comparisons on Staff Report Measures. The summary statistics for the correctional staff ratings on the PBRS 
are given in Table 17, the summary statistics for the clinician ratings are given in Table 14, and the analysis 
of variance results for the staff report comparisons are given in Table 18.  
For the correctional staff ratings, there were significant group differences for PBRS Anxious‐Depressed and 
Dull‐Confused subscale scores. The SCCF group (Mad = 5.86, SE = .48; Mdc = 3.74, SE = .31) scored significantly 
higher than the both the CSP MI (Mad = 3.82, SE = .44; Mdc = 2.87, SE = .28) and the GP MI (Mad = 3.63, SE = 
.76; Mdc = 1.98, SE = .50) groups on both subscales. The Anti‐Authority rating scale did not show statistically 
significant group differences (p = .08) but there was a small to moderate effect size (η2 = .05); the only signif‐
icant difference was between the GP MI and the SCCF groups (p = .04). There were no statistically significant 
time  effects  for  any  of  the  subscales  of  the  correctional  officer  ratings;  however,  there  were  significant 
group  by  time  interactions  for  the  Anti‐Authority,  Anxious‐Depressed,  and  Total  scores.  Figures  21  to  23 
demonstrate the interaction for these three variables. 
Further analyses of the interaction effects showed the same pattern of significance – there were significant 
changes over time for the CSP MI group but not for the other two groups. Specifically, for the Anti‐Authority 
subscale, the fourth assessment had lower scores than the first three assessment periods; for the Anxious‐
Depressed  subscale,  the  first  assessment  was  higher  than  all  other  assessment  periods;  and  for  the  Total 
PBRS scale, the first assessment was significantly higher than the fourth and fifth assessments. There were 
not  significant  changes  over  time  for  the  other  two  groups;  however  it  is  noteworthy  that  these  scores 
tended to increase over time.  
 

68 

 

 

RESULTS 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Figure 21. Mean Scores over Time for the PBRS Anti­Authority Subscale for each MI Group 
—•—051) Mr (n = 50)
—M—GP MI {n = 16)
SCCF (n 41)

 
 
Figure 22. Mean Scores over Time for the PBRS Anxious­Depressed Subscale for each MI Group 

—•—05P MI (n = 49)
—M—GP MI (n = 16)
—A-5CCF (n = 41)

 

RESULTS 

 

69 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Figure 23. Mean Scores over Time for the PBRS Total Scale for each MI Group 

tCSP MI (n = 49)
--GP MI (n = 16)
—'—SCCF(n = 41)

 
 
For  clinician  ratings  on  the  BPRS,  there  were  significant  mean  group  differences  for  the  Total  scale,  the 
Thought Disorder subscale, and the Withdrawal subscale. The GP MI group (M = 31.44, SE = .99) had signifi‐
cantly lower means on the total scale compared to both the CSP MI (M = 34.44, SE = .70) and the SCCF (M = 
35.92, SE = .66) groups, but there was not a significant difference between the CSP MI and SCCF groups. All 
three groups were significantly different from each other on the Thought Disorder subscale with the GP MI 
(M = 5.43, SE = .32) having the lowest scores followed by CSP MI group (M = 6.53, SE = .23) and then the 
SCCF group (M = 7.16, SE = .22). For the Withdrawal subscale, the SCCF group had significantly higher means 
(M = 7.93, SE = .16) compared to both the CSP MI (M = 7.55, SE = .17) and the GP MI (M = 6.99, SE = .24) 
groups, but there was not a significant difference between the CSP MI and GP MI groups.  
Time effects were statistically significant for all BPRS scales except Activity and Withdrawal subscales; how‐
ever, there were also significant interactions for Thought Disorder and Total scales. Figure 24 provides the 
means for change over time for the Activity, Anxious‐Depressed, Hostility‐Suspiciousness, Though Disorder, 
and Withdrawal subscales of the BPRS. For the Anxious‐Depressed and Hostility‐Suspiciousness scales, mean 
ratings  at  the  first  assessment  were  greater  than  mean  ratings  at  the  third  assessment  for  all  three  subs‐
cales.  Additionally,  for  the  Anxious‐Depressed  subscale,  the  mean  rating  at  the  first  assessment  was  also 
significantly greater than the mean at the second assessment. 

70 

RESULTS 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Figure 24. Mean Scores for the BPRS Subscales over Time Summarized across MI Groups 
Activity

Anxious‐Depressed

Thought Disorder

Withdrawal2

Hostility‐Suspiciousness

Mean BPRS Subscale Score

12
10
8
6
4
2
0
1

2

3

Assessment Period

 
Figures 25 and 26 are mean plots to demonstrate the interaction effects for BPRS Thought Disorder subscale 
and BPRS Total scores. Simple main effects for each group on the Thought Disorder subscale indicate that 
there are significant changes over time for the SCCF group but not for the other two groups. The SCCF group 
had significantly higher scores at the first assessment compared to the other two assessment periods.  
Figure 25. Mean Scores for the BPRS Thought Disorder Subscale over Time for each MI Group 

4

.,

7-

A

5

-

—•—05P MI (n = 49)
—M—GP MI (n = 25)
—A—SCCF(n = 55)
0
1

2

3

Time

 
For BPRS Total scores, the GP group does not change significantly over time but both of the other groups 
have significant time effects. In particular, the last assessment scores for the CSP MI group were significantly 
lower than the first two assessment periods, and the first assessment scores for the SCCF group were signifi‐
cantly higher than each of the other assessment periods. 

RESULTS 

71 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Figure 26. Mean Scores for the BPRS Total Scale over Time for each MI Group 
45
40
35
30
25
d 20

a 15
—0—05P MI (n = 49)
—M—GP MI (n = 25)
—A—SCCF(n = 55)

10
5

0
1

Z

3

Time

 
Slopes Analysis 
To compare change over time in another way, slopes analyses were conducted in addition to the means ana‐
lyses. For these analyses, a slope and intercept were computed for each person on each composite using the 
available  time  periods  for  anyone  who  completed  two  or  more  assessments.  These  slopes  and  intercepts 
were then compared across groups. If AS was impacting change across time, we would expect slopes to be 
different across study groups. We also computed an intercept value for each person on each self‐report va‐
riable; these intercepts were computed so that they represented an estimated value at initial assessment. 
Thus  differences  in  groups  would  indicate  different  starting  points.  As  a  reminder,  for  all  dependent  va‐
riables except the SLUMS, lower scores indicate better performance. Thus a positive slope would indicate a 
worsening of psychological well‐being over time and a negative slope would indicate an improvement over 
time. Similarly, a positive or larger intercept value indicates higher psychological distress (or lower cognitive 
functioning) at the outset compared to lower (or negative) values for all measures except the SLUMS.  
Table  19  gives  the  means  and  standard  deviations  for  the  slopes  and  intercepts  for  each  group  on  each 
composite and Table 20 provides the statistical results from a one‐way analysis of variance on each variable 
comparing if there are group differences in mean slopes and intercepts.  
 

72 

RESULTS 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Table 19. Summary Statistics on Slopes and Intercepts for each Self­Report Variable for the Study Groups 
CSP MI 
M 
SD 
 
 
Anxiety  
Intercept 
.27 
.82 
Slope 
‐.11 
.17 
Depression‐Hopelessness  
  
Intercept 
.17 
.70 
Slope 
‐.07 
.13 
Hostility‐Anger Control   
  
Intercept 
.16 
.64 
Slope 
‐.07 
.14 
Hypersensitivity 
  
  
Intercept 
.20 
.78 
Slope 
‐.09 
.18 
Psychosis  
  
  
Intercept 
.16 
.72 
Slope 
‐.08 
.19 
Somatization  
  
  
Intercept 
.25 
.78 
Slope 
‐.08 
.17 
Withdrawal‐Alienation   
  
Intercept 
.26 
.76 
Slope 
‐.02 
.18 
SLUMS  
  
  
Intercept 
20.74  4.71 
Slope 
.65 
.97 
Trails B/A 
  
  
Intercept 
2.94 
.94 
Slope 
‐.10 
.22 
Variable 

CSP NMI 
M 
SD 
 
 
‐.48 
.56 
‐.05 
.20 
  
  
‐.38 
.55 
‐.04 
.15 
  
  
‐.17 
.57 
‐.02 
.14 
  
  
‐.33 
.67 
‐.05 
.26 
  
  
‐.34 
.65 
‐.05 
.23 
  
  
‐.44 
.68 
‐.03 
.17 
  
  
‐.19 
.71 
.05 
.18 
  
  
22.01  3.29 
.78 
.87 
  
  
3.11  1.15 
‐.06 
.30 

GP MI 
M 
SD 
 
 
.10 
.73 
‐.06 
.20 
  
  
.003 
.65 
‐.05 
.22 
  
  
.06 
.64 
‐.04 
.15 
  
  
.16 
.81 
‐.04 
.21 
  
  
‐.03 
.79 
‐.08 
.29 
  
  
.08 
.68 
‐.05 
.16 
  
  
.15 
.78 
‐.01 
.23 
  
  
21.93  3.62 
.81 
.82 
  
  
3.14 
.87 
‐.15 
.36 

GP NMI 
M 
SD 
 
 
‐.68 
.48 
.03 
.10 
  
  
‐.71 
.40 
‐.01 
.10 
  
  
‐.37 
.50 
‐.03 
.09 
  
  
‐.48 
.72 
‐.05 
.15 
  
  
‐.63 
.63 
‐.04 
.10 
  
  
‐.59 
.52 
‐.04 
.10 
  
  
‐.37 
.73 
.02 
.17 
  
  
23.53  3.16 
.38 
.70 
  
  
3.08  1.09 
‐.07 
.28 

SCCF 
SD 
 
 
.44 
.69 
‐.07 
.19 
  
  
.54 
.84 
‐.21 
.21 
  
  
‐.01 
.65 
‐.04 
.18 
  
  
.18 
.66 
.03 
.26 
  
  
.38 
.80 
‐.06 
.28 
  
  
.46 
.66 
‐.06 
.27 
  
  
.37 
.81 
.05 
.34 
  
  
20.72  3.83 
.83  1.42 
  
  
3.05 
.99 
‐.98 
.40 

All 

M 

M 
 
‐.02 
‐.06 
  
‐.02 
‐.05 
  
‐.05 
‐.04 
  
‐.04 
‐.04 
  
‐.05 
‐.06 
  
‐.01 
‐.05 
  
.07 
.02 
  
21.61 
.70 
  
3.05 
‐.09 

SD 
 
.80 
.18 
  
.80 
.17 
  
.63 
.14 
  
.77 
.23 
  
.80 
.23 
  
.79 
.19 
  
.81 
.24 
  
3.93 
1.04 
  
1.02 
.32 

 
Table 20. F Statistics and Partial η2 Comparing Study Groups on Slopes and Intercepts 
Self‐Report Measures 
Intercept Comparisons
Slope Comparisons 
Anxiety  
F(4, 257) = 27.14, p < .001, η2 = .30
F(4, 257) = 1.39, p = .24, η2 = .02
2 
Depression‐Hopelessness  
F(4, 257) = 28.62, p < .001, η = .31
F(4, 257) = 1.30, p = .27, η2 = .02
2 
Hostility‐Anger Control  
F(4, 257) = 5.86, p < .001, η = .08
F(4, 257) = .88, p = .48, η2 = .01
2 
Hypersensitivity  
F(4, 257) = 10.23, p < .001, η = .14
F(4, 257) = 2.84, p = .02, η2 = .04
Psychosis  
F(4, 257) = 16.34, p < .001, η2 = .20
F(4, 257) = .24, p = .92, η2 = .004
2 
Somatization  
F(4, 257) = 24.10, p < .001, η = .27
F(4, 257) = .58, p = .68, η2 = .01
2 
Withdrawal‐Alienation  
F(4, 257) = 9.00, p < .001, η = .12
F(4, 257) = 1.18, p = .32, η2 = .02
2 
SLUMS 
F(4, 257) = 4.50, p = .002, η = .07
F(4, 257) = 1.46, p = .21, η2 = .02
2 
Trails B/A 
F(4, 257) = .30, p = .88, η = .005
F(4, 257) = .54, p = .71, η2 = .008

 
As  might  be  expected,  there  were  significant  group  differences  on  intercepts  for  each  self‐report  variable 
except  for  the  Trails  B/A  derived  task.  Figure  27  provides  the  mean  intercept  values  for  each  self‐report 
composite  for  each  group.  In  general,  the  MI  groups  had  worse  performance  on  these  psychological  va‐
riables compared to the NMI groups. The exceptions to this general finding is that the CSP NMI was not sig‐
nificantly different from SCCF and GP MI on hostility composite and was not different from GP MI on psy‐
chosis  and  withdrawal‐alienation  composites.  Similarly,  the  GP  NMI  group  was  not  significantly  different 
from the GP MI on SLUMS. Another general finding for intercept differences is that groups with the same 
mental health status (MI, NMI) tended to be similar to one another. The exceptions to this general finding 
were that for the MI groups, the SCCF group was significantly higher than the GP MI group on depression‐
hopelessness, psychosis, and withdrawal‐alienation composites.  
RESULTS 

73 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Figure 27. Mean Intercept Values for each Composite by Study Group 
0.80

0.60

0.40

■ Anxiety 

0.20

Depression‐Hopelessness 
Hostility‐Anger Control 

0.00

Hypersensitivity
Psychosis 

‐0.20

Somatization 
Withdrawal‐Alienation 

‐0.40

‐0.60

‐0.80
CSP MI

CSP NMI

GP MI

GP NMI

SCCF

 
 
In contrast to intercept analyses that showed many group differences, only hypersensitivity had significant 
differences in slopes between groups (see Table 20). The only significant differences were between the CSP 
MI group and the SCCF group. The CSP MI group had a negative slope indicating improvement over time and 
the SCCF group had a positive slope indicating a worsening trend over time.  
To better understand how change is occurring across groups, we identified participants as having positive, 
negative, or no change over time. Participants were classified as positive changers if they had strong positive 
change on at least one variable (i.e., slope was more than 2 standard deviations from mean and in the direc‐
tion of positive change) or had smaller positive change on three or more variables (i.e., slopes on at least 
three  variables  were  more  than  1  standard  deviation  from  mean  and  in  the  direction  of  positive  change). 
Likewise, participants were classified as negative changers if slopes were in negative direction. The remain‐
ing  participants  who  did  not  meet  the  rules  for  either  positive  or  negative  change  were  classified  as  not 
changing. Figure 28 provides the percentage of change types for each study group.  

74 

RESULTS 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Figure 28. Percentage of Change Types by Study Group 
90%
Negative Change (%)
Positive Change (%)

No Change (%)

80%
70%
60%
50%
40%
30%
20%
10%
0%
CSP MI

CSP NMI

GP MI

GP NMI

SCCF

 

Groups were significantly different in the percentage of change types, χ2(8, N = 270) = 16.26, p = .04. Using 
standardized residuals, the following conditions were found to be different from expectations: for the CSP 
MI group, there was a lower than expected percentage of persons changing negatively (5% vs. 8%); for the 
CSP NMI group, there was a lower percentage of people changing in positive direction than expected (14% 
vs. 24%); for the GP MI, there was a higher percentage of people changing in the positive direction (39% vs. 
24%) and fewer than expected stable patterns (52% vs. 68%); for the GP NMI group, there was a  lower per‐
centage of people changing positively (14% vs. 24%) and more stable patterns than expected (81% vs. 68%); 
and for the SCCF group, there was a higher percentage of persons changing negatively (13% vs. 8%). 

PREDICTOR ANALYSES 
The purpose of these analyses was to explore if there were predictors of the rate of change across time on 
each  composite.  Using  regression  analyses  to  predict  individual  slopes  as  the  dependent  variable,  we  ex‐
amined if the variables listed in Table 23 could explain rate of change. These variables were identified by the 
literature or the study advisory board as potential predictors. All study participants are used in these analys‐
es, and MI status and AS status are used as two of the predictors. 
 
 

RESULTS 

 

75 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Table 23. Variables Used to Predict Change over Time 
Predictor 
Notes
MI status (study group membership) 
0: NMI group; 1: MI group
AS status (study group membership) 
0: Not AS; 1: AS
Demographics  
Age (at start of study) 
DCIS variable
Education 
DCIS; 0: Less than HS; 1: HS diploma or GED 
Minority status 
DCIS; 0: Not a minority; 1: Minority
Criminal History 
Offense degree 
DCIS
Previous AS confinement 
DCIS; 0: No; 1: Yes
Prior incarcerations 
DCIS 
Gang membership 
DCIS; 0: No; 1: Known gang member
Psychological History 
Anger needs 
DCIS
Anti‐social personality disorder 
CCI
Anxiety (Axis I)  
CCI
Avoidant personality disorder 
CCI
Borderline personality disorder 
CCI
Dependent personality disorder 
CCI
Depression (Axis I) 
CCI
Depressive personality disorder 
CCI
History of deliberate self harm
DSHI (life time incidence)
Histrionic personality disorder 
CCI
Impulsivity 
CCI
Narcissistic personality disorder 
CCI
Obsessive‐compulsive personality disorder 
CCI
Paranoid personality disorder 
CCI
Passive‐aggressive personality disorder 
CCI
Psychotic thinking (Axis I) 
CCI
Post traumatic stress disorder (Axis I) 
CCI
PSI Attitudes towards AS 
PSI Time 1
PSI Fear Level 
PSI Time 1
PSI Safety 
PSI Time 1
Sadistic personality disorder 
CCI
Schizoid personality disorder 
CCI
Schizophrenia (Axis I) 
CCI
 Schizotypal personality disorder 
CCI
Self‐defeating personality disorder 
CCI
Self‐destruction needs 
DCIS 
Sex offender needs 
DCIS 
Social Phobia (Axis I) 
CCI
Trauma symptoms 
TSI
Withdrawal (Axis I) 
CCI

 
To determine which variables are potential predictors of self‐report outcomes, a forward statistical regres‐
sion was used. The information in Table 24 presents the regression analysis results providing the adjusted R2 
(proportion  of  variance  explained  in  the  slope  variable  by  the  predictors)  and  lists  which  variables  were 
found to be significant predictors, along with standardized regression coefficients. The sign of the regression 
coefficient provides information about the direction of the relationship between the dependent variable and 
the  predictor.  Recall  that  the  dependent  variable  is  rate  of  change  (slope)  with  positive  scores  indicating 
worsening  of  performance  over  time  for  all  variables  except  on  the  SLUMS  and  negative  scores  indicating 
improving performance over time for all variables except on the SLUMS. Thus, a negative relationship of a 

76 

RESULTS 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
predictor with a slope implies that high scores on a variable covary with lower slope scores and thus more 
improvement for all variables (except SLUMS where a negative relationship implies higher scores on predic‐
tor goes with more decline in SLUMS performance over time). 
 
Table 24. Regression Results: Significant Predictors of Rate of Change over Time in Composite Variables 
Construct 
Adj. R2 
Significant Predictors
Anxiety 
  .11*** 
Schizophrenia (Axis 1; β = ‐0.32)
PSI Safety (β = ‐0.20) 
TSI Total (β = 0.21) 
Depression‐
  .17*** 
Paranoid PD (β = ‐0.23)
Hopelessness 
Sadistic PD (β = 0.19) 
TSI Total (β = 0.30) 
Schizophrenia (Axis I; β = ‐0.38) 
Hostility‐       
  .12*** 
Passive‐Aggressive PD (β = ‐0.29)
Anger Control 
TSI Total (β = 0.16) 
Withdrawal (Axis I; β = ‐0.21) 
PSI Safety (β = 0.19) 
Anger Needs (β = 0.13) 
Hypersensitivity    .04*** 
DSHI (β = ‐0.22)
 
Psychosis 
  .03** 
Narcissistic PD (β = ‐0.20)
SLUMS 
  .08*** 
Obsessive‐Compulsive PD (β = 0.30)
PSI Fear Level (β = ‐0.24) 
Somatization 
  .09*** 
PSI Safety (β = ‐0.26)
Narcissistic PD (β = ‐0.14) 
Withdrawal‐
  .03** 
DSHI (β = ‐0 .18)
Alienation 
Trails B/A 
  .08*** 
PSI AS Attitude (β = ‐0.25)
Antisocial PD (β = 0.19) 
Narcissistic PD (β = ‐0.22) 
Depressive PD (β = 0.20) 
*p < .05; **p < .01; ***p < .001 

The study variables—MI status and AS confinement—were never significant predictors of outcomes. There 
were 15 different significant predictors on at least one outcome.For a predictor to have practical meaning in 
an applied setting, it would be important for predictors to be related to multiple outcome variables. There 
were no predictors that were significantly related to a majority of outcomes; however there were predictors 
that were significantly related to change over time on two or three multiple constructs. These were trauma 
history (positive relationship with change), PSI Safety (both positive and negative relationships with change), 
narcissistic  personality  disorder  (negative  relationship  with  change),  schizophrenia  scores  (  negative  rela‐
tionship with change), and history of self harm ( negative relationship with change). To provide an interpre‐
tive example, the positive relationships between trauma history and slopes for the anxiety composite indi‐
cate that higher scores on trauma co‐vary with higher anxiety slopes. This implies that more trauma leads to 
worsening over time on the anxiety composite. Thus, generalizing to significant predictors, higher scores on 
trauma  and  lower  scores  on  narcissistic  personality  disorder,  schizophrenia  (axis  I),  and  self  harm,  lead  to 
more negative change over time. The PSI Safety subscale had both positive and negative relationships with 
outcome  variables.  Higher  scores  on  the  PSI  Safety  subscale  (i.e.,  feeling  safer  in  AS)  was  related  to  im‐
provements in anxiety and somatization but also to more hostility over time. 

RESULTS 

77 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 

DISCUSSION 
The results of this study were largely inconsistent with our hypotheses and the bulk of literature that indi‐
cates AS is extremely detrimental to inmates with and without mental illness. We hypothesized that inmates 
in  segregation  would  experience  greater  psychological  deterioration  over  time  than  comparison  inmates, 
who were comprised of similar offenders confined in non‐segregation prisons. Similar to other research, our 
study  found  that  segregated  offenders  were  elevated  on  multiple  psychological  and  cognitive  measures 
when compared to normative adult samples (Andersen et al, 2000; Haney, 2003; Suedfeld et al., 1982; Zin‐
ger et al., 2001). However, there were elevations among the  comparison groups too, suggesting that high 
degrees  of  psychological  disturbances  are  not  unique  to  the  AS  environment.  The  GP  NMI  group  was  the 
only one that was similar to the normative group on a number of scales.  
In examining change over time patterns, there was initial improvement in psychological well‐being across all 
study  groups,  with  the  bulk  of  the  improvements  occurring  between  the  first  and  second  testing  periods, 
followed  by  relative  stability  for  the  remainder  of  the  study.  On  only  one  measure  –  withdrawal  –  did  of‐
fenders worsen over time, but this finding was only true for the two NMI groups, so it is not attributable to 
AS. Even given the improvements that occurred within the study timeframe, the elevations in psychological 
and  cognitive  functioning  that  were  evident  at  the  start  of  the  study  remained  present  at  the  end  of  the 
study.  
Another hypothesis was that offenders with mental illness would deteriorate over time in AS at a rate more 
rapid and more extreme than for those without mental illness. Patterns indicated that the MI groups (CSP 
MI, GP MI, SCCF) tended to look similar to one another but were significantly elevated compared to the NMI 
groups (CSP NMI, GP NMI), regardless of their setting. For the AS offenders, the MI group scored worse than 
the NMI group on all self‐report measures except the Trails test and all staff measures except the PBRS Anti‐
Authority scale. In addition to the changes over time described above, PBRS scores decreased significantly 
for segregated inmates regardless of their mental health status, which would be an indicator that staff may 
be perceiving improvements, but the significant differences were from the first to the second assessment 
periods when the majority of participants changed facilities, which suggests this is perhaps a measurement 
error rather than a true improvement. As hypothesized there was a differential time effect for the MI and 
NMI groups on several composite measures (i.e., anxiety, hostility‐anger control, hypersensitivity, somatiza‐
tion), but the interactions were in the opposite direction of our hypothesis; on average, the CSP NMI group 
did not change while the CSP MI group improved. 
We stated that offenders in segregation would develop an array of psychological symptoms consistent with 
the SHU syndrome. As already discussed, all of the study groups, with the exception of the GP NMI group, 
showed symptoms that  were associated with the  SHU syndrome. These elevations were present from the 
start and were more serious for the mentally ill than non‐mentally ill. In classifying people as improving, de‐
clining, or staying the same over time, the majority remained the same. There was a small percentage (7%) 
who  worsened  and  a  larger  proportion  (20%)  who  improved.  Therefore,  this  study  cannot  attribute  the 
presence of SHU symptoms to confinement in AS. The features of the SHU syndrome appear to describe the 
most disturbed offenders in prison, regardless of where they are housed. In fact, the group of offenders who 
were placed in a psychiatric care facility (SCCF) had the greatest degree of psychological disturbances and 
the greatest amount of negative change.  

78 

DISCUSSION 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Finally, in this study, we conducted some exploratory predictive analyses to determine if there were individ‐
ual  characteristics  that  could  identify  who  may  be  at  greater  risk  of  psychological  harm  from  segregation. 
There  were  no  individual  predictors  that  showed  strong  effects  for  predicting  change.  This  could  indicate 
that we did not have the correct predictors or that patterns of decompensation are individualized (i.e., not 
predictable), but it is more likely that the relative stability over time makes it difficult to predict change.  
A review of the findings warrants a discussion of plausible alternative explanations that might account for 
our results. The use of a repeated measures design enabled us to determine that change was occurring and 
in  which  direction.  Even  given  the  debate  about  whether  or  not  harmful  effects  resulted  from  AS,  it  was 
never suggested that inmates might improve as this study found. The presence of comparison groups avoids 
an attribution error; the changes, improvements in this case (i.e., 20%), are not due to segregation. These 
conclusions  replicate  those  drawn  by  Zinger  and  colleagues  (2001)  where  there  was  a  similar  lack  of  evi‐
dence of harm. These studies suffered criticism for high refusal rates, high attrition rates, small sample sizes, 
and short durations – limitations that were corrected in the present study (note, however, that no generali‐
zations should be made beyond the 1 year follow‐up period in this study). Furthermore, the use of reliable 
and valid standardized measures enabled the present research study to assess psychological functioning in 
an objective  manner.  Although the majority of these tests were  not normed for prisoner populations, the 
current reliability and validity findings increased our confidence in these measures.  
The most difficult finding to interpret is the improvement that occurred between the first and second testing 
sessions, which was significant for all groups except the GP NMI group. This effect may be due to reactivi‐
ty—the participants know they are in a study and respond in a particular way. Perhaps they have a need to 
respond in a way that puts them in the most favorable light (e.g., ability to handle demands of prison con‐
finement). (Sometimes improvement in performance due to being observed is called the Hawthorne effect; 
however this effect seems to be misunderstood and it was not merely the fact of being studied that led to 
those original finding of improvement [Gottfredson, 1996]). It is also possible that there are demand charac‐
teristics introduced by the field researcher that cues the participants on how to respond; this seems unlikely 
as the participants would be expected to respond in the hypothesized direction. Although a testing or prac‐
tice effect might explain the improvements on cognitive measures, we were unable to find support in the 
literature or from the study advisory board that psychological measures should be influenced by testing ef‐
fects. Because the changes occurred in the AS and comparison groups, it is not possible to attribute the im‐
provements  to  the  confinement  conditions;  however  it  may  be  that  participating  in  the  study  produces 
some  unknown  expectation.  Although  study  demands  may  lead  to  positive  ratings,  it  seems  unlikely  that 
these response biases would overshadow the negative impacts of AS if they really existed. However, there is 
not enough information in the data collected  to understand  the reason for the positive  change. The most 
likely explanation is that study participants were included in our study when they were in the midst of a cri‐
sis and, with time, the crisis dissipated.  

LIMITATIONS 
This  study  was  able  to  incorporate  several  design  features  that  improved  upon  the  capability  of  previous 
research to draw conclusions about the effects of AS. On the other hand, this study has several limitations 
that affect its generalizability to other  settings.  First, this study included literate adult  male offenders and 
should therefore not be generalized to female offenders, illiterate offenders, or juveniles. Second, this study 
can only be generalized to other prison systems to the extent that their conditions of AS confinement are 

DISCUSSION 

79 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
similar to Colorado’s. The same findings might not be found in other AS units that have different offender 
populations or criteria for placement, more restrictive confinement, or fewer mental health services.  
The duration of this study was limited to one year. We believed this time period to be adequate to detect 
harmful effects because it was postulated in earlier research that the effects of segregation would be quickly 
evident  (Grassian  &  Friedman,  1986;  Haney,  2003;  Kupers,  2008;  Lovell  et  al.,  2007;  Rhodes,  2004;  Toch, 
1992). Kupers (2008, p. 1006) stated “that for just about all prisoners, being held in isolated confinement for 
longer than 3 months causes lasting emotional damage if not full‐blown psychosis and functional disability.” 
Therefore, we expected that deleterious effects would become evident within a year, but it is possible they 
do not appear until after longer periods of segregation.  
This study used a moderate sample size because we anticipated moderate to large effects based on the lite‐
rature (e.g., Grassian, 1983; Haney, 2003; Pizarro & Stenius, 2004). It is possible that the true magnitude of 
the negative effect is small and, therefore, larger sample sizes would be required to detect negative changes 
and predict the types of offenders who might be harmed by segregation. In support of this postulate, the 
present study found small to moderate effect sizes for change over time, however they were in the opposite 
(positive) direction.  
This study examined group averages. It was not designed to identify if certain individuals might be worsened 
by the conditions of AS; rather the purpose was to examine whether offenders on the whole, both mentally 
ill and non‐mentally ill, are harmed by long‐term segregation. Also, in the design of this study, we assumed a 
general linear trend in the data and were not able to capture nonlinear changes over time that might have 
occurred.  It  is  possible  that  a  person  in  segregation  could  have  had  one  or  more  brief  episodes,  possibly 
even severe episodes, of psychopathology that were not reflected in our data because testing occurred at 
three month intervals and that would not have been reflected in trend analyses of their psychological func‐
tioning. This study was not designed to assess brief changes in psychological functioning, however serious.  
This study attempted to triangulate data between inmate self‐report, staff observations, and official records. 
In the research study, we had the largest degree of success in gathering self‐report data. Some may question 
whether inmates’ self‐report is reliable because they may have reason to exaggerate their symptoms, but 
our testing of the measures’ psychometric properties indicated that the participants responded in remarka‐
bly reliable and valid ways. The official record data, which was intended to help us understand the varying 
degree of social isolation to which study participants were exposed, was inconsistent and incomplete. Be‐
cause our findings did not show negative change over time, the official record data would not have been as 
useful as originally intended; however, it would have still been beneficial in describing the conditions of con‐
finement. Additionally, the data from the clinical staff suggested that there were issues with the BPRS data, 
where clinicians were able to rank order groups, but they did not estimate elevations to similar heights as 
those reported by inmates. These data also raise the possibility that clinical staff are aware of less distress 
than inmates validly report.  

FUTURE RESEARCH 
The definition of AS varies greatly from state to state, so much so that it is difficult to define or count the 
number of inmates held nationally in AS; therefore, replication is needed in other prison systems to deter‐
mine whether these findings still hold true when the conditions of confinement are varied. The present re‐
search was unable to determine which elements of CSP were essential to prevent harm from occurring, and 

80 

DISCUSSION 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
it did not assess the interventions used at CSP to monitor and treat inmates. Ongoing research is needed to 
better  understand  how  the  different  components  of  segregation  may  impact  offenders  differentially.  For 
example, the type and intensity of psychiatric services provided to AS inmates may have a particularly strong 
effect on whether they decompensate during extended periods of segregation. Research that incorporates 
qualitative data, such as mental health records and historical patient records, may also help to understand 
how individuals are impacted by their confinement conditions. It is important to study other high‐security 
settings that permit more out of cell time or increased interpersonal contact (i.e., group treatment).  
Similar research is needed with female offenders in AS. Although they represent a small percentage of the 
AS population, there is a stunning lack of information about the pathways that lead women to segregation 
or how they adapt to this environment. Women offenders have high rates of mental illness (James & Glaze, 
2006; O’Keefe & Schnell, 2008). Trauma appears to be a major determinant of mental illness in female of‐
fender populations (Green, Miranda, Daroowalla, & Siddique, 2005; Zlotnik & Pearlstein, 1997); incarcerated 
women report much higher rates of abuse than incarcerated men (McClellan, Farabee, & Crouch, 1997). In 
examining  coping  mechanisms,  the  most  unique  gender  differences  exhibited  by  women  are  their  strong 
need for social interaction and their propensity to cope with the prison environment predominantly through 
relationship  formation  (Severance,  2005).  Given  their  higher  rates  of  mental  illness,  trauma  history,  and 
needs for social interaction, women may be particularly vulnerable to potentially harmful effects of segrega‐
tion.  
One untapped topic in the area of segregation research is the role of staff, both how they affect the setting 
and the effects of the setting on them (Haney, 2008; Mears, 2008; Pizarro & Narag, 2008). Recognizing that 
correctional  officers  have  the  greatest  amount  of  contact  with  offenders,  Dvoskin  and  Spiers  (2004)  have 
suggested they need a larger role in the treatment and psychiatric care of offenders, including, but not li‐
mited to, psychotherapeutic techniques to diffuse crisis situations, consultation with mental health profes‐
sionals,  and  monitoring  inmates’  compliance  and  adjustment  to  psychotropic  medications.  Evaluation  re‐
search would benefit the field in understanding the effectiveness of staff training and intervention programs 
implemented in AS. Finally, assessing inmate perceptions of staff may have value in understanding the im‐
pact of long‐term segregation on inmates because how they are treated may have a significant impact on 
their adjustment to AS. 
There were some findings in this study that were difficult to interpret or that did not fit into the same gen‐
eral patterns described above. The Trails test did not differentiate between groups as did the other meas‐
ures. In contrast, the BPRS tended to differentiate between offenders with and without mental illness even 
better than did the self‐report measures. The hypersensitivity construct showed more variability and more 
differential changes over time than the other constructs; for offenders in AS, those with mental illness im‐
proved in hypersensitivity between times 1 and 2 but then showed a worsening trend while those without 
mental illness significantly improved between times 1 and 2, but then worsened between times 2 and 3, and 
then improved at the fourth interval. Further research may be needed to explore the reason for these dif‐
ferent patterns or to determine if these were spurious findings.  

POLICY IMPLICATIONS 
Does this study legitimize the use of segregation with offenders, including those with serious and persistent 
mental  illness?  Because  this  study  may  not  generalize  to  other  prison  systems,  especially  those  that  have 
conditions of confinement dissimilar to CSP, it is not possible to conclude that AS is not detrimental for all 
DISCUSSION 

81 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
offenders. Systems that are more restrictive and have fewer treatment and programming resources should 
not generalize these findings to their prisons. Replication is needed to understand how increased services, 
privileges, and out of cell time ameliorate the unintended consequences of AS, and research needs to inform 
prison systems about the standards and practices necessary to protect inmates in segregation from harmful 
psychological effects.  
It is also important to note that there may be other negative consequences of AS that we did not study. For 
example, Lovell et al. (2007) found that inmates released directly from segregation to the streets had dra‐
matically higher rates and severity of detected recidivism than AS inmates who first released to GP (but see 
Mears & Bales, 2009). We also did not study the degree to which AS met its purported goal of changing in‐
mate behavior for the better over time. The only questions addressed by this study were related to psycho‐
logical changes over time in segregation. Thus, we make no empirical or value judgments about whether and 
to what degree the use of AS balances the benefits (e.g., a safer prison system) with costs (e.g., significant 
reductions in freedom).  
It is impossible to ignore the extremely disproportionate rate at which inmates with serious mental illness 
are  assigned  to  AS  (Lovell,  2008;  Metzner  &  Fellner,  2010;  O’Keefe,  2008a),  which  has  to  some  degree 
“shocked the conscience” of the courts (see Jones ‘El v. Berge, 2001; Madrid v. Gomez, 1995; Ruiz v. John‐
son, 1999). In an era when prisons are expected to implement evidence‐based practices and to rehabilitate 
offenders who will be releasing back to the community, is it enough to avoid harm? Must we ask ourselves 
another question: what are the conditions required to improve inmates’ mental well‐being while in segrega‐
tion? Prison systems are held to a standard of treatment that is at least equivalent to community standards. 
It is likely that this most difficult segment of society has failed at all levels of community treatment and ear‐
lier criminal justice interventions, but the quest to treat and improve services for the most needy is an im‐
portant reality facing corrections agencies. 
Regarding their psychological functioning and levels of distress, these data suggest, although the differences 
were  small,  that  inmates  with  serious  mental  illness  are  less  likely  to  improve  in  segregation  and  are  less 
likely to get worse compared to mentally ill inmates in GP. We do not assume that the reasons for these ap‐
parently contradictory findings are the same. For example, it is possible that fewer inmates with mental ill‐
ness get worse because segregation is a safer and more structured environment. On the other hand, hypo‐
theses regarding their unlikeliness to improve include the significant limitations that segregation places on 
various types of therapeutic activities and services such as group therapy. Further, the data do not tell us 
which  aspects  of  AS  prevent  psychological  improvement  and  deterioration,  respectively,  among  inmates 
with mental illness. However, since prisons have a constitutional duty to respond to serious medical (includ‐
ing psychiatric) needs, the possibility that segregation may prevent improvement is cause for concern and 
further study.  
There  remain  significant  implications  for  mental  health  staff  who  work  in  prison  systems  that  permit  the 
placement of mentally ill  offenders in long‐term segregation. It is critical for mental  health staff to screen 
and assess offenders prior to AS placement to determine their vulnerability to harm that might occur as a 
result  of  their  segregation.  While  in  segregation,  it  is  important  that  the  mental  status  of  all  offenders  be 
assessed on a frequent, regular basis through rounds and individual sessions. Prison systems need to have a 
range of confinement options, such that offenders who are at risk of or are showing signs of decompensa‐

82 

DISCUSSION 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
tion can be removed from segregation and placed in an alternative high security environment that permits 
greater out of cell time and interaction with others.  
Other  systems  have  rejected  confinement  models  that  isolated  offenders  and  held  them  in  extremely  re‐
strictive spaces. Even if the segregation models of the early 1900’s and the state psychiatric hospitals of the 
mid‐19th century are viewed as “primitive” compared to modern‐day AS facilities, it is important to examine 
and understand why these models failed and were ultimately dismantled. Although there are a number of 
researchers who predict that there is no end in sight to the supermax model (King, 1999; Mears, 2008; Pizar‐
ro & Narag, 2008; Pizarro & Stenius, 2004), they have also raised empirical questions regarding their effica‐
cy. Questions about the efficacy of AS will be asked until more is known about whether the use of AS in pris‐
on systems improves conditions for the rest of the system, whether and how they improve inmate behavior 
within and beyond the prison walls, whether they are cost‐effective, whether they increase risks to public 
safety, and whether there are settings or individuals that are prone to psychological deterioration.  

DISCUSSION 

83 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 

REFERENCES 
American Correctional Association (2009). 2009 directory: Adult correctional departments, institutions, 
agencies, and probation and parole authorities. Alexandria, VA: Author. 
American Psychiatric Association. (1980). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (3rd ed). 
Washington, DC: Author. 
American Psychiatric Association. (2000). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (4th ed., text 
revision). Washington, DC: Author. 
American Psychological Association. (2009). Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association 
(6th ed.). Washington, DC: Author.  
Andersen, H. S., Sestoft, D., Lillebaek, T., Gabrielsen, G., & Hemmingsen, R. (2003). A longitudinal study of 
prisoners on remand: Repeated measures of psychopathology in the initial phase of solitary versus 
nonsolitary confinement. International Journal of Law and Psychiatry, 26, 165‐177. Retrieved from 
http://sciencedirect.com 
Andersen, H. S., Sestoft, D., Lillebaek, T., Gabrielsen, G., Hemmingsen, R., & Kramp, P. (2000). A longitudinal 
study of prisoners on remand: Psychiatric prevalence, incidence, and psychopathology in solitary vs. 
non‐solitary confinement. Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, 102, 19‐25.  
Andrews, D. A., & Bonta, J. L. (1995). Level of Service Inventory—Revised. Toronto, ON: Multi‐Health Sys‐
tems. 
Andrews, D. A., & Bonta, J. L. (2003). Level of Service Inventory‐Revised (LSI‐R): U.S. norms manual supple‐
ment. North Tonawanda, NY: Multi‐Health Systems, Inc. 
Arrigo, B. A., & Bullock, J. L. (2008). The psychological effects of solitary confinement on prisoners in super‐
max units: Reviewing what we know and recommending what should change. International Journal 
of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology, 52, 622‐641. doi: 10.1177/0306624X07309720 
Atherton, E. (2001). Incapacitation with a purpose. Corrections Today, 63, 100‐103. Retrieved from 
http://vnwebnhwwilsonweb.com 
Austin, J., Alexander, J., Anuskiewicz, S., & Chin, L. (1995). Evaluation of the Colorado Objective Prison Classi‐
fication System. San Francisco, CA: National Council on Crime and Delinquency.  
Beck, A. T., & Steer, R. A. (1993). Beck Hopelessness Scale: Manual. San Antonio, TX: The Psychological Cor‐
poration—Harcourt Brace & Company.  
Benjamin, T. B., & Lux, K. (1975). Constitutional and psychological implications of the use of solitary con‐
finement: Experience at the Maine state prison. Clearinghouse Review, 9, 83‐84.  
Briere, J. (1995). Trauma Symptom Inventory: Professional manual. Lutz, FL: Psychological Assessment Re‐
sources, Inc. 

84 

REFERENCES 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Briggs, C. S., Sundt, J. L., & Castellano, T.C. (2003). The effects of supermaximum security prisons on aggre‐
gate levels of institutional violence. Criminology, 41, 1341‐1376. Retrieved from 
http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi‐bin/fulltext/118866214/PDFSTART 
Brodsky, S., & Scogin, F. (1988). Inmates in protective custody: First data on emotional effects. Forensic Re‐
ports, 1, 267‐280. 
Burger, K. G., Calsyn, R. J., Morse, G. A., Klinkenberg, W. D., & Trusty, M. L. (1997). Factor structure of the 
Expanded Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 53, 451‐454. doi: 
10.1002/(SICI)1097‐4679(199708)53:5<451::AID‐JCLP5>3.0.CO;2‐Q 
Cohen, F. (2008). Penal Isolation: Beyond the Seriously Mentally Ill. Criminal Justice and Behavior, 35, 1017‐
1047.  
Collins, W. C. (2004). Correctional law for the correctional officer (4th ed.). Lanham, MA: American Correc‐
tional Association. 
Cooke, D. J. (1998). The development of the Prison Behavior Rating Scale. Criminal Justice and Behavior, 25, 
482‐506. doi: 10.1177/0093854898025004005 
Coolidge, F. L. (2004). An introduction to the Coolidge Correctional Inventory (CCI). Retrieved from 
http://www.uccs.edu/~faculty/fcoolidg//  
CTB/McGraw‐Hill.  (1994).  Tests of Adult Basic  Education  (TABE):  Version 7‐8.  Monterey, CA: CTB/McGraw‐
Hill. 
CTB/McGraw‐Hill. (2004). Tests of Adult Basic Education (TABE): TABE Form 7 to the 2002 GED Linking Re‐
port. Retrieved from 
http://www.ctb.com/media/articles/pdfs/AdultEducation/TABE_Form7_2002_GED_Linking_Report.
pdf?FOLDER<>folder_id=59997&bmUID=1089131925485 
Derogatis, L. (1993). Brief Symptom Inventory: Administration, scoring, and procedures manual. Minneapolis, 
MN: NCS Pearson, Inc. 
Ditton, P. M. (1999, July). Mental health and treatment of inmates and probationers. Washington, DC: U.S. 
Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Statistics. 
Dvoskin, J. A., & Spiers, E. M. (2004). On the role of correctional officers in prison mental health. The Psy‐
chiatric Quarterly, 75, 41‐59.  
Ecclestone, C. E. J., Gendreau, P., & Knox, C. (1974). Solitary confinement of prisoners: An assessment of its 
effects on prisoners’ personal constructs and andrenocortical activity. Canadian Journal of Beha‐
vioral Science, 6, 178 – 191. 
Gawande, A. (2009, March 30). Hellhole: The United States holds tens of thousands of inmates in long‐term 
solitary confinement. Is this torture? The New Yorker, 36‐45. Retrieved from 
http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2009/03/30/090330fa_fact_gawande 

REFERENCES 

85 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Gendreau, P., & Bonta, J. (1984). Solitary confinement is not cruel and unusual punishment: People some‐
times are! Canadian Journal of Criminology, 26, 467‐478.  
Gendreau, P. E., Freedman, N., Wilde, G. J. S., & Scott, G. D. (1968). Stimulation seeking after seven days of 
perceptual deprivation. Perceptual and Motor Skills, 26, 547‐550.  
Gendreau, P. E., Freedman, N., Wilde, G. J. S., & Scott, G. D. (1972). Changes in EEG alpha frequency and 
evoked response latency during solitary confinement. Abnormal Psychology, 79, 54‐59.  
Gendreau, P., McLean, R., Parsons, T., Drake, R., and Ecclestone, J. (1970). Effect of two days’ monotonous 
confinement on conditioned eyelid frequency and topography. Perceptual and Motor Skills, 31, 291‐
293.  
Gottfredson, G. D. (1996). The Hawthorne misunderstanding (and how to get the Hawthorne effect in action 
research). Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency, 33, 28‐48. doi: 
10.1177/0022427896033001003  
Grassian, S. (1983). Psychopathological effects of solitary confinement. American Journal of Psychiatry, 140, 
1450‐1454.  
Grassian, S., & Friedman, N. (1986). Effects of sensory deprivation in psychiatric seclusion and solitary con‐
finement. International Journal of Law and Psychiatry, 8, 49‐65.  
Gratz, K. L. (2001). Measurement of deliberate self‐harm: Preliminary data on the deliberate self‐harm in‐
ventory. Journal of Psychopathology and Behavioral Assessment, 23, 253‐263.  
Green, B. L., Miranda, J., Daroowalla, A., & Siddique, J. (2005). Trauma exposure, mental health functioning 
and program needs of women in jail. Crime & Delinquency, 51, 133‐151. doi: 
10.1177/0011128704267477 
Haney, C. (1993). Infamous punishment: The psychological effects of isolation. National Prison Project Jour‐
nal, 8, 3‐21.  
Haney, C. (2003). Mental health issues in long‐term solitary and "supermax" confinement. Crime and Delin‐
quency, 49, 124‐156.  
Haney, C. (2008). A culture of harm: Taming the dynamics of cruelty in supermax prisons. Criminal Justice 
and Behavior, 35, 956‐984.  
Hedlund, J. L., & Vieweg, B. W. (1980). The Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS): A comprehensive review. 
Journal of Operational Psychiatry, 11, 48‐64.  
Hewitt v. Helms, 459 U.S. 460 (1983). 
Hodgins, S., & Côté, G. (1991). The mental health of penitentiary inmates in isolation. Canadian Journal of 
Criminology, 33, 175‐182. 
Human Rights Watch. (1997). Cold storage: Super‐maximum security confinement in Indiana. New York, NY: 
Human Rights Watch.  

86 

REFERENCES 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Human Rights Watch. (1999). Red Onion State Prison: Super‐maximum security confinement in Virginia. 
Human Rights Watch, 11, 1‐24. 
Human Rights Watch. (2000). Out of sight: Super‐maximum security confinement in the United States. Hu‐
man Rights Watch, 12, 1‐9. 
James, D., & Glaze, L. (2006). Mental health problems of prisons and jail inmates. Washington, DC: Bureau of 
Justice Statistics. 
Jones v. Baker, 115 F.3d. 810 (6th Cir. 1998). 
Jones ‘El v. Berge, 164 F. Supp. 2d 1096 (W.D. Wis. 2001).  
King, R. D. (1999). The rise and rise of supermax: An American solution in search of a problem? Punishment 
and Society, 1, 163‐186. doi: 10.1177/14624749922227766 
Kupers, T. (2008). What to do with the survivors? Coping with the long‐term effects of isolated confinement. 
Criminal Justice and Behavior, 35, 1005‐1016. 
Kurki, L., & Morris, N. (2001). The purposes, practices, and problems of supermax prisons. Crime and Justice, 
28, 1‐21. 
Lovell, D. (2008). Patterns of disturbed behavior in a supermax population. Criminal Justice and Behavior, 35, 
985‐1004. 
Lovell, D., Johnson, L. C., & Cain, K. C. (2007). Recidivism of supermax prisoners in Washington state. Crime 
and Delinquency, 53, 633‐656. doi: 10.1177/0011128706296466 
Lukoff,  D.,  Nuechterlein,  K.,  &  Ventura,  A.  (1986).  Manual  for  the  expanded  brief  psychiatric  rating  scale. 
Schizophrenia Bulletin, 13, 261‐276. 
Madrid v. Gomez, 899 F. Supp. 1146 (N.D. Cal. 1995). 
McClary v. Kelly, 4 F. Supp. 2d 195 (W.D.N.Y. 1998). 
McClellan, D. S., Farabee, D., & Crouch, B. M. (1997). Early victimization, drug use, and criminality: A com‐
parison of male and female prisoners. Criminal Justice and Behavior, 24, 455‐476.  
McNair, D. M., Lorr, M., & Droppleman, L. F. (1992). Manual: Profile of Mood States, Revised. San Diego, CA: 
Educational and Industrial Testing Service. 
Mears, D. P. (2008). An assessment of supermax prisons using an evaluation research framework. The Prison 
Journal, 88, 43‐68. 
Mears, D. P., & Bales, W. D. (2009). Supermax incarceration and recidivism. Criminology, 47, 1131‐1166. doi: 
10.1111/j.1745‐9125.2009.00171.x 
Mears, D. P., & Watson, J. (2006). Towards a fair and balanced assessment of supermax prisons. Justice 
Quarterly, 23, 232‐270. doi: 10.1080/07418820600688867 

REFERENCES 

87 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Metzner, J. L., & Dvoskin, J. A. (2006). An overview of correctional psychiatry. Psychiatric Clinics of North 
America , 29, 761‐772. Retreived from 
http://psych.theclinics.com/issues/contents?issue_key=S0193‐953X(06)X0019‐9 
Metzner, J. L., & Fellner, J. (2010). Solitary confinement and mental illness in U.S. prisons: A challenge for 
medical ethics. Journal of the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law, 38, 104‐108. Retrieved 
from http://www.jaapl.org/cgi/reprint/38/1/104.pdf  
Morey, L. C. (1997). Personality Assessment Screener: Professional manual. Lutz, FL: Psychological Assess‐
ment Resources, Inc.  
Motiuk, L. L., & Blanchette, K. (2001). Characteristics of administratively segregated offenders in federal cor‐
rections. Canadian Journal of Criminology, 43, 131‐144.  
Motiuk, M. S., Motiuk, L. L., & Bonta, J. (1992). A comparison between self‐report and interview‐based in‐
ventories in offender classification. Criminal Justice and Behavior, 19, 143‐159. doi: 
10.1177/0093854892019002003 
Naday, A., Freilich, J. D., & Mellow, J. (2008). The elusive data on supermax confinement. The Prison Journal, 
88, 69‐93.  
National Institute of Corrections. (1997). Supermax housing: A survey of current practice, special issues in 
corrections. Longmont, CO: U.S. Department of Justice, National Institute of Corrections.  
National Institute of Corrections. (1999). Supermax prisons: Overview and general considerations. Longmont, 
CO: US Department of Justice, National Institute of Corrections.  
National Institute of Mental Health. (2010). The Numbers Count: Mental Disorders in America. Retrieved 
from http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/publications/the‐numbers‐count‐mental‐disorders‐in‐
america/index.shtml  
O’Keefe, M. L. (2005). Analysis of Colorado’s administrative segregation. [Technical Report]. Colorado 
Springs, CO: Department of Corrections.  
O’Keefe, M. L. (2008a). Administrative segregation for mentally ill inmates. Journal of Offender Rehabilita‐
tion, 45, 149‐165.  
O’Keefe, M. L. (2008b). Administrative segregation from within: A corrections perspective. The Prison Jour‐
nal, 88, 123‐143.  
O’Keefe, M. L., Klebe, K., & Hromas, S. (1998). Validation of the Level of Supervision Inventory (LSI) for com‐
munity based offenders in Colorado: Phase II. [Technical Report]. Colorado Springs, CO: Colorado 
Department of Corrections.  
O’Keefe, M. L., & Schnell, M. (2008). Offenders with Mental Illness in the Correctional System. Journal of Of‐
fender Rehabilitation, 45, 81‐104.  
Overall, J. E. & Gorham, D. R. (1962). The brief psychiatric rating scale. Psychological Reports, 10, 799‐812. 

88 

REFERENCES 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Pizarro, J. M., & Narag, R., E. (2008). Supermax prisons: What we know, what we do not know, and where 
we are going. The Prison Journal, 88, 23‐42.  
Pizzaro, J. & Stenius, V. M. K. (2004). Supermax prisons: Their rise, current practices and effect on inmates. 
The Prison Journal, 84, 248‐264.  
Reitan, R. M. (1958). Validity of the Trail Making Test as an indicator of organic brain damage. Perceptual 
and Motor Skills, 8, 271‐276.  
Rhodes, L. (2004). Total confinement: Madness and reason in maximum security. Berkeley, CA: University of 
California Press. 
Ruiz v. Johnson, 37 F. Supp. 855 (S.D. Texas 1999). 
Sandin v. Conner, 515 U.S. 473 (1995). 
Severance, T. A. (2005). You know who you can go to: Cooperation and exchange between incarcerated 
women. The Prison Journal, 85, 343‐367.  
Smith, P. S. (2008). “Degenerate criminals:” Mental health and psychiatric studies of Danish prisoners in soli‐
tary confinement, 1870‐1920. Criminal Justice and Behavior, 35, 1048‐1064. doi: 
10.1177/0093854808318782 
Spielberger, C., Gorsuch, R., & Lushene, R. (1970). The State‐Trait Anxiety Inventory: Test manual for Form X. 
Palo Alto, CA: Consulting Psychologists Press. 
Suedfeld, P., Ramirez, C., Deaton, J., & Baker‐Brown, G. (1982). Reactions and attributes of prisoners in soli‐
tary confinement. Criminal Justice and Behavior, 9, 303‐340. doi: 10.1177/0093854882009003004 
Sundt, J. L., Castellano, T. D., & Briggs, C. S. (2008). The sociopolitical context of prison violence and its con‐
trol: A case study of supermax and its effect in Illinois. The Prison Journal, 88, 94‐122.  
Tariq, S. H., Tumosa, N., Chibnall, J. T., Perry, M. H., & Morley, J. E. (2006). Comparison of the Saint Louis 
University Mental Status Examination and the Mini‐Mental State Examination for detecting demen‐
tia and mild neurocognitive disorder—a pilot study. American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 14, 
900‐910.  
Toch, H. (1992). Living in prison: The ecology of survival. Washington, DC: American Psychological Associa‐
tion.  
Toch, H. (2001). The future of supermax confinement. The Prison Journal, 81, 376‐388.  
Turner v. Safley, 482 U.S. 78 (1987). 
Ventura, J., Lukoff, D., Nuechterlein, K. H., Liberman, R. P., Green, M. F., & Shaner, A. (1993). Brief Psychia‐
tric Rating Scale (BPRS) expanded version (4.0): Scales, anchor points, and administration manual. 
International Journal of Methods in Psychiatric Research, 3, 227‐244.  
Ward, D. A., & Werlich, T. G. (2003). Alcatraz and Marion: Evaluating super‐maximum custody. Punishment 
and Society, 5, 53‐75. doi: 10.1177/1462474503005001295 
REFERENCES 

89 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Widows, M. R., & Smith, G. P. (2005). Structured Inventory of Malingered Symptomatology: Professional ma‐
nual. Lutz, FL: Psychological Assessment Resources, Inc. 
Wilkinson v. Austin, 545 U.S. 209 (2005). 
Zinger, I., Wichman, C., & Andrews, D. A. (2001). The psychological effects of 60 days in administrative se‐
gregation. Canadian Journal of Criminology, 43, 47‐88. 
Zlotnik, C., & Pearlstein, T. (1997). Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) comorbidity, and childhood abuse 
among incarcerated women. Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, 185, 761‐763. 
 

90 

REFERENCES 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 

APPENDIX A 
 

 

PSI 
 
Please rate how often the following items have applied to you in the past week. 
 
 
Never  Rarely  Sometimes Often 
True 
True 
True 
True 
1.  I find that even quiet noises are 
0 
1 
2 
3 
loud and disturbing. 
2.  My heart races faster than normal 
0 
1 
2 
3 
at times. 
3.  I am afraid for no reason. 
0 
1 
2 
3 
 
4.  I might go a day without brushing 
0 
1 
2 
3 
my teeth. 
5.  I do cardiovascular activity (jogging, 
0 
1 
2 
3 
running, speed walking, etc.). 
6.  I have difficulty catching my breath 
0 
1 
2 
3 
even when I am not exercising. 
7.  There are smells here that make 
0 
1 
2 
3 
me queasy. 
8.  I have pounding headaches that 
0 
1 
2 
3 
make it hard to concentrate. 
9.  I comb or brush my hair daily. 
0 
1 
2 
3 
 
10.  I struggle to get air. 
0 
1 
2 
3 
 
11.  I have a lot of energy. 
0 
1 
2 
3 
 
12.  My fear prevents me from doing 
0 
1 
2 
3 
things that I’d like to do. 
13.  I feel dizzy at times. 
0 
1 
2 
3 
 
14.  I look forward to getting back to 
0 
1 
2 
3 
the general population. 
15.  I do strength training (weight lift‐
0 
1 
2 
3 
ing, pull‐ups, push‐ups, etc.). 
16.  I feel as though I am choking. 
0 
1 
2 
3 
 
17.  I feel lightheaded or like I am going 
0 
1 
2 
3 
to faint. 
18.  I avoid shaving or grooming my fa‐
0 
1 
2 
3 
cial hair. 
19.  I sleep most of the day. 
0 
1 
2 
3 
 
20.  I find my whole body trembling for 
0 
1 
2 
3 
no apparent reason.  

APPENDICES 

Usually 
True 

Always 
True 

 

4 

5 

 

4 

5 

 

4 

5 

 

4 

5 

 

4 

5 

 

4 

5 

 

4 

5 

 

4 

5 

 

4 

5 

 

4 

5 

 

4 

5 

 

4 

5 

 

4 

5 

 

4 

5 

N/A 

4 

5 

 

4 

5 

 

4 

5 

 

4 

5 

4 

5 

4 

5 

 
 
 

91 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
 
21.  I have episodes where I am certain I 
will die soon. 
22.  I do not speak to anyone even 
when they talk to me. 
23.  I shower every day that I am al‐
lowed. 
24.  I am troubled by physical pain or 
aches. 
25.  I cannot stop myself from shaking. 
 
26.  I am bored to death. 
 
27.  Exercise is not important to me. 
 
28.  I sleep soundly at night. 
 
29.  It is important to me to keep good 
hygiene.  
30.  I break out in a sweat when I am 
not doing anything. 
31.  I find the quiet to be peaceful. 
 
32.  I start conversations with other 
people. 
33.  It is unsafe for me in the general 
population. 
34.  My cell temperature is comforta‐
ble. 
35.  I feel calm and relaxed. 
 
36.  I need a single cell for my own pro‐
tection. 
37.  This place makes me feel misera‐
ble. 
38.  I am not bothered by thoughts of 
dying. 
39.  I prefer administrative segregation 
to the general population.  
 

Never 
True 

Rarely 
True 

Sometimes
True 

Often 
True 

Usually 
True 

Always 
True 

0 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

0 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

0 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

0 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

0 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

0 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

0 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

0 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

0 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

0 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

0 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

0 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

0 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

0 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

0 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

0 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

0 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

0 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

0 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
N/A 

 

92 

APPENDICES 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
PRISON BEHAVIOR RATING SCALE 
Instructions: Based on your interactions and records such as Chronological Notes, disciplinary infractions or 
other incidents, please rate the inmate’s behavior by circling your answer. 
 
1. Tried but failed to follow instructions 
 
2. Appeared tense and unable to relax  
3. Appeared close to tears 
 
4. Caused trouble during his free time 
 
5. Cursed and swore (in an abusive manner) 
6. Appeared easily upset 
7. Appeared sluggish and drowsy 
8. Been held out of normal circulation  
(e.g. dry cell, mental health watch, special controls, 
RFP, punitive segregation etc.) 
 
9. Had trouble sleeping at night 
 
10. Appeared lacking in energy   
 
11. Sought reassurance   
 
12. Appeared to be brooding on something 
 
13. Victimized weaker inmates 
 
14. Appeared dull and unintelligent 
 
15. Fidgeted and been unable to sit still 
 
16. Tried to con staff 
 
17. Appeared frightened of other inmates 
 
18. Complained about staff 
 
19. Not been aware of what is going on around him 
  
20. Been aggressive towards staff 
 
 

APPENDICES 

Never/ 
Rarely 

 
Sometimes 

 
Often 

Most of 
the Time 

0 

1 

2 

3 

0 
 

1 
 

2 

3 

0 

1 

2 

3 

0 

1 

2 

3 

0 
 
0 
 
0 
 

1 
 
1 
 
1 
 

2 

3 

2 

3 

2 

3 

0 

1 

2 

3 

0 

1 

2 

3 

0 

1 

2 

3 

0 

1 

2 

3 

0 

1 

2 

3 

0 

1 

2 

3 

0 

1 

2 

3 

0 

1 

2 

3 

0 

1 

2 

3 

0 

1 

2 

3 

0 

1 

2 

3 

0 

1 

2 

3 

0 

1 

2 

3 

93 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
 

Never/ 
Rarely 

 
Sometimes 

 
Often 

Most of 
the Time 

0 

1 

2 

3 

0 

1 

2 

3 

0 

1 

2 

3 

0 

1 

2 

3 

0 

1 

2 

3 

0 

1 

2 

3 

0 

1 

2 

3 

0 

1 

2 

3 

0 

1 

2 

3 

0 

1 

2 

3 

0 

1 

2 

3 

0 

1 

2 

3 

0 

1 

2 

3 

0 

1 

2 

3 

0 

1 

2 

3 

0 

1 

2 

3 

0 

1 

2 

3 

21. Had a quick temper 
 
22. Been on report (e.g., got a negative CHRON, 
written up for COPD violation) 
 
23. Appeared preoccupied/dreamy 
 
24. Tried to play staff against each other 
 
25. Openly defied rules 
 
26. Appeared sad and depressed 
 
27. Stirred up trouble among other inmates 
 
28. Aided or abetted others to break the rules   
 
29. Been out of touch with what is happening 
around him 
 
30. Been victimized by other inmates 
 
31. Not understood orders 
 
32. Appeared to be scared 
 
33. Has few if any friends 
 
34. Avoided other inmates 
 
35. Given the impression of ignorance/inability 
 
36. Appeared depressed, gloomy, or sulky 
 
37. Had poor hygiene 
 
 
 
Completed by _________________________________ 
 

 

               Please Print Name 

 

94 

 

APPENDICES 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 

APPENDIX B 
SUMMARY OF STUDY MEASURES 
Most of the measures included in this study were self‐report pencil‐and‐paper tests; however, we also col‐
lected  data  from  clinicians  who  completed  the  Brief  Psychiatric  Rating  Scale  (BPRS)  and  correctional  staff 
who completed the Prison Behavior Rating Scale (PBRS). Two additional measures assessing cognitive func‐
tioning  (i.e.,  St.  Louis  University  Memory  Scale,  Trail  Making  Test)  were  administered  by  a  researcher.  In‐
struments used in this study were selected to assess a broad range of symptoms believed to be associated 
with  long‐term  segregation.  We  assessed  eight  constructs  by  means  of  10  different  measures  (and/or  ap‐
propriate subscales). The constructs of interest in this study were anxiety, cognitive impairment, depression‐
hopelessness,  hostility‐anger  control,  hypersensitivity,  psychosis,  somatization,  and  withdrawal‐alienation. 
In addition to these key variables, we measured other variables that may be predictors of outcomes, includ‐
ing trauma, personality disorders, malingering, and history of self‐harm.  
Measures were selected for ease of administration and strength of psychometric properties. In this appen‐
dix, we describe the measures used in this study, provide results concerning the psychometric properties of 
the measures, and describe the composites used for analyses in the report. Data are reported for the entire 
sample at each time period. Table B1 provides a quick reference guide to the tests used in this study as well 
as the constructs assessed by each of them.  
Table B1. Study Measures 
Measure 
Outcome Variables 
Beck Hopelessness Scale (BHS) 
Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) 
        Activity 
        Anxious‐Depressed  
        Hostility‐Suspiciousness  
        Thought Disorder 
        Withdrawal  
Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI) 
Anxiety 
Depression 
Hostility 
Interpersonal Sensitivity 
Obsessive‐Compulsive 
Paranoid Ideation 
Phobic Anxiety 
Psychoticism 
Somatization  
Personality Assessment Screener (PAS) 
Acting Out 
Alienation 
Anger Control 
Health Problems  
Hostile Control 
Negative Affect 
Psychotic Features 
Social Withdrawal 
Suicidal Thinking 

APPENDICES 

Construct

Administration 
 
Depression‐Hopelessness
Self‐Report 
Clinicians 
 
Anxiety, Depression‐Hopelessness
 
Hostility‐Anger Control
 
Psychosis
 
Withdrawal‐Alienation
 
Self‐Report 
Anxiety
 
Depression‐Hopelessness
 
Hostility‐Anger Control
 
Hypersensitivity
 
Anxiety
 
Psychosis
 
Anxiety
 
Psychosis
 
Somatization
 
Self‐Report 
Hostility‐Anger Control
 
Withdrawal‐Alienation
 
Hostility‐Anger Control
 
Somatization
 
Hostility‐Anger Control
 
Anxiety, Depression‐Hopelessness
 
Psychosis
 
Withdrawal‐Alienation
 
Depression‐Hopelessness
 

Times Assessed
B, every 3 months
B, every 6 months

B, every 3 months

B, every 3 months

95 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Measure 
Prison Behavior Rating Scale (PBRS) 
Anti‐Authority 
Anxious‐Depressed 
Dull‐Confused 
Prison Symptom Inventory (PSI) 
Panic Disorder 
Hypersensitivity‐External Stimuli 
Physical Symptoms 
Profile of Mood States (POMS)
Anger‐Hostility 
Depression‐Dejection 
Fatigue‐Inertia 
Tension‐Anxiety 
Saint Louis University Memory Scale 
(SLUMS) 
State‐Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) 
State Anxiety 
Trait Anxiety 
Trail Making Test (TMT) 
Time to Complete A Task 
Time to Complete B Task 
B – A Time 
B/A Time 
Predictor Variables 
Coolidge Correctional Inventory (CCI) 
Deliberate Self‐harm Inventory DSHI) 
Structured Inventory of  Malingered 
Symptoms (SIMS) 
Trauma Symptom Inventory (TSI) 

Construct

Administration 
Officers 

Times Assessed
B, every 3 months

Self‐Report 

B, every 3 months

Self‐Report 

B, every 3 months

Researcher 

B, every 3 months

Self‐Report 

Researcher 

B, every 3 months
B, every 3 months
B, every 3 months
B, every 3 months

Yes
Yes
Yes

B
B
B, every 3 months

Hostility‐Anger Control
Anxiety, Depression‐Hopelessness
Cognitive Impairment
Anxiety
Hypersensitivity
Somatization
Hostility‐Anger Control
Depression‐Hopelessness
Somatization
Anxiety
Cognitive Impairment

Anxiety
Anxiety
Cognitive Impairment
Cognitive Impairment
Cognitive Impairment
Cognitive Impairment
Personality Disorders
Self‐Harm
Malingering
Trauma

2nd

Note. Times assessed include the first time the test was administered as well as the interval at which it was given (unless it was only 
conducted at specific testing periods). B stands for baseline test.  

DESCRIPTION OF INDIVIDUAL MEASURES 
In  this  section,  descriptions  of  the  measures  and  summary  statistics  about  reliability  and  validity  are  pro‐
vided. Summary statistics include those published in the literature as well as those conducted with our study 
population. Cronbach’s alpha is used to estimate internal consistency reliability at each time period for the 
entire  sample.  Correlations  between  consecutive  time  periods  are  used  to  estimate  test‐retest  reliability. 
Convergent validity is estimated by correlations of each measure with other measures of the same construct 
for the entire sample at each time period. Tables for descriptive statistics on the measures are given with 
the  description  of  the  measure;  reliability  and  validity  statistics  are  presented  in  the  description  of  the 
measure and/or with the description of the composites.  
Beck Hopelessness Scale (BHS) 
Designed  to  measure  an  individual’s  degree  of  despair/depression,  the  BHS  (Beck  &  Steer,  1993;  Beck, 
Weissman, Lester, & Trexler, 1974) is a 20‐item self‐report measure on which scores can range from 0 to 20, 
with higher scores indicating a greater degree of despair about the future (Clum & Yang, 1995). Since this 
measure  does  not  have  any  subscales,  one  total  score  is  derived.  Respondents  answer  true  or  false  to 

96 

APPENDICES 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
statements  about  their  attitudes  over  the  past  week  (Beck  &  Steer,  1993).  It  takes  approximately  5  to  10 
minutes to complete this measure (Beck & Steer, 1993).  
The psychometric properties of the BHS are solid, as it has demonstrated internal consistency estimates of 
.65 to .89 for nonclinical samples of college students (e.g., Beck et al., 1974; Durham, 1982; Steed, 2001), .86 
to .93 for clinical in‐ or out‐patient samples (e.g., Beck et al., 1974; Durham, 1982; Dyce, 1996), and .83 in a 
forensic  sample  (Durham,  1982).  Three‐week  test‐retest  reliability  in  a  university  sample  was  found  to  be 
acceptable (r = .85) for the entire sample and was slightly higher for males (r = .94; Holden & Fekken, 1988). 
In  clinical  samples,  test‐retest  correlations  ranged  from  .66  (six‐week  test‐retest  correlation)  to  .69  (one‐
week test‐retest correlation; Beck & Steer, 1993). 
BHS self‐report ratings have also been correlated to clinician ratings of hopelessness, with correlations rang‐
ing from .78 to .98 (Beck  et al., 1974), which suggests that this  measure possesses acceptable convergent 
validity. Additionally, the BHS is considered to be a predictor of suicide risk in clinical populations (e.g., Beck, 
1986;  Beck,  Brown,  Berchick,  Stewart,  &  Steer,  1990;  Beck  et  al.,  1974;  Brown,  Beck,  Steer,  &  Grisham, 
2000),  with  scores  of  9  and  above  being  predictive  of  suicidal  ideation  (Beck,  Steer,  Kovacs,  &  Garrison, 
1985). Additionally, the correlation between the BHS and the Modified Scale for Suicide Ideation was found 
to be moderate at .46 (Clum & Yang, 1995) in a nonclinical sample of college students. Further evidence for 
the BHS’s convergent validity comes from a study on a clinical inpatient sample; the BHS was found to be 
significantly correlated with the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI; r = .68) and the Current Suicidal Intent (r = 
.68; Kovacs, Beck, & Weissman, 1975). 
Summary statistics are available for several different groups, including criminal psychiatric inpatients (Dur‐
ham, 1982). Durham (1982) assessed college students, general psychiatric patients, and forensic psychiatric 
patients on the BHS. He found that the mean for the nonclinical, college student sample was 2.32 (SD = 2.25, 
n = 197), 6.04 (SD = 4.67, n = 118) for the clinical, general psychiatric sample, and 6.62 (SD = 4.88, n = 99) for 
the clinical, forensic sample. In another study, including 2,067 psychiatric outpatients, the mean total BHS 
score was 9.06 (SD = 5.61; Bieling, Beck, & Brown, 2000). Palmer and Connelly (2005) assessed BHS scores 
for prisoners with (n = 24) and without (n = 24) a history of self‐harming behavior. They found that the mean 
BHS score for prisoners with a history of self‐harming behavior was 10.13 (SD = 4.81); for offenders without 
a  history  of  self‐harming  behavior  the  BHS  mean  score  was  found  to  be  significantly  lower  at  6.29  (SD  = 
4.49).
Summary statistics on the BHS for the current study are given in Table B2 for each group. Internal consisten‐
cy estimates indicated excellent consistency across items at each time (mean Cronbach’s alpha = .93; range 
= .92 to .94). Test‐retest correlation coefficients ranged between .66 and .79 (M = .71). Examination of the 
validity  coefficients,  given  in  the  composite  section  of  this  appendix,  indicated  that  the  BHS  is  correlated 
with other self‐report measures of depression (mean r = .58, range = .43 to .77); however, the correlations 
with  relevant  staff  reports  (BPRS  Anxious‐Depressed  and  PBRS  Anxious‐Depressed)  were  lower  (mean  r  = 
.18, range = ‐.02 to .33). 
 

APPENDICES 

 

97 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Table B2. Summary Statistics (M, SD, n) on BHS by Group and Time 
Time 
CSP MI 
CSP NMI 
GP MI 
GP NMI
SCCF
7.16 (5.63)  5.14 (4.52)  7.09 (5.38) 2.26 (3.16) 9.84 (6.28)
1 
n = 63 
n = 63 
n = 33 
n = 43 
n = 67 
7.59 (6.62)  4.66 (4.96)  5.56 (4.68) 2.35 (3.06) 9.20 (6.89)
2 
n = 62 
n = 59 
n = 32 
n = 41 
n = 64 
7.75 (6.37)  4.79 (4.88)  5.38 (4.58) 2.56 (3.92) 8.57 (6.85)
3 
n = 60 
n = 57 
n = 32 
n = 41 
n = 61 
8.12 (6.90)  3.87 (4.11)  5.62 (4.91) 2.60 (2.89) 9.20 (7.05)
4 
n = 60 
n = 56 
n = 29 
n = 39 
n = 59 
6.32 (6.31)  4.71 (5.03)  4.07 (4.22) 1.58 (2.06) 8.93 (6.88)
5 
n = 56 
n = 56 
n = 29 
n = 38 
n = 57 
5.86 (5.57)  3.51 (4.10) 
6 
NA 
NA 
NA 
n = 51 
n = 54 

All
6.56 (5.75)
n = 269 
6.24 (6.11)
n = 258 
6.12 (5.99)
n = 251 
6.22 (6.16)
n = 243 
5.55 (5.92)
n = 236 
4.61 (4.98)
n = 106 

Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) 
The expanded Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS‐E; Ventura et al., 1993) is a 24‐item measure administered 
by clinicians to assess patients with psychiatric disorders. It is designed to allow for the rapid review of psy‐
chological symptoms over time (e.g., Ventura et al., 1993). Ratings are made after a semi‐structured clinical 
interview with a client. Clinicians rate the different items on the BPRS‐E by means of a 7‐point severity scale 
(1‐ not present to 7‐ extremely severe); higher scores on this measure generally indicate greater severity of 
psychopathology (Segal & Silverman, 2002; Thomas, Donnell, & Young, 2004). However, since clinicians also 
have an option of using a not assessed (N/A) rating on any given item, scores may not accurately reflect the 
degree  of  psychopathology  (Ventura  et  al.,  1993).  The  clinical  interview  takes  approximately  10  to  40  mi‐
nutes, depending on familiarity with the client as well as presenting symptoms at the time of the assessment 
(Thomas et al., 2004). Research has indicated that there are five factors to which the individual items of the 
BPRS‐E are associated: thought disorder (directly reflecting psychosis), withdrawal, anxious‐depressed, hos‐
tility‐suspiciousness, and activity (Burger, Calsyn, Morse, Klinkenberg, & Trusty, 1997).  
Internal consistency reliability for the total BPRS‐E was found to be between .74 and .79 for clinical popula‐
tions (Perlick, Rosenheck, Clarkin, Sirey, & Raue, 1999; Segal & Silverman, 2002; Thomas et al., 2004). Fur‐
thermore, when considering the internal consistency reliability for the 5‐factor structure, the coefficients for 
four out of the five scales ranged from .73 (i.e., anxiety‐depression) to .81 (i.e., activity); the Cronbach’s al‐
pha for the hostility‐suspiciousness factor was found to be lower at .49 (Burger et al., 1997).  
Mean total scores for clinical populations were found to be between 37.9 (SD = 11.1) and 61.6 (SD = 12.9; 
Biancosino et al., 2004; Brown, Chhina, & Dye, 2008; Segal & Silverman, 2002), while the mean total for the 
BPRS‐E  among  inmates  with  psychiatric  problems  in  the  prison  population  was  found  to  be  49.29  (SD  = 
14.78; Gray, Bressington, Lathlean, & Mills, 2008). When individuals were tested over time in a clinical set‐
ting,  mean  scores  significantly  decreased  at  each  testing  interval  (Biancosino  et  al.,  2004;  Brown  et  al., 
2008), which indicates that the test may be sensitive to change over time following an intervention. 
The BPRS‐E has been shown to be correlated with the Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI), a self‐report measure 
of  psychological  symptoms  (Morlan  &  Tan,  1998),  indicating  convergent  validity.  Furthermore,  a  study  on 
female inmates showed that mental health referrals are more often done for those inmates who have re‐
ceived higher BPRS‐E scores, suggesting that this assessment tool is useful in detecting psychopathology in 
inmates (Nicholls, Lee, Corrado, & Ogloff, 2004).  

98 

APPENDICES 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Table B3 provides the summary statistics for the study groups on the BPRS scales at each time period. The 
BPRS scores tend to be lower than normative data found with other clinical populations, indicating a poten‐
tial floor effect and potential rater bias.  
Table B3. Summary Statistics (M, SD, n) on BPRS Scales by Group at each 6 month Time Period 
Assessment  CSP MI 
CSP NMI 
GP MI
GP NMI
SCCF
All 
 
 
 
Activity 
6.30 (1.74) 
5.56 (1.05)
6.21 (1.54)
5.82 (1.34)
6.82 (2.58) 
6.18 (1.84)
Time 1 
n = 59 
n = 57 
n = 33 
n = 39 
n = 62 
n = 250 
5.92 (1.49) 
5.26 (.67)
5.90 (1.27)
5.42 (1.18)
6.25 (1.44) 
5.78 (1.31)
Time 3 
n = 54 
n = 47 
n = 30 
n = 38 
n = 56 
n = 225 
6.17 (2.36) 
5.18 (.49)
5.96 (1.56)
5.28 (.53)
6.27 (2.05) 
5.82 (1.73)
Time 5 
n = 48 
n = 45 
n = 27 
n = 29 
n = 51 
n = 200 
Anxious‐Depressed 
 
 
9.51 (3.03) 
7.37 (2.22)
9.03 (2.90)
6.67 (1.81)
10.40 (3.34) 
8.74 (3.08)
Time 1 
n = 59 
n = 57 
n = 33 
n = 39 
n = 62 
n = 250 
9.07 (2.95) 
6.62 (2.15)
8.20 (2.44)
6.50 (1.84)
8.91 (2.64) 
7.97 (2.71)
Time 3 
n = 54 
n = 47 
n = 30 
n = 38 
n = 56 
n = 225 
8.44 (2.85) 
7.04 (2.95)
8.22 (2.31)
5.97 (1.68)
9.06 (3.13) 
7.90 (2.92)
Time 5 
n = 48 
n = 45 
n = 27 
n = 29 
n = 51 
n = 200 
Hostility‐Suspiciousness 
 
 
5.52 (2.46) 
4.04 (1.76)
4.70 (1.72)
3.90 (1.83)
5.47 (3.01) 
4.81 (2.39)
Time 1 
n = 59 
n = 57 
n = 33 
n = 39 
n = 62 
n = 250 
5.17 (2.45) 
3.34 (.64)
4.43 (2.16)
3.42 (1.26)
4.38 (1.54) 
4.20 (1.86)
Time 3 
n = 54 
n = 47 
n = 30 
n = 38 
n = 56 
n = 225 
4.54 (2.16) 
3.36 (.71)
4.37 (1.86)
3.76 (1.62)
4.72 (2.17) 
4.19 (1.88)
Time 5 
n = 48 
n = 45 
n = 27 
n = 29 
n = 51 
n = 200 
Thought Disorder 
 
 
6.59 (2.35) 
5.32 (.87)
5.64 (.99)
5.18 (.51)
8.29 (3.33) 
6.38 (2.41)
Time 1 
n = 59 
n = 57 
n = 33 
n = 39 
n = 62 
n = 250 
6.50 (1.87) 
5.17 (.48)
5.33 (.84)
5.10 (.39)
6.59 (1.94) 
5.85 (1.54)
Time 3 
n = 54 
n = 47 
n = 30 
n = 38 
n = 56 
n = 225 
6.35 (2.45) 
5.18 (.49)
5.44 (1.22)
5.38 (1.35)
6.61 (2.11) 
5.89 (1.84)
Time 5 
n = 48 
n = 45 
n = 27 
n = 29 
n = 51 
n = 200 
Withdrawal 
 
 
 
7.73 (1.76) 
6.79 (1.18)
7.00 (1.41)
6.38 (.63)
8.61 (2.60) 
7.43 (1.92)
Time 1 
n = 59 
n = 57 
n = 33 
n = 39 
n = 62 
n = 250 
7.83 (1.96) 
7.06 (1.40)
6.83 (1.26)
6.21 (.53)
7.59 (1.56) 
7.20 (1.58)
Time 3 
n = 54 
n = 47 
n = 30 
n = 38 
n = 56 
n = 225 
7.50 (1.62) 
6.71 (1.74)
7.22 (1.42)
6.31 (.76)
7.59 (1.55) 
7.14 (1.57)
Time 5 
n = 48 
n = 45 
n = 27 
n = 29 
n = 51 
n = 200 
 
 
 
Total 
35.66 (7.60)  29.07 (4.71)
32.58 (5.38)
27.95 (4.88)
39.60 (9.69)  33.52 (8.28)
Time 1 
n = 59 
n = 57 
n = 33 
n = 39 
n = 62 
n = 250 
34.50 (7.64)  27.45 (3.51)
30.70 (4.76)
26.66 (3.77)
33.71 (4.67)  31.00 (6.13)
Time 3 
n = 54 
n = 47 
n = 30 
n = 38 
n = 56 
n = 225 
33.00 (8.56)  27.47 (4.59)
31.22 (4.20)
26.69 (3.57)
34.25 (7.12)  30.92 (6.93)
Time 5 
n = 48 
n = 45 
n = 27 
n = 29 
n = 51 
n = 200 

Table B4 provides the Cronbach’s alpha estimates for the subscales at each assessment period. The internal 
consistency estimates for the BPRS subscales (M = .55, range = .40 to .66) were lower than those found in 
normative samples but similar across time periods; however, the internal consistency estimates for the total 
score is similar to that found in normative samples. Correlations between sequential time periods (6 months 

APPENDICES 

99 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
apart) are provided in Table B5 and show low stability across time. It is possible that participants changed 
facilities from one testing session to the next, causing a switch in their assigned clinicians. This change in cli‐
nicians could lower correlations between BPRS scores across time and present a picture of inmates’ psycho‐
pathological instability when, in fact, inter‐rater disparity might be causing the change in BPRS scores over 
time.  Correlations  between  the  BPRS  scales  and  relevant  self‐report  scales  of  the  same  construct  ranged 
between .15 and .35 (M = .28). Correlations between the BPRS scales and the relevant correctional officer 
ratings (PBRS scales) ranged between .08 and .29 (M = .19). These convergent validity estimates are lower 
than expected and are likely impacted by restriction of range (i.e., scores on the BPRS are averaging at the 
low end of the possible scores and standard deviations are small). 
Table B4. Internal Consistency Estimates (Cronbach’s 
alpha) for BPRS Scales at each Time Period 
BPRS Scale 
Time 1  Time 3  Time 5
Activity 
.58 
.53 
.64 
Anxious‐Depressed 
.55 
.60 
.66
Hostility‐Suspiciousness 
.57 
.61 
.51
Thought Disorder 
.64 
.52 
.57 
Withdrawal 
.47 
.49 
.40
Total Scale 
.81 
.80 
.79
 
Table B5. Correlations between Con­
secutive Time Periods for BPRS Scales 
BPRS Scale 
T1‐T3  T3‐T5 
Activity 
.36 
.40 
Anxious‐Depressed 
.45 
.43 
Hostility‐Suspiciousness 
.36 
.48 
Thought Disorder 
.33 
.58 
Withdrawal 
.30 
.23 
Total Scale 
.41 
.51 

77
TT
Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI) 

The BSI (Derogatis, 1993) is a 53‐item self‐report measure that is widely employed to assess a broad range 
of psychological symptoms. It measures clinical symptoms across nine subscales (i.e., Somatization, Obses‐
sive‐Compulsive, Interpersonal Sensitivity, Depression, Anxiety, Hostility, Phobic Anxiety, Paranoid Ideation, 
and Psychoticism) and three global scales (i.e., General Severity Index [GSI]; Positive Symptom Total; Positive 
Symptom Distress Index; Boulet & Boss, 1991). Respondents are asked to rate the degree of distress expe‐
rienced over the last week, using a 5‐point rating scale (0 – not at all to 4 – extremely). Higher scores on the 
BSI indicate  a greater degree of  psychopathology. Despite having different  subscales, the BSI seems  to be 
better at providing information on the general degree of psychopathology instead of the nature of it (Boulet 
& Boss, 1991). A minimum of 6th grade reading ability is required to complete this measure, and it generally 
takes 10 minutes to complete (Boulet & Boss, 1991).  
Internal consistency reliabilities across subscales are acceptable for clinical populations (range = .57  to .89; 
Boulet & Boss, 1991; Broday & Mason, 1991; Hayes, 1997; Kellett, Beail, Newman, & Frankish, 2003). Addi‐
tionally,  internal  consistency  reliabilities  for  nonclinical,  community  samples  for  the  different  subscales 
ranged from .60 to .81 (Kellett et al., 2003), whereas they ranged from .52 to .86 for forensic populations 
(Kellett et al., 2003; Zinger, Wichmann, & Andrews, 2001). Item‐total correlations for the scales ranged from 

100 

APPENDICES 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
.57 to .79, with a median correlation of .69, for clinical populations (Hayes, 1997) and ranged from .73 to .91 
for  forensic  populations  (Boulet  &  Boss,  1991).  Two‐week  test‐retest  reliability  is  acceptable  for  the  subs‐
cales (range = .68 [Somatization] to .91 [i.e., Phobic Anxiety]) and the GSI (r = .90; Cundick, 1975; Derogatis, 
1993;  Kellett  et  al.,  2003;  Piersma,  Reaume,  Boes,  1994)  across  nonclinical,  clinical,  and  forensic  samples. 
The BSI has been shown to be valid for studying change over time (Long, Harring, Brekke, Test, & Greenberg, 
2007).  
Normative data are widely available for psychiatric in‐ and out‐patients and the general population but not 
for a prison population (Derogatis, 1993). Normative means for the different subscales ranged from .67 (SD 
= .71) to 1.65 (SD = 1.11) in psychiatric outpatients, from .71 (SD = .97) to 1.26 (SD = 1.15) in psychiatric in‐
patients, and from .11 (SD = .25) to .37 (SD = .41) in nonclinical populations (Derogatis, 1993). Cochran and 
Hale  (1985)  conducted  a  normative  study  on  male  and  female  college  students  at  a  4‐year  college.  They 
found that mean scores ranged from .29 (SD = .27) to 1.17 (SD = .77) for males (n = 143) and from .32 (SD = 
.45) to 1.12 (SD = .66) for females (n = 204). Furthermore, normative data are available on the global scales 
of the BSI; the normative mean for the BSI GSI was 1.20 (SD = .70) for psychiatric outpatients, .25 (SD = .24) 
for nonclinical populations, and .97 (SD = .78) for psychiatric inpatients (Derogatis, 1993).  
Convergent validity has been assessed by means of comparing dimensions of the BSI to clusters on the Min‐
nesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI; Boulet & Boss, 1991; Cundick, 1975). Correlations of these 
comparisons were between .30 and .72 in Cundick’s (1975) study. In Boulet and Boss’s (1991) study, correla‐
tions  between  the  most  relevant  MMPI  and  BSI  subscales  were  found  to  be  moderate,  ranging  from  .50 
(MMPI  Depression  and  BSI  Depression)  to  .53  (MMPI  Hypochondriasis  and  BSI  Somatization).  In  a  clinical 
sample, some of the BSI subscales were significantly correlated with the associated subscales on the BPRS: 
the depression scale on the BSI was significantly correlated to the depressive mood scale on the BPRS (r = 
.69), the anxiety scales on the BSI and BPRS correlated as well (r = .49), and the two hostility scales of both 
measures were also significantly correlated with one another (r = .49; Morlan & Tan, 1998). Overall, mod‐
erate to high correlations with other measures seem to indicate that the BSI does, indeed, have adequate 
convergent validity. 
Table B6 provides the summary statistics for the present study on the BSI scales at each time period. Inter‐
nal consistency estimates for the BSI subscales were strong with Cronbach’s alphas ranging between .71 and 
.91 (M = .85). Test‐retest reliability estimates ranged between .53 and .79 (M = .72) indicating good stability 
within  three  month  testing  intervals.  The  BSI  subscales  showed  reasonable  convergent  validity  as  correla‐
tions  with  other  self‐report  measures  of  the  same  constructs  ranged  between  .15  and  .89  (M  =  .56)  but 
there were lower validity estimates with staff reports with correlations ranging between ‐.01 and .43 (M = .23). 
Table B6. Summary Statistics (M, SD, n) on BSI Scales by Group and Time  
Assessment 
CSP MI 
CSP NMI
GP MI
GP NMI
SCCF 
Anxiety 
 
7.87 (6.52)  3.43 (4.00) 7.30 (5.56) 2.30 (3.15) 9.69 (5.75) 
1 
n = 64 
n = 63 
n = 33 
n = 43 
n = 67 
7.21 (6.01)  2.24 (3.71) 5.56 (5.58) 1.46 (2.65) 7.91 (6.29) 
2 
n = 62 
n = 58 
n = 32 
n = 41 
n = 64 
6.69 (6.50)  2.68 (3.65) 6.25 (5.75) 1.85 (4.19) 7.92 (6.11) 
3 
n = 59 
n = 57 
n = 32 
n = 41 
n = 61 
5.92 (6.39)  2.71 (3.36) 5.17 (5.52) 1.49 (2.21) 8.11 (6.27) 
4 
n = 60 
n = 56 
n = 29 
n = 39 
n = 59 

APPENDICES 

All 
 
6.33 (5.92)
n = 270 
5.14 (5.77)
n = 257 
5.23 (5.88)
n = 250 
4.91 (5.66)
n = 243 

101 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Assessment 

CSP MI 
5.61 (6.25) 
5 
n = 56 
4.84 (5.88) 
6 
n = 51 
Depression 
 
9.32 (6.43) 
1 
n = 63 
7.92 (5.92) 
2 
n = 62 
8.07 (6.94) 
3 
n = 59 
7.18 (6.48) 
4 
n = 60 
7.30 (6.41) 
5 
n = 56 
6.29 (5.98) 
6 
n = 51 
Hostility 
 
 
6.74 (5.20) 
1 
n = 64 
5.66 (4.56) 
2 
n = 62 
5.78 (5.23) 
3 
n = 59 
5.30 (5.50) 
4 
n = 60 
5.61 (5.15) 
5 
n = 56 
4.32 (4.77) 
6 
n = 51 
Interpersonal Sensitivity 
 
5.39 (4.67) 
1 
n = 63 
5.14 (4.02) 
2 
n = 62 
4.62 (4.44) 
3 
n = 60 
4.00 (4.07) 
4 
n = 60 
4.42 (4.21) 
5 
n = 56 
4.13 (4.43) 
6 
n = 51 
Obsessive‐Compulsive 
 
9.76 (6.52) 
1 
n = 64 
8.92 (6.48) 
2 
n = 62 
8.60 (7.16) 
3 
n = 59 
7.87 (6.54) 
4 
n = 60 
8.07 (6.51) 
5 
n = 56 

102 

CSP NMI
2.43 (3.20)
n = 56 
2.78 (3.56)
n = 54 
 
5.94 (5.24)
n = 63 
4.72 (5.05)
n = 58 
4.64 (5.10)
n = 57 
4.27 (4.63)
n = 56 
4.05 (4.76)
n = 56 
3.96 (4.70)
n = 54 
 
4.02 (3.95)
n = 63 
2.53 (3.72)
n = 58 
3.10 (4.04)
n = 57 
3.66 (4.54)
n = 56 
3.45 (4.36)
n = 56 
3.56 (4.64)
n = 54 
 
3.43 (3.22)
n = 63 
2.36 (2.81)
n = 58 
2.44 (3.21)
n = 57 
2.64 (3.11)
n = 56 
2.52 (2.79)
n = 56 
2.24 (2.72)
n = 54 
 
5.41 (4.19)
n = 63 
4.28 (4.09)
n = 58 
4.46 (4.14)
n = 57 
4.75 (96)
n = 56 
4.27 (4.33)
n = 56 

GP MI
4.79 (5.12)
n = 29 

GP NMI
1.08 (1.85)
n = 38 

SCCF
7.47 (5.77)
n = 57 

NA 

NA 

NA 

7.97 (6.34)
n = 33 
6.44 (5.86)
n = 32 
7.38 (6.01)
n = 32 
6.62 (5.25)
n = 29 
5.76 (4.98)
n = 29 

3.24 (3.65)
n = 43 
2.22 (3.49)
n = 41 
2.49 (4.18)
n = 41 
1.95 (2.62)
n = 39 
1.68 (2.58)
n = 38 

11.91 (6.22) 
n = 67 
10.46 (7.02) 
n = 64 
9.87 (7.24)
n = 61 
10.20 (7.28) 
n = 59 
10.07 (7.16) 
n = 57 

NA 

NA 

NA 

5.58 (5.01)
n = 33 
4.34 (3.92)
n = 32 
5.12 (4.16)
n = 32 
5.31 (5.25)
n = 29 
5.17 (4.23)
n = 29 

1.93 (2.77)
n = 43 
1.71 (1.98)
n = 41 
1.71 (2.78)
n = 41 
1.91 (2.64)
n = 39 
1.21 (1.92)
n = 38 

6.50 (5.47)
n = 67 
5.76 (5.22)
n = 64 
6.30 (5.12)
n = 61 
6.64 (6.23)
n = 59 
5.79 (4.96)
n = 57 

NA 

NA 

NA 

5.15 (3.99)
n = 33 
3.72 (3.60)
n = 32 
4.44 (3.99)
n = 32 
3.90 (4.04)
n = 29 
3.41 (3.63)
n = 29 

2.40 (3.43)
n = 43 
1.68 (2.36)
n = 41 
1.27 (2.42)
n = 41 
1.23 (2.04)
n = 39 
0.89 (1.72)
n = 38 

6.91 (3.96)
n = 67 
5.98 (4.04)
n = 64 
6.28 (4.34)
n = 61 
6.39 (4.57)
n = 59 
6.56 (4.33)
n = 57 

NA 

NA 

NA 

10.02 (6.54)
n = 33 
8.31 (5.99)
n = 32 
9.03 (5.86)
n = 32 
8.14 (5.60)
n = 29 
7.59 (5.21)
n = 29 

3.02 (3.29)
n = 43 
2.78 (3.35)
n = 41 
2.66 (3.76)
n = 41 
2.26 (3.19)
n = 39 
2.23 (3.19)
n = 38 

11.03 (5.36) 
n = 67 
10.22 (6.44) 
n = 64 
9.95 (6.66)
n = 61 
10.54 (6.62) 
n = 59 
9.18 (6.36)
n = 57 

All 
4.47 (5.34) 
n = 236 
3.74 (4.91) 
n = 106 
 
8.03 (6.42) 
n = 269 
6.74 (6.34) 
n = 257 
6.73 (6.62) 
n = 250 
6.34 (6.32) 
n = 243 
6.10 (6.28) 
n = 236 
5.05 (5.46) 
n = 106 
 
5.14 (4.95) 
n = 270 
4.19 (4.47) 
n = 257 
4.54 (4.76) 
n = 250 
4.70 (5.31) 
n = 243 
4.38 (4.69) 
n = 236 
3.89 (4.69) 
n = 106 
 
4.80 (4.20) 
n = 269 
4.00 (3.85) 
n = 257 
3.96 (4.19) 
n = 251 
3.81 (4.10) 
n = 243 
3.80 (4.02) 
n = 236 
3.13 (3.75) 
n = 106 
 
8.02 (6.07) 
n = 270 
7.14 (6.18) 
n = 257 
7.06 (6.39) 
n = 250 
6.93 (6.32) 
n = 243 
6.44 (5.95) 
n = 236 

APPENDICES 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Assessment 
6 
Paranoid Ideation 
1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
Phobic Anxiety 
1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
Psychoticism 
1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
Somatization 
1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 

APPENDICES 

CSP MI 
6.96 (6.09) 
n = 51 
 
8.66 (4.78) 
n = 64 
7.71 (4.41) 
n = 62 
7.51 (5.35) 
n = 59 
6.43 (5.06) 
n = 60 
7.10 (5.23) 
n = 56 
6.78 (5.30) 
n = 51 
 
506 (5.18) 
n = 64 
4.60 (5.09) 
n = 62 
4.56 (5.31) 
n = 59 
3.98 (5.50) 
n = 59 
3.84 (4.53) 
n = 56 
3.20 (4.74) 
n = 51 
 
7.30 (5.16) 
n = 63 
6.84 (4.72) 
n = 62 
6.20 (5.16) 
n = 59 
5.06 (4.81) 
n = 60 
5.48 (5.04) 
n = 56 
5.27 (4.64) 
n = 51 
 
7.64 (7.35) 
n = 64 
5.76 (5.63) 
n = 62 
6.12 (6.59) 
n = 59 
5.55 (6.65) 
n = 60 
5.09 (5.18) 
n = 56 
3.74 (5.50) 
n = 51 

CSP NMI
4.23 (4.62)
n = 54 

GP MI

GP NMI

SCCF 

NA 

NA 

NA 

6.68 (4.52)
n = 62 
4.72 (3.95)
n = 58 
4.95 (3.98)
n = 57 
5.24 (4.45)
n = 56 
5.18 (4.73)
n = 56 
5.07 (4.48)
n = 54 

7.94 (5.12)
n = 33 
5.88 (4.93)
n = 32 
6.75 (4.98)
n = 32 
5.31 (3.87)
n = 29 
5.45 (4.73)
n = 29 

4.49 (4.71)
n = 43 
3.56 (3.79)
n = 41 
2.70 (3.63)
n = 41 
3.02 (3.22)
n = 39 
2.47 (3.83)
n = 38 

9.29 (4.90) 
n = 67 
8.78 (5.32) 
n = 64 
9.26 (4.84) 
n = 61 
9.78 (5.39) 
n = 59 
8.56 (4.71) 
n = 57 

NA 

NA 

NA 

1.89 (3.28)
n = 63 
1.43 (2.70)
n = 58 
1.22 (2.48)
n = 57 
1.05 (2.57)
n = 56 
1.27 (2.34)
n = 56 
1.13 (2.84)
n = 54 

3.82 (4.81)
n = 33 
2.72 (3.87)
n = 32 
3.59 (4.65)
n = 32 
2.41 (3.64)
n = 29 
2.3 (3.67)
n = 29 

1.28 (2.37)
n = 43 
0.83 (1.73)
n = 41 
0.86 (1.67)
n = 41 
0.69 (1.30)
n = 39 
0.50 (1.11)
n = 38 

6.15 (5.15) 
n = 67 
4.86 (5.21) 
n = 64 
5.41 (5.22) 
n = 61 
5.47 (4.84) 
n = 59 
4.74 (4.71) 
n = 57 

NA 

NA 

NA 

4.83 (4.26)
n = 63 
3.28 (3.31)
n = 58 
3.32 (3.41)
n = 57 
3.52 (3.34)
n = 56 
3.54 (3.77)
n = 56 
3.14 (3.72)
n = 54 

6.27 (5.20)
n = 33 
5.28 (4.62)
n = 32 
5.44 (4.58)
n = 32 
4.66 (3.70)
n = 29 
4.76 (3.38)
n = 29 

3.23 (3.51)
n = 43 
2.07 (3.09)
n = 41 
2.07 (3.75)
n = 41 
1.90 (2.73)
n = 39 
1.50 (3.16)
n = 38 

9.05 (4.99) 
n = 67 
7.94 (4.93) 
n = 64 
7.90 (5.18) 
n = 61 
8.04 (5.19) 
n = 59 
7.60 (4.81) 
n = 57 

NA 

NA 

NA 

3.89 (5.22)
n = 63 
2.59 (4.27)
n = 58 
3.37 (3.82)
n = 57 
2.93 (4.38)
n = 56 
3.05 (4.35)
n = 56 
2.71 (3.82)
n = 54 

5.21 (5.21)
n = 33 
4.34 (4.45)
n = 32 
5.59 (6.23)
n = 32 
3.58 (3.87)
n = 29 
4.52 (5.12)
n = 29 

2.46 (3.31)
n = 43 
1.61 (2.99)
n = 41 
1.66 (2.97)
n = 41 
1.20 (2.23)
n = 39 
1.47 (3.34)
n = 38 

8.09 (5.76) 
n = 67 
7.07 (5.62) 
n = 64 
6.67 (6.52) 
n = 61 
7.02 (6.50) 
n = 59 
6.30 (6.33) 
n = 57 

NA 

NA 

NA 

All 
5.50 (5.53)
n = 106 
 
7.60 (5.03)
n = 269 
6.41 (4.90)
n = 257 
6.47 (5.11)
n = 250 
6.29 (5.11)
n = 243 
6.05 (5.10)
n = 236 
5.85 (4.96)
n = 106 
 
3.84 (4.75)
n = 270 
3.11 (4.42)
n = 257 
3.28 (4.59)
n = 250 
2.95 (4.44)
n = 242 
2.80 (3.97)
n = 236 
2.11 (3.99)
n = 106 
 
6.38 (5.08)
n = 269 
5.36 (4.76)
n = 257 
5.18 (4.96)
n = 250 
4.87 (4.66)
n = 243 
4.80 (4.67)
n = 236 
4.14 (4.31)
n = 106 
 
5.76 (6.07)
n = 270 
4.53 (5.23)
n = 257 
4.83 (5.77)
n = 250 
4.37 (5.63)
n = 243 
4.24 (5.53)
n = 236 
3.18 (4.70)
n = 106 

103 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Coolidge Correctional Inventory (CCI) 
The Coolidge Correctional Inventory (CCI; Coolidge, 2004) is an adaptation of the Coolidge Axis II Inventory 
(CATI; Coolidge, n.d. a; Coolidge, Segal, Klebe, Cahill, & Whitcomb, 2009) designed for use by CDOC with new 
prison  admissions  to  identify  personality  disorders  and  neuropsychological  problems  among  inmates.  The 
assessment  follows  a  self‐report  format  with  a  4‐point  scale  (1—strongly  false  to  4—strongly  true)  across 
250 items. Scores are obtained for a total of 33 different scales (Coolidge et al., 2009) based on the Ameri‐
can Psychiatric Association’s (2000) diagnostic criteria (DSM‐IV‐TR). The CCI can be used to assess 14 perso‐
nality disorders – 10 from the DSM‐IV‐TR Axis II,  2 from the DSM‐IV‐TR (American Psychiatric Association, 
2000)  appendix,  and  2  from  the  DSM‐III  Axis  II  (American  Psychiatric  Association,  1980;  Coolidge  et  al., 
2009). The personality disorders assessed by the CCI are as follows: Antisocial, Avoidant, Borderline, Depen‐
dent, Depressive, Histrionic, Narcissistic, Obsessive‐Compulsive, Paranoid, Passive‐Aggressive, Sadistic, Schi‐
zoid, Schizotypal, and Self‐Defeating. Furthermore, the CCI is used to assess other psychological and neurop‐
sychological problems and syndromes (i.e., Introversion‐Extroversion, Maladjustment, Executive Functions, 
Decision  Difficulty,  Planning  Problems, Neuropsychological  Dysfunction,  Language,  Memory,  Neurosomatic 
Issues, Hostility‐Anger, Hostility‐Danger, Hostility‐Impulsivity, Hypersensitivity, Drug and Alcohol Problems) 
as  well  as  five  selected  Axis  I  scales  and  associated  subscales  (i.e.,  ADHD,  Post‐Traumatic  Stress  Disorder, 
Psychotic  Thinking,  Schizophrenia,  Social  Phobia,  Withdrawal,  Anxiety,  and  Depression;  Coolidge  et  al., 
2009). The CCI also has response validity scales available. For this study, the CCI personality disorders and 
Axis I scales were used as potential predictors of outcomes.  
The Cronbach’s alphas for the CCI’s subscales were found to be acceptable within prison populations, with a 
median Cronbach’s alpha of .78 for the personality subscales (range = .65 ‐ .86) in a sample of 3,962 inmates 
(Coolidge et al., 2009) and a median Cronbach’s alpha of .75 (range = .47 ‐ .84) in a sample of 3,090 inmates 
(Whitcomb, 2006). Mean scores on the personality disorders subscales of the CCI ranged from 42.76 (SD = 
8.59)  to  54.27  (SD  =  10.88),  with  a  median  of  47.67  (Coolidge  et  al.,  2009).  In  another  study,  Whitcomb 
(2006) found mean scores ranging from 41.25 (SD = 9.47) to 58.80 (SD = 9.97) for violent offenders and from 
41.38 (SD = 9.50) to 58.71 (SD = 9.29) for nonviolent offenders.  
Because the CCI is an adaptation of the CATI and little research has been done on the CCI, test‐retest reliabil‐
ity as well as convergent validity can, at the very least, be evaluated for the CATI as it measures many of the 
same components as the CCI but was not designed for correctional populations (Coolidge, n.d. a, Coolidge, 
n.d. b). One‐week test‐retest reliabilities were found to be strong, with an average correlation of .90 for the 
personality  disorders  (Coolidge,  n.d.  b).  Scores  on  personality  disorder  scales  of  the  CATI  were  correlated 
with scores on the respective Brief Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory II (MCMI‐II) scales (range = .10 to .87; 
Mdn = .58; Coolidge, n.d. b). 
Cronbach’s alphas for the single assessment period of the CCI were varied with values ranging between .46 
and .88 (M = .74). The majority of the internal consistency estimates were greater than .70 with lower esti‐
mates for Histrionic (.66), Self‐defeating (.64), Schizoid (.55), and Impulsivity (.46) scales.  
Deliberate Self‐Harm Inventory (DSHI) 
In order to assess self‐harming behavior in inmates who participated in this study, we used the Deliberate 
Self‐Harm Inventory (DSHI; Gratz, 2001; Gratz & Chapman, 2007). The DSHI is a 17‐item measure that ques‐
tions respondents about various self‐harming behaviors. Engagement in as well as frequency of engagement 

104 

APPENDICES 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
in different self‐harming behaviors are assessed. At the first testing session in this study, participants were 
asked about their lifetime history of deliberate self‐harm. Specifically, they were asked to indicate whether 
they have ever engaged in the various self‐harming behaviors and, if so, how old they were when they first 
engaged in the activity, how many times they engaged in the activity, when they most recently engaged in 
the behavior, how many years they engaged in the behavior, and whether engaging in the activity ever led 
to required medical treatment and/or hospitalization. Completion of this assessment takes most people less 
than 5 minutes (Fliege et al., 2006). For this study, self‐harming behavior was coded as a dichotomous varia‐
ble; a self‐harm total score was computed by summing the yes/no responses across the 17 self‐harming be‐
haviors.  Additionally,  the  DSHI  was  administered  at  the  last  testing  period  for  some  of  the  participants; 
however, the number of participants was small and those assessments were not used in this report. 
Internal consistency reliability for the DSHI in clinical populations was found to be .81, with a split‐half corre‐
lation of .78 (Fliege et al., 2006). Item‐total correlations in Fliege et al.’s (2006) study were between .23 and 
.55. Item‐total correlations in a nonclinical sample ranged from .00 to .65, with a median item‐total correla‐
tion of .45 (Gratz, 2001). Two‐ to four‐week test‐retest reliability was acceptable at .91 in a clinical popula‐
tion (Fliege et al., 2006) and at .68 in a nonclinical population (Gratz, 2001). Among a nonclinical population, 
the internal consistency coefficient was .82 for the DSHI (Gratz, 2001). Gratz also assessed the convergent 
validity of the DSHI, finding significant moderate correlations with other self‐harm measures (range = .35 to 
.49),  such  as  the  mental  health  history  self‐harm  item,  Diagnostic  Interview  for  Borderlines‐Revised  self‐
harm item, and Suicide Behaviors Questionnaire self‐harm item.  
For the current sample, the internal consistency estimate for the DSHI with dichotomous responses on the 
17 items was acceptable at .84. Table B7 provides the proportion of people who responded yes to each item 
and summary statistics for the total score.  
Table B7. Summary Statistics for the DSHI Items and Total Score 
Item 
CSP MI CSP NMI
Cutting 
47%
17%
Burn with cigarette 
44%
19%
Burn with match/lighter 
33%
14%
Carved words into skin 
16%
14%
Carved pictures into skin 
14%
14%
Purposefully scratched 
14%
5%
Bitten self (broke skin) 
9%
2%
Rubbed sandpaper on body 
3%
3%
Dripped acid on skin 
3%
0%
Used bleach, comet, oven cleaner to scrub skin
6%
2%
Stuck sharp objects into skin  
30%
11%
Rubbed glass into skin 
5%
0%
Broken own bones 
5%
2%
Banged head 
20%
5%
Punched self 
11%
3%
Prevented wounds from healing 
8%
0%
Any other self‐harm 
34%
8%
3.05 
1.19 
Total M (SD) 
(3.43) 
(1.82) 

GP MI
33%
24%
24%
21%
15%
6%
3%
0%
0%
0%
9%
0%
0%
18%
9%
3%
18%
1.85 
(2.28) 

GP NMI 
5% 
12% 
9% 
5% 
2% 
0% 
0% 
0% 
2% 
0% 
2% 
0% 
0% 
2% 
2% 
2% 
0% 
0.46 
(1.44) 

SCCF
61%
25%
22%
25%
18%
24%
18%
9%
3%
4%
28%
6%
6%
27%
13%
16%
42%
3.50 
(3.48) 

All
35%
26%
21%
17%
13%
11%
7%
4%
2%
3%
18%
3%
3%
15%
8%
7%
23%
2.17 
(2.96) 

Note. Item statistics are the percentage of persons who indicated a history of the self‐harm behavior over their lifetime prior to the 
study. 

 
APPENDICES 

 

105 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Personality Assessment Screener (PAS) 
The  PAS  is  a  quick  and  effective  screening  tool  that  gauges  the  social  functioning  of  an  individual  globally 
and across 10 subscales (viz., Negative Affect, Acting Out, Health Problems, Psychotic Features, Social With‐
drawal,  Hostile  Control,  Suicidal  Thinking,  Alienation,  Alcohol  Problem,  Anger  Control;  Harrison  &  Rogers, 
2007). The alcohol problem subscale was not included in this study because it was not a construct of inter‐
est. The PAS is a 22‐item screening measure that was originally derived from the larger Personality Assess‐
ment Inventory (Morey, 1991). Respondents rate each statement on a 4‐point scale (F—false, ST—slightly 
true,  MT—mostly  true,  VT—very  true);  higher  scores  on  this  measure  indicate  greater  severity  of  clinical 
problems  (Morey,  1997)  or  problems  with  impression  management,  as  Holden,  Book,  Edwards,  Wasylkiw, 
and Starzyk (2003) termed it. In order to complete this test, a 4th grade reading level is required; it should 
take no longer than 5 minutes to complete this assessment (Morey, 1997). For this study, raw scores rather 
than P‐scores were evaluated. 
Levels of internal consistency reliability are acceptable for the PAS total score as well as for subscale scores. In a 
sample of county jail inmates (N = 100), the Cronbach’s alpha was .74 (Harrison & Rogers, 2007) for total scores 
but lower for subscales, which is likely due to the small number of items (2) on each subscale. Despite the low 
number of items on each subscale, 6 of the 10 subscales exhibited alpha coefficients of .60 or greater (i.e., Nega‐
tive Affect, Health Problems, Psychotic Features, Social Withdrawal, Suicidal Thinking, and Alienation; Harrison & 
Rogers, 2007); alpha coefficients on the remaining subscales were not provided in Harrison and Rogers’ (2007) 
study. Alpha coefficients for the PAS total score have also been assessed in clinical and nonclinical samples. In a 
nonclinical sample, internal consistency was found to be .75 for the total score and ranged between .34 (i.e., Al‐
cohol Problem) and .68 (i.e., Suicidal Thinking) for subscales (Morey, 1997). In a clinical sample, internal consis‐
tency was found to be .79 for the total score and ranged between .48 and .84 for subscales (Morey, 1997). 
Both the total score and subscale scores were assessed to have good test‐retest reliability. For a nonclinical 
sample, 1‐month test‐retest reliability was .89 for the total PAS score and ranged between .66 and .92 for 
the subscales (Morey, 1997), with a median test‐retest reliability of .77 across subscales. For a clinical sam‐
ple, 1‐month test‐retest reliability was .85 for the total PAS score and ranged between .47 and .81 for the 
subscales (Morey, 1997), with a median test‐retest reliability of .66 across subscales.  
Normative  data  on  the  PAS  are  available  for  both  clinical  and  nonclinical  populations.  The  mean  raw  PAS 
total score for a nonclinical, community sample was found to be 16.66 (SD = 7.40; Morey, 1997). Mean raw 
scores  on  subscales  ranged  from  .37  (SD  =  .94)  to  4.05  (SD  =  .54;  Holden  et  al.,  2003;  Morey,  1997).  The 
mean raw PAS total score for a clinical sample was found to be 25.83 (SD = 9.99; Morey, 1997). Mean raw 
scores on subscales ranged from 1.19 (SD = 1.53) to 4.99 (SD = 2.48; Morey, 1997). Additionally, the PAS has 
shown  good  convergent  validity  (Morey,  1997).  The  total  score  on  the  PAS  has  been  positively  correlated 
with scores on the PAI and MMPI (Gondolf, 2008; Morey, 1997). Furthermore, adequate convergent validity 
has also been shown for the different subscales of the PAS (Gondolf, 2008; Morey, 1997). 
Table B8 provides the summary statistics for the study groups on the PAS scales at each time period. Cron‐
bach’s alphas were computed to assess internal consistency reliability with coefficients ranging between .27 
and .95 (M = .64). These estimates were somewhat lower than those found in the literature. The lowest re‐
liability estimates were for the Acting Out and Hostile Control subscales. Test‐retest correlation coefficients 
ranged between .54 and .84 (M = .69). Correlations of the PAS subscales with other self‐report measures of 

106 

APPENDICES 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
the same construct ranged between .34 and .67 (M = .50) and with correctional officer and clinician ratings 
the correlations ranged between .08 and .34 (M = .21). 
 
Table B8. Summary Statistics (M, SD, n) on PAS Scales by Group and Time  
Assessment 
CSP MI 
CSP NMI
GP MI
GP NMI
SCCF
Acting Out 
 
 
6.38 (1.94)  6.40 (2.06) 7.24 (1.85) 6.40 (1.90) 6.79 (1.74)
Time 1 
n = 64 
n = 63 
n = 33 
n = 43 
n = 67 
6.21 (2.07)  6.01 (1.99) 6.66 (1.94) 6.29 (1.93) 6.26 (1.88)
Time 2 
n = 62 
n = 59 
n = 32 
n = 41 
n = 64 
5.98 (2.04)  5.79 (2.15) 6.81 (1.49) 5.95 (2.12) 6.03 (1.97)
Time 3 
n = 60 
n = 57 
n = 32 
n = 41 
n = 61 
5.80 (2.07)  5.84 (2.21) 6.48 (1.57) 5.51 (2.39) 6.23 (2.02)
Time 4 
n = 60 
n = 56 
n = 29 
n = 39 
n = 59 
5.52 (2.25)  6.07 (2.21) 6.66 (1.26) 5.78 (1.89) 6.32 (2.15)
Time 5 
n = 56 
n = 56 
n = 29 
n = 38 
n = 57 
5.81 (2.42)  6.15 (206)
Time 6 
NA 
NA 
NA 
n = 51 
n = 54 
Alienation 
 
 
3.44 (1.96)  3.08 (1.71) 3.88 (1.71) 2.63 (1.83) 4.06 (1.94)
Time 1 
n = 63 
n = 63 
n = 33 
n = 43 
n = 67 
4.12 (1.73)  3.41 (1.92) 3.84 (1.48) 2.93 (1.65) 4.42 (1.73)
Time 2 
n = 60 
n = 59 
n = 32 
n = 41 
n = 64 
3.92 (1.82)  3.35 (1.88) 4.06 (1.41) 2.83 (1.67) 4.44 (1.68)
Time 3 
n = 60 
n = 57 
n = 32 
n = 41 
n = 61 
3.86 (1.81)  3.55 (1.90) 3.32 (1.47) 2.85 (1.71) 4.58 (1.45)
Time 4 
n = 59 
n = 56 
n = 28 
n = 39 
n = 59 
3.86 (1.66)  3.45 (1.84) 3.48 (1.30) 2.84 (1.79) 4.46 (1.42)
Time 5 
n = 56 
n = 56 
n = 29 
n = 37 
n = 57 
3.78 (1.79)  3.52 (1.79)
Time 6 
NA 
NA 
NA 
n = 51 
n = 54 
 
 
Anger Control 
3.52 (1.82)  2.79 (1.63) 3.06 (1.69) 2.19 (1.30) 2.92 (1.78)
Time 1 
n = 64 
n = 63 
n = 33 
n = 43 
n = 67 
3.39 (1.83)  2.47 (1.56) 2.91 (1.78) 2.10 (1.18) 3.03 (1.94)
Time 2 
n = 62 
n = 58 
n = 32 
n = 41 
n = 64 
3.38 (1.76)  2.70 (1.65) 2.81 (1.47) 2.12 (1.42) 3.02 (1.78)
Time 3 
n = 60 
n = 56 
n = 32 
n = 41 
n = 61 
3.24 (1.72)  2.61 (1.67) 2.66 (1.54) 2.08 (1.44) 2.90 (1.87)
Time 4 
n = 59 
n = 56 
n = 29 
n = 39 
n = 59 
3.09 (1.69)  2.55 (1.49) 2.96 (1.73) 2.18 (1.61) 2.89 (1.75)
Time 5 
n = 56 
n = 56 
n = 28 
n = 38 
n = 57 
2.98 (1.61)  2.52 (1.66)
Time 6 
NA 
NA 
NA 
n = 51 
n = 54 
Health Problems 
 
 
2.00 (1.62)  1.24 (1.64) 2.30 (1.78) 1.28 (1.79) 2.94 (1.70)
Time 1 
n = 64 
n = 63 
n = 33 
n = 43 
n = 67 
2.05 (2.02)  1.12 (1.66) 1.84 (1.72) 1.17 (1.32) 2.84 (1.64)
Time 2 
n = 61 
n = 58 
n = 32 
n = 41 
n = 64 
2.43 (1.97)  1.18 (1.69) 1.91 (1.75) 1.05 (1.24) 2.54 (1.53)
Time 3 
n = 60 
n = 56 
n = 32 
n = 41 
n = 61 
1.95 (1.66)  1.07 (1.26) 1.62 (1.29) 0.95 (1.10) 2.60 (1.67)
Time 4 
n = 59 
n = 56 
n = 29 
n = 39 
n = 58 

APPENDICES 

All 
 
6.59 (1.91) 
n = 270 
6.24 (1.96) 
n = 258 
6.05 (2.01) 
n = 251 
5.95 (2.10) 
n = 243 
6.02 (2.08) 
n = 236 
5.96 (2.25) 
n = 106 
 
3.43 (1.90) 
n = 269 
3.80 (1.80) 
n = 256 
3.76 (1.80) 
n = 251 
3.74 (1.78) 
n = 241 
3.70 (1.70) 
n = 235 
3.64 (1.78) 
n = 106 
 
2.93 (1.72) 
n = 270 
2.82 (1.75) 
n = 257 
2.86 (1.69) 
n = 250 
2.75 (1.72) 
n = 242 
2.75 (1.67) 
n = 235 
2.74 (1.63) 
n = 106 
 
1.98 (1.81) 
n = 270 
1.87 (1.83) 
n = 256 
1.88 (1.77) 
n = 250 
1.70 (1.58) 
n = 241 

107 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Assessment 

CSP MI 
2.02 (1.93) 
Time 5 
n = 54 
1.96 (1.65) 
Time 6 
n = 50 
Hostile Control 
 
3.35 (1.76) 
Time 1 
n = 62 
3.00 (1.67) 
Time 2 
n = 61 
2.78 (1.61) 
Time 3 
n = 60 
2.85 (1.63) 
Time 4 
n = 59 
2.87 (1.60) 
Time 5 
n = 55 
2.90 (1.78) 
Time 6 
n = 50 
Negative Affect 
 
4.89 (2.48) 
Time 1 
n = 64 
4.79 (2.06) 
Time 2 
n = 62 
4.50 (2.20) 
Time 3 
n = 60 
4.68 (2.35) 
Time 4 
n = 60 
4.09 (2.32) 
Time 5 
n = 56 
3.94 (2.14) 
Time 6 
n = 51 
Psychotic Features 
 
1.95 (1.54) 
Time 1 
n = 64 
1.90 (1.68) 
Time 2 
n = 61 
2.05 (1.82) 
Time 3 
n = 60 
1.80 (1.64) 
Time 4 
n = 60 
2.04 (1.70) 
Time 5 
n = 56 
1.74 (1.82) 
Time 6 
n = 51 
 
Social Withdrawal 
3.14 (1.74) 
Time 1 
n = 64 
3.53 (1.82) 
Time 2 
n = 62 
3.30 (1.82) 
Time 3 
n = 60 
3.52 (1.69) 
Time 4 
n = 60 
3.13 (1.77) 
Time 5 
n = 56 

108 

CSP NMI 
0.94 (1.13) 
n = 55 
1.17 (1.38) 
n = 54 
 
3.44 (1.62) 
n = 63 
3.26 (1.50) 
n = 58 
3.32 (1.66) 
n = 57 
3.29 (1.50) 
n = 55 
3.18 (1.54) 
n = 55 
3.17 (1.60) 
n = 53 
 
3.40 (1.56) 
n = 63 
3.06 (1.88) 
n = 59 
3.17 (1.74) 
n = 57 
3.21 (1.99) 
n = 56 
3.18 (1.88) 
n = 56 
3.06 (1.73) 
n = 54 
 
1.46 (1.51) 
n = 63 
1.24 (1.28) 
n = 59 
1.23 (1.27) 
n = 57 
1.38 (1.45) 
n = 56 
1.45 (1.55) 
n = 55 
1.33 (1.24) 
n = 54 
 
2.28 (1.42) 
n = 63 
2.51 (1.68) 
n = 59 
2.43 (1.69) 
n = 56 
2.68 (1.65) 
n = 56 
2.55 (1.62) 
n = 56 

GP MI
2.00 (1.58)
n = 29 

GP NMI
0.97 (1.28)
n = 38 

SCCF
2.53 (1.59)
n = 57 

NA 

NA 

NA 

2.76 (1.58)
n = 33 
2.91 (1.55)
n = 32 
2.81 (1.45)
n = 32 
3.17 (1.07)
n = 29 
2.76 (1.33)
n = 29 

3.28 (1.45)
n = 42 
3.07 (1.37)
n = 41 
3.17 (1.46)
n = 41 
3.13 (1.32)
n = 39 
3.16 (1.52)
n = 38 

2.61 (1.75)
n = 67 
2.11 (1.44)
n = 64 
2.48 (1.51)
n = 61 
2.51 (1.60)
n = 59 
2.16 (1.36)
n = 55 

NA 

NA 

NA 

4.73 (2.30)
n = 33 
4.56 (2.50)
n = 32 
4.59 (2.11)
n = 32 
4.07 (1.93)
n = 29 
4.17 (1.98)
n = 29 

2.64 (1.64)
n = 43 
2.68 (1.88)
n = 41 
2.34 (1.77)
n = 41 
2.38 (1.60)
n = 39 
2.21 (1.51)
n = 38 

5.60 (2.32)
n = 67 
5.08 (2.16)
n = 64 
4.95 (2.33)
n = 61 
5.36 (2.31)
n = 59 
5.12 (2.25)
n = 57 

NA 

NA 

NA 

1.91 (1.55)
n = 33 
1.62 (1.74)
n = 32 
1.59 (1.62)
n = 32 
1.00 (.92)
n = 29 
1.28 (1.13)
n = 29 

0.95 (1.25)
n = 43 
0.85 (1.11)
n = 41 
0.93 (1.33)
n = 41 
1.03 (1.20)
n = 39 
0.79 (1.23)
n = 38 

2.31 (1.88)
n = 65 
2.17 (2.05)
n = 64 
2.38 (1.72)
n = 60 
2.30 (1.87)
n = 59 
2.14 (1.92)
n = 57 

NA 

NA 

NA 

2.91 (1.88)
n = 33 
2.75 (1.87)
n = 32 
2.91 (1.61)
n = 32 
2.72 (1.41)
n = 29 
2.66 (1.37)
n = 29 

2.05 (1.68)
n = 43 
2.20 (1.42)
n = 41 
2.05 (1.38)
n = 40 
2.31 (1.73)
n = 39 
2.26 (1.62)
n = 38 

3.46 (1.88)
n = 67 
3.61 (1.81)
n = 64 
3.73 (1.66)
n = 60 
3.48 (1.66)
n = 58 
3.82 (1.75)
n = 56 

All 
1.72 (1.66) 
n = 233 
1.53 (1.56) 
n = 105 
 
3.10 (1.68) 
n = 267 
2.84 (1.56) 
n = 256 
2.90 (1.57) 
n = 251 
2.95 (1.50) 
n = 241 
2.81 (1.52) 
n = 232 
3.04 (1.68) 
n = 104 
 
4.34 (2.35) 
n = 270 
4.10 (2.28) 
n = 258 
3.97 (2.26) 
n = 251 
4.06 (2.34) 
n = 243 
3.83 (2.26) 
n = 236 
3.50 (1.98) 
n = 106 
 
1.76 (1.64) 
n = 268 
1.61 (1.69) 
n = 257 
1.70 (1.66) 
n = 250 
1.60 (1.59) 
n = 243 
1.63 (1.66) 
n = 235 
1.52 (1.56) 
n = 106 
 
2.82 (1.78) 
n = 270 
3.01 (1.81) 
n = 258 
2.96 (1.76) 
n = 248 
3.02 (1.71) 
n = 242 
2.96 (1.74) 
n = 2356 

APPENDICES 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Assessment 

CSP MI 
CSP NMI
3.16 (1.76)  2.57 (1.60)
Time 6 
n = 50 
n = 53 
Suicidal Thinking 
 
 
0.95 (1.64)  0.35 (1.12)
Time 1 
n = 62 
n = 62 
0.93 (1.63)  0.29 (.90)
Time 2 
n = 61 
n = 58 
0.83 (1.59)  0.21 (.86)
Time 3 
n = 58 
n = 57 
1.03 (1.83)  0.21 (.97)
Time 4 
n = 60 
n = 56 
0.87 (1.62)  0.20 (.80)
Time 5 
n = 55 
n = 56 
0.86 (1.71)  0.26 (1.08)
Time 6 
n = 51 
n = 53 

GP MI

GP NMI

SCCF

NA 

NA 

NA 

0.53 (1.08)
n = 32 
0.53 (1.22)
n = 32 
0.62 (1.36)
n = 32 
0.52 (1.30)
n = 29 
0.52 (1.30)
n = 29 

0.05 (.21)
n = 43 
0.05 (.31)
n = 41 
0.10 (.49)
n = 41 
0.02 (.16)
n = 39 
0.10 (.51)
n = 38 

2.64 (2.27)
n = 67 
2.41 (2.36)
n = 64 
2.31 (2.40)
n = 61 
2.39 (2.24)
n = 59 
2.02 (2.00)
n = 57 

NA 

NA 

NA 

All 
2.88 (1.70) 
n = 104 
 
1.04 (1.81) 
n = 266 
0.96 (1.78) 
n = 256 
0.90 (1.77) 
n = 249 
0.95 (1.80) 
n = 243 
0.82 (1.58) 
n = 235 
0.55 (1.44) 
n = 105 

Prison Behavior Rating Scale (PBRS) 
The PBRS was developed by Cooke (1998) for correctional staff to rate inmates’ behaviors in prison. While 
the use of the PBRS in U.S. prisons has been limited, we were unable to find another rating scale that could 
be  easily  used  by  correctional  staff  to  record  direct  observations  of  inmates’  behaviors.  The  PBRS  is  a  36‐
item  measure  comprising  three  subscales:  Anti‐Authority,  Anxious‐Depressed,  and  Dull‐Confused.  Higher 
scores on the PBRS indicate worse behavior assessments of inmates by officers. Correctional staff use a 4‐
point rating scale (0—never/rarely, 1—sometimes, 2—often, 3—most of the time) to rate the inmates’ beha‐
viors within the 4 weeks preceding the assessment. The PBRS was modified to use language that was more 
relevant for a United States sample; the questionnaire is given in Appendix A.  
The PBRS demonstrated adequate internal consistency reliability across the three subscales in a sample of 
467  male  prisoners:  .91  for  Anti‐Authority,  .84  for  Anxious‐Depressed,  and  .72  for  Dull‐Confused  (Cooke, 
1998). Cooke also demonstrated good test‐retest reliability over 2 to 3 weeks, with .76 for Anti‐Authority, 
.86 for Anxious‐Depressed, and .82 for Dull‐Confused.  
Table B9 provides the summary statistics for the study groups on the PBRS scales at each time period. Inter‐
nal consistency estimates for the PBRS scales at each time period are provided in Table B10. These alphas 
indicate strong internal consistency with a mean alpha of .90. Correlations between sequential time periods 
are provided in Table B11. Correlations between the first and second testing  intervals tended to have  the 
weakest correlation coefficients (M = .16); this period is when many of the participants switched facilities so 
there  was  a  change  in  raters  who  may  lack  familiarity  with  the  participants.  Correlations  between  PBRS 
scales and relevant clinician ratings were low (range = .08 to .24, M = .19) as they were with self‐report as‐
sessments (range = ‐.07 to .27, M = .10). Although the PBRS shows strong internal consistency estimates and 
some evidence for test‐retest reliability, it does not relate well with other measures of similar constructs.  
 

APPENDICES 

 

109 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Table B9. Summary Statistics (M, SD, n) on PBRS Scales by Group and Time  
Assessment 
CSP MI 
CSP NMI
GP MI
GP NMI
Anti‐Authority 
 
 
7.62 (7.37) 
7.68 (7.33)
6.05 (5.67)
6.28 (7.39)
Time 1 
n = 63 
n = 63 
n = 26 
n = 36 
6.21 (7.40) 
5.48 (6.67)
7.06 (5.07)
8.02 (6.96)
Time 2 
n = 61 
n = 59 
n = 28 
n = 35 
6.17 (7.40) 
3.73 (4.75)
9.01 (9.05)
6.92 (6.29)
Time 3 
n = 57 
n = 56 
n = 28 
n = 34 
4.02 (5.84) 
4.56 (4.88)
6.85 (7.96)
8.66 (6.32)
Time 4 
n = 59 
n = 55 
n = 26 
n = 31 
4.88 (6.42) 
3.32 (4.38)
7.30 (9.92)
7.63 (7.37)
Time 5 
n = 56 
n = 54 
n = 27 
n = 36 
3.90 (5.11) 
2.48 (4.27)
Time 6 
NA 
NA 
n = 49 
n = 54 
 
 
Anxious‐Depressed 
6.87 (7.26) 
3.56 (4.61)
4.08 (5.73)
2.89 (3.59)
Time 1 
n = 64 
n = 63 
n = 26 
n = 36 
4.39 (5.81) 
2.00 (3.42)
5.24 (6.58)
3.59 (4.08)
Time 2 
n = 61 
n = 59 
n = 28 
n = 34 
3.14 (4.10) 
1.51 (2.72)
5.81 (3.91)
3.97 (3.64)
Time 3 
n = 57 
n = 56 
n = 28 
n = 33 
3.41 (4.49) 
1.51 (3.29)
3.59 (4.37)
8.66 (5.06)
Time 4 
n = 59 
n = 55 
n = 26 
n = 30 
3.45 (4.57) 
1.74 (3.21)
3.70 (4.90)
3.51 (5.39)
Time 5 
n = 55 
n = 54 
n = 27 
n = 35 
4.00 (5.24) 
1.63 (3.06)
Time 6 
NA 
NA 
n = 48 
n = 54 
 
 
Dull‐Confused 
3.80 (4.04) 
2.14 (2.90)
6.05 (5.67)
6.28 (7.39)
Time 1 
n = 64 
n = 63 
n = 26 
n = 36 
3.08 (4.01) 
1.38 (2.44)
7.06 (5.07)
8.02 (6.96)
Time 2 
n = 61 
n = 58 
n = 28 
n = 34 
2.35 (2.93) 
0.93 (1.23)
9.01 (9.05)
6.92 (6.29)
Time 3 
n = 57 
n = 56 
n = 28 
n = 33 
2.78 (3.55) 
0.96 (1.41)
6.85 (7.96)
8.66 (6.32)
Time 4 
n = 59 
n = 55 
n = 26 
n = 31 
2.64 (3.43) 
1.05 (1.56)
7.30 (9.92)
7.63 (7.37)
Time 5 
n = 55 
n = 53 
n = 27 
n = 35 
3.12 (3.64) 
1.37 (2.64)
Time 6 
NA 
NA 
n = 49 
n = 54 
Total Score 
 
 
18.53 (15.94)  13.53 (12.84) 13.17 (13.80) 11.06 (11.93)
Time 1 
n = 64 
n = 63 
n = 26 
n = 36 
13.98 (14.41)  9.00 (11.15) 15.12 (12.58) 13.64 (10.66)
Time 2 
n = 61 
n = 59 
n = 28 
n = 34 
11.90 (13.52)  6.23 (7.60)
17.77 (12.88) 13.27(9.58)
Time 3 
n = 57 
n = 56 
n = 28 
n = 33 
10.55 (11.75)  7.10 (7.44)
12.63 (12.74) 14.45 (11.97)
Time 4 
n = 59 
n = 55 
n = 26 
n = 30 
11.10 (12.04)  6.38 (7.35)
12.26 (14.76) 13.54 (14.87)
Time 5 
n = 55 
n = 54 
n = 27 
n = 35 
10.94 (12.11)  6.38 (7.35)
Time 6 
NA 
NA 
n = 48 
n = 54 

110 

SCCF 
 
2.90 (5.51) 
n = 67 
4.59 (5.34) 
n = 64 
4.75 (5.62) 
n = 51 
5.34 (6.24) 
n = 55 
6.00 (7.14) 
n = 54 
NA 
 
5.25 (5.06) 
n = 67 
5.25 (5.06) 
n = 256 
6.31 (5.46) 
n = 246 
5.73 (4.73) 
n = 224 
6.36 (6.20) 
n = 224 
NA 
 
3.51 (3.94) 
n = 67 
4.18 (4.05) 
n = 64 
3.84 (3.63) 
n = 51 
4.01 (3.96) 
n = 54 
4.69 (4.82) 
n = 54 
NA 
 
11.90 (13.52) 
n = 67 
15.43 (12.16) 
n = 64 
14.65 (11.77) 
n = 51 
15.96 (15.24) 
n = 54 
18.39 (16.48) 
n = 54 
NA 

All
6.05 (6.99)
n = 255 
5.97 (6.19)
n = 247 
5.71 (6.68)
n = 226 
5.43 (6.21)
n = 225 
5.50 (6.98)
n = 227 
3.15 (4.72)
n = 103 
4.79 (5.65)
n = 256 
4.30 (5.32)
n = 246 
3.76 (4.18)
n = 224 
3.73 (5.04)
n = 224 
3.99 (5.40)
n = 225 
2.74 (4.37)
n = 102 
2.94 (3.50)
n = 256 
2.78 (3.50)
n = 245 
2.36 (2.85)
n = 225 
2.45 (3.29)
n = 225 
2.54 (3.65)
n = 224 
2.20 (3.26)
n = 103 
13.97 (14.01)
n = 256 
13.25 (12.54)
n = 246 
12.05 (11.58)
n = 225 
11.77 (12.34)
n = 224 
12.24 (13.74)
n = 225 
8.06 (10.53)
n = 102 

APPENDICES 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Table B10. Internal Consistency Estimates (Cronbach’s alpha) for PBRS 
Scales at each Time Period 
PBRS Scale 
Time 1  Time 2  Time 3 Time 4 Time 5 Time 6
Anti‐Authority 
.94 
.93 
.94
.94
.95
.90
Anxious‐Depressed 
.90 
.90 
.94
.90
.90
.90
Dull‐Confused 
.84 
.84 
.78
.85
.87
.82
Total  
.95 
.94 
.94
.95
.95
.94
 
Table B11. Test­retest Correlations between Consecutive 
Time Periods for each PBRS Subscale 
Measure 
T1–T2  T2–T3  T3–T4 T4–T5 T5–T6
Anti‐Authority 
.24 
.36 
.33
.55
.59
Anxious‐Depressed 
.14 
.33 
.46
.58
.48
Dull‐Confused 
.08 
.38 
.39
.55
.31
Total  
.16 
.38 
.42
.66
.51

Prison Symptom Inventory (PSI) 
The PSI was created by the research staff for this study to measure variables that were not assessed by oth‐
er existing psychological measures but were thought to be important in association with long‐term segrega‐
tion. Using the literature concerning the impact of AS on psychological functioning (e.g., Grassian, 1983; Ha‐
ney, 2003), questions were written to assess symptoms associated with this form of confinement, including 
nervousness,  headaches,  lethargy,  chronic  tiredness,  trouble  sleeping,  a  sense  of  impending  breakdown, 
perspiring  hands,  heart  palpitations,  dizziness,  nightmares,  trembling  hands,  and  fainting.  Furthermore, 
questions  about  exercise,  grooming,  and  safety  issues  within  administration  segregation  were  included  in 
the PSI. The scale has 39 items, rated on a 6‐point scale (0‐ never true to 5‐ always true). Questions were 
grouped into the following nine areas: fear level, safety, panic disorder, sensitivity to external stimuli, physi‐
cal hygiene, physical well‐being and exercise, mental well‐being, mutism, and attitudes about administrative 
segregation. The questionnaire is given in Appendix A. 
Three subscales were used as part of the major constructs of interest: panic disorder as a measure of anxie‐
ty, sensitivity to external stimuli as a measure of hypersensitivity, and physical well‐being and exercise as a 
measure of somatization. Fear level, safety, and attitudes about segregation subscales were used as predic‐
tors of how people changed over time, rather than as outcome variables. Analyses comparing groups on all 
of the PSI scales are included in Appendix C. Table B12 provides the summary statistics for the study groups 
on PSI scales at each time period.  
Table B12. Summary Statistics (M, SD, n) on PSI Scales by Group and Time  
Assessment 
CSP MI 
CSP NMI
GP MI
GP NMI
Attitudes about Segregation 
 
2.95 (3.19) 
1.68 (2.57)
2.46 (3.00)
1.00 (2.10)
Time 1 
n = 57 
n = 56 
n = 28 
n = 30 
2.97 (3.54) 
1.68 (2.63)
2.24 (2.76)
1.54 (2.42)
Time 2 
n = 61 
n = 56 
n = 25 
n = 26 
3.02 (3.36) 
1.04 (2.39)
2.04 (2.30)
1.22 (1.60)
Time 3 
n = 55 
n = 56 
n = 25 
n = 27 
2.60 (3.21) 
1.29 (2.43)
1.91 (2.45)
1.83 (2.58)
Time 4 
n = 55 
n = 55 
n = 22 
n = 24 
3.12 (3.51) 
1.45 (2.32)
2.54 (2.67)
1.30 (1.98)
Time 5 
n = 52 
n = 55 
n = 22 
n = 20 

APPENDICES 

SCCF 
 
4.58 (3.47) 
n = 67 
5.55 (3.30) 
n = 60 
4.62 (3.45) 
n = 55 
4.96 (3.42) 
n = 46 
5.24 (3.57) 
n = 45 

All
2.81 (3.24)
n = 238 
3.09 (3.42)
n = 228 
2.58 (3.18)
n = 218 
2.61 (3.20)
n = 202 
2.89 (3.32)
n = 194 

111 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Assessment 

CSP MI 
2.57 (3.45) 
Time 6 
n = 49 
Fear Level 
 
6.25 (4.62) 
Time 1 
n = 64 
5.50 (4.18) 
Time 2 
n = 62 
5.71 (4.10) 
Time 3 
n = 58 
5.22 (3.83) 
Time 4 
n = 59 
5.50 (3.50) 
Time 5 
n = 58 
5.43 (3.43) 
Time 6 
n = 51 
Hypersensitivity to External Stimuli 
10.54 (4.02) 
Time 1 
n = 64 
10.10 (4.52) 
Time 2 
n = 62 
10.71 (4.65) 
Time 3 
n = 58 
9.99 (4.64) 
Time 4 
n = 58 
9.54 (4.09) 
Time 5 
n = 56 
9.37 ( 4.33) 
Time 6 
n = 51 
Mental Well‐Being 
 
4.95 (2.48) 
Time 1 
n = 64 
4.88 (2.24) 
Time 2 
n = 61 
4.33 (2.42) 
Time 3 
n = 58 
4.71 (2.43) 
Time 4 
n = 58 
4.13 (2.24) 
Time 5 
n = 55 
4.02 (2.01) 
Time 6 
n = 51 
 
Mutism 
3.67 (2.19) 
Time 1 
n = 64 
4.44 (2.21) 
Time 2 
n = 62 
4.14 (2.29) 
Time 3 
n = 57 
4.41 (2.44) 
Time 4 
n = 58 
4.09 (2.08) 
Time 5 
n = 55 
4.00 (2.19) 
Time 6 
n = 50 

112 

CSP NMI
1.45 (2.32)
n = 52 

GP MI

GP NMI

SCCF 

NA 

NA 

NA 

4.17 (3.46)
n =63 
3.51 (2.54)
n = 59 
3.91 (2.73)
n = 57 
3.91 (2.96)
n = 56 
3.87 (2.75)
n = 56 
4.28 (2.72)
n = 54 

4.94 (3.78)
n = 33 
4.53 (3.37)
n = 32 
4.88 (3.40)
n = 32 
4.91 (3.08)
n = 29 
4.79 (3.21)
n = 29 

3.51 (3.03)
n = 43 
3.46 (2.60)
n = 41 
3.53 (2.07)
n = 41 
3.26 (2.53)
n = 39 
3.39 (2.49)
n = 38 

 
7.63 (4.15) 
n = 67 
7.14 (4.96) 
n = 64 
7.66 (4.00) 
n = 61 
6.76 (4.09) 
n = 59 
6.81 (4.30) 
n = 57 

NA 

NA 

NA 

9.62 (3.92)
n =63 
7.81 (3.86)
n = 59 
8.33 (4.11)
n = 57 
9.22 (4.49)
n = 56 
9.03 (4.09)
n = 56 
9.02 (3.59)
n = 54 

11.00 (5.38)
n = 33 
11.06 (3.83)
n = 32 
11.34 (3.95)
n = 32 
10.15 (3.78)
n = 29 
10.65 (4.43)
n = 29 

8.44 (3.70)
n = 43 
8.20 (4.09)
n = 41 
7.76 (4.13)
n = 41 
8.00 (3.20)
n = 39 
7.60 (3.62)
n = 38 

 
9.61 (3.94) 
n = 67 
10.11 (3.96) 
n = 64 
9.72 (4.63) 
n = 61 
9.22 (4.49) 
n = 59 
9.03 (4.09) 
n = 57 

NA 

NA 

NA 

4.48 (2.48)
n =63 
3.69 (2.55)
n = 59 
3.98 (2.41)
n = 57 
3.96 (2.26)
n = 56 
3.59 (2.25)
n = 56 
3.68 (2.52)
n = 54 

5.39 (2.54)
n = 33 
5.09 (2.61)
n = 32 
4.97 (2.47)
n = 32 
4.25 (2.78)
n = 28 
4.66 (2.54)
n = 29 

4.00 (2.43)
n = 43 
3.24 (2.34)
n = 41 
3.22 (2.31)
n = 41 
2.77 (1.56)
n = 39 
2.66 (2.29)
n = 38 

 
5.19 (2.39) 
n = 67 
5.33 (2.53) 
n = 63 
5.44 (2.61) 
n = 61 
5.58 (2.44) 
n = 59 
5.21 (2.24) 
n = 56 

NA 

NA 

NA 

2.65 (1.70)
n =63 
2.98 (1.97)
n = 59 
2.98 (1.81)
n = 57 
2.96 (1.74)
n = 56 
3.00 (1.80)
n = 55 
2.75 (1.69)
n = 52 

3.61 (2.07)
n = 33 
3.16 (1.87)
n = 32 
3.19 (1.89)
n = 32 
3.28 (1.74)
n = 28 
3.21 (1.76)
n = 29 

2.40 (1.50)
n = 43 
2.20 (1.50)
n = 41 
2.32 (1.56)
n = 41 
2.59 (1.44)
n = 39 
2.26 (1.60)
n = 38 

 
3.81 (1.96) 
n = 67 
4.11 (1.72) 
n = 64 
4.44 (2.28) 
n = 61 
3.95 (2.05) 
n = 57 
3.60 (1.94) 
n = 57 

NA 

NA 

NA 

All
1.92 (2.98)
n = 102 
5.51 (4.18)
n = 270 
5.01 (4.00)
n = 258 
5.31 (3.74)
n = 250 
4.94 (3.63)
n = 241 
5.00 (3.58)
n = 236 
4.84 (3.11)
n = 106 
9.82 (4.16)
n = 270 
9.40 (4.22)
n = 258 
9.52 (4.50)
n = 249 
9.55 (4.10)
n = 241 
9.32 (4.10)
n = 236 
9.20 (3.93)
n = 106 
4.80 (2.48)
n = 270 
4.48 (2.56)
n = 256 
4.42 (2.55)
n = 249 
4.38 (2.48)
n = 240 
4.08 (2.43)
n = 234 
3.86 (2.27)
n = 106 
3.26 (1.98)
n = 270 
3.51 (2.04)
n = 258 
3.52 (2.16)
n = 248 
3.53 (2.06)
n = 238 
3.31 (1.95)
n = 234 
3.38 (2.04)
n = 103 

APPENDICES 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Assessment 
Panic Disorder 

CSP MI 
 
9.09 (10.18) 
Time 1 
n = 64 
7.87 (8.62) 
Time 2 
n = 62 
8.76 (9.17) 
Time 3 
n = 60 
7.32 (7.72) 
Time 4 
n = 60 
6.50 (8.80) 
Time 5 
n = 56 
5.34 (7.25) 
Time 6 
n = 51 
Physical Hygiene 
 
5.39 (5.01) 
Time 1 
n = 64 
5.80 (4.75) 
Time 2 
n = 61 
5.67 (4.80) 
Time 3 
n = 58 
5.48 (5.43) 
Time 4 
n = 58 
5.73 (5.01) 
Time 5 
n = 56 
4.90 (4.75) 
Time 6 
n = 51 
 
Physical Well‐being and Exercise 
15.89 (7.76) 
Time 1 
n = 64 
17.10 (7.70) 
Time 2 
n = 62 
17.14 (7.05) 
Time 3 
n = 58 
16.13 (7.47) 
Time 4 
n = 58 
15.39 (7.49) 
Time 5 
n = 56 
13.95 (7.09) 
Time 6 
n = 51 

CSP NMI

GP MI

GP NMI

3.89 (5.49)
n =63 
3.71 (7.72)
n = 59 
3.46 (4.20)
n = 57 
3.79 (5.44)
n = 56 
3.45 (4.34)
n = 56 
3.60 (5.78)
n = 54 

5.03 (4.88)
n = 33 
5.43 (5.12)
n = 32 
6.11 (5.02)
n = 32 
4.99 (5.06)
n = 29 
4.08 (5.13)
n = 29 

2.77 (3.77)
n = 43 
2.37 (3.45)
n = 41 
3.00 (4.68)
n = 41 
2.22 (3.28)
n = 39 
1.82 (3.49)
n = 38 

SCCF 
 
10.98 (7.72) 
n = 67 
9.61 (8.70) 
n = 64 
9.55 (8.68) 
n = 61 
9.94 (8.68) 
n = 59 
8.07 (7.45) 
n = 57 

NA 

NA 

NA 

4.00 (4.03)
n =63 
4.06 (3.87)
n = 59 
3.44 (3.59)
n = 57 
3.25 (3.92)
n = 56 
3.12 (3.57)
n = 56 
3.18 (3.68)
n = 54 

4.64 (2.69)
n = 33 
3.66 (3.26)
n = 32 
4.19 (4.10)
n = 32 
3.21 (3.92)
n = 29 
3.62 (3.70)
n = 29 

2.07 (2.54)
n = 43 
1.74 (2.69)
n = 41 
2.17 (3.38)
n = 41 
1.92 (2.67)
n = 39 
1.08 (1.99)
n = 38 

 
8.26 (4.64) 
n = 67 
7.59 (5.60) 
n = 64 
6.19 (4.55) 
n = 61 
5.61 (4.99) 
n = 59 
5.22 (5.07) 
n = 57 

NA 

NA 

NA 

10.43 (5.55)
n =63 
9.85 (6.23)
n = 59 
10.30 (6.18)
n = 57 
10.28 (6.14)
n = 56 
9.54 (6.25)
n = 56 
9.26 (6.72)
n = 54 

15.79 (6.28)
n = 33 
13.68 (7.37)
n = 32 
13.84 (6.47)
n = 32 
13.07 (5.92)
n = 29 
13.58 (6.78)
n = 29 

9.21 (5.61)
n = 43 
7.26 (5.53)
n = 41 
8.12 (5.02)
n = 41 
7.44 (4.36)
n = 39 
7.08 (4.19)
n = 38 

 
18.93 (6.44) 
n = 67 
18.90 (6.01) 
n = 64 
18.98 (6.78) 
n = 61 
18.46 (6.67) 
n = 59 
17.60 (7.01) 
n = 57 

NA 

NA 

NA 

All
6.84 (7.84)
n = 270 
6.18 (7.62)
n = 258 
6.47 (7.65)
n = 251 
6.04 (7.19)
n = 243 
5.10 (6.78)
n = 236 
4.41 (6.54)
n = 106 
5.16 (4.67)
n = 270 
4.93 (4.77)
n = 257 
4.52 (4.40)
n = 249 
4.14 (4.64)
n = 241 
3.98 (4.46)
n = 236 
4.12 (4.41)
n = 106 
14.29 (7.40)
n = 270 
13.90 (7.91)
n = 258 
14.12 (7.60)
n = 249 
13.56 (7.48)
n = 241 
12.97 (7.57)
n = 236 
12.97 (7.57)
n = 106 

Internal consistency estimates are provided in Table B13 for all the PSI subscales. Cronbach’s alphas ranged 
between ‐.02 and .90 for the three scales related to the study constructs. Panic Disorder had strong reliabili‐
ty estimates ranging between .88 and .90. Hypersensitivity to External Stimuli demonstrated poor internal 
consistency with alpha estimates ranging between .27 and .41 (M = .34). The internal consistency was ade‐
quate for the Physical Well‐being and Exercise subscale with values ranging from .72 to .76 (M = .74). Test‐
retest correlation coefficients are provided in Table B14 and indicate stability between time periods across 
all subscales with correlations ranging between .45 and .83 (M = .67). 
 

APPENDICES 

 

113 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Table B13. Internal Consistency Estimates at each Time Period for each PSI Subscale 
Measure 
# Items Items*
T1
T2
T3 
Attitudes about Segregation 
2 
r14, 39
.78 .74 .76 
Fear Level 
4 
3, 12, 21, r38
.60 .58 .48 
Hypersensitivity to External Stimuli 
5 
1, 7, r31, r34, 37
.41 .43 .49 
Mental Well‐being 
2 
26, r35
.31 .38 .36 
Mutism 
2 
22, r32
.47 .37 .50 
Panic Disorder 
9 
2, 6, 10, 13, 16, 17, 20, 25, 30 .89 .89 .89 
Physical Hygiene 
5 
4, r9, 18, r23, r29
.62 .65 .61 
Physical Well‐being and Exercise 
8 
r5, 8, r11, r15, 19, 24, 27, r28 .72 .76 .73 
Safety 
2 
33, 36
.82 .84 .76 
Total  
39 
all
.90 .90 .90 

T4 
.75 
.50 
.35 
.33 
.52 
.88 
.68 
.75 
.81 
.90 

T5
.71
.46
.35
.30
.37
.90
.66
.76
.84
.89

T6
.67
.37
.27
‐.02
.31
.90
.60
.74
.90
.88

*r before a number indicates that the item is reversed scored. 

Table B14. Test­retest correlations between consecutive time periods for 
each PSI Subscale 
Measure 
T1–T2  T2–T3 T3–T4 T4–T5 T5–T6
Attitudes about Segregation 
.66 
.78
.78
.80
.79
Fear Level 
.46 
.64
.64
.57
.60
Hypersensitivity to External Stimuli 
.45 
.62
.58
.58
.53
Mental Well‐being 
.57 
.62
.62
.57
.51
Mutism 
.50 
.59
.65
.64
.67
Panic Disorder 
.68 
.71
.78
.75
.74
Physical Hygiene 
.67 
.68
.73
.65
.64
Physical Well‐being and Exercise 
.73 
.78
.83
.77
.77
Safety 
.72 
.71
.74
.82
.69

For the three subscales that related to study constructs, correlations with other measures were calculated 
as  assessments  of  convergent  validity.  The  PSI  subscales  demonstrated  adequate  validity  estimates  with 
other self‐report measures of the constructs (i.e., anxiety, hypersensitivity, and somatization) with correla‐
tions ranging between .41 and .61 (M = .50) and had lower correlations with staff reports (range = .18 to .39, 
M = .29).  
Profile of Mood States (POMS) 
Developed  by  McNair,  Lorr,  and  Droppleman  (1971,  1992),  the  POMS  is  intended  to  assess  respondents 
across  six  mood  factors:  Tension‐Anxiety  (heightened  musculoskeletal  tension),  Anger‐Hostility  (anger  and 
antipathy  towards  others),  Fatigue‐Inertia  (weariness,  inertia,  low  energy),  Depression‐Dejection  (depres‐
sion  and  sense  of  inadequacy),  Vigor‐Activity  (vigorousness,  ebullience,  high  energy),  and  Confusion‐
Bewilderment (bewilderment and muddle‐headedness). The POMS is a 65‐item self‐report measure; higher 
scores  on  the  POMS  indicate  more  negative  feelings  held  over  the  past  week  (McNair  &  Heuchert,  2006). 
Respondents rate each item on how well it describes them in the past week, using a 5‐point rating scale (0 – 
not at all to 4 – extremely). Completion of the POMS takes approximately 15 to 20 minutes and requires an 
8th grade reading level (Lorr, McNair, Heuchert, & Droppleman, 2003; McNair et al., 1992). 
Acceptable levels of internal consistency (as measured by Kuder‐Richardson Formula 20) for the subscales 
were found in a sample of 350 male psychiatric outpatients, ranging from .86 to .95 (McNair & Heuchert, 
2006;  Norcross,  Guadagnoli,  &  Prochaska,  1984).  Test‐retest  reliability  was  assessed  in  psychiatric  outpa‐
tients  over  the  course  of  3  to  110  days,  with  a  median  number  of  20  days  between  tests.  Stability  coeffi‐
cients were found to range between .65 and .74, with a median of .69 (McNair & Heuchert, 2006).  

114 

APPENDICES 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Normative data are available for a variety of populations but not for a prison population. Means for outpa‐
tients ranged from 10.0 (SD = 6.5) to 26.0 (SD = 15.8; McNair & Heuchert, 2006; Norcross et al., 1984). In a 
nonclinical, community sample comprised of males only, mean scores across subscales ranged from 5.6 (SD 
= 4.1) to 19.8 (SD = 6.8; McNair & Heuchert, 2006; Nyenhuis, Yamamoto, Luchetta, Terrien, & Parmentier, 
1999).  In  a  nonclinical,  male  college  student  sample,  mean  scores  across  subscales  ranged  from  8.6  (SD  = 
4.6) to 15.6 (SD = 6.0; McNair & Heuchert, 2006; Nyenhuis et al., 1999). Convergent validity has also been 
assessed for the POMS and found to be acceptable for the total and subscale scores (Nyenhuis et al., 1999). 
Table B15 provides the summary statistics for the study groups on the POMS subscales at each time period. 
Estimates of internal consistency reliability were strong with Cronbach’s alphas ranging between .89 and .96 
(M = .93). Correlations between sequential time periods indicated stability over time with coefficients rang‐
ing  between  .54  and  .80  (M  =  .68).  Convergent  validity  estimates  with  other  self‐report  measures  of  the 
same  construct  ranged  between  .35  and  .81  (M  =  .57),  and  with  staff  reports  the  coefficients  ranged  be‐
tween .14 and .38 (M = .25).   
Table B15. Summary Statistics (M, SD, n) on POMS Subscales by Group and Time  
Assessment 
CSP MI 
CSP NMI
GP MI
GP NMI
SCCF 
Anger‐Hostility 
 
 
20.92 (11.86)  14.78 (9.21) 19.28 (11.10) 10.37 (8.80) 18.03 (12.51)
Time 1 
n = 64 
n = 63 
n = 33 
n = 43 
n = 66 
17.46 (11.29)  11.07 (9.36) 17.74 (10.34)
7.54 (6.76)
17.80 (12.07)
Time 2 
n = 61 
n = 58 
n = 32 
n = 41 
n = 64 
16.88 (12.16)  12.23 (10.88) 18.61 (10.48)
7.67 (8.05)
17.74 (10.69)
Time 3 
n = 59 
n = 57 
n = 31 
n = 41 
n = 61 
17.22 (13.07)  12.18 (10.75) 16.87 (11.56)
7.54 (7.46)
18.64 (12.34)
Time 4 
n = 60 
n = 56 
n = 29 
n = 39 
n = 59 
16.02 (12.01)  12.02 (10.64) 15.17 (9.80)
6.71 (7.61)
17.63 (11.84)
Time 5 
n = 56 
n = 55 
n = 29 
n = 38 
n = 57 
14.03 (11.11)  11.65 (10.62)
Time 6 
NA 
NA 
NA 
n = 51 
n = 54 
Depression‐Dejection 
 
 
25.13 (15.64)  17.17 (13.77) 25.34 (16.57) 12.27 (11.39) 28.92 (14.33)
Time 1 
n = 64 
n = 63 
n = 33 
n = 43 
n = 67 
22.25 (14.17)  13.55 (12.14) 21.56 (13.46)
8.28 (8.66)
26.33 (15.39)
Time 2 
n = 61 
n = 58 
n = 32 
n = 41 
n = 64 
20.69 (14.91)  13.27 (13.42) 23.18 (15.04) 8.56 (12.16) 25.17 (15.23)
Time 3 
n = 59 
n = 57 
n = 31 
n = 41 
n = 61 
21.18 (14.85)  13.90 (12.77) 20.38 (15.02)
7.36 (7.20)
8.56 (12.16) 
Time 4 
n = 60 
n = 56 
n = 29 
n = 39 
n = 59 
19.35 (14.48)  12.28 (11.24) 19.03 (13.43)
6.90 (7.73)
7.36 (7.20) 
Time 5 
n = 56 
n = 56 
n = 29 
n = 38 
n = 57 
18.49 (13.01)  11.86 (11.94)
Time 6 
NA 
NA 
NA 
n = 51 
n = 54 
 
 
Fatigue‐Inertia 
10.10 (6.92) 
5.99 (6.18)
10.17 (7.26)
4.56 (4.78)
11.26 (6.76) 
Time 1 
n = 64 
n = 63 
n = 33 
n = 43 
n = 66 
9.36 (6.65) 
4.60 (4.36)
9.44 (5.52)
3.39 (4.15)
10.19 (6.28) 
Time 2 
n = 61 
n = 58 
n = 32 
n = 41 
n = 64 
8.84 (7.23) 
4.82 (5.32)
10.45 (7.28)
3.63 (4.86)
9.94 (7.02) 
Time 3 
n = 59 
n = 57 
n = 31 
n = 41 
n = 61 
9.07 (6.99) 
5.20 (5.06)
8.21 (6.98)
3.00 (3.49)
10.55 (7.26) 
Time 4 
n = 60 
n = 56 
n = 29 
n = 39 
n = 59 

APPENDICES 

All
16.88 (11.41)
n = 269 
14.54 (11.06)
n = 256 
14.72 (11.30)
n = 249 
14.81 (12.01)
n = 243 
13.86 (11.32)
n = 235 
12.80 (10.88)
n = 105 
22.19 (15.51)
n = 270 
18.98 (14.65)
n = 256 
18.40 (15.52)
n = 249 
18.19 (14.80)
n = 243 
16.97 (14.21)
n = 236 
15.08 (12.85)
n = 105 
8.54 (6.92)
n = 269 
7.54 (6.21)
n = 256 
7.54 (6.92)
n = 249 
7.46 (6.73)
n = 243 

115 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Assessment 
Time 5 
Time 6 
Tension‐Anxiety 
Time 1 
Time 2 
Time 3 
Time 4 
Time 5 
Time 6 

CSP MI 
7.59 (6.84) 
n = 56 
6.08 (5.14) 
n = 51 
 
15.83 (8.31) 
n = 64 
14.78 (8.28) 
n = 62 
14.26 (8.84) 
n = 60 
13.04 (8.08) 
n = 60 
12.46 (8.12) 
n = 56 
11.47 (7.73) 
n = 51 

CSP NMI
5.18 (5.41)
n = 56 
4.42 (4.85)
n = 54 

GP MI
7.94 (6.87)
n = 29 

GP NMI
3.05 (4.39)
n = 38 

SCCF 
11.06 (6.98) 
n = 57 

NA 

NA 

NA 

10.36 (7.26)
n = 63 
8.06 (6.01)
n = 59 
8.40 (7.06)
n = 57 
8.37 (7.13)
n = 56 
7.73 (6.64)
n = 56 
7.85 (6.34)
n = 54 

17.09 (8.71)
n = 33 
13.97 (7.16)
n = 32 
14.48 (7.63)
n = 31 
13.09 (9.11)
n = 29 
12.45 (7.25)
n = 29 

8.60 (6.64)
n = 43 
6.48 (4.72)
n = 41 
6.66 (6.02)
n = 41 
6.51 (4.99)
n = 39 
6.10 (5.10)
n = 38 

 
17.21 (8.49) 
n = 67 
15.74 (8.46) 
n = 64 
15.47 (8.29) 
n = 61 
16.16 (8.82) 
n = 59 
6.51 (4.99) 
n = 57 

NA 

NA 

NA 

All
7.17 (6.75)
n = 236 
5.23 (5.04)
n = 105 
13.90 (8.61)
n = 270 
12.06 (8.12)
n = 258 
12.00 (8.47)
n = 250 
11.68 (8.49)
n = 243 
10.91 (7.74)
n = 236 
9.56 (7.24)
n = 106 

Saint Louis University Mental Status (SLUMS) Examination 
The  SLUMS  Examination  (Tariq,  Tumosa,  Chibnall,  Perry,  &  Morley,  2006)  is  an  11‐item  screening  tool  de‐
signed to assess mild neurocognitive impairment and dementia. It assesses orientation, memory, attention, 
and executive functions. Scores on the SLUMS Examination can range from 0 to 30, with higher scores indi‐
cating better cognitive functioning. Cut‐offs for mild neurocognitive impairment and dementia are provided 
for persons with varying degrees of education (i.e., more than high school, less than high school; Tariq et al., 
2006). Administration takes approximately 7 minutes. While the SLUMS Examination is similar to the Mini 
Mental Status Exam (i.e., both measures screen for cognitive impairment), the SLUMS Examination may be 
better for assessing milder cognitive problems, because it is a more sensitive measure (Tariq et al., 2006). 
Due to its more sensitive nature and its associated ability to detect very mild forms of neurocognitive prob‐
lems, the SLUMS Examination was selected for this study. 
Summary statistics are available for several different populations, including nonclinical populations and old‐
er individuals. The mean for the total scale was found to be between 25.7 (SD = 2.8) and 26.9 (SD = 2.00; 
Tariq et al., 2006) for a nonclinical adult population, while means ranged from 26.9 (SD = 2.5) to 28.1 (SD = 
2.3; Heeter, Winn, Winn, & Bozoki, 2008) for older adults between 60 and 80 years of age.  
Table B16 provides the summary statistics for the study groups on the SLUMS test at each time period. The 
SLUMS’ internal consistency estimates for the present study were low (range = .48 to .60, M = .52) which 
may  be  reasonable  given  that  this  is  a  screening  measure  and  assesses  several  cognitive  functions.  Test‐
retest reliability estimates were stronger with correlations ranging between .63 and .78 (M = .71). Conver‐
gent validity was estimated by assessing the relationship of the SLUMS to the Trails B/A task and correction‐
al staff’s ratings on the PBRS Dull‐Confused subscale. Convergent validity coefficients were small with corre‐
lations to the Trails task ranging from .13 to .31 (M = .21) and to the PBRS Dull‐Confused subscale ranging 
between .03 and .18 (M = .10).  
 

116 

 

APPENDICES 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Table B16. Summary Statistics (M, SD, n) on SLUMS Score by Group and Time 
Time 
CSP MI 
CSP NMI 
GP MI
GP NMI
SCCF
All 
20.80 (5.43)  21.73 (3.34)  21.52 (4.04) 23.38 (3.73) 20.54 (3.73) 21.45 (4.24) 
1 
n = 64 
n = 63 
n = 33 
n = 43 
n = 67 
n = 270 
21.16 (4.77)  22.64 (3.63)  23.09 (3.68) 24.12 (3.23) 21.49 (4.33) 22.30 (4.16) 
2 
n = 62 
n = 59 
n = 32 
n = 41 
n = 63 
n = 257 
22.26 (4.59)  24.02 (3.25)  23.88 (2.88) 24.49 (3.49) 22.85 (4.37) 23.37 (3.95) 
3 
n = 60 
n = 57 
n = 32 
n = 41 
n = 61 
n = 251 
22.92 (4.31)  24.38 (3.03)  23.34 (3.67) 24.79 (3.68) 23.38 (3.91) 23.84 (3.80) 
4 
n = 60 
n = 56 
n = 29 
n = 39 
n = 59 
n = 243 
23.59 (4.04)  24.25 (3.34)  24.93 (3.24) 24.82 (3.24) 23.26 (4.05) 24.03 (3.69) 
5 
n = 56 
n = 56 
n = 29 
n = 38 
n = 57 
n = 236 
23.94 (4.57)  25.30 (2.88) 
24.62 (3.82) 
6 
NA 
NA 
NA 
n = 49 
n = 54 
n = 104 

State‐Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) 
The  STAI  (Spielberger,  Gorsuch,  &  Lushene,  1970)  partitions  anxiety  into  that  which  is  attributable  to  the 
condition one is in (i.e., state) and into the inherent anxiety of an individual (i.e., trait). It is a 40‐item self‐
report  inventory  that  includes  two  20‐item  subscales.  The  first  subscale  assesses  state  anxiety  and  is  ans‐
wered  on  a  4‐point  scale  (1—not  at  all,  2—somewhat,  3—moderately  so,  4—very  much  so);  the  second 
subscale assesses trait anxiety and is also answered on a 4‐point scale (1—almost never, 2—sometimes, 3—
often, 4—almost always).  
Internal  consistency  is  acceptable  for  the  STAI  with  coefficients  between  .81  and  .92  and  a  median  .84 
(Metzger, 1976). In a variety of nonclinical samples (i.e., college students, high school students, military re‐
cruits,  working  adults),  the  median  alpha  coefficient  was  .60  (Novy,  Nelson,  Goodwin,  &  Rowzee,  1993). 
Across  males  of  three  different  ethnicities  (i.e.,  White,  Black,  Latino),  alpha  coefficients  were  found  to  be 
between .93 and .95 for state anxiety and between .92 and .95 for trait anxiety (Novy et al., 1993). Internal 
consistency measures are high in prison populations (.83; Zinger et al., 2001). Overall, this inventory is valu‐
able  in  its  ability  to  distinguish  between  types  of  anxiety  and  because  normative  data  exist  for  a  prisoner 
population (Spielberger et al., 1970).  
Test‐retest reliability has been variable for the two subscales on the STAI. In a replication study by Joisting 
(1976), the STAI was administered both before and after a class examination. Correlations between the two 
tests were .66 for trait anxiety and .60 for state anxiety (Joesting, 1976). For a 104‐day test‐retest assess‐
ment, test‐retest reliability ranged from .73 to .84 (Spielberger et al., 1970). Furthermore, test‐retest relia‐
bility in another nonclinical sample was found to be .16, .26, and .15 for state anxiety assessed for different 
intervals (3 months, 8 months, 11 months; Nixon & Steffeck, 1977). Test‐retest reliability was also assessed 
for  trait  anxiety  in  the  same  nonclinical  sample  and  was  found to  be  .48,  .54,  and  .29  for  trait  anxiety  as‐
sessed for the same  three intervals  (3  months, 8  months, 11 months;  Nixon  & Steffeck, 1977). In another 
study with college students, test‐retest reliability was found to be .97 for trait anxiety and .45 for state an‐
xiety (Metzger, 1976). 
Means  for  state  anxiety  in  nonclinical  populations  seem  to  range  from  32.90  (SD  =  11.10)  to  49.20  (SD  = 
11.89), while means for trait anxiety in nonclinical populations ranged from 35.60 (SD = 9.90) to 45.89 (SD = 
12.96; Joesting, 1976; Nixon & Steffeck, 1977; Novy et al., 1993; Nyenhuis et al., 1999). 

APPENDICES 

117 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
The STAI has shown to be a valid measure, demonstrating convergent validity from .52 to .85 and good dis‐
criminant validity (Spielberger, 1983). Novy et al. (1993) found moderate to high correlations between the 
BDI and the STAI State/Trait scale (range = .59 to .81 for BDI and STAI State; range = .44 to .71 for BDI and 
STAI Trait) and between the BHS and the STAI State/Trait (range = .67 to .92 for BHS and STAI State; range = 
.26 to .76 for BHS and STAI Trait).  
Table B17 provides the summary statistics for the study groups on the STAI scales at each time period. Cron‐
bach’s alpha coefficients ranged between .93 and .95 (M = .94) for the two subscales, which indicates strong 
internal consistency estimates. Correlations between sequential time periods (range = .65 to .82, M = .73) 
suggest good stability over 3 month intervals with trait anxiety showing slightly stronger correlations (M = 
.79) than state anxiety (M = .68). Convergent validity with other self‐report measures of anxiety indicated 
good validity with coefficients ranging between .37 and .85 (M = .64); however, correlations with staff re‐
ports of anxiety were lower (ranging from .07 to .49 with a mean of .23).  
Table B17. Summary Statistics (M, SD, n) on STAI Subscales by Group and Time  
Assessment 
CSP MI 
CSP NMI 
GP MI
GP NMI
SCCF 
 
 
State Anxiety 
46.90 (12.16)  42.05 (11.42) 47.64 (13.52) 39.39 (12.04) 50.14 (12.72) 
Time 1 
n = 62 
n = 63 
n = 33 
n = 43 
n = 67 
45.83 (12.43)  38.43 (10.39) 44.53 (13.14) 36.68 (10.98) 48.42 (13.39) 
Time 2 
n = 62 
n = 59 
n = 32 
n = 41 
n = 64 
45.45 (12.40)  37.89 (12.05) 47.29 (11.68) 34.65 (7.35) 48.49 (12.78) 
Time 3 
n = 60 
n = 57 
n = 32 
n = 41 
n = 61 
44.01 (13.38)  37.50 (10.89) 45.08 (11.90) 33.80 (8.69) 49.41 (12.48) 
Time 4 
n = 60 
n = 56 
n = 29 
n = 39 
n = 59 
42.60 (12.98)  37.46 (11.54) 43.76 (12.07) 33.81 (9.40) 48.29 (11.70) 
Time 5 
n = 56 
n = 56 
n = 29 
n = 38 
n = 57 
43.28 (12.23)  36.89 (9.98)
Time 6 
NA 
NA 
NA 
n = 51 
n = 54 
 
 
Trait Anxiety 
48.41 (12.36)  42.78 (11.11) 49.70 (12.79) 37.82 (9.99) 54.45 (11.48) 
Time 1 
n = 62 
n = 63 
n = 33 
n = 43 
n = 67 
47.89 (11.91)  38.77 (10.25) 46.59 (11.84) 35.93 (10.76) 52.64 (12.28) 
Time 2 
n = 62 
n = 59 
n = 32 
n = 41 
n = 64 
47.49 (12.33)  38.40 (10.82) 47.59 (10.05) 34.44 (10.15) 51.50 (12.94) 
Time 3 
n = 60 
n = 57 
n = 32 
n = 41 
n = 61 
45.75 (13.11)  39.27 (10.10) 45.78 (10.69) 34.06 (8.86) 52.77 (11.10) 
Time 4 
n = 60 
n = 56 
n = 29 
n = 39 
n = 59 
44.65 (12.85)  38.70 (11.02) 44.06 (10.01) 32.74 (8.98) 52.28 (11.65) 
Time 5 
n = 56 
n = 56 
n = 29 
n = 38 
n = 57 
43.95 (12.10)  37.54 (10.62)
Time 6 
NA 
NA 
NA 
n = 51 
n = 53 

All 
 
45.46 (12.80)
n = 268 
43.16 (12.86)
n = 258 
42.83 (12.78)
n = 251 
42.31 (12.93)
n = 243 
41.48 (12.65)
n = 236 
40.09 (11.52)
n = 106 
 
47.06 (12.79)
n = 269 
44.92 (12.97)
n = 258 
44.27 (13.10)
n = 250 
44.09 (12.70)
n = 243 
43.09 (12.93)
n = 236 
40.70 (11.71)
n = 105 

Structured Inventory of Malingered Symptomatology (SIMS) 
The SIMS (Widows & Smith, 2005) is a 75‐item screening measure intended to detect feigned symptoms of 
psychopathology and cognitive functioning in clinical and forensic settings. A total score and scores on five 
subscales—Psychosis  (bizarre  or  unusual  psychotic  symptoms),  Neurologic  Impairment  (illogical  or  highly 
atypical neurological symptoms), Amnestic Disorders (symptoms of memory impairment), Low Intelligence 
(general cognitive incapacity or intellectual deficit), and affective disorders (atypical symptoms of depression 
and anxiety)—are obtained (Widows & Smith, 2005). The subscales are comprised of 15 items each; comple‐
118 

APPENDICES 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
tion  of  this  measure  takes  approximately  10  to  15  minutes  (Widows  &  Smith,  2005).  Participants  answer 
whether statements are applicable to them or are generally considered true (T); if a statement does not de‐
scribe them or cannot be considered true, an F is circled as the answer choice. The SIMS assesses whether 
respondents endorse atypical, improbable, inconsistent, or illogical symptoms. Scores above the cutoff mark 
suggest probable malingering but may also suggest genuine psychopathology. For this study, we used eleva‐
tions above these cutoff scores as an indicator of possible malingering.  
Internal consistency estimates have ranged from .24 to .86 for subscales and were found to be .72 to .88 for 
total scores (Merckelbach & Smith, 2003; Smith, as cited in Widows & Smith, 2005). Three‐week test‐retest 
reliability in honest responders was found to be .72 in a Dutch sample.  
Also reported in the manual are validity studies that indicated the SIMS to be a valid screening device for 
malingering. The SIMS total score correlated strongly with validity scales of the MMPI, including the F scale 
(“faking bad”; r = .84) and F‐K index scores (“honesty”; r = .81; Widows & Smith, 2005). A moderate correla‐
tion (r = .45) was found between the SIMS total score and the 16 Personality Factor Questionnaire Faking 
Bad  scale  (Widows  &  Smith,  2005).  Furthermore,  the  SIMS  total  score  was  highly  correlated  with  other 
commonly used indexes of malingering, such as the MMPI‐2 validity scales (range = .44 to .51), the Struc‐
tured Interview of Report Symptoms (SIRS) scales (.43 < r < .80), and the M Test (.46 < r < .67; Heinze & Pu‐
risch, 2001). A study by Edens, Poythress, and Watkins‐Clay (2009) indicated that the SIMS correlated highly 
with the SIRS (.81) and Personality Assessment Inventory NIM (.84) and that it correlated moderately with 
the  Personality  Assessment  Inventory  MAL  (.68)  and  RDF  (.45)  scales.  Furthermore,  the  SIMS  total  scores 
have been found to correlate significantly (p < .01) with the BDI (.64) as well as the STAI Trait (.55). Thus, the 
SIMS scales seem to be related to both validity and psychopathology measures. 
Mean scores on the SIMS were given in Lewis, Simcox, and Berry’s (2002) study. Mean scores across subs‐
cales for a forensic sample ranged from 1.2 (SD = 2.1) to 5.2 (SD = 2.6) and the mean total score for the sam‐
ple was found to be 14.5 (SD = 8.8; Lewis et al., 2002). Edens, Poythress, and Watkins‐Clay (2009) also found 
that  the  SIMS  nearly  always  correctly  classified  non‐malingering  inmates  but  that  there  were  more  errors 
with mentally ill, such that caution against classification of inmates with mental illness as malingerers is war‐
ranted.  While  it  is  suggested  to  administer  follow‐up  tests  once  an  elevated  score  has  been  found  on  the 
SIMS, this measure by itself is yet another way to gain a more comprehensive picture of the inmates in this 
study, be it in regards to the degree of their malingering or their psychopathology. 
Table B18 provides the summary statistics for the study groups on the SIMS scales at each time period. In‐
ternal consistency estimates ranged between .50 and .93 (M = .76) with the lowest alphas for the Affective 
Disorder subscale (M = .55) and the Low Intelligence subscale (M = .59). Table B19 provides the internal con‐
sistency estimates for the SIMS scales at each time period. Test‐retest coefficients were quite variable rang‐
ing between .06 and .83 (M = .48) with total scores showing the least variability (range = .54 to .79, M = .68). 
There  were  not  correlations  with  other  malingering  variables  to  assess  validity;  however,  correlations  be‐
tween subscales were computed for each time period. Correlations between subscales ranged between .34 
and  .98  with  variability  in  which  measures  demonstrated  the  weakest  and  strongest  correlations  at  each 
time period. 
 

 

APPENDICES 

 

119 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Table B18. Summary Statistics (M, SD, n) on POMS Subscales by Group and Time  
Assessment 
CSP MI
CSP NMI
GP MI
GP NMI
SCCF 
Affective Disorders 
 
 
 
5.97 (2.53) 
4.53 (2.13)
6.12 (2.60)
3.52 (1.89)
6.88 (2.25) 
Time 1 
n = 64 
n = 63 
n = 33 
n = 43 
n = 67 
6.07 (2.31) 
5.94 (12.44)
8.90 (16.38)
3.17 (1.85)
8.31 (11.74) 
Time 2 
n = 62 
n = 60 
n = 33 
n = 41 
n = 65 
6.59 (2.52) 
6.36 (12.59)
6.31 (2.26)
3.60 (2.07)
8.05 (12.09) 
Time 3 
n = 60 
n = 58 
n = 32 
n = 41 
n = 62 
6.09 (2.57) 
4.94 (2.42)
6.27 (2.78)
3.51 (1.83)
6.19 (2.60) 
Time 4 
n = 60 
n = 56 
n = 29 
n = 39 
n = 59 
5.62 (2.42) 
4.87 (2.38)
5.95 (2.29)
3.34 (1.82)
6.33 (2.47) 
Time 5 
n = 56 
n = 56 
n = 29 
n = 38 
n = 57 
6.05 (2.31) 
4.96 (2.57)
Time 6 
NA 
NA 
NA 
n = 51 
n = 54 
 
 
 
Amnestic Disorders 
3.16 (3.78) 
1.27 (1.53)
2.88 (2.94)
0.70 (1.12)
4.30 (2.60) 
Time 1 
n = 64 
n = 63 
n = 33 
n = 43 
n = 67 
3.51 (3.67) 
2.97 (12.74)
5.42 (17.02)
1.01 (2.50)
5.98 (12.24) 
Time 2 
n = 62 
n = 60 
n = 33 
n = 41 
n = 65 
3.32 (3.63) 
2.76 (12.95)
2.60 (2.74)
0.49 (.90)
5.66 (12.59) 
Time 3 
n = 60 
n = 58 
n = 32 
n = 41 
n = 62 
2.92 (3.52) 
1.70 (2.54)
2.66 (3.38)
0.80 (2.31)
3.95 (3.73) 
Time 4 
n = 60 
n = 56 
n = 29 
n = 39 
n = 59 
2.63 (3.29) 
1.27 (2.37)
2.62 (3.45)
0.66 (.85)
3.46 (3.53) 
Time 5 
n = 56 
n = 56 
n = 29 
n = 38 
n = 57 
2.48 (3.07) 
1.37 (2.63)
Time 6 
NA 
NA 
NA 
n = 51 
n = 54 
 
 
 
Low Intelligence 
4.04 (12.24) 
2.33 (1.59)
2.28 (1.44)
1.77 (1.56)
2.97 (2.17) 
Time 1 
n = 64 
n = 63 
n = 33 
n = 43 
n = 67 
2.53 (2.19) 
4.13 (12.56)
5.45 (16.90)
1.60 (1.94)
4.14 (12.10) 
Time 2 
n = 62 
n = 60 
n = 33 
n = 41 
n = 65 
3.09 (2.53) 
4.09 (12.80)
2.06 (1.72)
1.34 (1.51)
4.27 (12.43) 
Time 3 
n = 60 
n = 58 
n = 32 
n = 41 
n = 62 
2.55 (2.33) 
2.23 (2.03)
2.52 (2.01)
1.59 (1.98)
2.56 (1.95) 
Time 4 
n = 60 
n = 56 
n = 29 
n = 39 
n = 59 
2.53 (2.34) 
2.58 (1.94)
2.18 (1.97)
1.50 (1.50)
2.61 (2.17) 
Time 5 
n = 56 
n = 56 
n = 29 
n = 38 
n = 57 
2.85 (2.44) 
2.37 (2.10)
Time 6 
NA 
NA 
NA 
n = 51 
n = 54 
Neurological Impairment 
 
 
 
4.85 (12.36) 
2.24 (2.09)
2.88 (2.42)
1.44 (1.45)
4.24 (2.92) 
Time 1 
n = 64 
n = 63 
n = 33 
n = 43 
n = 67 
3.04 (3.23) 
3.70 (12.66)
5.58 (16.89)
1.54 (2.18)
5.74 (12.33) 
Time 2 
n = 62 
n = 60 
n = 33 
n = 41 
n = 65 
3.27 (3.08) 
3.80 (12.88)
3.13 (2.79)
1.30 (1.77)
5.37 (12.54) 
Time 3 
n = 60 
n = 58 
n = 32 
n = 41 
n = 62 
2.97 (3.10) 
2.54 (2.79)
2.59 (2.10)
1.31 (1.56)
3.90 (3.52) 
Time 4 
n = 60 
n = 56 
n = 29 
n = 39 
n = 59 
2.68 (2.98) 
1.93 (2.21)
3.14 (2.86)
1.11 (1.41)
3.83 (3.72) 
Time 5 
n = 56 
n = 56 
n = 29 
n = 38 
n = 57 
2.87 (2.83) 
2.15 (2.82)
Time 6 
NA 
NA 
NA 
n = 51 
n = 54 
 
 
 
 
 
 

120 

All
5.49 (2.56)
n = 270 
6.50 (10.36)
n = 261 
6.37 (8.72)
n = 253 
5.46 (2.64)
n = 243 
5.29 (2.51)
n = 236 
5.49 (2.48)
n = 106 
2.58 (2.93)
n = 270 
3.85 (10.79)
n = 261 
3.21 (9.12)
n = 253 
2.51 (3.34)
n = 243 
2.19 (3.07)
n = 236 
1.89 (2.89)
n = 106 
2.80 (6.17)
n = 270 
3.52 (10.50)
n = 261 
3.19 (8.82)
n = 253 
2.32 (2.09)
n = 243 
2.35 (2.06)
n = 236 
2.62 (2.27)
n = 106 
3.31 (6.44)
n = 270 
3.95 (10.70)
n = 261 
3.57 (9.00)
n = 253 
2.78 (2.94)
n = 243 
2.58 (2.95)
n = 236 
2.49 (2.82)
n = 106 

APPENDICES 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Assessment 
Psychosis 
Time 1 
Time 2 
Time 3 
Time 4 
Time 5 
Time 6 
Total 
Time 1 
Time 2 
Time 3 
Time 4 
Time 5 
Time 6 

CSP MI 
 
2.87 (3.52) 
n = 64 
2.67 (3.06) 
n = 62 
2.68 (3.06) 
n = 60 
2.55 (3.10) 
n = 60 
2.07 (2.84) 
n = 56 
2.26 (3.11) 
n = 51 
 
18.79 (15.41) 
n = 64 
17.82 (11.97) 
n = 62 
18.94 (12.00) 
n = 60 
17.07 (12.16) 
n = 60 
15.53 (10.87) 
n = 56 
16.53 (10.90) 
n = 51 

CSP NMI

GP MI

GP NMI

1.10 (1.66)
n = 63 
2.42 (12.73)
n = 60 
2.66 (12.94)
n = 58 
1.18 (2.12)
n = 56 
0.86 (1.54)
n = 56 
1.02 (2.34)
n = 54 

1.97 (2.47)
n = 33 
4.48 (17.06)
n = 33 
1.38 (1.62)
n = 32 
1.79 (2.37)
n = 29 
1.76 (3.11)
n = 29 

0.42 (.66)
n = 43 
0.80 (2.09)
n = 41 
0.69 (.94)
n = 41 
0.51 (1.02)
n = 39 
0.50 (.86)
n = 38 

SCCF 
 
4.55 (3.59) 
n = 67 
5.43 (12.35) 
n = 65 
5.37 (12.67) 
n = 62 
3.73 (3.92) 
n = 59 
3.44 (3.76) 
n = 57 

NA 

NA 

NA 

11.46 (5.85)
n = 63 
12.55 (12.69)
n = 60 
12.83 (12.82)
n = 58 
12.59 (8.97)
n = 56 
11.51 (7.43)
n = 56 
11.88 (9.33)
n = 54 

16.13 (8.36)
n = 33 
17.83 (16.58)
n = 33 
15.47 (7.88)
n = 32 
15.81 (9.60)
n = 29 
15.63 (10.48)
n = 29 

7.85 (4.38)
n = 43 
8.13 (9.43)
n = 41 
7.41 (4.78)
n = 41 
7.72 (5.17)
n = 39 
7.11 (4.06)
n = 38 

 
22.96 (9.56) 
n = 67 
23.49 (15.63) 
n = 65 
22.30 (16.32) 
n = 62 
20.33 (12.53) 
n = 59 
19.68 (13.31) 
n = 57 

NA 

NA 

NA 

All
2.37 (3.12)
n = 270 
3.24 (10.75)
n = 261 
2.85 (9.06)
n = 253 
2.11 (3.03)
n = 243 
1.82 (2.87)
n = 236 
1.63 (2.79)
n = 106 
16.05 (11.25)
n = 270 
16.50 (14.33)
n = 261 
16.06 (13.15)
n = 253 
15.18 (11.17)
n = 243 
14.23 (10.78)
n = 236 
14.13 (10.29)
n = 106 

 
Table B19. Internal Consistency Estimates (Cronbach’s alpha) for SIMS Scales 
at each Time Period 
SIMS Scale 
Time 1  Time 2 Time 3 Time 4 Time 5 Time 6
Affective disorder 
.55 
.60
.58
.56
.52
.50
Amnesia  
.80 
.86
.86
.88
.87
.87
Low Intelligence 
.52 
.52
.62
.63
.60
.65
Neurological Impairment 
.75 
.82
.79
.81
.83
.83
Psychosis 
.85 
.85
.84
.87
.86
.87
Total 
.90 
.92
.92
.93
.92
.91

Trail Making Test (TMT)  
The TMT (Reitan, 1958) measures neurocognitive deficits related to attention, speed, and mental flexibility. 
There are two tasks (A and B) and the length of time to complete each task was recorded as total score for 
each task. Completion time on this measure varies widely but is generally around 5 to 10 minutes for both 
tasks  (Strauss,  Sherman,  &  Spreen,  n.d.).  While  individuals  connect  only  numbers  in  ascending  order  on 
Trails  A,  they  have  to  connect  numbers  and  letters  alternately  in  ascending  order  for  Trails  B  (Tombaugh, 
2004). We computed two derived scores—ratio of times on the two tasks (B/A) and the difference between 
times on the two tasks (B – A); these derived scores provide an indication of the time difference between 
Trails A and Trails B (Tombaugh, 2004); however, for the analysis in the report the Trails ratio (B/A) was used 
to  assess  change  over  time.  The  TMT  has  been  shown  to  be  sensitive  to  neurocognitive  deficits  (Sherrill‐
Pattison, Donders, & Thompson, 2000); it is important to consider age and education of participants when 
interpreting scores though.  

APPENDICES 

121 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
The TMT has demonstrated adequate test‐retest reliability over a 14‐ to 24‐week period (Mdn = 20 weeks; 
Trails A r = .46; Trails B r = .44; Matarazzo, Wiens, Matarazzo, & Goldstein, 1974) although stability may be 
impacted by population groups and time intervals. Practice effects might be a problem (McCaffrey, Ortega, 
& Haase, 1993) although research has shown that practice effects between administrations separated by at 
least 3 months may be negligible (e.g., Basso, Bornstein, & Lang, 1999). Another study found that the TMT’s 
3‐week test‐retest reliability was moderate to high, with Trails A having a correlation of .55 and Trails B hav‐
ing a correlation of .75 (Bornstein, Baker, & Douglass, 1987).  
Normative  data  are  available  on  nonclinical  populations,  separated  by  age  group  (Tombaugh,  2004).  For 
people aged 18 to 59, mean times on the Trails A ranged from 22.93 (SD = 6.87; 18‐24 years) to 35.10 (SD = 
10.94; 55‐59 years); mean times on the Trails B ranged from 48.97 (SD = 12.69; 18‐24 years) to 78.84 (SD = 
19.09; 55‐59 years; Tombaugh, 2004). Additionally, Matarazzo et al. (1974) found means for the Trails A and 
B to be 21.76 (SD = 5.65) and 54.17 (SD = 12.54), respectively. Descriptive statistics were also provided on 
the two scores that will be derived in the current study. While B‐A was found to have a mean of 39.7 (SD = 
21.5), B/A was found to have a mean of 2.1 (SD = .6) for an older adult, community‐dwelling sample (Sán‐
chez‐Cubillo et al., 2009). Convergent validity is adequate for the total scores on each of the trials as well as 
for the B‐A score (Sánchez‐Cubillo et al., 2009). The ratio score of B/A did not show significant correlations 
with any of the other assessed cognitive measures in Sánchez‐Cubillo et al.’s (2009) study but Periáñez et al. 
(2007) suggested that the B/A might be a purer measure of executive functioning. 
After consultation with a neuropsychologist, it was decided to use a derived score by taking the ratio of time 
to complete Task B with time to complete Task A; however, information about all Trails scores are provided 
in  this  section.  Table  B20  provides  the  summary  statistics  for  the  study  groups  on  the  Trails  tasks  at  each 
time period. Correlations between sequential time periods for the entire sample are given in Table B21. Cor‐
relations between the Trails tasks at each time period ranged between .21 and .97 (absolute values of corre‐
lations are given; the Trails B/A was always negatively correlated with Trails A time). Table B21 also provides 
the mean correlation of each task with the other tasks over time. The Trails tasks were correlated with per‐
formance on the SLUMS and the PBRS Dull‐Confused subscale. Correlation coefficients were small with the 
SLUMS  (range  =  .13  to  .31,  M  =  .21)  and  with  the  correctional  officer  ratings  on  the  PBRS  Dull‐Confused 
(range  =  ‐.12  to  .09,  M  =  ‐.01),  indicating  that  these  measures  are  assessing  distinct  aspects  of  cognitive 
functioning. 
Table B20. Summary Statistics (M, SD, n) on TMT Scores by Group and Time  
Assessment 
CSP MI 
CSP NMI 
GP MI
GP NMI
SCCF
Task A Time 
 
 
29.36 (14.18)  27.20 (8.76)  25.65 (7.70)
24.28 (6.00) 32.36 (19.80) 
Time 1 
n = 62 
n = 61 
n = 33 
n = 43 
n = 67 
29.70 (17.34)  24.46 (7.00)  24.09 (8.22)
22.25 (4.84) 29.46 (13.36) 
Time 2 
n = 61 
n = 59 
n = 32 
n = 41 
n = 64 
29.45 (21.46)  23.06 (7.36)  24.52 (6.79)
21.70 (5.97) 28.13 (15.10) 
Time 3 
n = 60 
n = 57 
n = 32 
n = 41 
n = 61 
29.78 (19.01)  22.63 (7.94)  21.99 (7.32)
21.04 (4.17) 26.64 (11.00) 
Time 4 
n = 59 
n = 56 
n = 29 
n = 39 
n = 59 
27.54 (15.32)  23.48 (8.91)  21.34 (6.67)
20.97 (3.94) 27.57 (15.45) 
Time 5 
n = 56 
n = 56 
n = 29 
n = 38 
n = 57 
27.27 (15.95)  20.91 (5.59) 
Time 6 
NA 
NA 
NA 
n = 48 
n = 54 
 
 
 

122 

All 
 
28.34 (13.51)
n = 266 
26.54 (12.10)
n = 256 
25.78 (14.01)
n = 251 
25.02 (12.27)
n = 242 
24.78 (12.11)
n = 235 
23.81 (12.02)
n = 103 
 

APPENDICES 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Assessment 
Task B Time 
Time 1 
Time 2 
Time 3 
Time 4 
Time 5 
Time 6 
B – A Time 
Time 1 
Time 2 
Time 3 
Time 4 
Time 5 
Time 6 
B/A Ratio 
Time 1 
Time 2 
Time 3 
Time 4 
Time 5 
Time 6 

CSP MI 
 
84.70 (55.39) 
n = 61 
77.74 (44.98) 
n = 60 
75.42 (45.66) 
n = 60 
71.63 (37.92) 
n = 59 
69.43 (32.73) 
n = 56 
62.75 (32.75) 
n = 48 
 
55.27 (47.23) 
n = 61 
48.82 (35.29) 
n = 60 
45.98 (31.68) 
n = 60 
41.84 (27.51) 
n = 59 
41.89 (23.20) 
n = 56 
34.48 (22.88) 
n = 48 
 
2.95 (1.11) 
n = 61 
2.84 (1.19) 
n = 60 
2.68 (.82)
n = 60 
2.59 (1.00) 
n = 59 
2.64 (.74)
n = 56 
2.40 (.74)
n = 48 

CSP NMI
 
83.46 (42.82)
n = 62 
71.09 (29.85)
n = 59 
66.33 (26.20)
n = 57 
62.78 (25.66)
n = 56 
62.27 (30.01)
n = 56 
55.84 (20.71)
n = 54 
 
56.33 (40.60)
n = 60 
46.63 (26.48)
n = 59 
43.27 (24.97)
n = 57 
40.15 (23.39)
n = 56 
38.78 (25.33)
n = 56 
34.93 (18.53)
n = 54 
 
3.19 (1.54)
n = 60 
2.94 (1.01)
n = 59 
3.02 (1.24)
n = 57 
2.92 (1.15)
n = 56 
2.73 (1.00)
n = 56 
2.73 (.86)
n = 54 

GP MI

GP NMI

SCCF 

82.46 (34.64)
n = 33 
66.30 (27.77)
n = 31 
66.11 (27.25)
n = 32 
58.29 (22.17)
n = 29 
54.98 (20.41)
n = 29 

68.94 (23.83)
n = 43 
70.63 (35.41)
n = 40 
63.41 (24.79)
n = 41 
56.78 (19.63)
n = 38 
58.81 (19.96)
n = 38 

96.29 (58.26) 
n = 67 
81.57 (34.51) 
n = 63 
78.26 (38.12) 
n = 61 
74.69 (37.81) 
n = 59 
72.71 (41.64) 
n = 57 

NA 

NA 

NA 

56.81 (31.14)
n = 33 
42.40 (21.97)
n = 31 
41.59 (23.35)
n = 32 
36.30 (19.15)
n = 29 
33.64 (18.59)
n = 29 

44.66 (21.75)
n = 43 
48.41 (34.89)
n = 40 
41.71 (22.39)
n = 41 
35.81 (18.01)
n = 38 
37.58 (18.81)
n = 37 

63.93 (46.29) 
n = 67 
52.11 (27.20) 
n = 63 
50.13 (30.18) 
n = 61 
48.04 (30.67) 
n = 59 
45.14 (32.39) 
n = 57 

NA 

NA 

NA 

3.30 (1.21)
n = 33 
2.80 (.74)
n = 31 
2.71 (.84)
n = 32 
2.74 (.84)
n = 29 
2.67 (.90)
n = 29 

2.89 (.88)
n = 43 
3.27 (1.84)
n = 40 
2.97 (1.00)
n = 41 
2.72 (.82)
n = 38 
2.87 (1.05)
n = 37 

3.04 (1.12) 
n = 67 
2.80 (.74) 
n = 63 
2.71 (.84) 
n = 61 
2.74 (.84) 
n = 59 
2.67 (.90) 
n = 57 

NA 

NA 

NA 

All
 
84.50 (47.67)
n = 266 
74.62 (35.86)
n = 253 
70.90 (34.93)
n = 251 
66.38 (31.78)
n = 241 
65.04 (32.04)
n = 236 
59.09 (27.13)
n = 102 
 
56.17 (40.64)
n = 264 
48.28 (29.82)
n = 253 
45.12 (27.45)
n = 251 
41.35 (25.45)
n = 241 
40.24 (25.25)
n = 235 
35.19 (20.59)
n = 102 
 
3.06 (1.20)
n = 264 
2.95 (1.20)
n = 253 
2.87 (1.05)
n = 251 
2.77 (.99)
n = 241 
2.72 (.99)
n = 235 
2.57 (.82)
n = 102 

Table B21. Test­Retest Correlation Coefficients for Trails Tasks at Consecutive Testing Intervals 
Trails Task  Time 1 to 2  Time 2 to 3  Time 3 to 4 Time 4 to 5 Time 5 to 6
r* 
Trails A 
.70 
.65 
.83
.81
.87
.41 
Trails B 
.66 
.70 
.73
.76
.75
.71 
Trails B – A 
.58 
.63 
.58
.63
.59
.69 
Trails B/A 
.36 
.37 
.44
.44
.39
.50 
*means correlation of task with other Trails tasks over time. 

Trauma Symptom Inventory (TSI) 
The TSI (Briere, 1995) is a 100‐item self‐report assessment of posttraumatic stress and other psychological 
consequences of traumatic events, including but not limited to rape, child abuse, spouse abuse, physical as‐
sault, combat, major accidents, and natural disasters. Respondents use a 4‐point rating scale (0—never to 
APPENDICES 

123 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
3—often)  to  report  on  the  experience  of  100  events  that  could  have  occurred  within  the  last  6  months. 
Scores are obtained on three validity scales (Atypical Response, Response Level, and Inconsistent Response) 
and 10 clinical symptom domains (Anxious Arousal, Depression, Anger/Irritability, Intrusive Experiences, De‐
fensive  Avoidance,  Dissociation,  Sexual  Concerns,  Dysfunctional  Sexual  Behavior,  Impaired  Self‐Reference, 
and Tension Reduction Behavior). Greater scores indicate more symptoms associated with trauma (Fernan‐
dez, 1998). It has been found that a fifth‐ to seventh‐grade reading level is required to complete the TSI; it 
takes approximately 20 minutes to complete this assessment (Fernandez, 1998).  
The TSI’s clinical subscales have demonstrated internal reliability with different samples. Alpha coefficients 
ranged between .74 and .91 for the standardization sample (nonclinical) with a median alpha coefficient of 
.88; alphas ranged from .69 to .90 with a median alpha of .86 for the university sample; furthermore, inter‐
nal consistency reliability ranged from .74 to .90 with a median alpha coefficient of .89 for a clinical sample 
(Briere, 1995). The three validity scales were also found to have internal consistency reliabilities between .51 
and .80 across the standardization as well as a military sample (Briere, 1995). There are no known test‐retest 
reliability estimates or studies completed with prison populations.  
Normative data are available by gender and age groups for the general population as well as for a clinical 
sample separated by gender (Briere, 1995). Means on the subscales ranged from 2.32 (SD = 4.20) to 7.69 (SD 
= 6.03) for nonclinical, younger males (i.e., 18‐54; Briere, 1995). Clinical samples were separated by trauma 
history;  means  for  males  in  the  group  without  trauma  history  ranged  from  2.24  (SD  =  3.17)  to  9.45  (SD  = 
5.90), whereas means for males in the group with trauma history ranged from 6.30 (SD = 7.44) to 16.32 (SD 
= 5.27; Briere, 1995). 
Reasonable convergent validity was found between the TSI and other measures, such as the BSI, Symptom 
Checklist, Impact of Event Scale, and the Personality Assessment Inventory (Briere, 1995). More specifically, 
three of the TSI’s clinical subscales that are most closely associated with subscales of the BSI were found to 
have high correlations: Anxious Arousal (TSI) and Anxiety (BSI) had a high correlation of .75, Anger/Irritability 
(TSI) and Hostility (BSI) correlated at .77, and Defensive Avoidance (TSI) and Depression (BSI) had a correla‐
tion  of  .82  (Briere,  1995).  The  correlations  of  the  TSI  subscales  and  the  subscales  from  two  posttraumatic 
stress scales (i.e., Impact of Event Scale, Symptom Checklist) were found to range between .35 and .74, indi‐
cating convergent validity (Briere, 1995). The Sexual Concern subscale of the TSI was moderately correlated 
(r = .53) with a measure tapping into sexual concerns (Briere, 1995). Furthermore, the Dysfunctional Sexual 
Behavior subscale was moderately  correlated  (r =  .32) with a question on another measure on how many 
sexual partners the person had over the course of the past 12 months as well as with four questions assess‐
ing the likelihood of the participant engaging in sex with an attractive stranger (r = .32), sex with any stran‐
ger (r = .19), posing for pornography (r = .22), and sex for money (r = .17; Briere, 1995). The Borderline Per‐
sonality  Disorder  subscale  of  the  PAI  was  found  to  correlate  moderately  with  the  Impaired  Self‐Reference 
scale (r = .65) as well as the Tension Reduction Behavior scale (r = .54; Briere, 1995). 
Table B22 provides the summary statistics for the study groups on the TSI Total Score. The internal consis‐
tency estimates were similar across groups and high (M = .97).  
 

124 

 

APPENDICES 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Table B22. Summary Statistics (M, SD, n) on TSI Total Score by Group and Time  
Statistic 
CSP MI  CSP NMI 
GP MI
GP NMI
SCCF
All
M 
98.43 
53.66 
87.86
40.64
119.55
83.12
SD 
58.85 
42.04 
50.06
30.34
58.40
58.17
n 
62 
60 
33
41
60
262
Cronbach’s α 
.98 
.97 
.96
.96
.97
.98

NORMATIVE COMPARISONS 
Because we used standardized assessments in this study, it is possible to compare scores for the study sam‐
ple to normative data. In this section, comparisons were made between each study groups’ mean and the 
normative mean using a one sample t test. Normative values were taken from the test manuals when avail‐
able  or  were  gathered  from  the  literature.  Normative  data  from  general  adult  populations  were  typically 
used; if male norms were available they were used. If only normative data for clinical samples were available 
then outpatient norms were used. One sample t tests indicated that in general, for all groups except the GP 
NMI group, scores were elevated above the normative data when participants entered the study and tended 
to stay that way. There were also fewer elevations on the SIMS malingering subscales with study groups fre‐
quently scoring similarly to “honest responders.” Table B23 provides a visual representation of the signifi‐
cant differences by group at each time period on each measure. Red shading indicates that the group mean 
is significantly different from the normative mean in the direction of more psychological or cognitive prob‐
lems, whereas green shading indicates that the group mean is significantly better than the normative mean. 
No shading indicates the groups were statistically similar to the normative data. 
 

APPENDICES 

 

125 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 

•

•
•• • •

EMMEN

•••
•••

=MN=
MIN=
=NM=
MIN= •
'MN
MN MEN
.MEN
•
MEN
Ir•
MEN
M
MN
M
MN •
NE _EN
MEN
MEN
MEM
MN=

ME

MENNEMEMENEMEN MENEM...EMMEN =MENNEN=

•• •••

••

MENNEMEMENEMEN MENEM...MN=
=MENEM=
MENNEMEMENEMEN MENNEMENNEN • =MENEM=
MENNEMEMENEMENEMENEMENNEMEN • =MENEM=
•
MENI • MN ••1117
MN
11111111
MEN MN MN
MN
MEN • MN
MN
MEM
1.1
__AIP
MI1 l'i III
•1 I__
••w••••III1
•
• •••
1•
1- II•
••
•• ••
•
••
••

MMEMMEMMEMMEMMEMMEMEM

MN
• ••
MEN •
• ••
MN
N
••
MN
N
=MENEM=
MENNEMEMENEMEN =MN
MENNEMEMENEMEN MENEM
MENNEMENEMENEMENEMEN

•
••
••
•

Table B23. Significant Differences of Study Groups from Normative Means 
Norm 
Measure 
CSP MI 
CSP NMI 
GP MI 
GP NMI 
SCCF 
Mean 
Time Interval*:   
1  2  3 4 5 6 1 2 3 4 5 6 1 2 3 4 5 1 2  3  4  5  1  2 3 4 5
BHS‐college 
2.32     
         
BHS‐clinical 
6.04     
         
BPRS Total 
49.29     
         
BSI Anxiety 
1.56     
         
BSI Depression 
1.26     
         
BSI Hostility 
1.70     
         
BSI Interpersonal Sensitivity 
0.96     
         
BSI Obsessive‐Compulsive 
2.22     
         
BSI Paranoid Ideation 
1.65     
         
BSI Phobic Anxiety 
0.55     
         
BSI Psychotic 
0.75     
         
BSI Somatization 
1.61     
         
BSI GSI 
0.25     
         
PAS Acting Out 
2.45     
         
PAS Alienation 
1.70     
         
PAS Anger Control 
1.73     
         
PAS Health Problems 
1.13     
         
PAS Hostile Control 
2.52     
         
PAS Negative Affect 
2.84     
         
PAS Psychotic Features 
0.71     
         
PAS Social Withdrawal 
2.17     
         
PAS Suicidal Thinking 
0.37     
         
PAS Total 
16.66     
         
POMS Anger‐Hostility 
7.10     
         
POMS Depression‐Dejection 
7.50     
         
POMS Fatigue‐Inertia 
7.30     
         
POMS Tension‐Anxiety 
7.10     
         
POMS Vigor 
<19.80     
         
POMS Total 
14.80     
         
SIMS Affective Disorders 
5.2     
         
SIMS Amnestic Disorders 
2.5     
         
SIMS Low Intelligence 
3.2     
         
SIMS Neurological Impairment 2.4     
         
SIMS Psychosis 
1.2     
         
SIMS Total 
14.5     
         
SLUMS 
<25.70     
         
STAI‐State 
35.72     
         
STAI‐Trait 
34.89     
         
Trails A Time 
22.93     
         
Trails B Time 
48.97     
         
Trails B – A 
29 
   
         
Trails B/A 
2.18     
         
*There are six assessments for CSP groups and five for the other three groups.  

COMPOSITE SCORES 
A composite score was developed for seven of the eight primary constructs by standardizing scores from the 
scales on the self‐report assessments. Clinician and correctional officer ratings are not included in compo‐
sites so that comparisons between self‐report and staff reports can be made. Self‐report scores were stan‐

126 

APPENDICES 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
dardized so that comparisons between different measures could be made more easily and to create a single 
measure for constructs assessed by multiple self‐report assessments. Scores were standardized by centering 
on the mean of the entire sample at the first assessment and dividing by the standard deviation. A compo‐
site  score  was  computed  by  standardizing  each  assessment  and  averaging  the  standardized  scores  across 
the individual assessments as the composite score. Internal consistency reliability estimates, test‐retest cor‐
relations,  and  validity  coefficient  estimates  for  these  composites  and  associated  subscales  are  presented 
within the discussion of each construct. Composite means and standard deviations are reported in the main 
body of the report.  
Anxiety Construct 
Anxiety was measured by eight self‐report variables assessed at each time period. The self‐report measures 
used to create the anxiety composite score were the State and Trait subscales of the STAI; the Anxiety, Ob‐
sessive‐Compulsive,  and  Phobic  Anxiety  subscales  of  the  BSI;  the  Negative  Affect  subscale  of  the  PAS;  the 
Tension‐Anxiety subscale of the POMS; and the Panic Disorder subscale of the PSI. This construct was also 
assessed  with  ratings  by  correctional  staff  (PBRS  Anxious‐Depressed)  and  clinicians  (BPRS  Anxiety‐
Depression). 
Internal consistency reliabilities were computed for each assessment period for the entire sample. The in‐
ternal consistency estimates are provided in Table B24. The reliability estimates were strong, indicating good 
internal  consistency  at  each  time  period  for  the  composite.  Reliabilities  for  individual  scales  were  similar 
across  testing  intervals,  and  they  were  similar  to  internal  consistency  estimates  from  normative  samples; 
only the BPRS showed low internal consistency estimates.  
Table B24. Internal Consistency Estimates for Anxiety Construct 
Measure 
# of items  Time 1  Time 2  Time 3  Time 4  Time 5  Time 6 
Anxiety Composite 
8 
.89
.90
.91
.91
.90
.89 
BSI Anxiety 
6 
.86
.90
.91
.91
.90
.90 
BSI Obsessive‐Compulsive 
6 
.88 
.89 
.90 
.91 
.88 
.88 
BSI Phobic Anxiety 
5 
.83
.86
.86
.87
.82
.88 
PAS Negative Affect 
3 
.68
.65
.65
.70
.65
.60 
POMS Tension‐Anxiety 
9 
.91 
.91 
.92 
.92 
.91 
.89 
PSI Panic Disorder 
9 
.89
.89
.89
.89
.90
.90 
STAI State 
10 
.93
.94
.94
.94
.94
.93 
STAI Trait 
10 
.93 
.94 
.94 
.94 
.95 
.93 
PBRS Anxious‐Depressed 
14 
.90
.90
.94
.90
.90
.90 
BPRS Anxious‐Depressed 
5 
.55
NA
.60
NA
.66
NA 

Test‐retest correlations for the anxiety composite are provided in Table B25 and indicate stable constructs 
for three month assessments.  
Table B25. Test­Retest Correlation Coefficients for Anxiety 
Composite at Consecutive Time Periods for each Study Group 
Interval 
CSP MI  CSP NMI  GP MI  GP NMI SCCF
All
Time 1‐2 
.76 
.57 
.71 
.80
.49
.56
Time 2‐3 
.73 
.86 
.82 
.84
.71
.82
Time 3‐4 
.86 
.86 
.75 
.70
.73
.84
Time 4‐5 
.83 
.76 
.77 
.76
.71
.83
Time 5‐6 
.75 
.83 
NA 
NA
NA
.80

APPENDICES 

127 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
The validity coefficients between anxiety measures are provided in Table B26 and indicate good convergent 
validity for all measures except for the PBRS Anxious‐Depressed subscale. The pattern of relationships is sim‐
ilar across time periods.  
Table B26. Correlations between Anxiety Construct Measures at each Time Period 
Time 1 
BSI OC  BSI PA  PAS NA POMS TA PSI PD STAI‐S STAI‐T 
BSI Anxiety 
.79 
.75 
.65
.81
.71
.60
.68 
BSI Obsessive‐Compulsive   
.66 
.69
.70
.64
.55
.66 
BSI Phobic Anxiety 
 
 
.50
.58
.56
.46
.50 
PAS Negative Affect 
 
 
.71
.46
.62
.76 
POMS Tension‐Anxiety 
 
 
.52
.70
.76 
PSI Panic Disorder 
 
 
.37
.41 
STAI‐State 
 
 
.78 
STAI‐Trait 
 
 
 
PBRS Anxious Depressed   
 
 
BPRS Anxious‐Depressed   
 
 
Time 2 
BSI OC  BSI PA  PAS NA POMS TA PSI PD STAI‐S STAI‐T 
BSI Anxiety 
.78 
.78 
.62
.82
.73
.63
.67 
BSI Obsessive‐Compulsive   
.69 
.60
.69
.68
.59
.68 
BSI Phobic Anxiety 
 
 
.55
.59
.65
.54
.56 
PAS Negative Affect 
 
 
.66
.39
.63
.79 
POMS Tension‐Anxiety 
 
 
.56
.72
.78 
PSI Panic Disorder 
 
 
.44
.46 
STAI‐State 
 
 
.83 
STAI‐Trait 
 
 
 
PBRS Anxious‐Depressed   
 
Time 3 
BSI OC  BSI PA  PAS NA POMS TA PSI PD STAI‐S STAI‐T 
BSI Anxiety 
.83 
.83 
.69
.83
.73
.67
.70 
BSI Obsessive‐Compulsive   
.75 
.69
.73
.72
.66
.70 
BSI Phobic Anxiety 
 
 
.59
.64
.69
.55
.58 
PAS Negative Affect 
 
 
.73
.48
.68
.80 
POMS Tension‐Anxiety 
 
 
.58
.74
.79 
PSI Physical Symptoms 
 
 
.48
.48 
STAI‐State 
 
 
.85 
STAI‐Trait 
 
 
 
PBRS Anxious‐Depressed   
 
 
BPRS Anxiety‐Depression   
 
Time 4 
BSI OC  BSI PA  PAS NA POMS TA PSI PD STAI‐S STAI‐T 
BSI Anxiety 
.81 
.78 
.63
.82
.69
.69
.72 
BSI Obsessive‐Compulsive   
.66 
.64
.75
.69
.71
.72 
BSI Phobic Anxiety 
 
 
.52
.59
.58
.54
.63 
PAS Negative Affect 
 
 
.70
.48
.66
.77 
POMS Tension‐Anxiety 
 
 
.60
.77
.78 
PSI Physical Symptoms 
 
 
.51
.51 
STAI‐State 
 
 
.84 
STAI‐Trait 
 
 
 
PBRS Anxious‐Depressed   
 
Time 5 
BSI OC  BSI PA  PAS NA POMS TA PSI PD STAI‐S STAI‐T 
BSI Anxiety 
.80 
.79 
.66
.79
.72
.62
.65 
BSI Obsessive‐Compulsive   
.74 
.69
.77
.67
.63
.70 
BSI Phobic Anxiety 
 
 
.62
.60
.58
.51
.58 
PAS Negative Affect 
 
 
.68
.47
.62
.76 
POMS Tension‐Anxiety 
 
 
.61
.78
.78 

128 

PBRS AD 
.05 
.12 
.05 
.12 
.10 
.06 
.07 
.11 
 
 
PBRS AD 
.10 
.04 
.09 
.13 
.11 
.06 
.18 
.17 
 
PBRS AD 
.04 
.04 
.06 
.14 
.16 
‐.02 
.12 
.14 
 
 
PBRS AD 
.20 
.12 
.15 
.13 
.17 
.19 
.15 
.18 
 
PBRS AD 
.20 
.22 
.19 
.21 
.27 

BPRS AD
.42
.35
.33
.35
.37
.35
.36
.37
.33
BPRS AD

BPRS AD
.41
.39
.36
.40
.40
.34
.40
.49
.12
BPRS AD

BPRS AD
.33
.33
.26
.38
.40

APPENDICES 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
PSI Physical Symptoms 
STAI‐State 
STAI‐Trait 
PBRS Anxious‐Depressed 
BPRS Anxiety‐Depression 
Time 6 
BSI Anxiety 
BSI Obsessive‐Compulsive 
BSI Phobic Anxiety 
PAS Negative Affect 
POMS Tension‐Anxiety 
PSI Physical Symptoms 
STAI‐State 
STAI‐Trait 
PBRS Anxious‐Depressed 

 
 
 
 
 
BSI OC  BSI PA
.77 
.74
 
.67
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

.44

PAS NA
.62
.55
.49

POMS TA
.81
.64
.52
.69

PSI PD
.74
.66
.62
.45
.63

STAI‐S
.57
.55
.37
.65
.76
.44

.47 
.20
.83 
.19
 
.21
 
 
 
 
STAI‐T  PBRS AD
.64 
.12
.61 
.14
.49 
.05
.77 
.13
.77 
.18
.49 
‐.01
.85 
.09
 
.08
 
 

.32
.36
.46
.26
BPRS AD

Note: Only Times 1, 3, and 5 had the BPRS administered. Time 6 includes only the CSP NMI and CSP MI groups.  

Cognitive Impairment Construct 
Cognitive impairment was assessed by two individually administered tests and ratings by the researcher. The 
SLUMS  was  used  to  assess  orientation,  memory,  attention,  and  executive  function.  The  TMT  was  used  to 
assess attention. The time required to complete the Trails A (connect sequential numbers) and B (connect 
alternating numbers and letters) tasks were collected, and the ratio of times (B/A) was used as the attention 
measure.  Because  these  measures  were  not  correlated  (see  descriptions  of  measures  above),  we  did  not 
combine  these  scores  into  a  composite  measure  of  cognitive  impairment  and  each  was  used  individually. 
The correctional staff completed ratings on the PBRS Dull‐Confused scale.  
Internal consistency estimates for the SLUMS were provided earlier in the description of the measure. Table 
B27 provides the correlations between consecutive testing periods and Table B28 has the correlations be‐
tween  the cognitive assessments, including  the  correctional officer ratings.  The correlations between con‐
secutive time periods are moderate in size and indicate stability across 3 month assessment periods. There 
are some variations in size of coefficients across groups. The validity coefficients are small and indicate that 
these assessments are likely measuring unique aspects of cognitive function.  
Table B27. Test­Retest Correlation Coefficients for Cognitive Impair­
ment Measures at Consecutive Time Intervals by Study Group  
Interval 
CSP MI  CSP NMI  GP MI GP NMI SCCF
All
SLUMS Scores 
 
 
Time 1‐2 
0.72 
0.55 
0.64
0.38
0.59
0.63
Time 2‐3 
0.63 
0.74 
0.65
0.59
0.78
0.70
Time 3‐4 
0.75 
0.77 
0.67
0.70
0.76
0.75
Time 4‐5 
0.75 
0.42 
0.67
0.64
0.75
0.67
Time 5‐6 
0.84 
0.67 
NA
NA
NA
0.78
Trails B/A  Scores 
 
 
Time 1‐2 
0.51 
0.32 
0.29
0.48
0.40
0.36
Time 2‐3 
0.20 
0.63 
0.40
0.32
0.33
0.37
Time 3‐4 
0.31 
0.55 
0.58
0.64
0.28
0.44
Time 4‐5 
0.59 
0.33 
0.66
0.70
0.30
0.44
Time 5‐6 
0.47 
0.35 
NA
NA
NA
0.39
 

APPENDICES 

129 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Table B28. Correlations between Cognitive Impairment Measures at each Time Period 
Time 1 
TMT B/A  PBRS DC  Time 4 
TMT B/A  PBRS DC 
SLUMS 
‐.26 
‐.12 
SLUMS
‐.14
‐.10 
TMT B/A 
  
.09 
TMT B/A
‐.01 
PBRS Dull‐Confused  
  
  
PBRS Dull‐Confused  
  
  
Time 2 
TMT B/A  PBRS DC
Time 5
TMT B/A PBRS DC 
SLUMS 
‐.170 
‐.081 
SLUMS
‐.30
‐.18 
TMT B/A 
  
‐.019 
TMT B/A 
  
‐.05 
PBRS Dull‐Confused  
  
  
PBRS Dull‐Confused 
Time 3 
TMT B/A  PBRS DC
Time 6
TMT B/A PBRS DC 
SLUMS 
‐.26 
‐.11 
SLUMS 
‐.13 
‐.03 
TMT B/A 
  
.04 
TMT B/A
‐.12 
PBRS Dull‐Confused  
  
  
PBRS Dull‐Confused 
Note: Only times 1, 3, and 5 had the BPRS administered. Time 6 includes only the CSP NMI and CSP MI groups. 

Depression/Hopelessness Construct 
The  depression  construct  was  assessed  using  five  self‐report  measures.  The  subscales  used  to  create  this 
composite were the BHS, the BSI Depression subscale, the PAS Negative Affect and Suicidal subscales, and 
the POMS Depression‐Dejection subscale. Table B29 provides estimates of internal consistency reliability for 
each subscale and the composite at each time period. There is evidence for adequate internal consistency 
for the composite (M = .75; range = .71 to .77). Internal consistency estimates for the subscales were similar 
to reliabilities found with normative samples with subscales with fewer items demonstrating lower alphas.  
Table B29. Internal Consistency Estimates for Depression Construct by Time Interval 
Measure 
# of items  Time 1 Time 2 Time 3 Time 4 Time 5 Time 6 
Depression Composite 
5 
.74
.76
.76
.77
.76
.71 
BHS Total 
20 
.92
.94
.94
.94
.94
.92 
BSI Depression 
6 
.87
.89
.90
.89
.90
.86 
PAS Negative Affect 
3 
.68
.65
.65
.70
.65
.60 
PAS Suicidal Thinking 
2 
.86
.91
.94
.95
.90
.94 
POMS Depression‐Dejection 
15 
.95
.95
.96
.95
.95
.93 
PBRS Anxious‐Depressed 
14 
.90
.90
.94
.90
.90
.90 
BPRS Anxiety‐Depression 
5 
.55
NA
.60
NA
.66
NA 

Table B30 provides estimates of test‐retest reliability. The correlations between consecutive assessments for 
the depression composite were strong (M = .76, range = .57 to .90) indicating good stability over time. Al‐
though  there  was  some  variability  in  estimates  across  groups  and  times,  there  is  reasonable  stability  esti‐
mates for each group.  
Table B30. Test­Retest Correlation Coefficients for Depression 
Composite at Consecutive Time Intervals for each Study Group 
Interval 
CSP MI  CSP NMI  GP MI  GP NMI SCCF
All
Time 1‐2 
.77 
.69 
.57 
.79
.65
.59
Time 2‐3 
.68 
.82 
.74 
.85
.73
.80
Time 3‐4 
.88 
.90 
.73 
.69
.72
.84
Time 4‐5 
.77 
.74 
.82 
.71
.77
.83
Time 5‐6 
.70 
.79 
NA 
NA
NA
.76

Table B31 provides the correlations between the measures of the depression construct. The validity coeffi‐
cients between assessments of the depression construct indicate good convergent validity with the excep‐

130 

APPENDICES 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
tion of the PBRS Anxious Depressed subscale. The magnitude and general pattern of relationships between 
measures were similar across assessment periods.  
Table B31. Correlations between Depression­Hopelessness Measures at each Time Period 
Time 1 
BSI Dep  PAS NA PAS ST POMS DD PBRS AD BPRS AD 
BHS  
.71 
.61
.47
.60
.12
.32 
BSI Depression  
 
.71
.59
.85
.10
.43 
PAS Negative Affect 
 
.46
.65
.12
.35 
PAS Suicidal Thinking  
 
.44
‐.01
.34 
POMS Depression‐Dejection  
 
.45
.13 
PBRS Anxious Depressed 
 
‐.03 
BPRS Anxiety Depression 
 
 
Time 2 
BSI Dep  PAS NA PAS ST POMS DD PBRS AD BPRS AD 
BHS  
.70 
.54
.45
.61
.10
 
BSI Depression  
 
.63
.62
.88
.14
 
PAS Negative Affect 
 
.46
.67
.13
 
PAS Suicidal Thinking  
 
.54
.18
 
POMS Depression‐Dejection  
 
.12
 
PBRS Anxious Depressed 
 
 
Time 3 
BSI Dep  PAS NA PAS ST POMS DD PBRS AD BPRS AD 
BHS  
.74 
.61
.43
.65
‐.02
.33 
BSI Depression  
 
.69
.60
.88
.07
.37 
PAS Negative Affect 
 
.41
.71
.15
.40 
PAS Suicidal Thinking  
 
.53
.11
.30 
POMS Depression‐Dejection  
 
.10
.44 
PBRS Anxious Depressed 
 
.12 
BPRS Anxiety Depression 
 
 
Time 4 
BSI Dep  PAS NA PAS ST POMS DD PBRS AD BPRS AD 
BHS  
.77 
.61
.43
.69
.13
 
BSI Depression  
 
.67
.58
.88
.18
 
PAS Negative Affect 
 
.42
.66
.13
 
PAS Suicidal Thinking  
 
.46
.23
 
POMS Depression‐Dejection  
 
.18
 
PBRS Anxious Depressed 
 
 
Time 5 
BSI Dep  PAS NA PAS ST POMS DD PBRS AD BPRS AD 
BHS  
.75 
.61
.39
.66
.19
.27 
BSI Depression  
 
.69
.51
.89
.25
.42 
PAS Negative Affect 
 
.39
.68
.21
.38 
PAS Suicidal Thinking  
 
.48
.29
.39 
POMS Depression‐Dejection  
 
.27
.42 
PBRS Anxious Depressed 
 
.26 
BPRS Anxiety Depression 
 
 
Time 6 
BSI Dep  PAS NA PAS ST POMS DD PBRS AD BPRS AD 
BHS  
.58 
.46
.45
.45
.14
 
BSI Depression  
 
.62
.51
.84
.20
 
PAS Negative Affect 
 
.35
.62
.13
 
PAS Suicidal Thinking  
 
.42
.41
 
POMS Depression‐Dejection  
 
.12
 
PBRS Anxious Depressed 
 
 
Note: Only times 1, 3, and 5 had the BPRS administered. Time 6 includes only the CSP NMI and CSP MI groups.  

 
 

APPENDICES 

 

131 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Hostility/Anger Control Construct 
The hostility/anger control construct was assessed using five self‐report measures: the BSI Hostility subscale; 
the  Anger  Control,  Hostile  Control,  and  Acting  Out  subscales  on  the  PAS;  and  the  POMS  Anger‐Hostility 
subscale.  Ratings  by  correctional  staff  (PBRS  Anti‐authority)  and  clinicians  (BPRS  Hostility)  also  assess  the 
hostility construct. Table B32 provides the internal consistency reliabilities for the subscales and composite. 
The  composite  internal  consistency  was  low  (M  =  .57)  for  the  six  time  periods.  Subscale  reliabilities  were 
lower  than  expected  for  the  PAS  subscales  and  the  BPRS,  although  the  smaller  internal  consistency  esti‐
mates were for scales with a small number of items and these reliability estimates are similar to other litera‐
ture.  
Table B32. Internal Consistency Estimates for Hostility Construct by Time Interval 
Measure 
# of items  Time 1  Time 2 Time 3 Time 4 Time 5 Time 6 
Hostility Composite 
5 
.54 
.56
.57
.61
.55
.60
BSI Hostility 
5 
.85 
.84
.87
.90
.87
.88
PAS Anger Control 
2 
.53 
.60
.51
.56
.52
.33
PAS Hostile Control 
2 
.52 
.47
.42
.37
.36
.61
PAS Acting Out 
3 
.27 
.28
.30
.39
.39
.46
POMS Anger‐Hostility 
12 
.92 
.93
.94
.94
.94
.94
PBRS Anti‐Authority 
13 
.94 
.93
.94
.94
.95
.90
BPRS Hostility 
3 
.57 
NA
.61
NA
.51
NA

The  correlations  between  consecutive  time  periods  are  given  in  Table  B33.  These  estimates  of  test‐retest 
reliability indicate that the hostility composite is stable between 3 month assessment periods. Groups are 
fairly similar in the magnitude of correlation coefficients between testing periods.  
Table B33. Test­Retest Correlation Coefficients for Hostility 
Composite at Consecutive Time Intervals for each Study Group 
Interval 
CSP MI  CSP NMI  GP MI  GP NMI SCCF
All
Time 1‐2 
.73 
.75 
.83 
.78
.69
.71
Time 2‐3 
.67 
.82 
.76 
.77
.80
.77
Time 3‐4 
.80 
.84 
.76 
.80
.77
.80
Time 4‐5 
.76 
.78 
.56 
.79
.77
.76
Time 5‐6 
.66 
.72 
NA 
NA
NA
.69

Table B34 provides the correlations between measures of the hostility‐anger control construct for each time 
period. The validity coefficients were quite variable across all measures and time periods (ranging between   
‐.11 and .84). Although scores on these measures tend to be stable, the different assessments may be tap‐
ping into quite different aspects of hostility given these variable and lower correlations. Examination of the 
content of the PAS items suggested that these items tapped into useful domains for understanding hostile 
and acting out behavior of the participants and thus these measures were kept, even though this leads to 
lower internal consistency estimates. Removing these items from the composite did increase internal consis‐
tency estimates but did not substantially change the study results, thus all subscales were kept as part of the 
composite (additional results are available from the authors upon request). 
 

132 

 

APPENDICES 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Table B34. Correlations between Hostility­Anger Control Measures at each Time Period 
Time 1 
PAS AO  PAS AC  PAS HC  POMS AH  PBRS AA  BPRS H 
BSI Hostility 
.20 
.54 
.17
.69
.06
.27
PAS Acting Out 
 
.18 
.14
.10
‐.11
.09
PAS Anger Control  
 
 
.28 
.44 
.14 
.10 
PAS Hostile Control  
 
 
.17
.12
.19
POMS Anger‐Hostility 
 
 
.09
.19
PBRS Anti‐Authority  
 
 
 
 
 
.15 
BPRS Hostility  
 
 
Time 2 
PAS AO  PAS AC PAS HC POMS AH PBRS AA BPRS H 
BSI Hostility 
.15 
.60 
.19 
.76 
‐.01 
 
PAS Acting Out 
 
.15 
.14
.12
.08
PAS Anger Control  
 
 
.24
.56
.06
PAS Hostile Control  
 
 
 
.14 
.12 
 
POMS Anger‐Hostility 
 
 
.04
PBRS Anti‐Authority  
 
 
Time 3 
PAS AO  PAS AC  PAS HC  POMS AH  PBRS AA  BPRS H 
BSI Hostility 
.15 
.45 
.15
.50
.02
.36
PAS Acting Out 
 
.15 
.15
.16
.06
.05
PAS Anger Control  
 
 
.24 
.48 
.11 
.29 
PAS Hostile Control  
 
 
.11
.08
.13
POMS Anger‐Hostility 
 
 
.05
.28
PBRS Anti‐Authority  
 
 
 
 
 
.26 
BPRS Hostility  
 
 
Time 4 
PAS AO  PAS AC PAS HC POMS AH PBRS AA BPRS H 
BSI Hostility 
.24 
.55 
.33 
.84 
.14 
 
PAS Acting Out 
 
.10 
.13
.18
.03
PAS Anger Control  
 
 
.33
.51
‐.02
PAS Hostile Control  
 
 
 
.27 
.09 
 
POMS Anger‐Hostility 
 
 
.12
PBRS Anti‐Authority  
 
 
Time 5 
PAS AO  PAS AC  PAS HC  POMS AH  PBRS AA  BPRS H 
BSI Hostility 
.19 
.47 
.22
.77
.18
.25
PAS Acting Out 
 
.18 
.14
.16
‐.02
.04
PAS Anger Control  
 
 
.32 
.46 
.15 
.20 
PAS Hostile Control  
 
 
.16
.003
.04
POMS Anger‐Hostility 
 
 
.14
.27
PBRS Anti‐Authority  
 
 
 
 
 
.27 
BPRS Hostility  
 
 
Time 6 
PAS AO  PAS AC PAS HC POMS AH PBRS AA BPRS H 
BSI Hostility 
.22 
.46 
.36 
.81 
.07 
 
PAS Acting Out 
 
.23 
.34
.10
.03
PAS Anger Control  
 
 
.39
.47
.08
PAS Hostile Control  
 
 
 
.24 
‐.06 
 
POMS Anger‐Hostility 
 
 
.13
PBRS Anti‐Authority  
 
 
Note: Only times 1, 3, and 5 had the BPRS administered. Time 6 includes only the CSP NMI and CSP MI groups. 

 
Hypersensitivity Construct 
The hypersensitivity construct was measured by two self‐report measures—the External Stimulus subscale 
of the PSI and the Interpersonal Sensitivity subscale of the BSI. This construct is assessing two different as‐
pects  of  hypersensitivity—environmental  and  interpersonal.  Internal  consistency  reliabilities  for  the  subs‐

APPENDICES 

133 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
cales computed for each assessment period for the entire sample indicate that there is substantial variability 
in the internal consistency estimates (see Table B35); however, examination of each scale shows that the BSI 
has  strong  internal  consistency  estimates  whereas  the  PSI  has  low  estimates.  The  PSI  was  created  by  the 
researchers, and its purpose was to capture variables not measured by existing measures, thus it may not be 
a unidimensional construct. The internal estimates of the composite are lower than might be hoped for and 
are evidence for the lack of a homogeneous construct. 
Although internal consistency estimates were low, the composite demonstrated modest estimates of test‐
retest  reliability  (see  Table  B36)  and  the  correlations  between  these  two  subscales  provided  evidence  of 
convergent validity (see Table B37). Thus these scales were analyzed as a composite for the major analyses 
completed  in  the  report.  Results  for  analyses  done  on  each  individual  variable  are  available  from  the  re‐
searchers upon request.  
Table B35. Internal Consistency Estimates for Hypersensitivity Construct by Time Interval 
Measure 
# of items Time 1 Time 2 Time 3 Time 4 Time 5  Time 6 
Hypersensitivity Composite 
2 
.55
.58
.61
.51
.48 
.47 
BSI Interpersonal Hypersensitivity 
4 
.81
.71
.86
.84
.84 
.83 
PSI External Stimulus 
5 
.22
.32
.28
.39
.34 
.27 
 
Table B36. Test­Retest Correlation Coefficients for Hypersensitivity 
Composite at Consecutive Time Intervals for each Study Group 
Interval 
CSP MI  CSP NMI  GP MI  GP NMI SCCF
All
Time 1‐2 
.56 
.59 
.56 
.67
.21
.46
Time 2‐3 
.59 
.74 
.78 
.80
.60
.71
Time 3‐4 
.71 
.71 
.63 
.65
.57
.70
Time 4‐5 
.68 
.64 
.75 
.72
.60
.71
Time 5‐6 
.67 
.65 
NA 
NA
NA
.68
 
Table B37. Correlations between Hypersensitivity 
Measures at each Time Period 
Time:  1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6
BSI IS with PSI ES  .38  .41  .44  .34  .32 .31
Note: Time 6 includes only the CSP NMI and CSP MI groups.  

Psychosis Construct 
The psychosis construct was assessed by three self‐report measures—the Paranoid Ideation and Psychotic 
subscales  of  the  BSI  and  the  Psychotic  Features  subscale  of  the  PAS—and  clinician  ratings  (BPRS  Thought 
Disorder). Table B38 provides the Cronbach’s alphas for each subscale and the psychosis composite. Internal 
consistency estimates were good for this composite and its components. Internal consistency estimates for 
the subscales were similar to those found with normative samples.  
Table B38. Internal Consistency Estimates for Psychosis Construct by Time Interval 
Measure 
# of items  Time 1 Time 2 Time 3 Time 4 Time 5 Time 6 
Psychosis Composite 
3 
.73 
.78
.80
.79
.80
.76 
BSI Paranoid Ideation 
5 
.78 
.80
.82
.83
.82
.82 
BSI Psychoticism 
5 
.77 
.78
.80
.77
.79
.75 
PAS Psychotic Features 
2 
.62 
.72
.71
.71
.79
.73 
BPRS Thought Disorder 
5 
.64 
NA
.52
NA
.57
NA 

134 

APPENDICES 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Table B39 provides correlations between sequential time periods. Examination of these test‐retest reliability 
estimates indicates good stability between assessment periods. The study groups are similar in magnitude of 
correlations.  
 Table B39. Test­Retest Correlation Coefficients for Psychosis 
Composite at Consecutive Time Intervals for each Study Group 
Interval 
CSP MI  CSP NMI  GP MI  GP NMI SCCF
All
Time 1‐2  .59 
.61 
.67 
.74
.55
.55
Time 2‐3  .52 
.83 
.75 
.87
.73
.75
Time 3‐4  .76 
.74 
.70 
.81
.77
.80
Time 4‐5  .71 
.69 
.78 
.82
.68
.75
Time 5‐6  .64 
.79 
NA 
NA
NA
.71

Table B40 provides estimates of validity coefficients between the measures of the psychosis construct. Cor‐
relations  indicate  reasonable  convergent  validity  for  this  sample,  although  correlations  are  stronger  be‐
tween self‐report assessments than between self‐ and staff‐report assessments.  
Table B40. Correlations between Psychosis Measures at 
each Time Period 
Time  Measure 
BSI Psy PAS Psy BPRS TD
BSI Paranoid Ideation 
.71 
.57
.22
BSI Psychoticism 
 
.35
.27
1 
PAS Psychotic Features 
 
.32
BPRS Thought Disorder 
 
BSI Paranoid Ideation 
.74 
.66
BSI Psychoticism 
 
.48
2 
PAS Psychotic Features 
 
BSI Paranoid Ideation 
.77 
.76
.31
BSI Psychoticism 
 
.56
.30
3 
PAS Psychotic Features 
 
.25
BPRS Thought Disorder 
 
BSI Paranoid Ideation 
.78 
.71
4 
BSI Psychoticism 
 
.47
PAS Psychotic Features 
 
BSI Paranoid Ideation 
.79 
.72
.15
BSI Psychoticism 
 
.53
.13
5 
PAS Psychotic Features 
 
.14
BPRS Thought Disorder 
 
BSI Paranoid Ideation 
.72 
.64
6 
BSI Psychoticism 
 
.42
PAS Psychotic Features   
Note: Only times 1, 3, and 5 had the BPRS administered. Time 6 includes 
only the CSP NMI and CSP MI groups. 

Somatization Construct 
The somatization construct was measured by four self‐report assessments, including the Somatization sub‐
scale of the BSI, the Health Problems subscale of the PAS, the POMS Fatigue‐Inertia subscale, and the Physi‐
cal Well‐Being subscale of the PSI. The mean Cronbach’s alpha across somatization measures and time pe‐
riods was .79 (see Table B41) and for the composite the mean alpha was .77, indicating adequate internal 
consistency for this sample. Estimates were similar across time periods.  

APPENDICES 

135 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Table B41. Internal Consistency Estimates for Somatization Construct by Time Interval 
Measure 
# of items  Time 1 Time 2 Time 3 Time 4 Time 5 Time 6 
Somatization Composite 
3 
.78
.79
.78
.78
.78
.73 
BSI Somatization 
7 
.87
.85
.88
.89
.88
.88 
PAS Health Problems 
2 
.56
.65
.65
.59
.65
.59 
POMS Fatigue‐Inertia 
7 
.91
.90
.94
.92
.92
.90 
PSI Physical Well‐Being 
8 
.72
.76
.73
.75
.76
.74 

Table B42 provides test‐retest reliability estimates. Correlations between consecutive time periods indicate 
strong  stability  across  time.  Reliability  estimates  are  similar  across  study  groups.  Table  B43  provides  esti‐
mates  of  convergent  validity.  The  correlations  between  the  measures  of  somatization  are  reasonable  for 
both self‐report assessments and clinician ratings. Correlations show the same basic pattern and magnitude 
at each time period. 
Table B42. Test­Retest Correlation Coefficients for Somatization 
Composite at Consecutive Time Intervals for each Study Group 
Interval 
CSP MI  CSP NMI  GP MI  GP NMI SCCF
All
Time 1‐2 
.81 
.69 
.82 
.79
.60
.62
Time 2‐3 
.74 
.80 
.81 
.86
.77
.83
Time 3‐4 
.80 
.74 
.74 
.76
.81
.84
Time 4‐5 
.81 
.71 
.67 
.82
.58
.77
Time 5‐6 
.77 
.67 
NA 
NA
NA
.85
 
Table B43. Correlations between Somatization Measures at each Time Period 
Time  Measure 
PSI PE 
PAS HP POMS F BPRS AD
BSI Somatization  
.54 
.54
.59
.34
PSI Physical Exercise 
 
.55
.61
.43
1 
PAS Health Problems  
 
.42
.35
POMS Fatigue 
 
.40
BPRS Anxiety Depression    
BSI Somatization  
.62 
.55
.61
PSI Physical Exercise 
 
.63
.64
2 
PAS Health Problems  
 
.49
POMS Fatigue 
 
BSI Somatization  
.56 
.53
.65
.37
PSI Physical Exercise 
 
.59
.56
.39
3 
PAS Health Problems  
 
.46
.44
POMS Fatigue 
 
.40
BPRS Anxiety Depression    
BSI Somatization  
.58 
.52
.67
PSI Physical Exercise 
 
.62
.60
4 
PAS Health Problems  
 
.40
POMS Fatigue 
 
BSI Somatization  
.56 
.54
.65
.27
PSI Physical Exercise 
 
.57
.62
.44
5 
PAS Health Problems  
 
.47
.28
POMS Fatigue 
 
.34
BPRS Anxiety Depression    
BSI Somatization  
.44 
.40
.64
PSI Physical Exercise 
 
.54
.54
6 
PAS Health Problems  
 
.38
POMS Fatigue 
 
Note: Only times 1, 3, and 5 had the BPRS administered. Time 6 includes only the CSP NMI and CSP MI groups.  

136 

APPENDICES 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Withdrawal/Alienation Construct 
The  withdrawal/alienation  construct  was  assessed  using  two  PAS  subscales—Alienation  and  Social  With‐
drawal—and  clinicians’  ratings  on  the  BPRS  Withdrawal  subscale.  Internal  consistency  reliabilities  were 
computed for each assessment period for the entire sample and are provided in Table B44. The Cronbach’s 
alphas indicate adequate internal consistency estimates for the self‐report measures but are lower for the 
clinicians’ ratings. Estimates are of similar magnitude across time periods. 
 Table B44. Internal Consistency Estimates for Withdrawal­Alienation Construct by Time Interval 
Measure 
# of items  Time 1 Time 2 Time 3 Time 4 Time 5 Time 6 
Withdrawal Composite 
2 
.63
.71
.67
.70
.71
.62 
PAS Alienation 
2 
.79
.74
.75
.72
.72
.72 
PAS Social Withdrawal 
2 
.69
.74
.72
.78
.75
.83 
BPRS Withdrawal 
6 
.47
NA
.49
NA
.40
NA 

Table  B45  provides  the  estimates  of  test‐retest  reliability  for  the  withdrawal  composite.  Correlations  be‐
tween sequential time periods were strong indicating good stability. Reliabilities were similar across testing 
intervals, although there was some variability.  
Table B45. Test­Retest Correlation Coefficients for Withdrawal 
Composite at Consecutive Time Intervals for each Study Group 
Interval 
CSP MI  CSP NMI  GP MI GP NMI
SCCF
All
Time 1‐2 
.65 
.67 
.55 
.64
.87
.60
Time 2‐3 
.72 
.83 
.75 
.65
.50
.73
Time 3‐4 
.76 
.83 
.61 
.69
.52
.73
Time 4‐5 
.63 
.81 
.60 
.49
.69
.71
Time 5‐6 
.67 
.76 
NA 
NA
NA
.72

The  convergent  validity  estimates  are  provided  in  Table  B46.  The  correlations  between  the  self‐report  as‐
sessments  (both  PAS  subscales)  indicate  strong  correlation  coefficients;  however,  the  correlations  of  the 
self‐report with the clinician reports are low. The same pattern is shown across all time periods.  
Table B46. Correlations between Withdrawal­
Alienation Measures at each Time Period 
Time  Measure 
PAS SW BPRS W
PAS Alienation  
.46 
.17 
1 
PAS Social Withdrawal 
 
.16
BPRS Withdrawal
 
PAS Alienation  
.55 
 
2 
PAS Social Withdrawal 
 
PAS Alienation  
.50
.06
3 
PAS Social Withdrawal 
 
.14 
BPRS Withdrawal
 
PAS Alienation  
.53
4 
PAS Social Withdrawal 
 
 
PAS Alienation  
.54
.18
5 
PAS Social Withdrawal 
 
.19
BPRS Withdrawal 
 
 
PAS Alienation  
.45
6 
PAS Social Withdrawal 
 
Note: Only times 1, 3, and 5 had the BPRS administered. Time 6 
includes only the CSP NMI and CSP MI groups.  

APPENDICES 

137 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 

SUMMARY 
Using standardized measures allowed us to assess if the scores we obtained in this sample were reliable and 
valid; we were also able to compare scores from our sample to known values. The self‐report assessment 
variables in general tended to perform similarly across study groups, across time, and to normative samples 
when  examining  internal  consistency  and  test‐retest  reliability.  Self‐report  measures  of  similar  constructs 
tended to demonstrate convergent validity. In order to combine measures, a composite was developed for 
each construct of interest, except cognitive impairment, by standardizing scores from the first assessment 
and computing the mean across measures of the same construct. These composites demonstrated adequate 
research reliability (internal consistency and test‐retest).  
This study included self‐report and staff report information to allow for convergence using different sources 
of  information.  Clinician  ratings  were  gathered  using  the  well‐known  BPRS.  The  scores  from  this  measure 
had a floor effect with scores much lower than normative data (used with clinical populations, including pa‐
tients  who  were  not  in  crisis).  These  scores  had  lower  than  expected  reliability  and  validity  estimates,  al‐
though some subscales  correlated  modestly with self‐report measures. There  are several possible reasons 
for  this,  none  of  which  have  been  tested  in  this  study—participants  were  not  forthcoming  with  clinicians, 
changing  of  locations  may  lead  to  unfamiliarity  between  participant  and  clinicians;  lack  of  familiarity  with 
measures by clinicians; clinicians have been desensitized to extreme behaviors in a prison setting so partici‐
pants  seem  to  be  functioning  well;  clinicians  are  accurate  but  participants  are  exaggerating.  Although  the 
floor effect is a concern, because we hypothesized the scores to increase over time on the BPRS, the meas‐
ure should be able to assess if the mean scores are getting worse over time.  
We also used the only measure we could find that allowed for ratings by correctional staff. The only study 
available  on  the  PBRS  as  a  reference  described  the  development  of  this  measure.  The  PBRS  assessments 
showed good internal consistency reliability; however, test‐retest reliabilities were low and there was little 
evidence of convergent validity.  
Mean  scores  for  each  sample  were  compared  to  means  from  normative  samples  or  published  research. 
These  comparisons  to  general  adult  populations  (typically,  but  sometimes  psychiatric  populations  were 
used) tended to show that all groups except the general prison participants without mental illness (GP NMI) 
had statistically significant elevations for the majority of measures across the study assessment periods. This 
finding suggests that participants entering administrative segregation have significant mental health issues 
to start, which underscores the importance of assessing individuals over time to explore changes that condi‐
tions of confinement might engender. 
In summary, the demonstration of good psychometric properties of the data would suggest that responses 
are not given randomly or haphazardly and that participants are responding in a consistent fashion.  

 
 
 
 

138 

APPENDICES 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 

APPENDIX B REFERENCES 
American Psychiatric Association. (1980). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (3rd ed). 
Washington, DC: Author. 
American Psychiatric Association. (2000). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (4th ed., text 
revision). Washington, DC: Author. 
Basso, M. R., Bornstein, R. A., & Lang, J. M. (1999). Practice effects on commonly used measures of executive 
function across twelve months. The Clinical Neuropsychologist, 13, 283‐292. doi: 
10.1076/clin.13.3.283.1743 
Beck, A. T. (1986). Hopelessness as a predictor of eventual suicide. Annals of the New York Academy of 
Sciences, 487, 90‐96. doi: 10.1111/j.1749‐6632.1986.tb27888.x 
Beck, A. T., Brown, G., Berchick, R. J., Stewart, B. L., & Steer, R. A. (1990). Relationship between hopelessness 
and ultimate suicide: A replication with psychiatric outpatients. American Journal of Psychiatry, 147, 
190‐195. Retrieved from http://ajp.psychiatryonline.org/ 
Beck, A. T., & Steer, R. A. (1993). Beck Hopelessness Scale: Manual. San Antonio, TX: The Psychological Cor‐
poration: Harcourt Brace & Company.  
Beck, A. T., Steer, R. A., Kovacs, M., & Garrison, B. (1985). Hopelessness and eventual suicide: A 10 year 
prospective study of patients hospitalized with suicidal ideation. American Journal of Psychiatry, 
142, 559‐563. Retrieved from http://www.lexisnexis.com/ 
Beck, A. T., Weissman, A., Lester, D., & Trexler, L. (1974). The measurement of pessimism: The hopelessness 
scale. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 42, 861‐865. doi: 10.1037/h0037562 
Biancosino, B., Barbui, C., Pera, V., Osti, M., Rocchi, D., Marmai, L., & Grassi, L. (2004). Patient opinions on 
the benefits of treatment programs in residential psychiatric care. The Canadian Journal of Psychia‐
try, 49, 613‐619. Retrieved from http://server03.cpa‐
apc.org:8080/Publications/Archives/CJP/2004/september/biancosino.pdf 
Bieling, P. J., Beck, A. T., & Brown, G. K. (2000). The Sociotropy‐Autonomy Scale: Structure and implications. 
Cognitive Therapy and Research, 24, 763‐780. doi: 10.1023/A:1005599714224 
Bornstein, R. A., Baker, G. B., & Douglass, A. B. (1987). Short‐term retest reliability of the Halstead‐Reitan 
Battery in a normal sample. The Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, 175, 229‐232. doi: 
10.1097/00005053‐198704000‐00007 
Boulet, J., & Boss, M. W. (1991). Reliability and validity of the Brief Symptom Inventory. Psychological As‐
sessment, 3, 433‐437. doi: 10.1037/1040‐3590.3.3.433 
Briere, J. (1995). Trauma Symptom Inventory: Professional manual. Lutz, FL: Psychological Assessment Re‐
sources, Inc. 
Broday, S. F., & Mason, J. L. (1991). Internal consistency of the Brief Symptom Inventory for counseling‐
center clients. Psychological Reports, 68, 94. doi: 10.2466/PR0.68.1.94‐94 
APPENDICES 

139 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Brown, G. K., Beck, A. T., Steer, R. A., & Grisham, J. R. (2000). Risk factors for suicide in psychiatric outpa‐
tients: A 20‐year prospective study. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 68, 371‐377. doi: 
10.1037/0022‐006X.68.3.371 
Brown, S., Chhina, N., & Dye, S. (2008). The psychiatric intensive care unit: A prospective survey of patient 
demographics and outcomes at seven English PICUs. Journal of Psychiatric Intensive Care, 4, 17‐27. 
doi: 10.1017/S1742646408001295 
Burger, K. G., Calsyn, R. J., Morse, G. A., Klinkenberg, W. D., & Trusty, M. L. (1997). Factor structure of the 
Expanded Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 53, 451‐454. doi: 
10.1002/(SICI)1097‐4679(199708)53:5<451::AID‐JCLP5>3.0.CO;2‐Q 
Clum, G. A., & Yang, B. (1995). Additional support for the reliability and validity of the Modified Scale for Sui‐
cide Ideation. Psychological Assessment, 7, 122‐125. doi: 10.1037/1040‐3590.7.1.122 
Cochran, C. D., & Hale, W. D. (1985). College norms on the Brief Symptom Inventory. Journal of Clinical Psy‐
chology, 41, 777‐779. doi: 10.1002/1097‐4679(198511)41:6<777::AID‐JCLP2270410609>3.0.CO;2‐2 
Cooke, D. J. (1998). The development of the Prison Behavior Rating Scale. Criminal Justice and Behavior, 25, 
482‐506. doi: 10.1177/0093854898025004005 
Coolidge, F. L. (n.d. a). An introduction to the Coolidge Correctional Inventory (CCI). Retrieved from 
http://www.uccs.edu/~faculty/fcoolidg// 
Coolidge, F. L. (n.d. b). Coolidge Axis Two Inventory‐Revised (CATI+): Manual. Retrieved from 
http://www.uccs.edu/~faculty/fcoolidg// 
Coolidge, F. L. (2004). Coolidge Correctional Inventory. Colorado Springs, CO: Author. 
Coolidge, F. L., Segal, D. L., Klebe, K. J., Cahill, B. S., & Whitcomb, J. M. (2009). Psychometric properties of the 
Coolidge Correctional Inventory in a sample of 3,962 prison inmates. Behavioral Sciences and the 
Law, 27, 713‐726. doi: 10.1002/bsl.896 
Cundick, B. P. (1975). Review of the Brief Symptom Inventory. In J. Close Conoley & J. J. Kramer (Eds.), The 
tenth mental measurement yearbook (pp. 111‐112). Lincoln, NE: University of Nebraska Press. 
Derogatis, L. (1993). Brief Symptom Inventory: Administration, scoring, and procedures manual. Minneapo‐
lis, MN: NCS Pearson, Inc. 
Durham, T. W. (1982). Norms, reliability, and item analysis of the Hopelessness Scale in general psychiatric, 
forensic psychiatric, and college populations. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 38, 597‐600. doi: 
10.1002/1097‐4679(198207)38:3<597::AID‐JCLP2270380321>3.0.CO;2‐6 
Dyce, J. A. (1996). Factor structure of the Beck Hopelessness Scale. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 52, 555‐
558. doi: 10.1002/(SICI)1097‐4679(199609)52:5<555::AID‐JCLP10>3.0.CO;2‐D 
Edens, J. F., Poythress, N. G., & Watkins‐Clay, M. M. (2009). Detection of malingering in psychiatric unit and 
general population prison inmates: A comparison of the PAI, SIMS, and SIRS. Journal of Personality 
Assessment, 88, 33‐42. doi: 10.1207/s15327752jpa8801_05 

140 

APPENDICES 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Fernandez, E. (1998). Review of the Beck Hopelessness Scale [revised]. In J. C. Impara & B. S. Plake (Eds.), The thir‐
teenth mental measurement yearbook (pp. 123‐125). Lincoln, NE: University of Nebraska Press. 
Fliege, H., Kocalevent, R. D., Walter, O. B., Beck, S., Gratz, K. L., Guiterrez, P. M., & Klapp, B. F. (2006). Three 
assessment tools for deliberate self‐harm and suicide behavior: Evaluation and psychopathological 
correlates. Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 61, 113‐121. doi: 10.1016/j.jpsychores.2005.10.006 
Gondolf, E. W. (2008). Supplemental mental health treatment for batterer program participants (Document 
no. 223030). Retrieved from http://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/nij/grants/223030.pdf  
Grassian, S. (1983). Psychopathological effects of solitary confinement. American Journal of Psychiatry, 140, 
1450‐1454. Retrieved from http://ajp.psychiatryonline.org/index.dtl 
Gratz, K. L. (2001). Measurement of deliberate self‐harm: Preliminary data on the deliberate self‐harm in‐
ventory. Journal of Psychopathology and Behavioral Assessment, 23, 253‐263. doi: 
10.1023/A:1012779403943 
Gratz, K. L., & Chapman, A. L. (2007). The role of emotional responding and childhood maltreatment in the 
development and maintenance of deliberate self‐harm among male undergraduates. Psychology of 
Men & Masculinity, 8, 1‐14. doi: 10.1037/1524‐9220.8.1.1 
Gray, R., Bressington, D., Lathlean, J., & Mills, A. (2008). Relationship between adherence, symptoms, treat‐
ment attitudes, satisfaction, and side effects in prisoners taking antipsychotic medication. The Jour‐
nal of Forensic Psychiatry & Psychology, 19, 335‐351. doi: 10.1080/14789940802113493 
Haney, C. (2003). Mental health issues in long‐term solitary and "supermax" confinement. Crime and Delin‐
quency, 49, 124‐156. doi: 10.1177/0011128702239239 
Harrison, K. S., & Rogers, R. (2007). Axis I screens and suicide risk in jails: A comparative analysis. Assess‐
ment, 14, 171‐180. doi: 10.1177/1073191106296483 
Hayes, J. A. (1997). What does the Brief Symptom Inventory measure in college and university counseling 
center clients? Journal of Counseling Psychology, 44, 360‐367. doi: 10.1037/0022‐0167.44.4.360 
Heeter, C., Winn, B., Winn, J., & Bozoki, A. (2008). The challenge of challenge: Avoiding and embracing diffi‐
culty in a memory game (Unpublished manuscript). Retrieved from 
http://meaningfulplay.msu.edu/proceedings2008/mp2008_paper_31.pdf 
Heinze, M. C., & Purisch, A. D. (2001). Beneath the mask: Use of psychological tests to detect and subtype 
malingering in criminal defendants. Journal of Forensic Psychology Practice, 1, 23‐52. doi: 
10.1300/J158v01n04_02 
Holden, R. R., Book, A. S., Edwards, M. J., Wasylkiw, L. , & Starzyk, K. B. (2003). Experimental faking in self‐
reported psychopathology: Unidimensional or multidimensional? Personality and Individual Differ‐
ences, 35, 1107‐1117. doi: 10.1016/S0191‐8869(02)00321‐5 
Holden, R. R., & Fekken, C. (1988). Test‐retest reliability of the Hopelessness Scale and its items in a universi‐
ty population. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 44, 40‐43. doi: 10.1002/1097‐
4679(198801)44:1<40::AID‐JCLP2270440108>3.0.CO;2‐P 
APPENDICES 

141 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Joesting, J. (1976). Test‐retest reliabilities of state‐trait anxiety inventory in an academic setting: replication. 
Psychological Reports, 38, 318. Retrieved from http://ejournals.ammonsscientific.com/ 
Kellett, S., Beail, N., Newman, D. W., & Frankish, P. (2003). Utility of the Brief Symptom Inventory in the as‐
sessment of psychological distress. Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 16, 127‐
134. doi: 10.1046/j.1468‐3148.2003.00152.x 
Kovacs, M., Beck, A. T., & Weissman, A. (1975). Hopelessness: An indicator of suicidal risk. Suicide, 5, 98‐103. 
Lewis, J. L., Simcox, A. M., & Berry, D. T. R. (2002). Screening for feigned psychiatric symptoms in a forensic 
sample by using the MMPI‐2 and the Structured Inventory of Malingered Symptomatology. Psycho‐
logical Assessment, 14, 170‐176. doi: 10.1037/1040‐3590.14.2.170 
Long, J. D., Harring, J. R., Brekke, J. S., Test, M.A., & Greenberg, J. (2007). Longitudinal construct validity of 
Brief Symptom Inventory subscales in schizophrenia. Psychological Assessment, 19, 298‐308. doi: 
10.1037/1040‐3590.19.3.298 
Lorr, M., McNair, D. M., Heuchert, JW. P., & Droppleman, L. F. (2003). POMS: profile of mood states. Toron‐
to, Canada: Multi‐Health Systems. 
Matarazzo, J., Wiens, A., Matarazzo, R., & Goldstein, S. (1974). Psychometric and clinical test‐retest reliabili‐
ty of the Halstead Impairment Index in a sample of healthy, young, normal men. Journal of Nervous 
and Mental Disease, 158, 37‐49. doi: 10.1097/00005053‐197401000‐00006 
McCaffrey, R. J., Ortega, A., & Haase, R. F. (1993). Effects of repeated neuropsychological assessments. Arc‐
hives of Clinical Neuropsychology, 8, 519‐524. doi: 10.1016/0887‐6177(93)90052‐3 
McNair, D. M., & Heuchert, J. W. P. (2006). POMS: Profile of Mood States, technical update. North Tonawan‐
da, NY: Multi‐Health Systems Inc. 
McNair, D. M., Lorr, M., & Droppleman, L. F. (1971). Manual: Profile of Mood States. San Diego, CA: Educa‐
tional and Industrial Testing Service. 
McNair, D. M., Lorr, M., & Droppleman, L. F. (1992). Manual: Profile of Mood States, Revised 1992. San Di‐
ego, CA: Educational and Industrial Testing Service. 
Merckelbach, H., & Smith, G. P. (2003). Diagnostic accuracy of the structured inventory of malingered symp‐
tomatology (SIMS) in detecting instructed malingering. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, 18, 
145‐152. doi: 10.1093/arclin/18.2.145 
Metzger, R. L. (1976). A reliability and validity study of the State‐Trait Anxiety Inventory. Journal of Clinical 
Psychology, 32, 276‐278. doi: 10.1002/1097‐4679(197604)32:2<276::AID‐
JCLP2270320215>3.0.CO;2‐G 
Morey, L. C. (1991). Personality Assessment Inventory: Professional manual. Odessa, FL: Psychological As‐
sessment Resources, Inc. 
Morey, L. C. (1997). Personality Assessment Screener: Professional manual. Lutz, FL: Psychological Assess‐
ment Resources, Inc.  

142 

APPENDICES 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Morlan, K. K., & Tan, S. (1998). Comparison of the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale and the Brief Symptom In‐
ventory. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 54, 885‐894. doi: 10.1002/(SICI)1097‐
4679(199811)54:7<885::AID‐JCLP3>3.0.CO;2‐E 
Nicholls, T. L., Lee, Z., Corrado, R. R., & Ogloff, J. R. P. (2004). Women inmates’ mental health needs: Evi‐
dence of the validity of the Jail Screening Assessment Tool (JSAT). International Journal of Forensic 
Mental Health, 3, 167‐184. Retrieved from http://www.iafmhs.org/iafmhs.asp 
Nixon, G. F., & Steffeck, J. C. (1977). Reliability of the State‐Trait Anxiety Inventory. Psychological Reports, 
40, 357‐358. Retrieved from http://ejournals.ammonsscientific.com/  
Norcross, J. C., Guadagnoli, E., & Prochaska, J. O. (1984). Factor structure of the Profile of Mood States 
(POMS): Two partial replications. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 40, 1270‐ 1277. doi: 10.1002/1097‐
4679(198409)40:5<1270::AID‐JCLP2270400526>3.0.CO;2‐7 
Novy, D. M., Nelson, D. V., Goodwin, J., & Rowzee, R. D. (1993). Psychometric comparability of the State‐
Trait Anxiety Inventory for different ethnic subpopulations. Psychological Assessment, 5, 343‐349. 
doi: 10.1037/1040‐3590.5.3.343 
Nyenhuis, D. L., Yamamoto, C., Luchetta, T., Terrien, A., & Parmentier, A. (1999). Adult and geriatric norma‐
tive data and validation of the Profile of Mood States. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 55, 79‐86. doi: 
10.1002/(SICI)1097‐4679(199901)55:1<79::AID‐JCLP8>3.0.CO;2‐7 
Palmer, E. J., & Connelly, R. (2005). Depression, hopelessness and suicide ideation among vulnerable prison‐
ers. Criminal Behaviour and Mental Health, 15, 164‐170. doi: 10.1002/cbm.4 
Periáñez, J. A., Ríos‐Lago, M., Rodríguez‐Sánchez, J. M., Adrover‐Roig, D., Sánchez‐Cubillo, I., Crespo‐Facorro, 
B., Quemade, J. I., … (2007). Trail Making Test in traumatic brain injury, schizophrenia, and normal 
ageing: Sample comparisons and normative data. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, 22, 433‐447. 
doi: 10.1016/j.acn.2007.01.022  
Perlick, D. A., Rosenheck, R. A., Clarkin, J. F., Sirey, J., & Raue, P. (1999). Symptoms predicting inpatient ser‐
vice use among patients with bipolar affective disorder. Psychiatric Services, 50, 806‐812. Retrieved 
from http://ps.psychiatryonline.org/index.dtl  
Piersma, H. L., Reaume, W. M., & Boes, J. L. (1994). The Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI) as an outcome meas‐
ure for adult psychiatric inpatients. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 50, 555‐563. doi: 10.1002/1097‐
4679(199407)50:4<555::AID‐JCLP2270500410>3.0.CO;2‐G 
Reitan, R. M. (1958). Validity of the Trail Making Test as an indicator of organic brain damage. Perceptual 
and Motor Skills, 8, 271‐276. doi: 10.2466/PMS.8.7.271‐276  
Sánchez‐Cubillo, I., Periáñez, J. A., Adrover‐Roig, D., Rodriguez‐Sánchez, J. M., Rios‐Lago, M., Tirapu, J., & 
Barceló, F. (2009). Construct validity of the Trail Making Test: Role of task‐switching, working memo‐
ry, inhibition/inference control, and visuomotor abilities. Journal of International Neuropsychologi‐
cal Society, 15, 438‐450. doi: 10.1017/S1355617709090626 

APPENDICES 

143 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Segal, S. P., & Silverman, C. (2002). Determinants of client outcomes in self‐help agencies. Psychiatric Servic‐
es, 53, 304‐309. doi: 10.1176/appi.ps.53.3.304 
Sherrill‐Pattison, S., Donders, J., & Thompson, E. (2000). Influence of demographic variables on neuropsy‐
chological test performance after traumatic brain injury. The Clinical Neuropsychologist, 14, 496‐
503. doi: 10.1076/clin.14.4.496.7196 
Spielberger, C., Gorsuch, R., & Lushene, R. (1970). The State‐Trait Anxiety Inventory: Test manual for Form X. 
Palo Alto, CA: Consulting Psychologists Press. 
Spielberger, C., Gorsuch, R., Lushene, R., Vagg, P. R., & Jacobs, G. A. (1983). The State‐Trait Anxiety Inventory 
for adults: Sampler set. Palo Alto, CA: Consulting Psychologists Press. 
Steed, L. (2001). Further validity and reliability evidence for Beck Hopelessness Scale scores in a nonclinical 
sample. Educational and Psychological Measurement, 61, 303‐316. doi: 
10.1177/00131640121971121 
Strauss, E., Sherman, E. M. S., & Spreen, O. (Eds.). A compendium of neuropsychological tests: Administra‐
tion, norms, and commentary (3rd ed., pp. 3‐28). New York, NY: Oxford University Press. 
Tariq, S. H., Tumosa, N., Chibnall, J. T., Perry, M. H., & Morley, J. E. (2006). Comparison of the Saint Louis 
University Mental Status Examination and the Mini‐Mental State Examination for detecting demen‐
tia and mild neurocognitive disorder—a pilot study. American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 14, 
900‐910. doi: 10.1097/01.JGP.0000221510.33817.86 
Thomas, A., Donnell, A. J., & Young, T. R. (2004). Factor structure and differential validity of the Expanded 
Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale. Assessment, 11, 177‐187. doi: 10.1177/1073191103262893 
Tombaugh, T. N. (2004). Trail Making Test A and B: Normative data stratified by age and education. Archives 
of Clinical Neuropsychology, 19, 203‐214. doi: 10.1016/S0887‐6177(03)00039‐8 
Ventura, J., Lukoff, D., Nuechterlein, K. H., Liberman, R. P., Green, M. F., & Shaner, A. (1993). Brief Psychia‐
tric Rating Scale (BPRS) expanded version (4.0): Scales, anchor points, and administration manual. 
International Journal of Methods in Psychiatric Research, 3, 227‐244.  
Whitcomb, J. M. (2006). Psychometric Properties of the Coolidge Correctional Inventory (CCI) in a sample of 
4872 prison inmates (Unpublished master’s thesis). University of Colorado at Colorado Springs, CO.  
Widows, M. R., & Smith, G. P. (2005). Structured Inventory of Malingered Symptomatology: Professional ma‐
nual. Lutz, FL: Psychological Assessment Resources, Inc. 
Zinger, I., Wichmann, C., & Andrews, D. A. (2001). The psychological effects of 60 days in administrative se‐
gregation. Canadian Journal of Criminology, 43, 47‐83. Retrieved from http://www.ccja‐
acjp.ca/en/cjc.html  
 

144 

 

APPENDICES 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 

APPENDIX C 
PRISON SYMPTOM INVENTORY ANALYSES 
The Prison Symptom Inventory (PSI) was developed by the researchers to assess potential responses to AS 
confinement  that were not covered by  other measures. These variables were  identified  through examina‐
tion of the professional literature and include nervousness, headaches, lethargy, chronic tiredness, trouble 
sleeping,  a  sense  of  impending  breakdown,  perspiring  hands,  heart  palpitations,  dizziness,  nightmares, 
trembling  hands,  and  fainting.  Additionally,  items  about  exercise,  grooming,  and  safety  issues  within  AS 
were included. The 39‐item inventory is given in Appendix A and information about the psychometric prop‐
erties of the scale are provided in Appendix B.  
PSI  items  were  grouped  by  the  researchers  into  subscales  which  were  thought  to  measure  specific  con‐
structs.  Three  of  these  subscales  (Hypersensitivity  to  External  Stimuli,  Panic  Disorder,  and  Physical  Well‐
Being and Exercise) related to constructs assessed by the composites and were included in the composite 
analyses  reported  in  the  main  body  of  the  report.  In  this  appendix  we  provide  results  from  the  analyses 
comparing the study groups on all of the PSI subscales to address the major hypotheses. Table C1 gives a list 
of the subscales along with items and possible range of scores. Higher scores on the PSI subscales indicate 
more negative behaviors except on the Attitudes about Segregation subscale where higher scores indicate a 
preference for AS. Table C2 (a replication of Table B12) provides the summary statistics on each subscale for 
each study group.  
Table C1. PSI Subscales and Range of Possible Scores 
Subscale 
# Items
Items
Attitudes about Segregation 
2
r14, 39
Fear Level 
4
3, 12, 21, r38
Hypersensitivity to External Stimuli 
5
1, 7, r31, r34, 37
Mental Well‐Being 
2
26, r35
Mutism 
2
22, r32
Panic Disorder 
9
2, 6, 10, 13, 16, 17, 20, 25, 30
Physical Hygiene 
5
4, r9, 18, r23, r29
Physical Well‐Being and Exercise 
8
r5, 8, r11, r15, 19, 24, 27, r28
Safety 
2
33, 36

Range of Possible Scores
0 – 10
0 – 20
0 – 25
0 – 10
0 – 10
0 – 45
0 – 25
0 – 40
0 – 10

Note. Item numbers with an r indicate that the item is reversed coded.  

Table C2. Summary Statistics (M, SD, n) on PSI Scales by Group and Time  
Assessment 
CSP MI 
CSP NMI
GP MI
GP NMI
Attitudes about Segregation   
2.95 (3.19) 
1.68 (2.57)
2.46 (3.00)
1.00 (2.10)
1 
n = 57 
n = 56 
n = 28 
n = 30 
2.97 (3.54) 
1.68 (2.63)
2.24 (2.76)
1.54 (2.42)
2 
n = 61 
n = 56 
n = 25 
n = 26 
3.02 (3.36) 
1.04 (2.39)
2.04 (2.30)
1.22 (1.60)
3 
n = 55 
n = 56 
n = 25 
n = 27 
2.60 (3.21) 
1.29 (2.43)
1.91 (2.45)
1.83 (2.58)
4 
n = 55 
n = 55 
n = 22 
n = 24 
3.12 (3.51) 
1.45 (2.32)
2.54 (2.67)
1.30 (1.98)
5 
n = 52 
n = 55 
n = 22 
n = 20 
2.57 (3.45) 
1.45 (2.32)
6 
NA 
NA 
n = 49 
n = 52 

APPENDICES 

SCCF 
 
4.58 (3.47) 
n = 67 
5.55 (3.30) 
n = 60 
4.62 (3.45) 
n = 55 
4.96 (3.42) 
n = 46 
5.24 (3.57) 
n = 45 
NA 

All
2.81 (3.24)
n = 238 
3.09 (3.42)
n = 228 
2.58 (3.18)
n = 218 
2.61 (3.20)
n = 202 
2.89 (3.32)
n = 194 
1.92 (2.98)
n = 102 

145 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Assessment 
Fear Level 

CSP MI 
CSP NMI
 
 
6.25 (4.62) 
4.17 (3.46)
1 
n = 64 
n =63 
5.50 (4.18) 
3.51 (2.54)
2 
n = 62 
n = 59 
5.71 (4.10) 
3.91 (2.73)
3 
n = 58 
n = 57 
5.22 (3.83) 
3.91 (2.96)
4 
n = 59 
n = 56 
5.50 (3.50) 
3.87 (2.75)
5 
n = 58 
n = 56 
5.43 (3.43) 
4.28 (2.72)
6 
n = 51 
n = 54 
Hypersensitivity to External Stimuli 
10.54 (4.02) 
9.62 (3.92)
1 
n = 64 
n =63 
10.10 (4.52) 
7.81 (3.86)
2 
n = 62 
n = 59 
10.71 (4.65) 
8.33 (4.11)
3 
n = 58 
n = 57 
9.99 (4.64) 
9.22 (4.49)
4 
n = 58 
n = 56 
9.54 (4.09) 
9.03 (4.09)
5 
n = 56 
n = 56 
9.37 ( 4.33) 
9.02 (3.59)
6 
n = 51 
n = 54 
Mental Well‐Being 
 
4.95 (2.48) 
4.48 (2.48)
1 
n = 64 
n =63 
4.88 (2.24) 
3.69 (2.55)
2 
n = 61 
n = 59 
4.33 (2.42) 
3.98 (2.41)
3 
n = 58 
n = 57 
4.71 (2.43) 
3.96 (2.26)
4 
n = 58 
n = 56 
4.13 (2.24) 
3.59 (2.25)
5 
n = 55 
n = 56 
4.02 (2.01) 
3.68 (2.52)
6 
n = 51 
n = 54 
Mutism 
 
 
3.67 (2.19) 
2.65 (1.70)
1 
n = 64 
n =63 
4.44 (2.21) 
2.98 (1.97)
2 
n = 62 
n = 59 
4.14 (2.29) 
2.98 (1.81)
3 
n = 57 
n = 57 
4.41 (2.44) 
2.96 (1.74)
4 
n = 58 
n = 56 
4.09 (2.08) 
3.00 (1.80)
5 
n = 55 
n = 55 
4.00 (2.19) 
2.75 (1.69)
6 
n = 50 
n = 52 

146 

GP MI

GP NMI

4.94 (3.78)
n = 33 
4.53 (3.37)
n = 32 
4.88 (3.40)
n = 32 
4.91 (3.08)
n = 29 
4.79 (3.21)
n = 29 

3.51 (3.03)
n = 43 
3.46 (2.60)
n = 41 
3.53 (2.07)
n = 41 
3.26 (2.53)
n = 39 
3.39 (2.49)
n = 38 

SCCF 
 
7.63 (4.15) 
n = 67 
7.14 (4.96) 
n = 64 
7.66 (4.00) 
n = 61 
6.76 (4.09) 
n = 59 
6.81 (4.30) 
n = 57 

NA 

NA 

NA 

11.00 (5.38)
n = 33 
11.06 (3.83)
n = 32 
11.34 (3.95)
n = 32 
10.15 (3.78)
n = 29 
10.65 (4.43)
n = 29 

8.44 (3.70)
n = 43 
8.20 (4.09)
n = 41 
7.76 (4.13)
n = 41 
8.00 (3.20)
n = 39 
7.60 (3.62)
n = 38 

 
9.61 (3.94) 
n = 67 
10.11 (3.96) 
n = 64 
9.72 (4.63) 
n = 61 
9.22 (4.49) 
n = 59 
9.03 (4.09) 
n = 57 

NA 

NA 

NA 

5.39 (2.54)
n = 33 
5.09 (2.61)
n = 32 
4.97 (2.47)
n = 32 
4.25 (2.78)
n = 28 
4.66 (2.54)
n = 29 

4.00 (2.43)
n = 43 
3.24 (2.34)
n = 41 
3.22 (2.31)
n = 41 
2.77 (1.56)
n = 39 
2.66 (2.29)
n = 38 

 
5.19 (2.39) 
n = 67 
5.33 (2.53) 
n = 63 
5.44 (2.61) 
n = 61 
5.58 (2.44) 
n = 59 
5.21 (2.24) 
n = 56 

NA 

NA 

NA 

3.61 (2.07)
n = 33 
3.16 (1.87)
n = 32 
3.19 (1.89)
n = 32 
3.28 (1.74)
n = 28 
3.21 (1.76)
n = 29 

2.40 (1.50)
n = 43 
2.20 (1.50)
n = 41 
2.32 (1.56)
n = 41 
2.59 (1.44)
n = 39 
2.26 (1.60)
n = 38 

 
3.81 (1.96) 
n = 67 
4.11 (1.72) 
n = 64 
4.44 (2.28) 
n = 61 
3.95 (2.05) 
n = 57 
3.60 (1.94) 
n = 57 

NA 

NA 

NA 

All
5.51 (4.18)
n = 270 
5.01 (4.00)
n = 258 
5.31 (3.74)
n = 250 
4.94 (3.63)
n = 241 
5.00 (3.58)
n = 236 
4.84 (3.11)
n = 106 
9.82 (4.16)
n = 270 
9.40 (4.22)
n = 258 
9.52 (4.50)
n = 249 
9.55 (4.10)
n = 241 
9.32 (4.10)
n = 236 
9.20 (3.93)
n = 106 
4.80 (2.48)
n = 270 
4.48 (2.56)
n = 256 
4.42 (2.55)
n = 249 
4.38 (2.48)
n = 240 
4.08 (2.43)
n = 234 
3.86 (2.27)
n = 106 
3.26 (1.98)
n = 270 
3.51 (2.04)
n = 258 
3.52 (2.16)
n = 248 
3.53 (2.06)
n = 238 
3.31 (1.95)
n = 234 
3.38 (2.04)
n = 103 

APPENDICES 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Assessment 
Panic Disorder 
1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 

CSP MI 
 
9.09 (10.18) 
n = 64 
7.87 (8.62) 
n = 62 
8.76 (9.17) 
n = 60 
7.32 (7.72) 
n = 60 
6.50 (8.80) 
n = 56 
5.34 (7.25) 
n = 51 

CSP NMI

GP MI

GP NMI

3.89 (5.49)
n =63 
3.71 (7.72)
n = 59 
3.46 (4.20)
n = 57 
3.79 (5.44)
n = 56 
3.45 (4.34)
n = 56 
3.60 (5.78)
n = 54 

5.03 (4.88)
n = 33 
5.43 (5.12)
n = 32 
6.11 (5.02)
n = 32 
4.99 (5.06)
n = 29 
4.08 (5.13)
n = 29 

2.77 (3.77)
n = 43 
2.37 (3.45)
n = 41 
3.00 (4.68)
n = 41 
2.22 (3.28)
n = 39 
1.82 (3.49)
n = 38 

SCCF 
 
10.98 (7.72) 
n = 67 
9.61 (8.70) 
n = 64 
9.55 (8.68) 
n = 61 
9.94 (8.68) 
n = 59 
8.07 (7.45) 
n = 57 

NA 

NA 

NA 

4.00 (4.03)
n =63 
4.06 (3.87)
n = 59 
3.44 (3.59)
n = 57 
3.25 (3.92)
n = 56 
3.12 (3.57)
n = 56 
3.18 (3.68)
n = 54 

4.64 (2.69)
n = 33 
3.66 (3.26)
n = 32 
4.19 (4.10)
n = 32 
3.21 (3.92)
n = 29 
3.62 (3.70)
n = 29 

2.07 (2.54)
n = 43 
1.74 (2.69)
n = 41 
2.17 (3.38)
n = 41 
1.92 (2.67)
n = 39 
1.08 (1.99)
n = 38 

 
8.26 (4.64) 
n = 67 
7.59 (5.60) 
n = 64 
6.19 (4.55) 
n = 61 
5.61 (4.99) 
n = 59 
5.22 (5.07) 
n = 57 

NA 

NA 

NA 

10.43 (5.55)
n =63 
9.85 (6.23)
n = 59 
10.30 (6.18)
n = 57 
10.28 (6.14)
n = 56 
9.54 (6.25)
n = 56 
9.26 (6.72)
n = 54 

15.79 (6.28)
n = 33 
13.68 (7.37)
n = 32 
13.84 (6.47)
n = 32 
13.07 (5.92)
n = 29 
13.58 (6.78)
n = 29 

9.21 (5.61)
n = 43 
7.26 (5.53)
n = 41 
8.12 (5.02)
n = 41 
7.44 (4.36)
n = 39 
7.08 (4.19)
n = 38 

 
18.93 (6.44) 
n = 67 
18.90 (6.01) 
n = 64 
18.98 (6.78) 
n = 61 
18.46 (6.67) 
n = 59 
17.60 (7.01) 
n = 57 

NA 

NA 

NA 

Physical Hygiene 
5.39 (5.01) 
1 
n = 64 
5.80 (4.75) 
2 
n = 61 
5.67 (4.80) 
3 
n = 58 
5.48 (5.43) 
4 
n = 58 
5.73 (5.01) 
5 
n = 56 
4.90 (4.75) 
6 
n = 51 
Physical Well‐Being and Exercise 
15.89 (7.76) 
1 
n = 64 
17.10 (7.70) 
2 
n = 62 
17.14 (7.05) 
3 
n = 58 
16.13 (7.47) 
4 
n = 58 
15.39 (7.49) 
5 
n = 56 
13.95 (7.09) 
6 
n = 51 

All
6.84 (7.84)
n = 270 
6.18 (7.62)
n = 258 
6.47 (7.65)
n = 251 
6.04 (7.19)
n = 243 
5.10 (6.78)
n = 236 
4.41 (6.54)
n = 106 
5.16 (4.67)
n = 270 
4.93 (4.77)
n = 257 
4.52 (4.40)
n = 249 
4.14 (4.64)
n = 241 
3.98 (4.46)
n = 236 
4.12 (4.41)
n = 106 
14.29 (7.40)
n = 270 
13.90 (7.91)
n = 258 
14.12 (7.60)
n = 249 
13.56 (7.48)
n = 241 
12.97 (7.57)
n = 236 
12.97 (7.57)
n = 106 

 

The analyses in this section follows the same structure as in the main body of the report: (1) comparisons 
between  the  two  CSP  groups  are  made  on  the  six  time  periods;  (2)  comparisons  between  the  two  NMI 
groups are completed on the five common time periods; and (3) comparisons between the three MI groups 
are completed on the five common time periods. Mixed design analysis of variance (ANOVA) techniques are 
used  to  compare  group  differences,  change  over  time,  and  the  interaction  between  groups  and  time.  We 
were most interested in whether there are significant interactions which would imply that groups are chang‐
ing differentially over time. The analyses in this section help address goals 2 and 3 of the project—to assess 
whether  offenders  with  mental  illness  decompensate  differentially  in  AS  compared  to  offenders  without 
mental illness and to compare psychological functioning of participants AS to relevant comparisons groups.  

APPENDICES 

147 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
Comparisons between CSP Groups 
Table C3 gives the results from the ANOVA analyses comparing mean change over time and mean differenc‐
es between the two AS groups. For each PSI subscale, the MI group scored significantly higher than the NMI 
group  although  the  strength  of  the  difference  varied  over  the  subscales  (.05  ≤  η2  ≤  .23).  For  the  Physical 
Well‐Being and Exercise and Mental Well‐Being subscales there were significant time effects, but not signifi‐
cant interaction effects. For both subscales, there was a general decrease over time with scores at the last 
time  period  showing  significantly  lowered  mean  scores  compared  to  scores  at  earlier  assessment  periods. 
For the Panic Disorder and Hypersensitivity to External Stimuli subscales, there were significant interaction 
effects. For the Panic Disorder subscale, there was a significant decrease over time for the MI group; how‐
ever, the NMI group did not change significantly over time. Figure C1 provides a graphical display of this in‐
teraction. 
Table C3. F Statistics and Partial η2 Comparing AS Groups across 6 Time Periods 
Subscale 

Group Main Effect 

Attitudes about 
Segregation 

F(1, 77) = 3.35, p = .07, η  = .04 

Fear Level 

F(1, 97) = 17.82, p < .001, η  = .16 

Hypersensitivity to 
External Stimuli 

F(1, 96) = 8.11, p = .005, η  = .08 

Mental Well‐Being 

F(1, 94) = 5.10, p = .03, η  = .05 

2

2

2

2

Time Main Effect 

Interaction Effect 
2

F(3.82, 294.12) = 1.93, p = .11, η  = .02 

2

F(4.36, 422.41) = 1.54, p = .18, η  = .02 

F(3.82, 294.12) = 0.63, p = .48, η  = .01 
F(4.36, 422.41) = 0.73, p = .58, η  = .01 
2

F(5, 480) = 2.65, p = .02, η  = .03 

2

F(4.70, 441.37) = 3.25, p = .01, η  = .03 
F(5, 460) = 1.93, p = .09, η  = .02 

2

F(4.00, 396.25) = 2.75, p = .03, η  = .03 

F(1, 92) = 17.80, p < .001, η  = .16 

Panic Disorder 

F(1, 99) = 12.60, p = .001, η  = .11 

Physical Hygiene 

F(1, 95) = 8.76, p = .004, η  = .08 

Physical Well‐Being 
and Exercise 

F(1, 96) = 27.30, p < .001, η  = .22 

2

2

2

2

F(5, 480) = 1.55, p = .17, η  = .02 

2

Mutism 

2

2

2

F(4.70, 441.37) = 2.44, p = .53, η  = .01 
2

F(5, 460) = 0.26, p = .94, η  = .003 

2

2

2

F(4.00, 396.25) = 3.10, p = .02, η  = .03 
2

F(5, 475) = 1.84, p = .10, η  = .02 

F(5, 475) = 1.46, p = .20, η  = .02 

2

F(4.60, 441.67) = 2.45, p = .03, η  = .02 

2

F(4.60, 441.67) = 1.00, p = .42, η  = .01 

 
Figure C1. Mean Scores over Time for AS Groups on the PSI Panic Disorder Scale 
45
40
35
30
25
CSP MI

20

CSP NMI

15
10
5
0
1

 
 

148 

2

3

4

5

6

 
 

APPENDICES 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
For the Hypersensitivity to External Stimuli Scale, the interaction is displayed in Figure C2. There was a signif‐
icant change over time for the NMI group but the MI group did not change significantly over time. For the 
NMI group, there was a significant decrease in mean scores from time 1 to time 2 but scores were signifi‐
cantly higher at times 4, 5, and 6 than time 2. 
Figure C2. Mean Scores over Time for AS Groups on the PSI Hypersensitivity to External Stimuli Scale 
24
21
18
15
CSP MI

12

CSP NMI
"4%.

9
6
3
0

1

2

3

4

5

6

 
 
Comparisons between NMI groups 
 
Comparisons were made between the CSP NMI and GP NMI groups on the five common time periods. Table 
C4  provides  the  results  from  the  mixed  design  ANOVA  analyses  comparing  mean  change  over  time  and 
mean differences between groups.  
Table C4. F Statistics and Partial η2 Comparing NMI Groups across 5 Time Periods 
Subscale 

Group Main Effect 

Attitudes about 
Segregation 

F(1, 55) = 0.01, p = .93, η  < .001 

Fear Level 

F(1, 91) = 1.88, p = .17, η  = .02 

Hypersensitivity to 
External Stimuli 

F(1, 91) = 1.74, p = .19, η  = .02 

Mental Well‐Being 

F(1, 91) = 4.32, p = .04, η  = .04 

Mutism  

F(1, 90) = 5.76, p = .02, η  = .06 

Panic Disorder 

Time Main Effect 

Interaction Effect 

2

F(4, 220) = 1.66, p = .16, η  = .03 

2

F(4, 364) = 0.28, p = .89, η  = .003 

2

F(4, 364) = 2.59, p = .04, η  = .03 

2

F(3.64, 330.90) = 3.97, p = .005, η  = .04 

2

F(4, 360) = 0.70, p = .59, η  = .01 

2

2

F(1, 91) = 4.01, p = .05, η  = .04 
2

Physical Hygiene 

F(1, 91) = 9.47, p = .003, η  = .09 

Physical Well‐Being 
and Exercise 

F(1, 91) = 6.36, p = .01, η  = .06 

2

2

F(4, 220) = 1.01, p = .40, η  = .02 

2

2

F(4, 364) = 0.32, p = .85, η  = .003 

2

F(4, 364) = 1.01, p = .40, η  = .01 

2

2

2

F(3.52, 319.86) = 0.28, p = .87, η  = .003 
2

F(4, 364) = 2.20, p = .07, η  = .02 
2

2

F(3.84, 349.56) = 1.73, p = .14, η  = .02 

2

F(3.64, 330.90) = 1.42, p = .23, η  = .02 
2

F(4, 360) = 1.24, p = .29, η  = .01 
2

F(3.52, 319.86) = 0.59, p = .65, η  = .01 
2

F(4, 364) = 1.56, p = .18, η  = .02 
2

F(3.84, 349.56) = 0.90, p = .46, η  = .01 

 
The CSP NMI group had significantly higher mean scores than the GP NMI group for all PSI subscales except 
Fear  Level,  Hypersensitivity  to  External  Stimuli,  and  Attitudes  about  Segregation.  There  were  significant 
main effects of time for Hypersensitivity to External Stimuli and for Mental Well‐Being. Follow‐up tests for 
changes in sequential time periods indicated that the first assessment period scores were higher than the 

APPENDICES 

149 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
second assessment period scores for both scales with significant time effects. There were no statistically sig‐
nificant interactions between groups and time implying that scores over time were similar in the groups.  
Comparisons between MI groups 
Comparisons were made between the CSP MI, GP NMI, and SCCF groups on the five common time periods. 
Table C5 provides the results from the mixed design ANOVA analyses comparing mean change over time and 
mean differences between groups.  
Table C5. F Statistics and Partial η2 Comparing MI Groups across 5 Time Periods 
Subscale 

Group Main Effect 

Time Main Effect 

Attitudes about 
Segregation 

F(2, 91) = 12.56, p < .001, η  = .22 

Fear Level 

F(2, 132) = 6.86, p = .001, η  = .09 

Hypersensitivity to 
External Stimuli 

F(1, 131) = 0.65, p = .52, η  = .01 

Mental Well‐Being 

F(2, 126) = 3.46, p = .03, η  = .05 

Mutism 

F(2, 127) = 2.11, p = .12, η  = .03 

Panic Disorder 

Interaction Effect 

2

2

F(3.60, 327.62) = 1.34, p = .26, η  = .02 

F(7.20, 327.62) = 1.12, p = .35, η  = .02 

2

F(3.72, 491.72) = 1.27, p = .28, η  = .01 

2

F(7.45, 491.72) = 0.49, p = .86, η  = .01 

2

F(4, 524) = 0.77, p = .55, η  = .01 

2

F(4, 504) = 2.06, p = .08, η  = .02 

2

F(4, 508) = 0.62, p = .65, η  = .005 

2

F(2, 135) = 4.65, p = .01, η  = .06 
2

Physical Hygiene 

F(2, 130) = 4.05, p = .02, η  = .06 

Physical Well‐
Being and Exercise 

F(2, 131) = 5.73, p = .004, η  = .08 

2

2
2

2

F(4, 524) = 0.58, p = .80, η  = .01 

2

F(8, 504) = 1.03, p = .41, η  = .02 

2

2
2
2

F(8, 508) = 1.32, p = .23, η  = .02 

2

F(7.24, 489.00) = 0.69, p = .69, η  = .01 

2

F(7.82, 508.46) = 2.87, p = .004, η  = .04 

2

F(7.41, 485.27) = 1.02, p = .42, η  = .02 

F(3.62, 489.00) = 3.33, p = .01, η  = .02 
F(3.91, 508.46) = 3.13, p = .02, η  = .02 
F(3.70, 485.27) = 2.42, p = .05, η  = .02 

2

2

2

 
There were significant group differences on all of the subscales except Hypersensitivity to External Stimuli 
and Mutism. For the Fear Level and Attitudes toward Segregation subscales, the SCCF group scored signifi‐
cantly higher than the other two groups. For the Panic Disorder, Physical Hygiene, Physical Well‐Being and 
Exercise  subscales,  the  GP  MI  group  scored  significantly  lower  than  the  other  two  groups.  For  the  Mental 
Well‐Being  subscale,  the  SCCF  group  scored  significantly  higher  than  the  CSP  MI  group  but  there  were  no 
other significant differences.  
The  Panic  Disorder  and  Physical  Well‐Being  and  Exercise  subscales  showed  statistically  significant  changes 
over time; however for both variables the  changes showed improvement over time. Just  one of the subs‐
cales showed a statistically significant time effect and interaction effect—Physical Hygiene. For this subscale, 
the SCCF group showed significant decreases across time (i.e., improved hygiene over time) whereas the CSP 
MI and GP MI groups did not show significant change over time.  

SUMMARY 
Although there were statistically significant findings, the results did not support the hypotheses of the study. 
We  expected  that  there  would  be  a  worsening  over  time  in  reported  behavior/sensations  and  that  this 
change  would  be  worse  for  inmates  with  mental  illness  in  AS.  However,  we  found  that  when  significant 
changes  over  time  occurred,  they  tended  to  be  in  the  direction  of  improvement  and  this  improvement 
tended  to  occur  more  frequently  for  inmates  with  mental  illness.  When  making  comparisons  of  the  AS 
groups to the relevant comparison groups, there was no indication that the segregation groups behavior and 
attitudes declined over time in comparison to the non‐segregated groups.  
 

150 

APPENDICES 

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not
been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 
 

  

Ps 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

APPENDICES 

151

 

 

Prison Profiteers - Side
PLN Subscribe Now Ad 450x450
CLN Subscribe Now Ad 450x600