Skip navigation

Virginia's Justice System Report Justice Policy Inst. 2013

Download original document:
Brief thumbnail
This text is machine-read, and may contain errors. Check the original document to verify accuracy.
VIRGINIA’S JUSTICE SYSTEM:
Expensive, Ineffective and Unfair
NOVEMBER 2013

Virginia’s justice system is expensive, ineffective and inequitable. Despite some recent small progress in 
the areas of post‐incarceration reentry, particularly felony disenfranchisement, the state continues to 
suffer under misguided policies and practices of the past.  
 

KEY POINTS:
Expensive
Virginia’s Public Safety Office and Judiciary 
have combined annual budgets of nearly $3 
billion, representing 7.7 percent of the total 
general and non‐general state expenditures.  
 
The annual cost to confine an individual in state 
prison is more than $25,000, with inflated health 
care costs for the increasing numbers of 
prisoners over the age of 50. Virginia spends 
roughly $1.5 billion a year to operate crowded 
jails and prisons. 
 
The cost to incarcerate a young person in a 
juvenile facility is roughly $100,000 per year. 
 
Small, sensible changes to state statutes can 
make a big difference. Changing the amount 
that distinguishes larceny from grand larceny 
from $200 to $600 could save the state 
approximately $22.5 million over six years. 
 
In 2011, Virginia spent more than $94 million on 
drug arrests alone. While other states like 
Washington and Colorado have begun to 
question and revise policies and practices that 
prioritize drug law enforcement, Virginia has 
shown no movement in this area.  
 
 
 
 

Ineffective
The “tough on crime,” so‐called “truth in 
sentencing” laws enacted in the 1990s have 
failed in driving down crime or recidivism. They 
have only driven up costs and created a larger 
group of people who carry the burden of post‐
incarceration collateral consequences. 
 
Virginia’s aggressive stance on arresting people 
for drug violations has had no effect on 
reducing drug use. In fact, illicit drug use has 
increased in recent years. 
 

Inequitable
People of color, particularly African Americans, 
are over‐represented at each stage of the 
Virginia criminal justice system. In Virginia, 
African Americans comprise roughly 20 percent 
of the adult population. In the justice system, 
they comprise: 
 47.4 percent of all arrests 
 76.2 percent of robbery arrests 
 52.2 percent of aggravated assault arrests 
 60.8 percent of state prison inmates (For 
every white person incarcerated in Virginia, 
six African Americans are behind bars) 
 
As a result of the figures above, 20.4 percent of 
African American Virginians have lost the right 
to vote, isolating them from their communities 
and civic participation. 

JUSTICE POLICY INSTITUTE

2

In August of 2013, U.S. Attorney General Eric 
Holder addressed the annual meeting of the 
American Bar Association, lamenting the fact 
that “too many Americans go to too many 
prisons for far too long, and for no truly good 
law enforcement reason.” He  also questioned 
whether our “war on drugs” has been “truly 
effective,” and has led to “an outsized, 
unnecessarily large prison population.” 
Holder’s speech not only provided a critique of 
our justice system that is “in too many respects 
broken,” but urged action to address these 
deficiencies.1 
 
The Attorney General’s remarks are especially 
applicable to Virginia, a state that, despite 
experiencing a decline in overall crime over the 
past decade, continues to spend vast amounts of 
money on arresting and confining its citizens 
with little to show apart from high incarceration 
rates and strained budgets. 
 

INTRODUCTION

areas of urgently needed reform. This report 
does not claim to cover all aspects of Virginia’s 
justice system or possible solutions. 
 
The selection of a new governor in 2013 allows 
Virginians an opportunity to take a fresh look at 
the challenges created by decades of over‐
punishment and the associated costs. In a poll of 
prospective voters however, less than one 
percent of respondents named crime and public 
safety issues as priorities, thirty‐seven percent 
named the economy as the top issue guiding 
their vote and twelve percent named the 
budget.2 This may be a welcome stance given 
that crime is low and not at the top of voters’ 
social concerns. Because Virginia’s system of 
handling crime and public safety is overly‐
institutional and expensive, thinking about the 
economy and budget requires reconsidering the 
state’s criminal justice systems.   
 
Some, like former Governor George Allen, 
whose 1994 campaign was successful largely 
due to a “tough on crime,” prison‐focused 
platform, has attributed the state’s drop in crime 
to the practice of putting more people behind 
bars for longer.3 In truth, evidence shows crime 
rates to be relatively independent of 
incarceration practices and findings specific to 
Virginia have also found longer prison terms to 
be ineffective at reducing recidivism by released 
persons.4 

Virginia has enjoyed a steady decline in crime 
over the last two decades. As of 2011, the state 
showed crime rates well below the national 
average for most offenses. However, so‐called 
“tough on crime” policies enacted in the mid‐
1990s have led to over‐incarceration in the state 
with jails and prisons suffering from crowding 
and expensive maintenance. 
 
This report provides an overview 
Virginia ranks low in Violent and Property crime
of Virginia’s criminal justice 
nationally, but high in incarceration and spending
system and a brief look at juvenile 
State Ranking
Ranking
justice statistics, with an eye 
Violent Crime, 2011
46th
toward identifying problem areas 
Property Crime, 2011
43rd
and potential solutions. As with 
Federal & State Incarceration Rate, 2011
13th
other states and the nation as a 
Adult Community Supervision Rate, 2007
44th
whole, justice systems are 
General Funds Spending on Corrections,
11th
complex and, sadly, rife with 
2008

Sources: Virginia Performs, “Crime,” July, 2013,
http://vaperforms.virginia.gov/indicators/publicsafety/crime.php; Pew Center on
the States, One in 31: The Long Reach of American Corrections, (Washington,
DC, 2009).

VIRGINIA’S JUSTICE SYSTEM

3

 
Changes in arrest rates (per 100,000) varied by category from 2002 to 2011
 

2002

2011

Change

Arrests, rate

4441.9

4004.9

∨ 9.8%

Group A arrest rate

1548.0

1806.4

∧ 16.7 %

Group B arrest rate

2894.0

2199.0

∨ 24.0 %

Violent offense arrest rate

119.3

108.5

∨ 11.1 %

Drug offense arrest rate

346.1

455.0

∧ 31.5 %

Source: Crime in Virginia, annual editions 2001-2011; Crime in the United States,
annual editions 2001-2011.

Virginia’s adherence to onerous justice policies 
that were more common thirty years ago puts 
the state increasingly out‐of‐step with its 
neighbors and many states across the nation. As 
shown in the table on page 6, despite relatively 
low overall crime rates, Virginia’s practice of 
mass incarceration and the costs that come with 
it put the state near the other end of the ranking 
scale.  

 

EVEN WITH DECLINING
CRIME, ARRESTS IN VA
HAVE REMAINED
STABLE.
Overall, crime has decreased in Virginia over the 
last two decades, a trend experienced across the 
country. However, the number of arrests (as 
opposed to the rate of arrest) in the state has 
remained relatively stable, falling only 1.1 
percent. This can be attributed to a greater 
number of arrests for drug violations, a 
phenomenon that has occurred nationally. 
 
Compared to other states and the national 
average, Virginia has low rates of reported 
crime.a In 2011, the state had the 5th lowest 

                                                            
a

 It is important to note that “reported offenses” 

represent the number of offenses reported by law 
enforcement to the FBI’s Uniform Crime Reporting 

 

violent crime rate at 196.7 per 100,000 people, 
about half of the national rate. The 2011 
property crime rate was the 8th lowest in the 
U.S at 2,249.6 per 100,000 people. Virginia’s 
violent and property crime rates have fallen in 
the last decade (by 33 percent and 22 percent, 
respectively), mirroring the trend of crime rates 
across the country.  
 
In contrast to declining violent and property 
offenses, the number of reported drug offenses 
increased by nearly half during the same period, 
from 34,404 to 50,650, an issue that will be 
discussed in further detail below.  
 
Between 2002 and 2011, Virginia’s overall arrest 
rate fell by 9.8 percent; much less than the 33 
percent and 22 percent drop in reported major 
crime. However, disaggregating arrests for 
various offenses shows increases in some areas. 
For example, the arrest rate for Group A 
offenses—those considered the most serious— 
increased by 16.7 percent, driven by a rise in 
arrests for drug offenses, kidnapping, robbery, 
shoplifting and larceny. Arrest rates for Group B 
offenses,5 which include many non‐violent 
violations such as disorderly conduct and liquor 

                                                                                         
program, not offenses reported to law enforcement by 
citizens. That said, reported offense counts, much like 
arrest counts, reflect law enforcement activity. 

JUSTICE POLICY INSTITUTE

4

Similar to the national trend, in the past 10 years Virginia has seen violent and property crime rates
decline 33 and 22 percent, respectively.
500

504.5

450

386.3

400
350
300

Rate per 100,000 residents

Rate per 100,000 residents

550

291

250

196.7

200
150

Violent Crime rate US

3800
3600
3400
3200
3000
2800
2600
2400
2200
2000

3658.1

2,908.7

2883.3

2,249.6

Property crime rate US

Violent Crime rate VA

         

Property crime rate VA

Source: Crime in Virginia, annual editions 2001‐2011; Crime in the United States, annual editions 2001‐2011. 

law violations, decreased by 24 percent from 
2,894 to 2,199 per 100,000. 
 

Drug Arrests
Similar to other jurisdictions across the country, 
drug arrests in Virginia have increased in 
contrast to violent and property offense arrests, 
to a large extent negating the decline in overall 
crime. As more police funding has been tied to 
performance measures (i.e., number of arrests), 
police departments have often been forced to 
shift focus to low‐level, non‐violent drug 
violations as a means to help maintain or 
increase numbers and, thus, funding.6 Unable to 
make arrest quotas through arrests for serious 

Number of drug arrests

Arrests for drug offenses increased
steadily between 2002 and 2011.
38,000

36,408

36,000

                                                            
b
 Aos, Phipps, Barnoski and Webb estimated costs per 

34,000
32,000
30,000
28,000
26,000

crime, enforcement has turned to arresting 
people who otherwise would go unnoticed and 
pose a relatively low public safety risk to 
communities. As drug crimes are rarely 
reported by community members to police, 
upward trends in this area clearly reflect a shift 
in the use of law enforcement resources toward 
crimes that must be sought out rather than 
reported.7 
 
In 2012, Virginia arrested 38,349 people on drug 
charges, a 51 percent increase from 2002. 
Marijuana arrests accounted for 62.4 percent, or 
23,936, of those arrests. Estimating law 
enforcement and court costs per arrest of $1,650 
for marijuana possession and $5,260 for more 
serious narcotic and drug equipment arrests, the 
state spent more than $94 million on drug 
arrests alone in one year.b While other states like 

25,244

24,000
2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011

Source: Crime in Virginia, annual editions 2002‐2011 

arrest and court costs for various offenses in 
Washington State in 1995. Washington provides a 
good comparison with Virginia in that the value of 
the dollar is similar in the two states. Using 
www.measuringworth.com to calculate the amounts 
in 2012 dollars, we have estimated similar costs for 
Virginia.  

 

VIRGINIA’S JUSTICE SYSTEM

5

 
Washington and Colorado have begun to 
question and revise policies and practices that 
prioritize drug law enforcement, Virginia has 
shown no movement in this area.8  
 
Current science and policy shifts recognize that 
drug abuse is best addressed as a public health 
issue and is largely unresponsive to justice 
system interventions. Virginia’s aggressive 
stance on arresting people for drug violations is 
a case in point. Decades of increasing drug 
arrests has had no effect on reducing drug use 
and, in fact, illicit drug use has increased in 
Virginia in recent years.9 
 

OVER THE PAST
DECADE VIRGINIA
COURTS HAVE SEEN A
SLIGHT INCREASE IN
CASES.
The Virginia courts system is comprised of four 
levels: the Supreme Court, the Court of Appeals, 
the Circuit courts and District courts. The 
District Courts handle misdemeanor criminal 
cases (maximum penalty of one year in jail or a 
fine up to $2,500) and preliminary felony cases 
to determine whether the case will go on to the 
Circuit Court. The Circuit Courts handle felony 
criminal cases.  
 
The caseloads of Virginia’s Circuit Courts, 
which process the most serious criminal cases, 
saw relatively slow growth from 2002 to 2011, 
increasing by only 7.8 percent in cases 
commenced (from 166,389 to 179,362). This 
increase was less than the 13 percent population 
growth during that time.10  
 
Some court‐related issues in need of reform 
include the placement of judges and the system 
of appointing and paying public defenders and 

court‐appointed attorneys to provide a defense 
for those who cannot afford counsel.  
 

Judicial Selection
Virginia and South Carolina are the only states 
where judges are chosen through a purely 
legislative process. While the quality of judges 
in Virginia is not in question, per se, the selection 
process resembles a political appointment rather 
than performance‐based hiring. Legislative 
changes that would allow more input by local 
bar associations and legal groups as well as the 
general public have been put forth almost 
perennially but have yet to get the votes needed 
to pass. In the existing process, many judicial 
candidates undergo intense scrutiny by state 
legislators only to be rejected, leaving key 
positions unfilled.11 
In addition to the caseload management issues 
caused by judicial vacancies, judges who owe 
their selection to the influence of individual 
politicians may, intentionally or unintentionally, 
“misapply the law to benefit friends and 
disadvantage foes.”12  
 

Indigent defense
The state’s indigent defense system has been 
heavily criticized as insufficient. The system, 
which pits prosecutors representing the state 
against public defenders or court‐appointed 
attorneys for those who cannot afford their own 
counsel, claims to put these two parties on equal 
footing. However, while the two positions are 
paid through similar pay schedules, prosecutors 
in many jurisdictions are given salary 
supplements that can raise their pay 
substantially and have more access to funds 
beneficial in preparing and presenting a case, 
such as expert witness fees.13 Court‐appointed 
defense attorneys, on the other hand, must work 
within statutory pay caps that greatly limit the 
amount of time and effort they devote to each 
case. 

JUSTICE POLICY INSTITUTE

6

Virginia’s Incarceration Rate (per 100,000) in 2011

 

Prison Rate

Jail Rate

KY 

489 

TN 

406 

VA 

469 

KY 

402 

TN 

438 

VA 

349 

WV 

378 

WV 

224 

MD 

360 

MD 

221 

NC 

357 

NC 

198 

http://www.sentencingproject.org/map/map.cfm#map

unnecessary collateral 
consequences and the erosion of 
public trust, to name a few.18 
 

VIRGINIA’S
CORRECTIONAL
SYSTEM IS
LARGE,
EXPENSIVE AND
INEFFECTIVE.

 
Virginia’s prison incarceration rate is below the 
Additionally, the appointment of an attorney for 
national average. Given that the United States as 
those who cannot afford one, does not actually 
a whole incarcerates its citizens at rates never 
come free in Virginia. Defendants may be 
before seen in recorded history, a below average 
charged “up to $1,235 per count for some 
ranking does not reflect low incarceration rates. 
felonies” for a public defender’s services. 
In fact, Virginia’s rates are relatively high when 
Virginia is one of only a few states that does not 
compared to its neighbors. The state’s jail 
currently have provisions for these charges to be 
incarceration rate is considerably higher than 
waived.14 Of the fifteen states with the largest 
the national average. As shown in the table, in 
prison populations, thirteen impose a charge for 
2011, of the five states that are physical 
counsel, often discouraging defendants from 
neighbors to Virginia, only Kentucky had a 
accepting counsel; a practice that makes 
higher prison incarceration rate and only 
conviction and commitment more likely.15  
Kentucky and Tennessee had higher jail rates. 
 
 
In 2003, Virginia’s Indigent Defense Delivery 
Jail
System was given poor grades on a “report 
Virginia is home to 66 local and regional jails 
card” from the Virginia Indigent Defense 
and two local jail farms. In 1937, the state’s jail 
Coalition (VIDC) and echoed in a report 
system was called the “most peculiar one in the 
released by the American Bar Association the 
nation” and remains largely the same today, 
following year.16 The VIDC found that the state 
with funding responsibility “spread across 
scored poorly in the funding of indigent defense 
numerous state and local agencies” and 
and the parity of pay between defenders and 
fragmented policies and 
prosecutors as well as in the 
th
procedures.19 The state’s jails 
Virginia has the 8 highest
“quality of and standards 
house local‐responsible 
jail incarceration rate in the
required for defense counsel.”17 A  U.S., holding 1 of every
inmates, state‐responsible 
lack of quality defense counsel 
214 adult Virginians.
inmates and federal prisoners.  
can lead to numerous problems, 
At any time, roughly 28 
including over‐incarceration, overuse of pretrial 
percent of Virginia’s jail population consists of 
detention, increased likelihood to plead guilty, 
state‐responsible inmates and federal prisoners.  
process mistakes and wrongful convictions, 
 
overly difficult reentry from prison due to 

VIRGINIA’S JUSTICE SYSTEM

7

 
Virginia’s jail rates are above the national 
average (349 vs. 236 per 100,000) and the eighth 
highest in the US. In fact, on an average day one 
of every 214 adult Virginians are in jail.20 
Depending on the rating system used, Virginia’s 
jails operate at between 100 percent and 150 
percent capacity.c The average daily jail 
population (ADP) in Virginia “dropped for the 
first time on record” in 2008 to 28,683 persons. 
In 2009, the ADP dropped again, a change 
attributed to decreases in drug arrests, 
specifically for cocaine.21 The number of overall 
drug arrests did slightly decrease in 2008 and 
2009, but then resumed a steady rate of increase 
in 2010 and 2011 (see graph on page 4). Such a 
rapid fluctuation in jail populations due to a 
temporary decline in drug‐related arrests 
demonstrates the immediate influence such 
arrests have on the overall jail population. 
Policymakers and system stakeholders should 
consider the strong impact that drug policies can 
have on correctional populations and emphasize 
a public health approach to substance use over 
continued justice system involvement and 
confinement. 
 

Prison
More Virginians are in prison than in jail; one of 
every 179 people.22 The Department of 
Corrections (DOC) is responsible for 43 facilities, 
including 27 major institutions, 8 field units, 7 
work centers, and 1 private prison. 
 
In 2011, Virginia had the nation’s 13th highest 
incarceration rate, with 469 per 100,000 state 
residents (38,130 individuals) in prison. This 
was less than the U.S. rate of 492 and an 11 
percent increase from the 2002 state rate of 422. 
According to the Pew Center on the States, 

                                                            
c

 The lower capacity figure is calculated by assuming 
“double‐bunking” in cells.  

between 1982 and 2007 Virginia’s incarceration 
rate increased by 205 percent.23    
 
In 1995, Virginia eliminated parole and 
instituted a “truth‐in‐sentencing” (TIS) system 
that requires all state‐responsible inmates to 
serve at least 85 percent of their sentences. Other 
changes made in the state have lengthened 
sentences for many offenses and increased the 
number of offenses which qualify for enhanced 
penalties. These strategies have filled the state’s 
prisons and ensure an inevitable increase in the 
correctional population into the future. Virginia 
also continues to create laws and policies that fill 
prisons. In fact, changes to the state’s sentencing 
guidelines passed in early 2013 are, according to 
the Virginia Criminal Sentencing Commission’s 
Fiscal Impact report “likely to result in longer 
prison terms for some offenders.”24 
 
During Governor George Allen’s tenure from 
1994 to 1998, “the state built new, tougher 
prisons with tighter security and earned a 
reputation as one of the most severe corrections 
systems in the nation. In fact, Virginia built 
more prisons than the state could fill, and soon 
began renting out prison beds to other states.”25 
That is no longer the case. 
 
The state’s jails operate at as much as 150 
percent capacity. And, while DOC prison 
facilities operate at over 96 percent capacity, 
usually around 28 percent of jail inmates are 
awaiting placement at a state prison.26 So, a 
small amount of available bed space in some 
DOC facilities does not mean there is not an 
crowding problem within the state correctional 
system. 
 
In fact, prison capacity and populations are 
confounded by the closing of prisons due to 
budget and safety reasons and the renting of 
beds to other states. In 2011, Virginia housed 

JUSTICE POLICY INSTITUTE

8

over 1,000 inmates from Hawaii, Pennsylvania 
and the U.S. Virgin Islands but will end this 
 

practice because of crowding. 

 

A SNAPSHOT OF JUVENILE JUSTICE IN THE
COMMONWEALTH  
27

Virginia continues to struggle with how to effectively respond to unwanted behavior by youth in ways 
that positively address problems rather than worsen a child’s opportunity for successful development. 
Too often, youth in Virginia find themselves drawn deeper and deeper into the justice system because of 
zero tolerance policies in school, the commission of status offenses or behavior driven by mental health 
issues.d 
 
For example, according to a study of incarcerated youth in the Commonwealth, 62.9 percent of these 
young people were on psychotropic medication, more than three‐fourths reported a 
history of moderate or severe problems in school attendance and most performed academically at levels 
far below their age.28  And unlike other states that have moved towards more local, therapeutically 
oriented secure placements for youth requiring confinement, Virginia continues to rely on large, 
centralized and adult‐like juvenile prisons to confine youth.29 
 
Virginia continues to rank at the bottom of the states in compensation for court‐appointed attorneys for 
indigent defendants and has not made significant changes to statutory pay caps in recent decades. 
Currently, the maximum fee allowed for an attorney appointed to a juvenile case is $100.30  
 
Virginia’s juvenile justice system also experiences disproportionate minority contact with the problem 
only growing as youth move more deeply into the justice system.  While African‐American youth 
represent only about 20 percent of the youth population in Virginia, African‐American youth comprise: 
 42.5 percent of all arrested youth 
 52 percent of youth detained 
 69.8 percent of youth committed. 
 
Youth correctional expenditures in 2012: 
 Per incarcerated young person $103,493.93 in FY 2012 
 Total juvenile correctional center expenditures not including education expenditures in FY 2012 = 
$78,448,395 
 DJJ operating expenditures in FY 2012 = $190.3 million 
 
Despite the expense, recidivism rates for youth released from confinement remain high; the 36 month re‐
arrest rate is 75.2 percent and the 36 month reconviction rate is 66.7 percent. These outcomes, along with 

                                                            
d

 Status offenses, such as runaway or curfew violation, are those which, if committed by an adult, would not be 
considered a crime. 

VIRGINIA’S JUSTICE SYSTEM

9

 
the vast amount of research in the area, suggests that Virginia could spend less money, and more 
effectively, by diverting some of these youth to evidence‐based community alternatives. 
 
Virginia continues to transfer youth as young at 14 years old to criminal court for certain offenses, 
including automatic transfer in some cases and virtually unfettered prosecutorial discretion in others, in 
contrast to a national trend towards ending such practices. Data from the Virginia Sentencing 
Commission suggests Virginia is unnecessarily transferring many youth to the adult system, as a majority 
of such youth do not receive sentences requiring active 
2012 Group A Arrests, juveniles
placement in adult prison, including 1 in 5 who only 
Simple Assault
28.0 %
received probation.31 Further, research shows that 
Drug Violations
19.3 %
adolescents’ brains continue to develop until they reach 
Shoplifting
13.0 %
their mid‐20’s, limiting reasoning and impulse control 
Other Larceny
12.5 %
and that even those youth who have committed serious 
2012 Group B Arrests, juveniles
offenses are less likely to recidivate if offered services in 
Other Non-Traffic
36.4 %
the juvenile rather than adult system.32  
Runaway
24.7 %
Despite these challenges, the Commonwealth is also 
Liquor Law Violations
11.6 %
experiencing some positive trends.  For example from 
Curfew/Loitering
11.6 %
2001 to 2010, Virginia lowered the number of youth in 
confinement by 36.5 percent, reducing commitments by 28 percent and detentions by 49 percent.33  
   
In 2012, there were an estimated 947,362 people under the age of 18 in the Commonwealth, 11.6 percent 
of the total population. Of the 341,577 arrests made in that year, 28,817 (8.4 percent) were juveniles. 

 

 

OVER-INCARCERATING
VIRGINIANS HAS
LASTING
CONSEQUENCES TO
TAXPAYERS AND
COMMUNITIES.
Less crime in Virginia is a good thing. Whether 
crime reductions are driven by incarceration or 
not, is over‐incarceration a problem? Yes. 
Maintaining a criminal justice system that relies 
heavily on the most restrictive methods of 
punishment is extremely expensive, 
disproportionately impacts communities of 
color and is ineffective at addressing the root 
causes of crime and the likelihood of 
reoffending. 
 

Expensive
Estimating the costs of a state’s law enforcement 
and judicial systems is difficult, given the 
multiple funding streams and functions 
performed by police and courts. Also, there is no 
standard of per capita spending or percentage of 
a state’s budget that these services should meet. 
In Virginia’s 2011 state budget, Public Safety 
and the Judicial Department made up 7.7 
percent, or $2.99 billion, of the total general and 
non‐general expenditures in the state.  
 
In 2008, the approximate annual budget of 
operating the state’s jails was $798 million. The 
2010 prison budget was $748.6 million.34 That 
represents an approximate annual expense of 
more than $1.5 billion for incarceration in 
Virginia. A recent study by the Vera Institute of 
Justice found that, of forty participating states, 
Virginia had the 17th highest correctional 

JUSTICE POLICY INSTITUTE

10

budget. With an average daily prison 
population of 29,792, the state spends an 
estimated $25,129 per inmate per year.35   
 
The cost to taxpayers is substantial for operating 
such a large prison system with an estimated 
cost per taxpayer of at least $151 per year.36  
 
Adding to the costs of Virginia’s correctional 
system is an incarcerated population that is 
increasingly older and in need of medical care.  
Due to lengthy sentences and the abolition of 
parole, the Department of Corrections average 
inmate medical expenses increased 33 percent 
between 2006 and 2010 to $4,827. These costs 
represent about 15 percent of all DOC 
expenditures.37 Prison health care costs are 
roughly one and a half times as much for 
incarcerated people who are 50 or older. 
  
The population of incarcerated people in 
Virginia’s prisons who are age 50 or older grew 
from 715 in 1990 to 5,966 in 2011, an increase of 
734 percent and has contributed to higher 
correctional expenditures.  
 

Ineffective
The increased use of incarceration in Virginia 
has largely been justified for the goal of 
reducing crime through the incapacitation of 
law‐breakers and the deterrence of future law‐
breakers. However, there is a solid body of 
research that debunks the connection between 
incarceration and crime.38 In fact, the Virginia 
DOC’s own research found that, “using logistic 
regression to control for offender and offense 
characteristics, TIS [truth‐in‐sentencing] was 
found to have no significant impact on 
standardized recidivism rates.”39 In other words, 
when one takes away other factors and looks 
only at the sentencing system, TIS does not help 
reduce recidivism.   
 

When comparing the recidivism rates of people 
sentenced under TIS guidelines with those 
sentenced under parole eligibility the DOC also 
found the paroled group were actually re‐
confined less (17.6 percent for TIS versus 17.3 for 
paroled people).  
 

Inequitable
Laws that mandate lengthy sentences that are 
grossly out of proportion with the offense for 
which an individual has been convicted unfairly 
remove individuals from their families and 
communities for long periods of time. Beyond 
being an overly expensive and harsh system of 
criminal justice, it is applied disproportionately 
to communities of color, particularly under‐
educated African Americans in Virginia. 
Decades after such harsh sentencing laws were 
enacted, a diverse group of voices have called 
for lawmakers to create fair and more 
proportionate practices.  
 

THE GRAND LARCENY
ISSUE
One way in which the Virginia criminal justice 
system could minimize the impact it has on 
individuals convicted for minor offenses, reduce 
its incarcerated population and save money is 
by altering the grand larceny threshold that 
distinguishes between a misdemeanor and 
felony charge. That threshold is currently set at 
$200. In other words, if the offense involves 
fraud or theft of anything valuing more than 
$200, the offense is charged as grand larceny, a 
felony. The threshold was last raised through a 
change in statute thirty‐three years ago in 1980 
from $100.40 Two hundred dollars in 1980 would 
have an estimated value of $557 today.41 Only 
two states, Virginia and New Jersey have 
current thresholds at $200 and are the lowest in 
the nation. 
 

VIRGINIA’S JUSTICE SYSTEM

11

 
A Virginia Department of Corrections study 
from 2008 estimated that raising the 
larceny/grand larceny threshold to $600 would 
save $1.8 million in the first year, $4.5 million in 
the sixth year and a cumulative $22.5 million 
over a six year time frame.42  
 

AFRICAN AMERICANS
ARE
OVERREPRESENTED IN
VIRGINIA’S JUSTICE
SYSTEM.
In Virginia, as in many jurisdictions across the 
U.S., from arrest to incarceration, the racial 
disparity between the general population and 
those who encounter the criminal justice system 
is vast. The problem snowballs as individuals 
move further into the system. African 
Americans in Virginia are more likely to be 
arrested for serious offenses, more likely to be 
convicted for those offenses and more likely to 
receive lengthy sentences for those convictions. 
 
It is in the best interest of society that we 
support an equitable justice system that holds 
individuals accountable for harmful behavior. 

Conversely, systems that treat one or more 
groups more harshly than others is damaging to 
society and undermines our faith in justice and 
our sense of community.  
 
 
The racial disparity in arrests and arrest rates 
remained virtually unchanged throughout the 
last decade. While African Americans make up 
only slightly less than 20 percent of the adult 
population in Virginia, they were arrested for 
Group A offenses at more than twice that rate in 
2002 (45.2 percent) and 2011 (44.2 percent). 
Arrests for several violent Group A offenses 
were skewed even more against African 
Americans, as shown in the table below.  
 
Arrests for Group B offenses showed only 
slightly less racial disproportionality, with 
African Americans arrested for 37.6 percent of 
all Group B offenses in 2002 and 36.7 percent in 
2011. 
 
 In 2011, more than 16,000 African Americans 
were arrested for drug offenses in Virginia, 44 
percent of all drug arrests in the state. This 
phenomenon is not new; Human Rights Watch 
reported that, in 2006, African American drug 

African American Virginians are arrested for serious offenses at rates greater than
their population.

Robbery

1,942

Total number of
African
American arrests
2011
1,479

Murder/Non-negligent Manslaughter
Aggravated assault
Kidnaping/Abduction
Negligent manslaughter
Forcible rape
Forcible sodomy
Sexual assault with an object
Forcible fondling

277
4,180
998
5
345
202
108
625

187
2,180
519
2
138
80
36
196

67.5%
52.2%
52.0%
40.0%
40.0%
39.6%
33.3%
31.4%

Violent Group A

8,682

4,817

55.5%

Total
number of
arrests 2011

% of African American
arrests (20% of population)
76.2%

Rate of arrest per 100,000 in population

JUSTICE POLICY INSTITUTE

12

African American, 
people confined in 
Virginia’s prisons are 
mostly between the ages 
of 30 and 40, prime years 
for providing for families 
and contributing to 
society. 

Violent Arrest Rates by Race, 2002 and 2011
337.0

329.0

 
69.1

Incarcerated people in 
Virginia are mostly 
under‐educated, with 
White arrest rate
Black arrest rate
White arrest rate
Black arrest rate
more than three‐quarters 
2002
2002
2011
2011
having achieved a high 
school diploma or less. 
The education breakdown shown in the graph 
arrests in the state made up 53 percent of all 
on page 13 is representative of incarcerated 
drug arrests.43 Research has shown that African 
populations throughout the country and serves 
American drug use is typically less than that of 
to highlight the importance of education both as 
whites, on the whole, making their over‐
a crime prevention strategy and as a component 
representation a function of justice system 
to prison‐based programs that seek to promote 
priorities rather than an equitable response to 
successful re‐entry into society following 
law violations.44 
incarceration. Changing the 
 
For every white person
dynamics of the education‐
Racial disparity continues at 
incarcerated in Virginia, six
incarceration equation 
the correctional level of the 
African Americans are behind
requires the political will to 
justice system in Virginia. 
bars.
invest in public safety 
Virginia’s prisoners are 
strategies that promote educational 
mostly African American, family‐aged and 
opportunities, especially for poor communities 
under‐educated. African Americans incarcerated 
of color. 
in state‐run facilities comprise over 60 percent of 
the inmate population, despite making 
up less than 20 percent of the general 
population.  

66.6

African Americans are held in Virginia
prisons at 3 times their general population
percentage.

  
The ratio of disparity between African 
American and white prisoners in 
Virginia is nearly 6‐to‐1 and greater than 
the national average of 5.6‐to‐1. In other 
words, for every white person 
incarcerated in Virginia, six African 
Americans are behind bars.  
 
In addition to being overwhelmingly 

60.8%

36.2%

2.3%
White

African American

Hispanic

VIRGINIA’S JUSTICE SYSTEM

13

 
 

the loss of voting rights due to a felony 
conviction—is much higher than the national 
average with 5,576 per 100,000 experiencing 
disenfranchisement, or 7.3 percent of the adult 
population. As a result of higher rates of justice 
system involvement, African Americans in 
Virginia suffer disenfranchisement 

POST-CONVICTION AND
RE-ENTRY BARRIERS

There are many collateral consequences of 
justice system involvement in Virginia that may 
follow individuals for years, often causing more 
disruption and harm than the 
original sentence. Virginia’s 
Over half of Virginia prisoners are between
ages 30 and 50.
criminal code contains hundreds of 
statutes that place restrictions on 
individuals who have been 
convicted of criminal offenses, 
particularly for felony offenses.45  
13.0%
 
Some of these restrictions are 
socially supported such as 
prohibiting employment that gives 
18-24
access to children for individuals 
who have been convicted of sex 
offenses. Others prohibit those convicted of 
felonies from working for private security 
companies or contracting with day care centers 
(for example, as a cleaning service). More than 
protecting the public from dangerous people, 
these statutes limit the opportunities of people 
returning to their communities after 
incarceration, making re‐entry success more 
difficult and encouraging participation in 
underground employment. 
 
Virginia’s rate of felony disenfranchisement—

29.9%
24.6%

16.7%

7.9%
4.4%
2.1%
25-29

30-39

40-49

50-54

55-59

1.4%

60-64 65 & over

disproportionately compared to other 
communities. In fact, 20.4 percent of African 
American Virginians are disenfranchised. The 
US average rate of disenfranchisement is 1,878 
per 100,000, affecting 2.5 percent of the 
population and 7.7 percent of African 
Americans. The problem of disparity appears to 
be increasing rather than subsiding.  
 
Apart from the potential impact 
disenfranchisement may have on elections, “the 
revocation of voting rights compounds the 
isolation of formerly 
Over 75 percent of Virginia inmates have an
incarcerated individuals from 
eduacation of high school or less.
their communities, and civic 
32.2%
32.0%
participation has been linked 
with lower recidivism rates.”46 
Allowing such participation 
13.6%
helps returning individuals feel 
more connected and integral to 
6.3%
their communities, increasing 
1.2%
their social capital and 
Less than 9th Less than high High school or Some college College degree
encouraging lawful behavior.  
grade
school
GED

JUSTICE POLICY INSTITUTE

14

 
In May 2013, following substantial efforts by 
advocates in the state, Governor McDonnell 
authorized automatic voting rights restoration 
to people convicted of felonies who have 
completed all their judicial obligations.47 The 
clemency applies only to those whose offense is 
considered “non‐violent” or “not serious” by the 
state, leaving out many truly non‐violent 
offenses such as drug manufacturing or sale, but 
is a step in the right direction for Virginia.48 It is 
also a positive recognition by lawmakers that 
post‐conviction collateral consequences are an 
important issue in a state where so many will 
eventually face the challenges of re‐entry. 
 
Some jurisdictions in Virginia have also 
embraced the “ban the box” movement which 
seeks to eliminate questions about prior 
convictions on employment applications. In 
early 2013 the Richmond City Council joined 
“forty‐three localities nationwide, including 
Newport News” in removing the questions from 
city job applications, a move they hope will 
encourage private sector employers to do the 
same.49  
 

RECOMMENDATIONS
Virginia faces an escalating crisis if the state 
does not take steps to reassess and change its 
approach to crime and imprisonment. The 
actions needed to improve the criminal justice 
system involve mostly a return to policies of the 
past with an overall shift toward community 
investments and away from the continued and 
increasing overuse of the justice system. 
 

Repeal Truth-in-Sentencing
statutes and reinstate parole.

Other 
states and the Federal government that rode the 
early 1990s truth‐in‐sentencing bandwagon have 
begun to chip away at the policies, finding them 

costly, unfair and arbitrary.50 Virginia should do 
the same. The TIS and parole elimination 
policies passed in Virginia were meant to 
address crime rates, however by the time the 
legislation was enacted crime had already begun 
to drop in the Commonwealth and across the 
country, including in places without such 
measures. To reduce costs to taxpayers, increase 
the successful reentry of formerly‐incarcerated 
people and to ensure that individuals have an 
incentive to participate in treatment and other 
programs thereby reducing their sentences 
through positive behavior, the state should 
reinstate a parole system and meaningful good‐
time sentence reductions.  
 
Reduce focus on drug offenses.  As 
violent and property crimes have fallen in 
Virginia, law enforcement has upped its 
attention to drug offenses. A harsh approach to 
drug offenses fails the state in several ways. 
First, it is an ineffective way of addressing the 
potential health needs of the arrested people. 
Jails and prisons, particularly crowded ones, 
provide very little treatment or re‐entry 
preparation for people who may have substance 
abuse disorders. These people, if arrest is 
appropriate at all, should be diverted to 
treatment–based interventions. 
 
Second, criminalizing drug‐related behavior 
often draws people into a spiral of criminal 
justice involvement. If the original offense does 
not warrant incarceration, a failed drug test 
while under supervision may. Each violation or 
misstep of the arrested person pushes them 
further into the justice system where treatment 
is unlikely and the costs are great. 
 
Finally, such an approach goes against the 
current public sentiment of handling drug 
violations as a public health issue, rather than a 
criminal one. Across the country, jurisdictions 

VIRGINIA’S JUSTICE SYSTEM

15

 
are opting for laws and policies that focus law 
enforcement efforts away from drug users and 
toward the more serious behaviors they were 
meant to address. Virginia should join in the 
public health approach to issues of drug abuse 
in society. 
 

Work to address racial disparity
throughout the criminal justice
system.  The problem of racial disparity 
plagues the criminal justice systems of many 
states and the federal government. Virginia 
should join the many other states attempting to 
reduce racial disproportionality through 
programs that target reductions in 
disproportionate minority contact and increase 
the use of community‐based alternatives to 
incarceration to reduce continued and future 
justice system involvement.  
 

Demand better educational
resources and opportunities,
especially for low-income
communities of color. Improving 
educational resources and opportunities for low‐
income communities of color is one way to 
increase public safety. Educational attainment 
improves employment opportunities and can be 
a strong way to connect individuals with their 
 

communities. Such an approach to public safety 
requires a commitment that begins as early as 
possible in the lives of young people and 
continues through to adulthood.  
 

Re-allocate juvenile justice
resources from centralized, adultlike juvenile prisons to more
robust and proven communitybased alternatives. Research and 
experience has shown that young people 
respond better in environments where their 
educational and emotional needs are met. 
Rather than confining youth in correctional 
settings, Virginia should adopt a more 
therapeutic model of residential, close‐to‐home 
facilities for the rare cases where confinement is 
deemed necessary. 
 

Restore the authority of judges to
make decisions regarding the trial
and treatment of youth as adults. 
Youth transfer statutes, based on outdated 
tough‐on‐crime philosophies, should be 
amended to allow courts to make decisions 
based on the merits of each case rather than 
automatically transfer youth to criminal courts. 
Such policies cause irreparable damage to youth 
and serve no greater justice aim. 

                                                            
 Talking Points Memo, “READ: Holderʹs Remarks At American Bar Association As Prepared For Delivery,”August 
2013. http://talkingpointsmemo.com/livewire/read‐holder‐s‐remarks‐at‐american‐bar‐association‐as‐prepared‐for‐
delivery 
2 Quinnipiac University, “Virginia Voters Know Little About Gov Candidates, Quinnipiac University Poll Finds,” 
March 27, 2013. http://www.quinnipiac.edu/institutes‐and‐centers/polling‐institute/virginia/release‐
detail?ReleaseID=1874 . 
3 GeorgeAllen.com, “The George Allen Record – Abolition of Parole – October 13, 1994,” October 13, 2011. 
http://www.georgeallen.com/2011/10/the‐george‐allen‐record‐abolition‐of‐parole‐october‐13‐1994/ 
4 Virginia Department of Corrections, Recidivism Trend, FY 1990‐FY2006 (Richmond, Virginia: Research and 
Forecasting, 2011). 
5 Justice Research and Statistics Association, “What is NIBRS?” August 14, 2013. 
http://www.jrsa.org/ibrrc/background‐status/e‐o_GroupB.shtml  
1

6

 Eric Blumenson and Eva Nilsen, Policing for Profit: The Drug War’s Hidden Economic Agenda (Chicago: 1997). 
http://www.fear.org/chicago.html. 

 

JUSTICE POLICY INSTITUTE

16

                                                                                                                                                                                                
7 Paul Ashton, Rethinking the Blues: How we police in the U.S. and at what cost (Washington, DC: Justice Policy 
Institute, 2012).; Eric Blumenson and Eva Nilsen, Policing for Profit: the Drug War’s Hidden Economic Agenda 
(Chicago: University of Chicago Law Review). http://www.fear.org/chicago.html. 
8 Jon Gettman, Marijuana in Virginia: Arrests, Usage and Related Data, The Bulletin of Cannabis Reform, October 19, 
2009.  
9 SAMHSA, “Appendix C: Comparison of the 2008‐2009 and 2009‐2010 Model‐Based Estimates 
(50 States and the District of Columbia),” November 2013.  
http://www.samhsa.gov/data/NSDUH/2k10State/NSDUHsae2010/NSDUHsaeAppC2010.htm#tabC.1 
10 Commonwealth of Virginia, 2011, The Judiciary’s Year in Review, Virginia Circuit Courts (Roanoke, Virginia: 
Virginia State Judiciary, 2011).; U.S. Bureau of the Census, www.census.gov.;  
Infoplease.com, “U.S. Population by State, 1790 to 2011, August 14, 2013. 
http://www.infoplease.com/ipa/A0004986.html#ixzz2WUpVkv9m 
11 Creigh Deeds, “Reform would select best qualified judges, not best connected,” The Roanoke Times, April 28, 2013. 
http://www.roanoke.com/opinion/pointcounterpoint/1877385‐12/reform‐would‐select‐best‐qualified‐judges‐not‐
best.html 
12 Amanda Frost and Stefanie A. Lindquist, “Countering the Majoritarian Difficulty,” Virginia Law Review 96, no. 4. 
(2010). 
13 Bill Freehling, “Poor defendants get shortchanged. Public defender salaries low, caseloads heavy,” The Free Lance‐
Star, September 3, 2006. http://www.nlada.org/DMS/Documents/1157465536.59/211119.  
14 Kevin Johnson, “Reports: Some states charge poor for public defenders,” USA Today, October 3, 2010. 
http://usatoday30.usatoday.com/news/nation/2010‐10‐03‐feesforjustice_N.htm  
15 Rebekah Diller, Alicia Bannon and Mitali Nagrecha, Criminal Justice Debt: A Barrier to Reentry, (New York: 
Brennan Center for Justice, 2010). http://www.brennancenter.org/publication/criminal‐justice‐debt‐barrier‐reentry  
16
 The Spangenberg Group, A Comprehensive Review of Indigent Defense in Virginia, January 2004, (West 
Newtown, MA, 2004). 
17 Betsy Wells Edwards, “Virginia’s Indigent Defense Delivery System Receives Poor Grades from VIDC,” Access to 
Legal Services, April 2003. http://www.vsb.org/publications/valawyer/apr03/probono.pdf. 
18 Kate Taylor, System Overload: The Costs of Under‐Resourcing Public Defense (Washington, DC: Justice Policy 
Institute, 2011). 
19 Department of Criminal Justice Services, Virginia’s Peculiar System of Local and Regional Jails (Roanoke, Virginia: 
Commonwealth of Virginia, 2010). http://www.dcjs.virginia.gov/research/documents/2010%20JailReport‐2.pdf 
20 Pew Center on the States, One in 31: The Long Reach of American Corrections, (Washington, DC: The Pew 
Charitable Trusts, 2009). http://datacenter.kidscount.org/data/tables/99‐total‐population‐by‐child‐and‐adult‐
populations?loc=1&loct=2#detailed/2/48/false/867,133,38,35,18/39,40,41/416,417 
21 Commonwealth of Virginia, Report on the Offender Population Forecasts (FY2010 TO FY2015), (Roanoke, Virginia: 
2009). 
22 Pew Center on the States, One in 31: The Long Reach of American Corrections, (Washington, DC: The Pew 
Charitable Trusts, 2009). 
23 Sinead Keegan and Amy L. Solomon, Prisoner Reentry in Virginia, (Washington, DC: Urban Institute, 2010). 
http://www.urban.org/publications/411174.html ; Prison Policy Initiative, “Section II: Incarceration & Its 
Consequences,” August 14, 2013. http://www.prisonpolicy.org/prisonindex/variation.html  
24 Fiscal Impact Statement for Proposed Legislation: Senate Bill No. 1214. Virginia Criminal Sentencing Commission. 
January 16, 2013.  
25 PBS, “Online News Hour: Election 2000,” November 2013. 
http://www.pbs.org/newshour/election2000/races/allen_bio.html. 
26 Virginia Department of Corrections, Management Information Summary Annual Report 
Year Ending June 30, 2010,(Richmond, 2010), pg. 86. 
27 Virginia Department of Juvenile Justice, Data Resource Guide FY 2012. 
28 Virginia Department of Juvenile Justice , Profiles of Committed Juveniles Fiscal Years 2004 ‐2008 
29 Virginia Department of Juvenile Justice, “Residential Programs,” November 2013. 
http://www.djj.virginia.gov/ResidentialPages/ResidentialPrograms.aspx.  

 

VIRGINIA’S JUSTICE SYSTEM

17

 
                                                                                                                                                                                                
30 The Spangenberg Group, A Comprehensive Review of Indigent Defense in Virginia, January 2004, (West 
Newtown, MA, 2004). 
31 Meredith Farrar‐Owens, Virginia Criminal Sentencing Commission, Juveniles Convicted in Circuit Court FY2001‐
FY2008, Presentation to the Virginia State Crime Commission (June 25, 2009). 
32 A Parent’s Guide to Juvenile Transfer in Virginia, Campaign for Youth Justice; Transfer and Certification of 
Juveniles, Virginia State Crime Commission. 
33 Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, “Easy Access to Juvenile Populations,” November 2013.  
http://www.ojjdp.gov/ojstatbb/ezapop/. 
34 Virginia Department of Criminal Justice Services, Virginia’s Peculiar System of Local and Regional Jails, 
(Richmond, 2010). 
35 Christian Henrichson and Ruth Delaney, The Price of Prisons (Washington, DC, Vera Institute, 2012). 
36 Virginia Department of Taxation, ANNUAL REPORT, FISCAL YEAR 2011. 
37 Virginia Department of Corrections, Management Information Summary Annual Report 
Year Ending June 30, 2010,(Richmond, 2010), pg.19. 
38 Ryan S. King, Marc Mauer and Malcolm C. Young, Incarceration and Crime: A Complex Relationship (Washington, DC: 
The Sentencing Project, 2005); Howard N. Snyder and Jeanne B. Stinchcomb, “New‐Age Perspectives on an Age‐Old 
Question: Do Higher Incarceration Rates Mean Lower Crime Rates?” Corrections Today, October 2006.. 
39 Virginia Department of Corrections, Recidivism Trend, FY1990—FY2006, 2011. 
40 Virginia State Crime Commission, Grand Larceny Threshold, October 2008. 
41 Measuringworth.com, “Seven Ways to Compute the Relative Value of a U.S. Dollar Amount ‐ 1774 to Present,” 
November 2013. www.measuringworth.com. 
42 Tama S. Celi, Impact of Larceny/Fraud Thresholds on Virginia Prison Bed Space, (Richmond, Virginia Department 
of Corrections, 2008). 
43 Human Rights Watch, “Decades of Disparity: Drug Arrests and Race in the United States,” 2006. 
http://www.hrw.org/sites/default/files/reports/us0309web_1.pdf.  
44 Maia Szalavitz, “Study: Whites More Likely to Abuse Drugs Than Blacks,” Time, November 2011. 
http://healthland.time.com/2011/11/07/study‐whites‐more‐likely‐to‐abuse‐drugs‐than‐blacks/  
45 American Bar Association, “National Inventory of the Collateral Consequences of Conviction,” November 2013. 
http://www.abacollateralconsequences.org/ 
46 Jean Chung,  Felony Disenfranchisement, A Primer, The Sentencing Project, June 2013. 
47 The Advancement Project, “Rights Restoration,” November 2013. 
http://www.advancementproject.org/issues/voting‐rights‐restoration 
48 Secretary of the Commonwealth, “Restoration of Rights,” November 2013. 
http://www.commonwealth.virginia.gov/judicialsystem/clemency/restoration.cfm 
49 Virginia Public Radio, “Second Chance Advocates Want to Ban the Box,” November 2013. 
http://virginiapublicradio.org/2013/03/22/second‐chance‐advocates‐want‐to‐ban‐the‐box/ 
50 Donna Leinwand Leger, “Feds seek lesser sentences for some drug crimes,” USA Today, July 2013. 
http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2013/07/11/justice‐department‐wants‐changes‐to‐mandatory‐
sentences/2509893/ . 

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
 
This report would not have been possible without the generous support of the Public Welfare Foundation. 
 
The Justice Policy Institute (JPI) would like to express gratitude to the following organizations who have 
been meeting regularly out of shared concern on justice system issues in the commonwealth for their 
feedback on this report: 
 
Prison Fellowship Ministries 
ACLU of Virginia 
Prisoners & Families for Equal Rights & Justice 
Bridging the Gap in Virginia 
Resource Information Help for Disadvantaged  
Center for Budget Priority 
Faith Leaders Moving Forward 
Safe Horizons 
Interfaith Council 
The Advancement Project 
JustChildren 
Virginia Alliance Against Mass Incarceration  
Muslim Chaplin Services of Virginia 
Virginia Community Criminal Justice Association  
NAACP 
Virginia CURE 
New Life Deliverance Tabernacle  
Virginians for Alternative to the Death Penalty 
NOBLE 
Virginian Union University Center for the Study 
Offender Aid and Restoration 
of the Urban Child 
 
Additionally, JPI would like to express appreciation to Andy Block, Kate Duvall, Alexandra Grass, Lillie 
Branch‐Kennedy, Carla Peterson, Jesse Frierson, Bobby Vassar and the Virginia State Police, Criminal 
Information Services Division for providing assistance and feedback for this brief.  
 
JPI staff includes Paul Ashton, Spike Bradford, Zerline Hughes, Marc Schindler, Kellie Shaw and Keith 
Wallington. 
 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR
SPIKE BRADFORD, SENIOR RESEARCH ASSOCIATE
Spike Bradford is a data analyst, project manager, and educator with experience in criminal justice, drug 
policy and public health. He authored the well‐publicized report, Common Ground: Lessons Learned from Five 
States that Reduced Juvenile Confinement by More than Half , has appeared on various news outlets including 
Minnesota Public Radio and Midday with Dan Rodricks, Baltimore, and has been selected as a panelist for 
various events and convenings including the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyersʹ National 
Advocacy Call on Developing Legislation series. 
 
Spike’s work at JPI includes: Working for a Better Future: How Expanding Employment Opportunities for D.C.’s 
Youth Creates Public Safety Benefits for All Residents, For Better or For Profit: How the Bail Bonding Industry 
Stands in the Way of Fair and Effective Pretrial Justice, and Crime, Correctional Populations and Drug Arrests 
Down in 2011. 
 
Spike has also worked at the Department of the Attorney General of Hawai`i to evaluate juvenile justice 
initiatives and oversee the collection of data for the Uniform Crime Reports. Spike holds a Master of 
Education from Bowling Green State University and a Master of Arts from the University of Hawai`i. 
 

Reducing the use of incarceration and the justice system and promoting policies
that improve the well‐being of all people and communities.

1012 14th Street, NW, Suite 400
Washington, DC 20005
TEL (202) 558-7974
FAX (202) 558-7978
WWW.JUSTICEPOLICY.ORG

 

 

Federal Prison Handbook
Advertise Here 2nd Ad
CLN Subscribe Now Ad 450x600