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Strategic Plan 2007-2013, WA DOC, 2006

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State of Washington

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Department of Corrections
Strategic Plan 2007-2013

Washington State
DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Department of Corrections

Strategic Plan 2007-2013

FROM THE SECRETARY
I am pleased to submit the Department of Corrections’ 2007-2013 Strategic
Plan. The development of this plan began in October 2005 with a Future
Search Conference, and has continued through a series of collaborative and
informative processes. The plan reflects the desire to create a shared vision
for the future of Corrections and for the safety of Washington’s citizens. It
demonstrates the collective and ongoing learning and dedication of our staff,
community partners, and criminal justice researchers.

Harold W. Clarke
Secretary

Within these pages, we first describe the Department today; by describing
our present responsibilities, resources and challenges, we establish our
need to impact the future. We then describe the processes used to shape
our strategies for the next six years. Finally, we define that future in our
strategies and activities. We include measures that will inform us of our
progress toward goals, and our accountability to the citizens of Washington
State.
In order to plan with focus and communicate with transparency, we have
developed five major goal statements. These broad statements provide
a framework for the next six years. With these goals, we can align all
our diverse activities, organize and maximize our resources for targeted
investments, and increase understanding. These goals are:
•

Increase recruitment and retention of diverse, qualified, competent and
valued staff

•

Maintain safe work environments for staff

•

Develop improved business practices and tools that are responsive,
effective and efficient

•

Maintain offender safety during incarceration and supervision

•

Increase successful re-entry of offenders to communities

These goals lead to one ultimate outcome, the Department’s most essential
statewide responsibility -TO INCREASE PUBLIC SAFETY.
We will be monitoring and communicating our progress. This Strategic Plan’s
success is ours to ensure. And yet, we look forward to ongoing support
through open dialogues and growing partnerships with the Governor, the
Governor’s Office, Legislature, victim groups, criminal justice partners, and
all communities large and small throughout Washington State.
Sincerely,

Harold W. Clarke
Secretary
1

Department of Corrections

Strategic Plan 2007-2013

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Department of Corrections Overview ................................... 3
Agency Mission, Vision and Structure ................................. 5
Agency Overview ......................................................... 6
Agency Partners .........................................................12
Shaping Our Future ........................................................ 15
Future Search ............................................................17
Performance Management .............................................18
Achieving Results .......................................................... 21
Logic Model ...............................................................24
Goals, Objectives, Strategies, Activities
And Performance Measures ........................................25

2

Department of Corrections

Strategic Plan 2007-2013

Overview
___________________

3

Department of Corrections

Strategic Plan 2007-2013

4

Department of Corrections

Strategic Plan 2007-2013
Department of Corrections Overview

Agency Structure
The Department of Corrections
(DOC) consists of four offices:
Office of the Secretary
The Secretary of DOC is a
cabinet-level position appointed
by the Governor to administer
state adult correctional facilities,
community supervision activities,
and correctional industries. The
Secretary’s Office includes:
•
•
•

Health Services Department
Risk Management Department
Communications Department

Prisons Division is responsible
for the operation of all adult
correctional facilities and includes:
•
Institutional Services
•
Correctional Industries
•
Emergency Operations
Community Corrections Division
is responsible for community-based
offender supervision and programs
which include:
•
Community Supervision
•
Work Release
•
Victim Services
•
Legal Financial Obligations
•
Interstate Compact
•
Hearings
Administrative Services Division
provides administrative and support
services to all of DOC and includes:
•
Budget Resource
Management
•
Training and Policy
•
Capital Programs
•
Human Resources
•
Information Technology
•
Business Services
•
Internal Audit

THE WASHINGTON STATE
DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

MISSION STATEMENT
The Department of Corrections, in
collaboration with its criminal justice
partners, will contribute to staff and
community safety and hold offenders
accountable through administration of
criminal sanctions and effective re-entry
programs.

VISION STATEMENT
We create environments in which all
offenders learn to make choices that
contribute to a safer society.

Authority Statement
The Department of Corrections was created in 1981 by the Washington State
Legislature. The enabling legislation for the Department is contained in Chapter 72,
Revised Code of Washington. The 2006 Legislative Session bills recently signed by
Governor Gregoire will additionally update our authority.

5

Department of Corrections

Strategic Plan 2007-2013

Department of Corrections Overview

Agency Overview
The Department of Corrections is responsible for the management of
all state operated adult prisons and the supervision and monitoring
of specific adult offenders living in the community. In addition, the
Department is legally and/or constitutionally mandated to provide
offenders with health care services and correctional work programs, and
to maintain an offender tracking system.
The Department is currently responsible for the incarceration of
approximately 18,000 offenders. Nearly 2,000 of these offenders reside
in out-of-state contract facilities or in local jails. In addition, the
Department is responsible for supervising over 26,000 offenders in the
community. Offenders under the Department’s jurisdiction are typically
felony offenders sentenced in Washington State Superior Courts.
The population of offenders incarcerated by the state is expected to
increase at a rate of about two percent, or 300 offenders, per year.
The number of offenders supervised in the community is also expected
to increase. It is anticipated that these offenders will require more
resource-intensive services.
The Department employs approximately 8,000 men and women and
the current biennial operating budget appropriation is $1.5 billion.
Approximately 75 percent of all operating resources are allocated to the
incarceration of offenders in facilities. The Department headquarters
is located in Tumwater. Other facilities and offices are located in
communities throughout the state.

Prior to 1874, territorial inmates
were held in county jails or the old
Hudson’s Bay Company jail located
in Steilacoom.
In 1874, the Legislature established
a contract with a partnership to
open the first prison in what is now
Bucoda. This facility was a two-story
wooden structure that housed 93
inmates. The partnership was paid
70¢ per day to house the inmates
and received all proceeds from
inmate labor.
In 1886, the Legislature authorized
construction of the State Penitentiary
at Walla Walla on land donated by the
citizens of the area. The first inmates
were moved there from the Bucoda
facility in 1887.
In 1901, the Board of Control
managed all the state’s public
institutions. In 1921, these functions
were transferred to the Department
of Business Control. Between 1921
and 1971, state correctional facilities
were administered in combination
with several other functions of
state government by a centralized
department. In 1971, all functions
related to institutions were moved
into the new Department of Social
and Health Services.
In 1981, the Legislature transferred
the administration of adult
correctional services to the newly
created Department of Corrections.
The enabling legislation for DOC
is contained in Chapter 72 of the
Revised Code of Washington.

6

Department of Corrections

Strategic Plan 2007-2013
Department of Corrections Overview

OUR FACILITIES AND OFFICES
BELLINGHAM
BELLINGHAM WR

WHATCOM

SAN JUAN
COLVILLE
OKANOGAN

PEND
OREILLE

SKAGIT

MT VERNON
CLALLAM BAY
CORRECTIONS CENTER

FERRY

OKANOGAN

STEVENS

ISLAND
OAK HARBOR

SNOHOMISH

PT ANGELES

CLALLAM
PT HADLOCK

OLYMPIC CORRECTIONS CENTER

POULSBO
BREMERTON

JEFFERSON

PORT ORCHARD
PENINSULA WR

MASON

MISSION CREEK CORRECTIONS
CENTER FOR WOMEN

KITSAP

WASHINGTON CORRECTIONS CENTER
SHELTON

MONTESANO
STAFFORD CREEK CORRECTIONS CENTER
RAYMOND

DEER PARK SCOPE
MONROE CORRECTIONAL COMPLEX
MONROE

CHELAN

SPOKANE (7)
SCOPE-EDGECLIFF
AIRWAY HEIGHTS CORRECTIONS CENTER)
COPS (8)
PINE LODGE CORRECTIONS CENTER FOR WOMEN
SPOKANE CJC
BROWNSTONE WR
NE OFFICES (3)
ELEANOR CHASE HOUSE WR
E REGION OFFICE

DOUGLAS

BISHOP LEWIS WR
HELEN B. RATCLIFF HOUSE WR
MADISON RECOVERY WR
REYNOLDS WR
SEATTLE CJC

GRANT

KING

WENATCHEE

RAP LINCOLN WR
PROGRESS HOUSE WR
TACOMA CJC

DOC HQ
OLYMPIA (2)
OLYMPIA WR

EPHRATA

KITTITAS
WHITMAN
ADAMS

MCNEIL ISLAND CORRECTIONS CENTER
MOSES LAKE

ELLENSBURG

THURSTON

PIERCE

CEDAR CREEK
CORRECTIONS CENTER

COLFAX

PIERCE COUNTY FIELD OFFICES, OUTSTATIONS (28)

CHEHALIS

PACIFIC

LEWIS

YAKIMA

OTHELLO
AHTANUM VIEW
CORRECTIONAL COMPLEX
AHTANUM VIEW WR
YAKIMA (2)
YAKIMA CJC

COYOTE RIDGE
CORRECTIONS CENTER

GARFIELD
BENTON

FRANKLIN

TOPPENISH

WAHKIAKUM

SPOKANE

LINCOLN

KING COUNTY FIELD OFFICES, OUTSTATIONS (32)

WASHINGTON CORRECTIONS CENTER FOR WOMEN

GRAYS HARBOR

MARYSVILLE
EVERETT
EVERETT OMMU
EVERETT CJC
NW REGION (2)
LYNNWOOD

COWLITZ

WALLA
WALLA

SKAMANIA

LONGVIEW (2)
LONGVIEW WR

SUNNYSIDE

PASCO
TRI-CITIES WR
KENNEWICK

COLUMBIA

CLARKSTON

ASOTIN

TRI-CITIES ANNEX
WALLA WALLA
WASHINGTON STATE PENITENTIARY

KLICKITAT

15 INSTITUTIONS

CLARK
LARCH CORRECTIONS CENTER
CLARK COUNTY WR

SKAMANIA COUNTY

GOLDENDALE

VANCOUVER (6)
VANCOUVER CJC

15 WORK RELEASE FACILITIES
132 FIELD OFFICES, COMMUNITY JUSTICE CENTERS,
COP SHOPS, AND OUTSTATIONS
1 DOC HEADQUARTERS

Chart 253
9/28/2005

Institutions:
The Department of Corrections operates eight major or multi-custody
institutions that house maximum, close, medium, and minimum custody
offenders. The Department operates seven minimum-security facilities
that include three forestry camps and an assisted living facility. Minimumsecurity facilities house offenders who will be released to the community
within 48 months. The Department’s facilities range in age from the almost
120 year-old Washington State Penitentiary to new construction.

Work Release Facilities:
The Department operates 15 work release facilities. Offenders housed in
work release facilities have progressed from full confinement to partial
confinement, and are required to seek, secure and maintain employment
in the community, and contribute to the cost of their room and board. This
model is designed to ensure offenders have employment and housing plans
when they are released to communities.

Community Supervision Field Offices:
Community Supervision services are delivered in 132 field offices,
community justice centers, Community Oriented Policing (COP) Shops, and
outstations across the state. These locations are used for staff, offender
programming and as places for offenders under community supervision to
report.
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Department of Corrections

Strategic Plan 2007-2013

Department of Corrections Overview

OUR STAFFING CHALLENGES
The Department of Corrections employs approximately 8,000 people.
Effective employees are the most vital of the Department’s resources.
DOC and the public are relying on our dedicated and skilled staff to deliver
correctional programs 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. Like most large
and complex organizations, DOC is always seeking to recruit and retain a
qualified workforce.
The business of corrections is labor intensive. Prison facilities require that
mandatory positions, or posts, be filled at all times in order to provide
appropriate levels of security. Staff are the only means for providing
appropriate levels of supervision over offenders in the community.
Medical and information technology positions are required to provide
essential services to offenders and staff.
There are numerous factors that make creating a sustainable workforce
more challenging today than in previous years. These include:
•

Lower salaries in DOC than for similar positions in some jurisdictions

•

An anticipated increase in DOC staff retirements due to an aging
workforce

•

The isolated location of several facilities which limits access to
housing and basic family needs

DOC staff is facing increasingly complex, changing and high performance
expectations. Changes are caused by the complexity of laws and the
changing demographics of our offender population. Workforce challenges
manifest themselves as vacant positions, excess overtime usage, large and
complex caseloads, and increased risk of liability. A lack of a qualified
workforce results in an increase in safety and security risks, increased
training and overtime costs, and a decrease in staff morale.
The staffing challenges DOC will address as priorities include:
•

Ability to compete in labor markets, especially correctional and health
care markets

•

Ability to retain qualified staff and reduce the current turnover rate of
12 percent per year

•

Ability to provide job expectations and training that is task specific
and competency based

•

Need to add over 800 positions for currently funded prison expansion

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Department of Corrections

Strategic Plan 2007-2013
Department of Corrections Overview

SPECIFIC CHALLENGES

THE POPULATION CHALLENGES

Hiring Staff for Prison
Expansion: Prison expansion is
occuring as two major projects, at
the Washington State Penitentiary
and Coyote Ridge Corrections
Center. These projects will add
nearly 2,700 beds to prison
capacity in 2008 and 2010.
Approximately 800 positions are
needed to operate this expanded
capacity. This will be challenging.
Unemployment rates are trending
down, DOC’s turnover rate is 12%
per year, other jurisdictions pay
higher salaries than DOC, and the
expansions are occuring in locales
challenged to provide housing and
other resources for staff.

As the third largest state biennial budget, the Department is almost entirely
supported by the State General Fund. The increased offender populations
combined with the changing state revenue and expenditure priorities create
unique pressures for the Department and state government.

Staff Retention: Most counties
in the state pay correctional
staff higher salaries than the
state. This often results in the
Department hiring and training
staff only to have a county hire
them away. The hiring process
for custody staff is lengthy and
the training program to work with
offenders is thorough and requires
several weeks. Paying lower
salaries than counties increases
the Department’s recruitment and
training costs.

State sentencing laws determine who goes to prison or jail, how long
they stay, and who is supervised in the community. This influences the
Department’s capacity, needs, and services.
Between Fiscal Years 1996 and 2006, the incarcerated offender population
increased by 48 percent, or 5,863 offenders. Between 2001 and 2006,
the number of offenders on active supervision increased by 27 percent.
Increases are expected to continue with both offender populations. The
Department’s budget and capital plan are driven by changes in the offender
population and their needs.
Between Fiscal Years 2006 and 2017, the incarcerated offender population
is forecast to increase from about 18,000 to 24,000 based on the June 2006
forecast. This is an increase of about 6,000 offenders, or a 31 percent
increase.

WASHINGTON STATE PRISON POPULATION

23,000
21,000
19,000
17,000
15,000
Funded
Capacity
Funded
Capacity

13,000
11,000
9,000
Jun-95

Forecast

Actual

Jun-98

9

Jun-01

Jun-04

Jun-07

Jun-10

Jun-13

Department of Corrections

Strategic Plan 2007-2013

Department of Corrections Overview

CONFINEMENT BED SHORTFALL

RISK MANAGEMENT:

As of April 2006, the number of offenders requiring total confinement
was 18,002. The number of confinement beds available was 15,114.
That represented a 19 percent shortfall in bed capacity. The Department
has been implementing emergency measures to house offenders, such as
contracting with local jurisdictions and prisons in other states to house
Washington State offenders. This is not a viable long term solution.
To partially address the capacity gap, the Department is building the
following prison bed expansions:
Minimum security capacity:
• 200 beds at Airway Heights Corrections Center
• 120 beds at Mission Creek Corrections Center
• 100 beds at Cedar Creek Corrections Center
• 80 beds each at Monroe Correctional Complex and Larch
Corrections Center
Medium security capacity:
• 1,792 beds at Coyote Ridge Corrections Center
Maximum/Close security capacity:
• 892 beds at the Washington State Penitentiary
These current expansions will not close the gap. The Department will
continue to require expansions at existing sites and will need to begin
siting another prison.

SOLUTIONS TO SHORTFALL

10

The Department faces
challenges in delivering services
to an expanding offender
population within increasingly
complex systems. The
Department’s operations are
inherently risky and subject
the Department to liability.
Agency managers are aware
of their role in managing risks,
and major programs have
identified their areas of risk.
The Department has a full time
Risk Management Administrator
and an active risk management
program. While overall
liability to Washington State is
decreasing, the Department
continues to experience claims
and lawsuits. Enterprise risk
management is promoted
through many of the goals in
this strategic plan and is an
integral part of the Department’s
internal monthly Government
Management Accountability and
Performance forums.

Department of Corrections

Strategic Plan 2007-2013
Department of Corrections Overview

SOLUTIONS TO THE CONFINEMENT BED
SHORTFALL
There are two ways to solve the issue of the prison bed shortage: Reduce
demand and increase capacity.

Washington State Penitentiary expansion housing
unit

The Department is committed to preparing each offender for successful reentry into the community by investing in research-based and cost-effective
intervention services. These services are essential to reducing an offender’s
likelihood to re-offend while they are in the community.

Reduce Demand:
The Department has three primary initiatives to reduce an offender’s reoffense behavior:

Washington State Penitentiary aerial

1. Development of an Offender Personalized Plan
All offenders will enter Reception Diagnostic Centers where an in-depth
screening will take place to identify each offender’s strengths and deficits.
This will include identifying risk factors for future criminal behavior; initial
custody designation; and will identify an offender’s needs for housing,
education, vocational training, sex offender treatment, mental health
services, chemical dependency treatment, and medical/dental services.
The plan will incorporate the estimated length of stay for each offender and
prioritize offender services based on the degree of deficits and length of
incarceration.
2. Re-Entry Programs Within the Institutions
An offender will move through the prison system, based on behavior and
programming needs identified in the personalized plan. Research based
programs and services will be delivered based on the plan, type of facility
and offender needs.
3. Community-Based Re-entry Support
Offenders released from prison and jails will be actively engaged in meeting
the goals and requirements of their personalized plan during the period of
community supervision. Offenders will be provided and connected with
community based resources and support systems to ensure they are each
linked to resources to meet identified needs. Community-based resources
include housing, livable wage employment, education, mental health and
sex offender treatment and other essential linkages.

Increase Capacity:
Our 2005 Statewide Facilities Master Plan identifies additional prison
expansion opportunities at existing sites. However, the prison population
continues to rise beyond currently funded construction projects.
The Department is and will continue to be challenged in not only meeting
the overall needs for housing offenders, but also in having facilities that are
the appropriate security levels for increasing offender populations.
11

Department of Corrections

Strategic Plan 2007-2013

Department of Corrections Overview

OUR PARTNERS
DOC plays an important part in a complex criminal justice system.
The system involves many local and state agencies, officials, and the
community. DOC is not the only agency that has a role in public safety,
but as a single entity it is perhaps the most visible at the state level.
State and local resources, the demographics of at-risk populations, state
sentencing laws, and the overall success of other social and educational
programs can have dramatic, long-term impacts on DOC.
Ultimately, the resources, abilities, and actions of many partnering
agencies and communities influence the success and direction of DOC.

The Criminal Justice System

DOC is considered the final
stop in the administration of
justice. The justice system
includes over 830 police and
sheriff departments, prosecuting
attorney’s offices, defense
attorneys, Superior Courts, jails,
prisons, and state and local
probation offices in over 320 small
and large communities throughout
the state.
By the time a person enters prison
to serve a sentence, he or she
has had contact with at least four
different agencies and public
officials. Often this number is
higher.
It has been estimated that the
combined local and state cost
for Washington’s criminal justice
system is approximately $2.5
billion each year. This is almost
$410 per Washington State
resident.

Nationally, in 2002, only 49
percent of violent crimes
and 40 percent of property
crimes were reported to
law enforcement.

In 2002, over 305,000 crimes
were reported in Washington
State communities. In the same
year, over 7,240 offenders
were admitted to state prisons.
Compared to the number of
reported crimes, a relatively small
percentage of people go to prison.

In Washington State, on
average:
100 reported crimes
“resulted in”
26 arrests
“resulted in”
15 Superior Court filings
“resulted in” more than
6 felony convictions
“resulted in”
4 sentences served in the
community and 2
sentences served in prison.

The above chart is provided to illustrate the level of activity in relation to
the various activities within the criminal justice system. The data was
provided by the Administrative Office of the Courts, Caseload Forecast
Council, Office of Financial Management, Sentencing Guidelines
Commission, and Washington Association of Sheriffs and Police Chiefs.

12

Department of Corrections

Strategic Plan 2007-2013
Department of Corrections Overview

PUBLIC AGENCIES AS PARTNERS
DOC recognizes that many offenders and their families receive services
from other public agencies. DOC continually seeks opportunities for
information and resource sharing with public agencies to ensure efficient,
effective, and responsive services are provided to mutual clients. Most
offenders or their family members are at some point also:
• Clients of the Department of Social and Health Services
• On law enforcement databases
• In need of Employment Security Department services
DOC shares responsibilities, resources or concerns with a broad range of
state, local and national public organizations. A small but representative
list of these include: American Correctional Association, Big Brothers
and Big Sisters, Campfire Girls, Criminal Justice Training Commission,
Department of Personnel, Girl and Boy Scouts, Indeterminate Sentence
Review Board, National Institute of Justice, National Institute of
Corrections, Sentencing Guidelines Commission, Washington Association of
Sheriffs and Police Chiefs, Washington State Patrol, Washington
State Institute for Public Policy, YMCA, and YWCA.

COMMUNITIES AS PARTNERS

Just as DOC capacity has to
adapt to offender population
increases, so do the capacities
of our communities. We
recognize the importance
of continuing to assist
communities in meeting the
challenge of receiving and
accepting returning offenders.

Over 97 percent of the individuals in Washington State
institutions will return to Washington communities.
Throughout these communities, local government, labor,
business, community and faith-based organizations and
hundreds of individual volunteers provide services to support
offender re-entry. They provide services and support to
offenders in the institutions, on supervision, and long after the offender
leaves the correctional system.
For quite some time the Department has invited individuals and
organizations to assist in preparing offenders for release. The Department
recognizes now that it is not enough to invite them to assist, but what is
needed is to engage them as a partner in the entire process of re-entry.
As part of that engagement, the Department provides them with the
information and training they need to deliver critical services.
The Department values its partners and will remain committed to
increasing the number of effective and sustainable partnerships.

13

Department of Corrections

Strategic Plan 2007-2013

14

Department of Corrections

Strategic Plan 2007-2013

Shaping our
Future
___________________

15

Department of Corrections

Strategic Plan 2007-2013

16

Department of Corrections

Strategic Plan 2007-2013
Shaping Our Future

FUTURE SEARCH INFORMS US
In the fall and winter of 2005-2006, the Washington Department
of Corrections launched a project called Future Search to
identify values and goals shared by DOC staff, management
and community stakeholders, and to propose action steps for
achieving them.
The project included a three-day conference that produced
seven “vision statements” that had wide support among the
staff and stakeholders who participated. The vision statements
affirmed that the Department of Corrections:
•

Recognizes the value of diversity and our responsibility to promote
cultural competency, respect, dignity, trust, and professionalism

•

Seeks to build and sustain collaboration to advance safe communities

•

Promotes education about evidence-based correctional practices that
lead to offender rehabilitation and decreased crime

•

Relies on recruiting and retaining diverse, competent, well-trained staff
to accomplish its mission

•

Values partnerships and programs to prevent crime and intervene in the
cycles of criminal behavior

•

Provides offenders with needed health care services and access to
treatment and educational services that foster productive and lawabiding behavior

•

Collaborates with all stakeholders for safe integration of offenders
back into the community

A report was prepared summarizing the conference work and vision
statements. The Department then followed with a series of meetings
around the state to explain Future Search. Staff and citizens were
encouraged to provide feedback.
In early 2006, the process continued with efforts to refine the vision
statements and identify specific action steps for achieving them. The results
of the Future Search process are reflected in this plan, and staff members
have been encouraged to regard the vision statements as key principles
guiding the Department’s work.

17

Department of Corrections

Strategic Plan 2007-2013

Shaping Our Future

PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT
FRAMEWORK
DOC’s performance management system begins with setting strategic
direction. Then proven performance management methods inform us of our
performance results. The performance management methods are:
•

GOVERNMENT MANAGEMENT, ACCOUNTABILITY AND
PERFORMANCE (GMAP) FORUMS

•

AMERICAN CORRECTIONAL ASSOCIATION (ACA)
STANDARDS/ACCREDITATION

•

SELF-ASSESSMENTS USING BALDRIGE QUALITY CRITERIA

DOC is integrating strategic direction and methods of performance
management into one performance system.

PLAN &
ALLOCATE

ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ

STRATEGIC PLAN
LOGIC MODELS
PUBLIC NEEDS & EXPECTATIONS
BUDGET AND ALLOTMENT PROCESS

MANAGE &
MONITOR

ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ

RESPOND &
IMPROVE

GMAP FORUMS & MEASURES
CORRECTIONAL STANDARDS (ACA)
BALDRIGE CRITERIA ASSESSMENTS
JOB DESCRIPTIONS/EXPECTATIONS

18

ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ

LISTENING & INFORMATION SHARING
EXECUTIVE & BOARD MEETINGS
PROCESS & PROGRAM IMPROVEMENTS
PLAIN TALK

TARGETED
PUBLIC
SERVICE
RESULTS

Department of Corrections

Strategic Plan 2007-2013
Shaping Our Future

DOC continues in its commitment
to seek further ACA accreditation.
To date, six work release facilities
have been accredited. We remain
on course to have all work release
facilities accredited by the end
of calendar year 2006. We are
now increasing our accreditation
targets to include Community
Supervision operations by the end
of fiscal year 2008, and all prison
facilities by the end of calendar
year 2007.
These achievements will be
earned through intensive
dedication and collaboration of
our Planning and Performance
Department and the Divisions
of Prisons and Community
Corrections.

GMAP
The Department began using the Government Management Accountability
and Performance (GMAP) system in the summer of 2005. Leaders
throughout the agency have been trained in its principles and processes.
GMAP forums have replaced previous performance and quality review
processes. The GMAP process has assisted us in improving performance
management in the following ways:
•

Standardizing high expectations and skills in developing and
delivering performance information

•

Organizing and scheduling the relentless follow-up required for
making progress with competing priorities

•

Developing data sources and data reliance in decision making

•

Setting baseline measurements for long-term performance measures

•

Informing internal and external stakeholders of priority challenges
and action plans

The Department conducts GMAP forums at many organizational levels. At
monthly statewide Executive Leadership Team meetings, GMAP forums are
held. The three Deputy Secretaries and the Health Services Director rotate
leading the discussions as we highlight timely management issues, and also
include measurement of budget performance, risk management and human
resources management. Within each division, operating level, units and
sites, GMAP forums occur regularly. The Department has achieved increased
knowledge and performance as a result of these GMAP forums. The forums
will remain a standard practice within our performance management
system.

AMERICAN CORRECTIONAL ASSOCIATION
ACCREDITATION
American Correctional Association (ACA) standards are recognized as
national best practices for corrections. The Department is committed
to these standards, and believes they provide an essential benchmark in
measuring accountability.

19

Department of Corrections

Strategic Plan 2007-2013

Shaping Our Future

SELF-ASSESSMENTS
OF INTERNAL CAPACITY

BALDRIGE CRITERIA
A FRAMEWORK FOR
QUALITY OF:

The Department recognizes that staff is an essential part of our internal
capacity. We utilize staff surveys to assess that capacity and identify
agency performance strengths and areas that can be improved. The
Department recently completed two surveys.

1.

Leadership

2.

Strategic Planning and
Resource Allocation

In January 2006, the Department administered an agency self-assessment
that is based on the “Malcolm Baldrige Criteria for Performance
Excellence.” This survey was completed by over 800 randomly identified
staff of all levels and locations. The Department is using survey results to
focus on Leadership, Strategic Planning, Resource Allocation, and Business
Results.

3.

Customer and Stakeholder
Focus

4.

Measurement, Analysis
and Knowledge
Management

In April 2006, Department staff completed the Employee Satisfaction survey
administered by the Department of Personnel. With results from this
survey, the Department will focus on increasing staff recognition for work
well done, and on providing more opportunities for input to leadership.

5.

Human Resources Focus

6.

Process Improvement and
Risk Management

Results of these surveys created baselines against which we will measure
our annual progress. The Department will also focus on improving staff
understanding of how their work is directly linked to the Department’s
strategic direction, how success is measured at individual levels up through
agency levels, and how to directly participate in developing strategies and
carrying out activities that bring about improved results.

7.

Business Results

20

Department of Corrections

Strategic Plan 2007-2013

Achieving
Results
___________________

21

Department of Corrections

Strategic Plan 2007-2013

22

Department of Corrections

Strategic Plan 2007-2013
Achieving Results

MISSION STATEMENT
The Department of
Corrections, in collaboration
with its criminal justice
partners, will contribute
to staff and community
safety and hold offenders
accountable through
administration of criminal
sanctions and effective reentry programs.

ACHIEVING RESULTS
We focus our Strategic Plan on these major goals so that we increase our
capacity, not only to deliver our mission but also to seek our future vision.
•

Increase recruitment and retention of diverse, qualified, competent and
valued staff

•

Maintain safe work environments for staff

•

Develop improved business practices and tools that are responsive,
effective and efficient

•

Maintain offender safety during incarceration and supervision

VISION STATEMENT

•

Increase successful re-entry of offenders to communities

We create environments in
which all offenders learn to
make choices that contribute
to a safer society.

Achieving these goals leads to our ultimate outcomes, the Department’s
essential statewide responsibilities --

TO REDUCE RE-OFFENSE BEHAVIOR, and
TO INCREASE PUBLIC SAFETY.

23

Department of Corrections

Strategic Plan 2007-2013

Achieving Results

ACHIEVING RESULTS BY LINKING ACTIVITIES TO GOALS
Agency Control
Key Activities
Recruiting & hiring staff
Training & developing staff

Agency Influence
Initial
Outcomes

Key Outputs
Plans, partnerships, new
job descriptions, new
hires

DOC Goal
Outcomes

Community
Impacts
Ultimate
Outcomes

Qualified candidates & staff
available & hired
Staff prepared to succeed

Communicating, surveying,
coaching, valuing staff

Revised training &
development
programs

Informed strategic decisions

Pursuing ACA accreditation
Measuring & analyzing
performance & results
Planning, designing,
updating, implementing,
deploying

Updated job
descriptions, timely
evaluations,
recognition, more
dialogue

Performance data,
reports & knowledge

Providing healthcare &
research-based
treatments

Updated IT, training,
contracts, policies

Providing research-based
programs targeted to
offender risks, deficits, &
re-entry success
Realigning resources to
re-entry activities

Increased efficiency &
effectiveness
Offender & public health
improved &/or protected

ACA accreditation

Confining & supervising
offenders

Assessing offender risks
& deficits

ACA standards followed

Updated offender
treatment programs

Corrections culture shift to
re-entry focus

“So that”

Offenders prepared for
re-entry
Communities have capacity
for offender re-entry needs
Diverse, qualified,
competent staff hired
when needed, valued
& retained

Updated re-entry
focused programs
Re-entry initiative &
policies

Safe work
environments for
staff

Re-entry information
sources &
partnerships

Improved business
practices & tools

Collaborating with
communities

Offender safety
during incarceration
& supervision

“So that”

Successful re-entry
of offenders to
communities
Reduced re-offense
behavior
Increased public
safety (Priority of
Government result)

24

Department of Corrections

Strategic Plan 2007-2013
Achieving Results

GOAL: Increase recruitment and retention of diverse,
qualified, competent, and valued staff
OBJECTIVE:
Increase retention of qualified and competent staff

STRATEGY:
Increase employee morale

ACTIVITIES:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•

Use information gained from staff surveys and assessments, along with
an improved exit interview process
Increase timeliness of employee evaluations
Increase agency cultural awareness activities
Increase communication from executive leadership to all staff
Collect, analyze and use salary survey information
Increase family friendly alternative work schedules
Improve information technology tools and training, automate routine
tasks and provide sharable data

PERFORMANCE MEASURES:
•
•
•

Percent of timely employee evaluations
Percent of change in results of annual employee satisfaction
survey
Increased number of cultural activities

STRATEGY:
Target staff training to job success and leadership

ACTIVITIES:
•
•
•
•

Develop and implement new Supervisory Skills Training and Leadership
Development Program
Improve the quality of new employee orientation training
Develop and implement a structured mentorship program
Update all position descriptions, to align with agency strategic direction
and goals, and to include core competencies

PERFORMANCE MEASURES:
•
•
•

Percent of new staff completing new orientation training
Percent of staff completing new Supervisory Skills Training and
Leadership Development Program
Percent of timely updated position descriptions

25

Department of Corrections

Strategic Plan 2007-2013

Achieving Results

OBJECTIVE:
Diverse, qualified and competent candidates are available and hired

STRATEGY:
Dedicate resources to strategic recruitment

ACTIVITIES:
•
•
•

Develop strategic and pro-active recruitment plans that include
marketing, and are responsive to vacancies and expansion plans
Partner with agencies and communities to increase candidate pools for
specific locations and job classes
Improve candidate screening tools and selection practices

PERFORMANCE MEASURES:
•
•

Vacancy rates reduced
Increasing of viable and diverse candidate pools

26

Department of Corrections

Strategic Plan 2007-2013
Achieving Results

GOAL: Maintain safe work environments for staff
OBJECTIVE:
Protect staff

STRATEGY:
Maintain facilities, offices and equipment

ACTIVITIES:
•

•
•
•

•
•

Develop a prioritized plan to improve or replace obsolete
and/or deteriorating mechanical, electrical, utility, plumbing and
telecommunications systems
Develop a prioritized plan to address aging buildings that do not meet
seismic safety requirements
Improve safety features of firing ranges used for weapons training and
annual qualification
Make capital investments to comply with environmental regulations
for air handling, water, wastewater, steam and storm water
management systems
Maintain, enhance or create technology tools which enhance work place
safety
Provide mobile and remote access to offender information for
Community Corrections Officers

PERFORMANCE MEASURES:
•
•

Number of facility improvement plans approved
Percent of approved facility plans completed on time and within
budget

STRATEGY:
Provide training that increases staff knowledge, skills and abilities in
maintaining safe environments

ACTIVITIES:
•
•
•

Revise annual training plans
Use post-training evaluations to review and increase training
effectiveness
Prepare for ACA accreditation of all facilities and operations within
the Prisons and Community Corrections Divisions

PERFORMANCE MEASURES:
•
•
•

Percent of staff completing mandatory training
Reduction in staff injuries, offender incident reports, Labor and
Industries claims
Percent of ACA accreditations added

27

Department of Corrections

Strategic Plan 2007-2013

Achieving Results

GOAL: Develop improved business practices and tools that
are responsive, effective, and efficient
OBJECTIVE:
Meet the business administration needs of the agency

STRATEGY:
Deploy new business practices and technology systems

ACTIVITIES:
•
•
•

•
•
•
•

•

Govern technology services and investments to leverage agency
resources
Include technology project management as a standard part of internal
GMAP forums
Measure resources needed to maintain prioritized technology systems
and applications, and retire non-critical or lowest priority systems and
applications
Improve information technology infrastructures
Conduct feasibility study and cost benefit analysis for implementing a
telemedicine system
Increase user competency with technology systems
Maintain, enhance or create information technology systems that can
effectively and efficiently respond to the business, administrative and
offender tracking needs of the agency, and provide timely and accurate
data
Pursue implementation of health care records system

PERFORMANCE MEASURES:
•
•
•
•

Percent of projects completed on time and within budget
Increased data availability, timeliness and accuracy
Percent of change in cost per offender for health services
Percent of critical system availability

OBJECTIVE:
Update business practices, training, contracts and policies to increase
performance results

STRATEGY:
Use DOC performance management framework to plan, review and ensure
progress

ACTIVITIES:
•

•
•

Publish and post monthly performance reports of DOC performance
measures on agency intranet site, making timely and accurate DOC
performance information available to all staff
Include performance expectations in training and policies where
applicable
Include performance outcomes and measures in all contracts

28

Department of Corrections

Strategic Plan 2007-2013
Achieving Results

PERFORMANCE MEASURES:

Sustainability Accomplishments
to Date:
The first correctional facility in
the United States to receive a
LEED Gold building recognition
was completed at the Monroe
Correctional Complex in 2005.
DOC received the 2006 Public
Agency Recycler of the Year
Award from the Washington State
Recycling Association.
Five DOC prisons are composting
their food waste.
Between 1989 and 2005, the
Washington Corrections Center
implemented changes that
resulted in cutting offender water
consumption in half.

•
•
•

Percent of policies reviewed annually
Number of ACA accredited facilities and programs
Percent of contracts including performance measures

OBJECTIVE:
Support the priority of government to protect the environment

STRATEGY:
Pursue the objectives identified in the DOC Sustainability Plan

ACTIVITIES:
•
•
•
•
•
•

Construct new facilities to Leadership in Energy and Environmental
Design (LEED) Silver or better standards
Install water conservation fixtures to reduce water consumption
Install new energy efficient lighting to reduce energy consumption and
light pollution
Identify least energy consuming and least toxic products that are cost
effective to purchase and use
Continue replacing existing vehicles with hybrid and flexible fuel
vehicles when cost effective to purchase and use
Increase offender jobs in composting and recycling within prisons

PERFORMANCE MEASURES
•
•

Increased environmental compliance results
Increased use of sustainable practices and purchases

29

Department of Corrections

Strategic Plan 2007-2013

Achieving Results

GOAL: Maintain offender safety during incarceration and
supervision
OBJECTIVE:
Protect offenders, staff and communities

STRATEGY:
Use results from validated assessment tools to target programs to address
offender risks and deficits

ACTIVITIES:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•

Provide offender programs that keep offenders engaged in pro-social
behavior
Provide appropriate staffing to manage offender needs and risks
Provide constitutionally required offender health care services
Prepare for ACA accreditation of all facilities and operations within the
Prisons and Community Corrections Divisions
Increase re-entry focused programs that reduce prison overcrowding
Complete funded health care facility improvements and expansions
timely
Update and deploy offender assessment tools that are validated by
research, to identify offenders’ risks, deficits and programming needs

PERFORMANCE MEASURES:
•
•
•
•
•

Number of ACA accreditations added
Trends in offender incident reports
Average daily offender population
Number of offender infractions – major and violent
Number of days from sentence to intake assessment, or from
release to start of supervision

30

In 2005, a grant from
the Bureau of Justice
Administration enabled DOC
to hire two investigators under
the Prison Rape Elimination
Act (PREA). The investigators
are dedicated to investigating
allegations of sexual assault in
which prison inmates are the
victims.

Department of Corrections

Strategic Plan 2007-2013
Achieving Results

GOAL: Increase successful re-entry of offenders to
communities
GOAL ALIGNMENT
Our re-entry goal is aligned
with what is most important to
state citizens: Public safety
is improved when offenders
releasing from incarceration and
supervision have fewer deficits
and more skills than when they
entered the criminal justice
system.

RECEPTION DIAGNOSTIC
CENTER
All convicted felons entering
Washington’s prison system
will first go to a Reception
Diagnostic Center. These
centers utilize a comprehensive
set of validated diagnostic
assessment and classification
tools with each offender. The
tools identify the medical,
dental, mental health, social
and risk factors needing to be
addressed for the offender’s
successful re-entry to the
community. The resulting plan
identifies the specific programs
and treatments needed. The
plan moves with the offender as
the offender progresses through
facilities and programs.

OBJECTIVE:
Increase offender readiness for re-entry

STRATEGY:
Make successful offender re-entry the responsibility of all staff and the
focus of all programs and activities

ACTIVITIES:
•

•
•

•
•
•
•
•

•

•

Create a statewide Re-entry Task Force, with broad membership
representing all parts of DOC, and its criminal justice, community
and research partners, to develop DOC’s re-entry initiative
Implement the Reception Diagnostic Centers (RDC’s) plan at Washington
Corrections Center and Washington Corrections Center for Women
Review all offender programs and treatment for their researchbased effectiveness in addressing offender deficits and reducing
recidivism
Update basic education programs to increase program completions
Update job readiness and vocational programs to reflect job market
opportunities and focus on industry certifications
Update offender change programs to those based in cognitive behavioral
treatment
Implement the Educational Programs and Correctional Industries Linkage
Iniative
Expand mental health services beyond the seriously mentally ill
offenders, and continue adding non-medication based treatment
models validated by contemporary research to reduce recidivism
Research positive time and other sentencing options, additional
alternatives to incarceration, and concentrating re-entry programs by
custody and/or location, for potential recidivism and/or cost-beneficial
impacts
Identify and deploy additional research-based re-entry practices specific
to female offenders

PERFORMANCE MEASURES:
•
•
•
•

•
•

Percent of offenders who receive research-based
programming and/or treatment targeted to their deficits
Percent of staff who complete training in DOC’s re-entry
initiative and practices
Percent of offenders who release at Earned Release Date
with a comprehensive re-entry/personalized plan in effect
Percent of offenders receiving the health services indicated
as priority needs in the offender plan developed at the
Reception Diagnostic Center
Number of offenders on community supervision
Reduced number of offender re-offenses while on
community supervision

31

Department of Corrections

Strategic Plan 2007-2013

Achieving Results

OBJECTIVE:
Increase community capacity to assist in successful offender re-entry

STRATEGY:
Engage community stakeholders, partners, and offender families in the reentry initiative

ACTIVITIES:
•
•
•

•
•
•

Create and deploy a public information campaign on the re-entry
initiative, and hold public information forums for community groups
Provide re-entry information to communities, partners, potential
partners and offender families
Collaborate with other agencies, public and private organizations, and
community groups to link our common clients (offenders and families)
to community resources, and target our collective investments to
services that support successful offender re-entry
Continue to provide interactive family centered approaches and
programs
Collaborate with external researchers
Increase work release capacity and offender length of stay in work
release facilities

PERFORMANCE MEASURES:
•

•
•

Number of community (private and public) partnerships
developed and/or sustained, having effective collaboration
and results recognized
Number of services and activities provided which assist
offenders’ families in re-entry readiness
Increase in work release capacity utilization and offender length
of stay

32

Fatherhood Program Earns
National Honors
McNeil Island Corrections Center
received the 2006 Fatherhood
Award from the National
Fatherhood Initiative for its
programs to encourage positive
involvement by incarcerated
fathers in the lives of their
children.
Long Distance Dads is a course
designed to encourage and
develop fatherhood skills and
family ties in a correctional
environment. The course teaches
offenders how to effectively
participate in activities such
as parent-teacher telephone
conferences and a Father-Child
Day held each June. Since 2001,
over 170 men have graduated
from this program.
The program has served as the
nucleus for numerous familyoriented activities
and educational programs.

The Washington State Department of Corrections’ Strategic Plan is published by the
Department of Corrections.
Janet R. Zars, Organizational Planning and Measures Manager
Administrative Services Division
PO Box 41106
Tumwater, Washington 98504-1106
jrzars@doc1.wa.gov
Visit Department of Corrections’ Web Site at
www.doc.wa.gov
Design and typesetting by Anne-Marie Brown and Tanya Nozawa, Graphic Designers

P316 (5/2006)

 

 

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