Skip navigation

Aclu Testimonials From Katrina Prisoners

Download original document:
Brief thumbnail
This text is machine-read, and may contain errors. Check the original document to verify accuracy.
Testimonials from Inmates Incarcerated
at New Orleans Old Parish Prison during Hurricane Katrina
Inmate #1 states she was housed in Templeman IV during Hurricane Katrina. She says she
had been incarcerated in OPP for four months prior to Hurricane Katrina. When the
hurricane hit, Inmate #1 says her dorm quickly filled with chest high water. She states she
was next moved to a smoke-filled dorm where she was housed with male prisoners. She says
that the deputies locked her and the other prisoners inside the dorm. “While I was a [sic]
Templeman the deputy les [sic] did lock all the doors I feared [sic] for my life. I thought I
was going to die.” She says she was not fed or given water for three days. Inmate #1 says
she was next moved into a room filled with water and made to stay there for 24 hours prior
to being moved onto the Interstate 10 overpass. On the overpass, she states she was ordered
not to move on threat of being shot by the guards. While on the overpass, she states that
fellow prisoners were losing consciousness from hunger and dehydration; she herself was
pepper-sprayed.
Inmate #2 says he was housed in Templeman 1 Units A-3 and D-4 during Hurricane Katrina.
Inmate #2 states he was housed in OPP for 2 and a half weeks prior to Hurricane Katrina.
Inmate #2 reports that the guards did not stay on their posts; the guards would leave for hours
at a time. When the guards would return, they would mace prisoners and shoot them with
bean bags. Inmate #2 reports that he saw two dead bodies floating on the first floor medical
ward. Inmate #2 states he was not given food or water during the hurricane both while in
Templeman and while out on the Interstate 10 overpass. Inmate #2 says he was on the
overpass for 24 hours. Prior to reaching the overpass, Inmate #2 states he was made to wait
in line in water up to his/her neck. While on the overpass, Inmate #2 reports he was not
allowed to move around or stretch on threat of being shot by the guards. Eventually, Inmate
#2 and prisoners around Inmate #2 were maced for attempting to stretch their legs. When
boarding a bus to leave the overpass, Inmate #2 states that he was pushed and verbally
abused by Angola deputies. “When getting ready to board the buses we was pushed and told
to hurry up you (bitches) by Angola deputies.”
Inmate #3 was incarcerated in the House of Detention (HOD) for over a month prior to
Hurricane Katrina. He says he was locked in his cell with no food or water. Deputies quit
their jobs and left their posts. “Some deputies left there [sic] position talking about they quit
there [sic] job.” A Sgt. Bell hit Inmate #3 on top of his head with a pump. Inmate #3 heard
several shots fired within the prison and says that the deputies assaulted and maced him and
other prisoners. Upon reaching the interstate 10 overpass, Inmate #3 received the sustenance
he had been denied inside HOD: “I receive [sic] water and food when I reach [sic] the
overpass but they let us starve while I was in prison.” Inmate #3 was transferred to Angola,
but the abuse did not stop. “I am scare [sic] for my life cause [sic] these deputies beating
[sic] on us inmates.”
Inmate #4 was incarcerated in OPP (HOD) for three months prior to Hurricane Katrina. He
was left in a locked cell and not moved until three days after Hurricane Katrina hit the jail.
Food and water were not provided to any of the prisoners around Inmate #4, “no, no-one had

food or water for four five days at least.” Inmate #4 says that abuse was rampant.
“...[D]eputies just about assaulted everyone . . . . [Y]es they did mace guys for no reason.”

Inmate #5 was incarcerated in OPP (Templeman III F and C Side) for 2 weeks prior to
Hurricane Katrina. OPP guards left Inmate #5 locked in his cell in rapidly rising water for
3 days. “[T]he flood water got up to 6 feet up to my neck, and I’m 6'1", I really thought I was
going to die...” Inmate #5 says the power went out and inmates had “fires burning inside the
building...” Eventually the smoke became overpowering and the inmates “had to break all
the windows to get air...” The lack of power left Templeman III dark to the point “you could
not see in front of you....” As the days went on, the inmates took desperate measures to get
help. “[W]e were just scared to die in the High Water we were hangeing [sic] out of
windows with sings [sic] saying help us But know [sic] one came!” Eventually guards did
come and take Inmate #5 to the Interstate 10 overpass. “When we were moved out we lefed
[sic] a lot of guys still in there [sic] cells they could not get out, they were saying Please Help
us But we Could not the guards just lefted [sic] them there.” While on the overpass, Inmate
#5 observed, “they had dead people in the water dogs, cats, oil, gas, Wast [sic], what ever
you could name they had it, I did not want to witness any of this s**t!” From the overpass,
Inmate #5 was transferred to Hunt Correctional Facility where, “we were liveing [sic] like
abandit [sic] animals” and the guards, “talked to us like shite [sic].” Inmate #5 was
eventually transferred to Angola where he says, “I saw the guards here Beat, Kick, Punch,
slappe [sic], even mace a few guys...”

Inmate #6 was incarcerated in OPP (Templeman IV Unit A) for a month prior to Hurricane
Katrina. She says that there were virtually no deputies present the night of the hurricane.
Her cell filled with water which eventually rose to her chest. The next morning she was
moved into Templeman III (where men are housed) and locked in a cell. The men had been
setting fires prior to her arrival at Templeman III. “There was ‘NO’ vintilation [sic] and it
was filled with smoke to such a capacity that we were coughing uncontrollably and literally
could not breathe.” She says she had nothing to eat from Monday morning (8/29/05) until
Wednesday Night (8/31/05). Several of the men attempted to escape, she says “they were
not only shot at, but they were also kicked, beatened [sic] with clubs , and the butt of Deputy
assault weapons!” On the morning of 8/30/05 she was evacuated to the Interstate 10
overpass. “The evacuation: hideous to say the least . . . . So gruesome that we had to
walk/wade through standing toxic-contaminated water filled with feces, urine and all kinds
of other foreign debris for days on end that the details are actually almost impossible to
fathom how one can survive it and not be scarred to extremes.”
Inmate #7 was incarcerated in OPP (Templeman II E-2) for four months prior to Hurricane
Katrina. He reports that he received, “no Food are [sic] water are [sic] air . . . . They left us
to Die.” He was left in a locked cell and says that guards assaulted and maced him and other
inmates. He states that inmates did attempt to escape, “or they would have Died.” Escaping
inmates were shot at; inmates not attempting to escape were shot with bean bags. He says
that he saw dead people in the water. In order to reach the overpass, Inmate #7 says he

walked through chest high water with human waste, oil and gas. He was eventually sent to
Hunt Correctional Facility, which he described as “[p]ure [h]ell.” The guards at Hunt,
“treated us like Old nasty Dogs. We could asked them nothing if you tryed [sic], you might
get shot at, are [sic] curse out.”
Inmate #8 was incarcerated in OPP (Templeman I Unit D-4) for 5 months prior to Hurricane
Katrina. During the hurricane itself, Inmate #8 fell on the wet floor (“it was like walking on
wet glass”) and injured his back. Eventually, his unit was flooded to a chest-high level.
Prior to the hurricane, the deputies left their posts, “on August 27th 2005, about 11:30 P.M.,
Saturday Night.” He says that prisoners did escape, “through brakeing [sic] holes through
the walls, because the deputies left us for dead.” The escaping prisoners, “were in fact shot
at, and had “Broken” arms...” While Inmate #8 did not see any dead bodies in the jail, he
said, “the inmates who first experienced the water before I did, Did state there were bodies
dead floating in the Medical Unit, M.O.U. and on the receiving tier, first floor, where inmates
were traped [sic].” Inmate #8 says that inmates were burning milk cartons to see (the power
had gone out) and the resulting smoke made it very difficult to breathe. Inmate #8 suffers
from high blood pressure and was unable to obtain medical help. Eventually he was
evacuated to the Interstate 10 overpass. While on the overpass, the guards sprayed him with
pepper spray for stretching his legs.
Inmate #9 was incarcerated in OPP (Templeman I Unit F-4) for a month prior to Hurricane
Katrina. He says that the deputies abandoned their posts and he was left in a locked cell. He
says that he went two to three days without food, water, lights and medication. According
to Inmate #9, it was unbearably hot in Templeman I, “breathing was very hard I had to fan
myself to keep from passing out everything was out of control we had no one to look after
us were left for dead.” He was eventually evacuated to the Interstate 10 overpass. To reach
the overpass he had to walk through contaminated water. “The water was nasty all black an
dirty all types of debris even human waste. There was no way that I could have stop the
force of that water entering my mouth I swallow some of it I even vomit an I felt bad for
hours I felt like I was going to die.” Inmate #9 has been suffering from serious mental and
physical health problems. “I need to see a doctor I need help urgently soon as possible I can
not go on living like this...” Eventually, Inmate #9 made it to Hunt, which he described as
“devastating like a horror movie or something...”
Inmate #10 was incarcerated in OPP (Templeman III Unit A-4) for three days prior to
Hurricane Katrina. The deputies abandoned their posts and locked inmate #10 in his cell.
Eventually, inmate #10 was in a locked cell in waist high water. He was not provided food
between August 27th and September 1st. He says that prisoners escaped and guards shot at
the escaping prisoners. Eventually he was evacuated and he ended up at Hunt Correctional
Facility. At Hunt, “[m]en were stabbing each other, fighting... [g]uards were macing us....
People were also being rape [sic]. One inmate at Hunt suffered a stab wound and ran to the
guards for assistance; they told him to get back to the yard, when he didn’t move he was shot
at and maced.
Inmate #11 was incarcerated in OPP (Templeman II) for fifty days prior to Hurricane

Katrina. He was left in total darkness with no food and water for several days. There was
little to no staff supervision, “[m]ost deputies have abandon [sic] their post.” The Special
Investigation Division eventually came into Inmate #11's unit and “began waving their guns
in our faces.” Inmate #11 witnessed many inmates fight each other in OPP. “There were no
safety measures taken to insure my or other inmates well-being.” He was evacuated
Wednesday morning and “had to wade & stand in the most foulest water I have ever seen.”
He was taken to the Interstate 10 overpass where he was maced several times for having to
stretch or use the bathroom. He was given no food or water.
Inmate #12 was incarcerated in OPP (Templeman I Unit E-1) for 2 months prior to Hurricane
Katrina. Before the hurricane, staff members at OPP told the inmates that Katrina was
scheduled to hit New Orleans. However, he says that “no one in athority [sic] (deputy)
mention any plans or precaution. We were on our own.” Inmate #12 is a 54 year old male
with high blood pressure. The power went out and the heat soon became unbearable. “We
needed help! Out of desperation we began to bang on the metal door hopeing [sic] someone
was there, finally the deputy we thought would help, burst in spraying mace and beating us
with flashlights and clubs.” Next the prisoners in Inmate #12's dorm were forced to break
windows in order to get air. After three days in Templeman 1 the guards began to evacuate
the dorm. In order to reach the Interstate 10 overpass, inmate #12 walked through, “nasty
stinky water up to my shoulders. Everything was in that water for three-3- blocks, human
bowel [sic], dead animals, cases of used surenges [sic] - needles. Upon reaching the
overpass, “[i]f we ask for food or water we were mace or beat.” “I never experience anything
like this since Vietnam.” Inmate #12 states that the guards on the overpass would sic dogs
on the inmates if they stood up to stretch. He says that many inmates on the overpass were
sick and desperately needed medical attention they did not receive.
Inmate #13 was incarcerated in OPP (Rendon Work Release) for eighteen months prior to
Hurricane Katrina. The day before the hurricane, Inmate #13 was moved to Templeman V.
The morning of the hurricane, “we awake to find water up to our knees and no security.... the
power was off and no one had access to any food or water for 4 days even the pregnant
juvenile females...” Inmate #13 is a high blood pressure patient and was unable to obtain his
medication following the hurricane. Inmate #13 says that Templeman V was forced to
evacuate without assistance from the guards following the fourth day without food and water.
Because the water was up to 6 feet deep outside their building, they had to assist the pregnant
females. Once inmate #13 reached the Interstate 10 overpass he asked for his blood pressure
medication, “and was told if I ask again I would be shot.” Eventually Inmate #13 was sent
to Hunt Correctional Facility where he witnessed violence and rape. “I saw violent acks [sic]
such as rape and stabbings in the short period of time I was there on the recreational yard....
one inmate got stabbeb [sic] on the yard and ask the guard to help him and the deputy shot
at him and the man was visibly covered in blood..”
Inmate #14 was incarcerated in OPP (Conchetta Unit 1-2) for six days prior to Hurricane
Katrina. She was moved from the first floor because it was flooded. She was locked in a cell
on the second floor. She says that the guards were assaulting the prisoners. Inmate #14 did
not have food or water for five days. “ . . . I was very weak and very hungry believe me I

really didn’t thing [sic] we were going to live to talk to our family.” Eventually, Inmate #14
was evacuated to the Interstate 10 overpass where she was given food and water. She is “a
very sick woman I have a heart condition and I have high blood pressure,” and she was not
given her medication on the overpass or in OPP. Currently, Inmate #14 is incarcerated in
Angola and she has yet to receive any medication.
Inmate #15 was incarcerated in OPP (HOD) for one year prior to Hurricane Katrina. He
reports that he knows the deputies left their posts because, “we couldn’t get an answer for
days.” The deputies did not return to move inmate #15 for four to five days. During this
time he was provided little to no food or water. Inmate #15 referred to this time as, “horrible,
the worst thing I experiment [sic] in life.” According to inmate #15, prisoners were escaping
through windows and he saw guards shooting at the escaping inmates. He also saw a dead
body “flowing in the parkin [sic] lot.”
Inmate #16 was incarcerated in OPP (Templeman II Unit D-3) for two months prior to
Hurricane Katrina. Inmate #16 states, “the deputies did not stay on their posts we were left
for dead for three days we were left on the tier with no power, lights, food or water our dome
[sic] was lock [sic] and we didn’t have much air to breathe.” Medication was not available
because, “everyone had left.” Prisoners were attempting to escape but deputies were macing
and shooting at them. When inmate #16 was eventually evacuated he “feared for my life as
I saw all of the water it was up to my neck.” He was transported to the Interstate 10 overpass
on the back of a truck; the overpass is “where we saw dead bodies floating.” The overpass
is also where “some people began to faint and pass out because of the heat and hunger
pains.” Inmate #16 was also forced to sit motionless on the overpass and was threatened
with being shot. Finally, Inmate #16 was taken to Hunt where “for two days there were
fights where people was getting stabbed, bust [sic] in the head and shot or shot at....”
Inmate #17 was incarcerated in OPP (Conchetta Unit 3-1) for sixteen to seventeen days prior
to Hurricane Katrina. She states that guards gave the inmates contaminated water from a
shower to drink. Then the guards took the water back to bathe in and afterwards returned it
to the inmates to drink. She reports that “people were fainting and seizing up and the gaurds
[sic] wouldn’t come to help.” The guards also refused to intervene when five or six girls
began beating one girl over a food dispute. The dorm became pitch black and because the
toilets were full and overflowing - there was a toxic smell in the air. “People were losing
their minds with hunger & delirium.” Inmate #17 was evacuated by crawling through second
story window out onto a boat. She was taken to the Interstate 10 overpass and told that there
was no food. She began to eat out of a trash can because she was starving.
Inmate #18 was incarcerated in OPP (Conchetta Unit 3-2) for two days prior to Hurricane
Katrina. She says that she had no water and was forced to drink out of the toilet. The
deputies left their posts and had food to eat and water to drink. They did not share with the
prisoners. Inmate #18 states that deputies would only come to where the prisoners were
when fights would break out; “they would mace the inmattes [sic] curse them out and hit
them they were not doing anything to help.” For four days inmate #18 had no food to eat and
only contaminated water from a trash can to drink. Women were passing out “left and right

and they [the deputies] said what do you want us to do....”
Inmate #19 was incarcerated in OPP (Conchetta Unit D-1) for two months prior to Hurricane
Katrina. “It was like we were left to die. No water, no air, no food. We were left with
deputies that were out of control!” 100 women were being held in Inmate #19's dorm
because of flooding–the dorm was unbearably hot. The deputies had food to eat and water
to drink while the inmates “drank water out of trash cans . . . .” Inmate #19 still has
“recurring nightmares about what I saw and what I went through.” She describes her
evacuation as “deplorable” and states that she was “abandoned with no thought about
water/food.” She says the deputies were spraying male inmates with gas.
Inmate #20 was incarcerated in OPP (Conchetta) for 25 months prior to Hurricane Katrina.
The first day of the hurricane the inmates were “left without lights and air venthilation [sic].”
Medication was not provided to anyone. By the second day, the inmates in her unit were not
being fed and were forced to drink contaminated water out of the toilet. The inmates from
the first floor were moved up to Inmate #20's floor and the heat soon became unbearable.
The smell was also unbearable. “The smell at this point was horrendous. Decay, vomit,
blood and urine permeated from every crevice.” The inmates were forced to break windows
to get air. The lack of medical attention led to rampant problems, “[w]omen were having
seisures [sic], birthing pains, panic and asthma attacks.” Eventually Inmate #20 was
evacuated to the Interstate 10 overpass. There she witnessed the result of one escape attempt.
“A male tried to run/escape and was shot in the back.” Inmate #20 was also maced and
denied medical treatment.
Inmate #21 was incarcerated in OPP (Templeman I) for four days prior to Hurricane Katrina.
He was locked in a cell with other inmates where water rose to chest level. Deputies were
not at their posts and he had no way to communicate with anyone besides other trapped
inmates. After he was eventually released from this cell, he and others were evacuated to a
higher floor of the building and locked and abandoned for two days. “We made a hold [sic]
in the wall so we can get some help from outside but no one came.” He was eventually able
to escape by swimming out of the hole and being escorted by deputies to an overpass.
During this time, he had no access to food or water for three days. There was no access to
medication and “inmates [were] passing out on the overpass…” After being transferred to
Hunt Correctional Center, he slept on the wet ground with no mattress for two days, before
being transferred two further times until he finally arrived at South Louisiana Correctional
Center.
Inmate #22 was incarcerated in OPP (Templeman I) for five months prior to Hurricane
Katrina. During the hurricane, there was no electricity in the prison and deputies left their
posts. His cell filled with water. He was not provided medication or drinking water and was
in “serious pain.” He was physically assaulted in his cell and not evacuated until three days
after the hurricane.
Inmate #23 was incarcerated in OPP (Old Parish Prison) for six months prior to Hurricane
Katrina. His unit lost electricity and he was ankle deep in water. “You couldn’t see your

hand in front of your face!” Most deputies left the posts, and the few who stayed did not
provide food or water to the inmates. “We had one pack of cereal during those three days
of Hell!” After inmates from a lower floor were brought up to the third floor, they were
overcrowded and had double the number of people for the cell capacity. He was eventually
evacuated after three days. He was brought by boat to the overpass, sprayed with mace and
forced to “lay down on wet grass outside for 24 hours” with one bottle of water, but no food.
He had painful rashes and no opportunity for medical treatment. He describes assaults by
staff members both under the bridge in New Orleans and at Hunt Correctional Facility.
Inmate #24 was incarcerated in OPP (Templeman I) for two days prior to Hurricane Katrina.
His building lost power prior to the storm; and there was no access to food, water, or
medication. He was locked in a cell filled with water until released by deputies. After he
was released, he waded in chest-deep water. “I thought things would get much better but it
got worser [sic]. I though [sic] I was going to die that I wasn’t going to make it out there.
I was stuck on that bridge for three days – no water or nothing.” After being evacuated to
the bridge, he was sprayed repeatedly with mace and saw people shot.
Inmate #25 was incarcerated in OPP (Templeman IV) for two months prior to Hurricane
Katrina. There was no electricity at the time the hurricane hit and they received their last
meal on the morning of the hurricane. She was trapped in a ground-level dorm in 4-5 feet
of water for two days. There were inmates shot and tear gas released. After two days, she
was transferred to Templeman III and again locked in a cell, and still without any access to
food or water and without electricity. Despite this transfer, she was “once again back in this
five feet contaminated water, floated feces, dead bloated animals.” She and other inmates
were eventually released and transferred to a bridge, where they stayed for 24 hours at
gunpoint without blankets, food, or water. At the bridge, she saw guards harassing and
beating some inmates. Her eyes and face were swollen for days afterwards, she believes
from exposure.
Inmate #26 was incarcerated in OPP (Conchetta) for one day prior to Hurricane Katrina.
Her cell filled with backed-up toilet water. During the two days between the hurricane
hitting and her evacuation, she had only a plate of grits and a cup of water. She was
evacuated through an open window on the second floor and onto a small fishing boat. When
she was being evacuated, she saw dead bodies. “They told us if we didn’t shut up we were
going to stay there another day.” They had to “walk through sewer water” to get to the
bridge. At the bridge, she had no access to food or water.
Inmate #27 was incarcerated in OPP (Templeman) for eight months prior to Hurricane
Katrina. On the evening of the hurricane, water had entered the cells. “We couldn’t even
see the toilets and no electricity. The water was waist-deep . . . . Feces was floating in the
water from the toilets . . . . By 3pm on the [day after the hurricane hit], the water was up to
our armpits. We were calling for help, but no one would come to our calls for help.” The
deputies had left their posts, but after one day came to evacuate her and others to the second
floor of the men’s facility next door, wading through armpit-deep water in the dark. She was
transferred to a cell that was smoky from a fire. She had no food or water. She was

evacuated from the prison that afternoon, wading through water that “was literally burning
my skin it was so thick with diesel fuel from the pumps.” She waited in central lock-up for
nine hours. While they were waiting, she saw deputies shooting at the male prisoners. She
saw male inmates “with sheets and stuff on poles or broom sticks or something on fire . . .
out the window yelling to save them.” She had no water during the night she spent on the
overpass. In the morning, six boats with a capacity of six persons each arrived to evacuate
1700 people. People who challenged the process or refused to sit down on the hot concrete
were maced or beaten. Ironically, she describes how she only felt safe when she arrived at
Angola prison, “if you can believe that in a maximum security prison for men with murders
[sic] and rapist [sic].” She was shocked that nothing had been done earlier, especially when
she heard from those at Angola that “they were ready since the 20th of Aug. to receive us.”
She did not eat or drink between the morning of the 29th and the evening of the 31st.
Inmate #28 was incarcerated in OPP (Conchetta) for five days prior to Hurricane Katrina.
She was evacuated after the water reached five inches. She had nothing to eat and was given
water “out of a dirty trash can.” She was evacuated by boat on Wednesday to the bridge and
then the overpass.
Inmate #29 was incarcerated in OPP (Conchetta) for three months prior to Hurricane Katrina.
They lost power due to the hurricane and were forced to drink “contaminated water from
unsanitized garbage cans.” She suffers from asthma and had no access to necessary medical
treatment. She was evacuated by boat on Thursday to the Interstate 10 overpass where she
received “Cheetos, glass of water, and an apple; some inmates received nothing.” She was
left on the interstate for hours before being transported to Angola by bus.
Inmate #30 was incarcerated in OPP (Conchetta) for 26 days prior to Hurricane Katrina and
had not yet gone to court. She was on the second floor and water only reached the top of the
stairs. All of those on the first floor were evacuated to the second floor, the beds were
removed from the cells, and all were crowded in. “People crammed like sardines – it was
horrible.” The inmates broke a window to let some air in. She did not eat for the two days
before she was evacuated and was only provided one half-cup of water from a garbage can.
“We found this one button that you push to flush the toilet leaked water when you flushed
so there was a mad rush to it.” She was mistreated by the guards who “talked and screamed
at us like we were total garbage the whole time.” When she ran out of her asthma
medication, it was never replaced. Multiple people had seizures and a woman went into preterm labor two months early. “Our dorm looked like a city dump – feces in the shower, the
toilets were overflowing…It’s sad to think and know now that the people at Angola were
waiting for us on Friday the 26th. But our Mayor and Sheriff said ‘keep them where they
belong.’” When she was evacuated, they were forced to leave everything behind.
Inmate #31 was incarcerated in OPP (Templeman I Unit D2) for 6 and a half months prior
to Hurricane Katrina. He states that the inmates on his unit were forced to break windows
to get fresh air. He also says that he was in a locked cell while in Templeman. The deputies
vacated their posts; Inmate #31 says he did not see a deputy until they “they came back to let
us out.” The deputies evacuated Inmate #31's unit two days after the hurricane. He was

taken to the Interstate 10 overpass, where he states, “for two more days we stood there with
no food or water.” Inmate #31 eventually fainted from a lack of food and water; he asked
deputies on the overpass for food and they told him to sit down. He says that the deputies
shot at inmates for attempting to escape, or as Inmate #31 characterized it, “trying to live.”
Inmate #31 reports he saw the arm of a man that he knew to be dead.
Inmate #32 was incarcerated in OPP (Templeman I Unit D2) for three months prior to
Hurricane Katrina. The power in Inmate #32's cell went out the night of the hurricane; he
says that three days went by before he saw a deputy. During those three days in Templeman,
plus an additional two days on the Interstate 10 overpass, Inmate #32 did not receive any
food, water or medication.
I

Inmate #33 was incarcerated in OPP (Templeman II Unit E-3) for a month prior to Hurricane
Katrina. According to Inmate #33, Unit E-3 was completely abandoned by the prison staff,
“we did not see any more deputies, medical personnel, or ranking officers for 5 days or
nights.” During this time, the inmates in Unit E-3 “did not have. . .medications, no
electricity, no water, no food, no air, and no change of clothes....” In addition, they were
locked inside their dormitory. The floors in Unit E-3 were filled with two feet of water; this
water was contaminated with urine and feces. According to Inmate #33, the inmates in Unit
E-3 were forced to break windows to get fresh air because “[w]e could not breath [sic] from
the urine and feces.” Eventually, Inmate #33 was evacuated to the interstate 10 overpass.
He was told, “to shut my f**ing mouth up and sit down” when he asked a ranking officer if
the inmates were going to get food, water, medication, or a change of clothes. Inmate #33
says 6 female deputies told him that 21 inmates had perished in OPP. Currently, Inmate #33
is housed at Claiborne Parish Detention Center where he is “scared to death” because
inmates are punched, slapped and kicked at random.
Inmate #34 was incarcerated in OPP (Templeman I Unit D-4) for ten months prior to
Hurricane Katrina. Unit D-4 was without power and food during the hurricane. The deputies
abandoned their posts for three days and did not return until the day after Hurricane Katrina
. In the absence of the deputies, “[p]anic and chaos erupted in our dorm. Fear and hunger
gripped everyone, Fights broke out . . . .” The deputies took Inmate #34 and the prisoners
from his unit down to the first floor where, “we encountered waters 4 and a half feet high full
of contamination of fuel and human waist [sic]. First Floor was over Flowing with material
from every toilet of three days use.” Upon reaching the Interstate 10 overpass, Inmate #34
says “there was nothing but more confusion accompanied with pepper spray. We were
brought no food or water.”
Inmate #35 was incarcerated in OPP (Old Parish Prison Unit B-4) prior to Hurricane Katrina.
The deputies in Inmate #35's unit abandoned the prisoners with no food, water and
medication until they were eventually evacuated. Inmate #35 says several inmates “escaped
by breaking through walls and windows and jumping to freedom.” These escaping inmates
were shot at and Inmate #35 heard several of the gunshots. Inmate #35 had this to say of his
experience at OPP: “the conditions that I were [sic] left in were some of the stuff you only
see on T.V. the stench from the waste and urine was horrendous. The five days in which I

was left in total chaos with some of the most dangerous criminals in the city was one I wish
never to endure again.” On Wednesday August 31, 2005, Inmate #35 was taken to the
Interstate 10 overpass. He says the deputies escorting inmates to the overpass were tasering
and macing prisoners. Once on the overpass, Inmate #35 says there was still no water, food
or medication provided to him or other inmates. Inmate #35 was eventually taken to Hunt
Correctional Facility where “their [sic] were several incidents of stabbings, beating’s [sic]
and on one occassion [sic] a fellow inmate was shot by prison guard while only seeking help
from his man wound’s [sic].”
Inmate #36 was incarcerated in OPP (Templeman I Unit F-1) for seven months prior to
Hurricane Katrina. For more than twenty-four hours Inmate #36 was without lights, water,
food or facilities. Inmate #36 says the deputies in his unit abandoned their posts during this
same period. When Inmate #36 was evacuated, he was forced to stand in chest high water
for five to six hours without being provided food or water. In addition, Inmate #36 was
beaten and maced by deputies for talking. Eventually, Inmate #36 was taken to the Interstate
10 overpass where he was not given food, water or medical attention for two days. He was
also maced several times. Inmate #36 had this to say of his time on the overpass: “[t]heir
[sic] were many people being beaten, falling out, even dead.”
Inmate #37 was incarcerated in OPP prior to Hurricane Katrina. Inmate #37 was forced to
go several days without food; he also had to drink contaminated water. Because of the lack
of ventilation, Inmate #37 says inmates began to break out windows just to get air. The
deputies were ignoring the inmates. “[I] seen one guy fall out, and the officer didn’t no [sic],
if he died or passed out, because they (officers) refused to come and see what his problem
was.”
Inmate #38 was incarcerated in OPP (Templeman I Medical Unit B-1) for ten months prior
to Hurricane Katrina. Inmate #38 (who uses a wheelchair) was housed in a unit abandoned
by deputies and filled with sewer water. Several inmates were forced to open their own cells
because “the deputies left them in their [sic] to die.” The deputies also assaulted and maced
prisoners in Inmate #38's unit. Inmate #38 was not provided water or food for nearly five
days. He says that a few prisoners were shot at when attempting to escape. “I am having
nightmare at night because all I think about is that I could of die because the deputies did not
want to do they job.”
Inmate #39 was incarcerated in OPP (Templeman I A Side) for two days prior to Hurricane
Katrina. Inmate #39 says that the water in Templeman A side was twelve feet high and the
deputies “left us in there to die.” He was moved to Templeman II where there was no food,
water or air for 3 days. Inmates at Templeman II were “dieing [sic] left and right passing out
couldn’t breath [sic].” Inmate #39 says inmates were shot at when attempting to escape. He
says that inmates were being shot in the head at close range and escaping prisoners were also
being shot at close range. Once Inmate #39 reached the Interstate 10 overpass, inmates were
being maced, shot at, and bitten by police dogs.

Inmate #40 was incarcerated in OPP (Templeman III Unit A-1) for a week prior to Hurricane
Katrina. In Unit A-1 inmates were locked in cell–four to six people in two men cells. The
water rose rapidly and days passed without food or water. Eventually, other prisoners
managed to break out of their cells and they attempted to free the prisoners still locked in
cells. Prisoners began breaking windows and setting fires in a desperate attempt to get air
and alert the deputies to their plight. Officers from the Special Investigation Division came
onto the unit and began to shoot at the prisoners out of their cells. The SID officers locked
the prisoners back up and told the other inmates to wait. By the time Inmate #40 was freed
from his cell (Tuesday night, Wednesday morning) he was standing in chest high water.
Inmate #40 was taken to central lockup to where other inmates were already in a frenzied
state, waiting to be taken to the Interstate 10 overpass. Inmate #40 states that prisoners
attempting to escape were “maced, shot at and even shot as they tried to escape.” Once
Inmate #40 reached the overpass, he was denied food and water for an additional two days.
Some prisoners on the overpass were being sprayed with mace, others were “falling out.”
Inmate #40 was eventually sent to Hunt Correctional Facility where inmates were fighting
and stabbing each other out on the yard.
Inmate #41 was incarcerated in OPP (Templeman II Unit F-2) for thirteen months prior to
Hurricane Katrina. He says the deputies assigned to Unit F-2 left their posts for hours at a
time. He also states that the deputies assaulted and maced prisoners. As for food, Inmate
#41 reports “we didn’t eat anything for about 3 days.” Unit F-2 also lost all power and no
inmates were provided with medication. Inmate #41 says the inmates on Unit F-2 “seen a
few dead bodies and we were told not to say nothing or we were going to be like them.”
When Inmate #41 was evacuated from Templeman II, the water was very high so he says
prisoners had to swim or wade out to safety. He eventually reached the Interstate 10
overpass, where he was denied food and water for two days.
Inmate #42 was incarcerated in OPP (Templeman I Unit F-3) for three months prior to
Hurricane Katrina. After the hurricane hit, Inmate #42 says he had no water or food in the
prison for two days. He witnessed prisoners escape by jumping out windows; those who did
were “shot and bleeding.” Inmate #42 states “they had two body’s [sic] floding [sic] in the
water in Templeman-3.” When Unit F-3 was finally unlocked (two days after Katrina), the
inmates had to “stand in water up to our necks for 5 hours.” Inmate #42 spent two days on
the Interstate 10 overpass; during this period he did not have food or water.
Inmate #43 was incarcerated in OPP (Old Parish Prison Unit A-2) for ten months prior to
Hurricane Katrina. The deputies in Unit A-2 abandoned their posts. Inmate #43 says the
inmates in his unit were not fed for five days. He described the living conditions as “bad”,
five people to a cell, malfunctioning toilets and no power. Inmate #43 states he saw dead
bodies in the water. The prisoners in Inmate #43's unit were locked in their cells for four
days while the flood waters were steadily rising.
Inmate #44 was incarcerated in OPP (South White Street Unit A-1) for three weeks prior to
Hurricane Katrina. Inmate #44 went without food or water for three to four days. The
deputies moved the prisoners in Inmate #44's unit upstairs into a small room and then left

them there. Inmate #44 says the deputies “just left everybody upstairs going crazy, cause
[sic] they did not get water are [sic] food.” He felt the deputies, “left us in the jail to die.”
Prisoners in Inmate #44's unit were breaking through walls and jumping into the water to
escape. Inmate #44 says those escaping prisoners were shot at - but he doesn’t know for sure
if they were killed or not. Inmate #44 was “very scared” that he was going to drown. “They
had people that were in the jail floating, dead from starving from not eating are [sic] drinking
water.” Inmate #44 says prisoners were drinking contaminated water, fighting and stabbing
one another in the jail. Eventually Inmate #44 was evacuated out of the jail through six to
seven feet high water - water so high that shorter inmates had to be carried to safety by taller
inmates. Once on the overpass, Inmate #44 says prisoners were passing out from lack of
food and water; Inmate #44 himself did not get anything to eat or drink for over twenty four
hours. The guard out on the overpass were eating and drinking in front of the inmates.
When they ran out of food, Inmate #44 says that some of the guards began to quit. Inmate
#44 was eventually sent to Hunt, where he witnessed prisoners fighting and stabbing one
another.
Inmate #45 was incarcerated in OPP (Templeman III Unit C-3) for eleven days prior to
Hurricane Katrina. On the day the hurricane hit, the deputies in Inmate #45's unit locked the
prisoners in their cells. When the power went out, Inmate #45 began to get weak from a lack
of food and water. He “began to realize that we had been left for dead.” On the next day,
Inmate #45 says the older prisoners began to get sick from a lack of medication. In addition,
some prisoners were able to free themselves and they began freeing other prisoners. Inmate
#45 was not freed at this time. As Tuesday night wore on, prisoners began setting fires in
order to see–the smoke from the fires made it very difficult to breathe. In order to get air, the
prisoners in Inmate #45's unit began to break windows. The next day, out of desperation,
Inmate #45 began to drink the contaminated water. The contaminated water made him feel
sick. Finally, on Thursday, Inmate #45 was evacuated out of Templeman III. He had to
wade through chest high water in order to reach the boat taking prisoners to the interstate 10
overpass. Inmate #45 was given water, but still no food. Eventually he passed out from a
lack of food. While on the overpass, Inmate #45 says Department of Corrections officers
were “yelling at people, spaying [sic] gas, and shooting inmates with bean-bag guns.”
Eventually Inmate #45 was put on a bus and taken to Hunt Correctional Facility. While at
Hunt, Inmate #45 says “people were fighting, making shanks, and stabbing people. I was
scared for my life.” The D.O.C. officers did nothing, “[o]ne inmate cross the gun line yelling
for help, and D.O.C. shot him. I seen someone get stabbed in the face. He was scaried [sic]
to run to the gaurds [sic] because thay [sic] would have shot him too.”
Inmate #46 was incarcerated in OPP (Templeman III Unit F-3) for four months prior to
Hurricane Katrina. He was locked in a cell on the first floor with three and a half feet of
flood water. An inmate from the juvenile unit managed to free himself. That prisoner came
to Unit F-3 and opened all the cells from the control unit. Inmate #46 says that the deputies
were on and off their posts and all the prisoners were scrambling to find a way out. Some
prisoners burned things for light, while others broke holes in the wall and jumped out to
escape. Those escaping prisoners were maced and shot with bean bags by deputies. The
prisoners still trapped in their cells broke windows to get fresh air. Inmate #46 did not eat

for six to seven days. Inmate #46 says “inmates were having seizures. Deputies hit kick and
beat on inmates all on the bridge.” Eventually Inmate #46 was evacuated to Hunt
Correctional Facility; while there he witnessed inmates fighting and stabbing one another.
Inmate #46 described his two days at Hunt as “[t]he worst 2 days in my life!”
Inmate #47 was incarcerated in OPP (Templeman III Unit B-4) for four days prior to
Hurricane Katrina. The deputies in Unit B-4 left their posts the Sunday night prior to
Hurricane Katrina. Inmate #47 was locked in a cell filled with rising flood water. On
Monday evening, deputies came back to Inmate #47's unit and moved him upstairs into a
small gym with 150 other prisoners. During the move, “[s]ome of the deputies were masing
[sic] people and slaming [sic] them in the water.” Inmate #47 was locked in the small gym
for three days without food or water. Inmate #47 says inmates on the third floor were
causing a disturbance in the absence of the deputies. “There were numorous [sic] fights,
people getting stabbed, hit with all kinds of objects, it was just a big mess.” Prisoners were
attempting to escape but Inmate #47 abstained because “the deputies started shooting at
inmates.” On Wednesday evening Inmate #47 was evacuated (at gunpoint) and sent to the
Interstate 10 overpass, where he still did not receive any food, water or medication. Because
of the extreme heat, Inmate #47 passed out while on the overpass. Inmate #47 was out on
the overpass for over 24 hours.
Inmate #48 was incarcerated in OPP (Templeman I Unit D3) for four months prior to
Hurricane Katrina. Inmate #48 says that the deputies were never on their posts, that
“everybody was screaming and making noise but no one ansered [sic].” Eventually, Inmate
#48 was moved to the third floor and locked in a cell. That first day the inmates in D3 had
nothing to eat and only contaminated water to drink. The next day, deputies brought the
inmates water contaminated with bleach. After this, Inmate #48 did not see deputies until
he was evacuated on the third day. While on the Interstate 10 overpass, Inmate #48 was
given water but not food. He was next sent to Hunt where he stayed on the yard with all the
other prisoners. Inmate #48 says all the prisoners on the yard had knives and they were
fighting and stabbing each other and the deputies did nothing to stop them.
Inmate #49 was incarcerated in OPP (Old Parish Prison) for twenty two months prior to
Hurricane Katrina. Inmate #49 was not moved from OPP until three days after the hurricane.
He says that the deputies did not remain on their posts. He was not given any food but he
was given a “lil [sic] water.” He was not given his medication. Inmate #49 says one prisoner
was shot. While still in the jail, Inmate #49 witnessed prisoners passing out, getting sick
from the smell in the jail and breaking windows to get air in order to survive.
Inmate #50 was incarcerated in OPP (Templeman II Unit E4 2nd floor) for nine months prior
to Hurricane Katrina. He says that he was left in a locked cell unattended (the deputies did
not stay on their posts) the entire night of the hurricane. He was not given food or water for
several days. Inmate #50 says that deputies were assaulting inmates on the overpass, during
the evacuation and at Hunt Correctional Facility. He says none of the prisoners were able
to get medication during the entire ordeal. Inmate #50 saw one corpse, “I seen one dead
body and man that sh*t shook me up!” He is now at Ouchita, a facility that he describes as

“racist to the T.” At Ouchita, inmates “get tazed, maced, and bean bagged on a regular basis,
and I know that these deputies hate us because they tell us everyday.”
Inmate #51 states she was housed in Conchetta Unit 3-2 during Hurricane Katrina. She says
she had been incarcerated in OPP for six months prior to the hurricane. Inmate #51 reports
that the lights went out on Monday, and she was rescued on Wednesday. From Sunday,
August 28 until Wednesday, inmates “was [sic] trapped for four days without food water or
light no air.” Inmate #51 reports that the guards yelled at inmates for no reason, and that they
had food and water that they did not share with inmates. Inmate #51 states that the guards
were in a back room with the door open, and that inmates asked if they could break a window
for air–the guards refused to allow them to break a window. Inmate #51 says that the
inmates “was falling over one another sleeping on the floor, with no cloths [sic] on that’s
how hot it was.” The toilet was overflowing, and inmates were drinking contaminated water
from a garbage can. Inmate #51 reports that a Mr. Gussman “said to leave the inmates where
they are. My God he left us there to die.” Inmate #51 states that guards were making and
receiving phone calls from their family members, but that she was not able to call her family
in the 9th Ward to see if they were okay. As of the date of his response to the questionnaire,
Inmate #51 still did not know where her family was. When Inmate #51 was rescued on
Wednesday, she was given food, water and medication.
Inmate #52 reports that he was housed in Templeman III F Side. He was in OPP for one day
before the hurricane. Inmate #52 states he was housed in the gym when the water started
rising. No deputies were in the gym with the inmates, and after 12 hours the water had
become waist-deep. Inmate #52 reports that a few people escaped. At some point, the
inmates were moved to an upper and lower tier which housed approximately 35 people.
Inmate #52 reports that approximately 100 inmates were placed on each tier, and that the
water was chest-high. Inmate #52 reports that a couple of prisoners were still locked in their
cells, and that other prisoners helped them out of their cells. The building lost power around
midnight, August 29. Breakfast on August 29 was the last meal that the inmates ate at the
prison–from that point on they had no food or water. Inmate #52 reports that escaping
prisoners were shot at, and that “deputies did assault prisoners.” Inmate #52 reports the
inmates could not breathe, and he “thought we were going to sufacate [sic].” Some inmates
found a pipe and started to break windows to get oxygen.
After 48 hours on F Side, Inmate #52 was brought to the bridge early Wednesday
morning, before the sun came up. The inmates were “told to leave everything behind, and
walk out with our hands on our heads. The water was so deep I had to [sic] small prisoners
holding on to me. One on each shoulder.” The inmates were taken to the bridge in small
boats carrying approximately 8 to 10 prisoners at a time. Once on the bridge, Inmate #52 still
did not receive food or water. He reports being told there was no water or food, but he says
deputies were drinking water. After approximately 8 hours on the bridge, another boat took
Inmate #52 to a bus. The inmates on the bus were reportedly given one gallon of water to
share, and were taken to Hunt. When they arrived, they were handed a blanket, two
sandwiches, and some water. Inmate #52 reports the arriving inmates were told to find a spot
in the grass. When it rained the next day, the inmates had to sleep where it was wet. On

Friday morning, Inmate #52 reports being transported to LSP, where he is currently being
held.
Inmate #53 reports that she was housed in Conchetta Unit 1-2 during Hurricane Katrina. She
arrived in OPP in December 2004. Inmate #53 states that on Friday, August 26, DOC. had
buses already available, and that a deputy informed the inmates to pack a small plastic bag
and to be prepared to evacuate at any moment. That evening, Inmate #53 reports that the
phones were turned off. On Saturday, August 27, the inmates were told that they might have
to be moved upstairs. The power went out on Saturday, and continued to be run off
generators. The inmates had breakfast on Sunday, August 28, and that was their last meal.
Mid-morning, a captain told Inmate #53 to use a squeegee and push broom to push rising
water that was “coming from outside and from inside sewer drains.” Inmate #53 reports that
she looked for sandbags to block doorways and she saw none. Inmate #53 states she was
then ordered to move deputies’ personal belongings to the 3rd floor classroom. She states that
when she asked about the food in the 1st floor kitchen, she was told not to worry about it.
Inmate #53 states that she helped inmates in locked dorms on 1-1 moved their belongings
and mattresses to 2-2, and also helped her dorm mates move belongings and mattresses to
2-1. Inmate #53 states that when she asked if she could help with the food downstairs, she
was told to go to dorm 2-1, which was then locked. The inmates received no food, and the
generators then went down. “No power, no windows, no air, no food after nightime [sic] we
were issued a 1/4 cup of water from a trash can (used) filled with water from the faucet
previously.” The running water was turned off on Sunday afternoon, and Inmate #53 was
covered in sewer water and dirt from moving mattresses and belongings. Water was running
from the roof down the elevator shaft and onto the 2nd floor. Inmate #53 saw no dead bodies,
but she reports hearing of some dead bodies on the deputies’ radios. Inmate #53 was also
not maced, but she states that she was locked in the dorm during a riot, and that she heard
officers say: “‘Let them kill each other.’” Inmate #53 states that she was not given
medication, even after she passed out on Tuesday, August 30.
Inmate #54 was housed in Conchetta Unit 3-2. She had been in OPP since mid-August at
the time of the hurricane. Inmate #54 states that Unit 3-2 did not fill with water, because it
was on the third floor, but the unit was double occupied because inmates from St. Bernard
parish were placed there. The deputies remained on their posts, “but they treated us with no
respect whatsoever.” Inmate #54 reports the telephones were turned off on Friday, August
26. Inmate #54 states that Angola officials rescued the inmates on September 1. She was
housed in “an overcrowded, airless open dormitory.” She witnessed no physical assaults on
inmates, “but the verbal and emotional abuse that was heaped on inmates was intolerable.
We were called bitches, whores, etc. and several inmates fainted because of the oppressive
heat, including myself.” Inmate #54 reports that other inmates put cool towels on her face
using contaminated water. Inmate #54 states that the generators lost power Monday, August
29 at about 1:30 a.m. When inmates attempted to climb on top of bunks to see the rising
water through the windows, deputies told them to “‘Get down, bitches.’” The five toilets on
3-2 were each filled with human excrement, and the smell for three days was unbearable;
inmates had no food or water for 2 and a half days. Inmate #54 reports that she saw about
12 fellow inmates being denied medication. She witnessed no escapes and saw no dead

bodies. Inmate #54 was evacuated to the Broad Street overpass by Angola personnel in
boats. She received one cup of water at the overpass, and was eventually brought to Angola
State Penitentiary by bus. At Angola, inmates received food, medication, water and personal
hygiene supplies. Inmate #54 witnessed no assaults.
Inmate #55 was housed in Templeman I B-1 Medical Observation Unit. He had be in OPP
for 36 days prior to the hurricane. Inmate #55 was in the first floor Medical Observation
Unit–which is for inmates in wheelchairs--because he suffers from “permanent foot drop.”
Inmate #55 states that he was housed in an open dorm with 20 other inmates, and that his
dorm filled with waist-high sewage water. Inmate #55 also reports that deputies left their
post. He reports that “[a]lthough we were told on the Thursday before the storm that we
were going to be moved, we weren’t moved until Monday night after the storm passed.
Chief Rudy told us we were going to be moved.” They reported that the toilets were backing
up on Monday at around 7:30 a.m. Inmate #55 states that all of the prisoners from the first
floor M.O.U., including himself, were placed in the second floor gym, which was “flood dark
and hot Monday night.” Inmate #55 is 6'0" tall, and when he was brought downstairs on
Tuesday morning the water was chest-high. He and other inmates were escorted through the
building by five“high ranking officers with the O.P.P. Sheriffs Office with shotguns.” Once
outside, Inmate #55 and fellow prisoners were placed on boats and they were taken to the
Broad St. Overpass. On the overpass, Inmate #55 remained for approximately 7 hours
without food or water.
Inmate #55 reports that he “personally was maced by a member of the Special Investigation
Division (S.I.D.) a unit with the O.P.P. Sheriffs [sic] office. The mace was sprayed on a
group of inmates “several times who were seated on the Broad Overpass!” Once he was on
the Broad St. Overpass, Inmate #55 reports seeing “prisoners breaking out windows on the
2nd & 3rd floors, waiving blankets yelling for help.” Inmate #55 “personally saw 6 prisoners
jump to the water below from the floors mentioned.” Inmate #55 states that “[a]fter the
shooting stopped there was a prisoner with a big whole [sic] in his left upper back bleeding
very bad being dragged up the Broad Overpass where we were seated.” Inmate #55 describes
they evacuation as “a total mess.” “Once it was time to get on the bus to be transferred we
were flexcuffed very tight.” After 100 yards, the inmates had to leave the first bus and water
through waist-high water to a second bus. Inmate #55 tried to tell the D.O.C. officers about
his medical condition, and he was told to “shut.” Inmate #55 was carried by other inmates
who were also flexcuffed. Inmate #55 was placed in Hunt Correctional Facility, where he
received water, a spoiled sandwich, and a blanket. He was placed in a tent, and stayed there
in the rain
Inmate #56 was housed in Templeman II Unit E-1 during the storm, and he had been in OPP
for approximately 20 days prior to the hurricane. Inmate #56 reports that his unit lost power
on Monday morning. Inmates were very anxious, in part because there were “no sheriffs
visible. It seems they’ve abandon [sic] their posts.” By mid-morning on Monday, “the air
is foul. We can’t flush our toilets or take a shower because they are tied into the electricity.”
Inmate #56 reports that he had not eaten since Sunday morning, and inmates began panicking
and rioting–yelling for the guards’ attention. SID entered several dorms spraying mace and
shooting bean bag guns; they demanded silence. This was the only time during the day that

Inmate #56 saw officers. That evening, Inmate #56 reports: “My head is killing me because
of the toxic air. My stomach is empty and I am experiencing symptoms of dehydration.” No
food was delivered on Tuesday, and Inmate #56 states that “[n]o deputies are at their posts.
I am totally dejected. When I look at my fellow inmates all I can see is defeat in their eyes.”
Inmate #56 is evacuated at approximately 5 p.m. Tuesday evening. He states that
while being evacuated, “I have no idea that what is on the other side of the door will
continually haunt me all the days of my life.” When the deputies escorted the inmates to the
lower levels of the prison, “the noxious odors hits [sic] us dead on. Then the pools of water
appear. We are forced into it at gunpoint.” Inmate #56 reports that he could see gasoline,
used blood bags, feces, and needles in the water. Once he entered the water, “it is well to my
shoulders. Underfoot I hit objects I cannot possibly identify.” Inmate #56 reports that this
lasted “well over 5 hours.”
When he arrives on the Broad Street overpass at around 10 p.m., he sees thousands
of inmates lined in a close sitting position with guards circling them. The next morning,
someone next to him stood up to stretch. “Instantly a guard runs over a [sic] pepper sprays
the group of us. My eyes burn, my face is on fire. They leave us that way without water.”
When inmates ask for permission to use a restroom, they are told to urinate and defecate on
themselves. Throughout the day, guards are drinking bottled water, but inmates are given
none. Inmate #56 reports seeing other inmates maced, shot at with bean bag guns, and
tasered. He states that he “saw an old man being attacked by police K-9s simply because his
limbs became numb and he needed to stretch.” At approximately 10 p.m. on Wednesday he
is relocated to a section of I-10, where he is given one bottle of water and still no food,
despite seeing 2 trucks full of both food and water. After several more hours, he was placed
on a bus for Hunt Correctional Facility. Once he arrived there, he received some food and
a blanket, and was placed on the wet law. Eventually he was transferred to Riverbend, where
he is finally allowed to shower and is given his third meal in six days.
Inmate #57 reports being housed in HOD Unit 3 during the hurricane. He had been at OPP
for 59 days prior to the hurricane. Inmate #57's cell did not fill with water. He reports that
prisoners were unable to open cells because the ranks and deputies handcuffed the cells.
Inmate #57 also states that SID officers and deputies shot a man on the 4th Floor claiming that
he was out of his cell. Inmate #57 states that there “was no need for that because they still
had an outside cell door where you cannot even touch a deputy.” Inmate #57 states that he
knows a man on the 3rd floor was shot because Inmate #57 heard the shots. Soon after he
heard the shots, Inmate #57 reports that the top rank in HOD came to Inmate #57's floor
laughing, and saying that “the same would happen to us if we get loose from our cells.”
Inmate #57 states that he was maced when he asked questions about food and water. The
power went out in his building at 2 a.m. on Monday. When he was being evacuated, Inmate
#57 reports seeing SID officers drinking bottled water that was never given to the inmates.
He says “the main S.I.D. officer even kicked a 40 year old man because he did not want to
sit down in the contaminated water.” Inmate #57 reports that he was in the prison for four
days and was on the Interstate 10 overpass for 1 day. He did not receive any food, water or
medication.
Inmate #57 did not see any inmates escape, but from the window of his cell he saw
inmates in Templeman jumping out of windows. “[T]he reason why they jumped out the

windows because one of the Templeman was on fire.” He reports seeing SID officers shoot
at least three people, and he states: “I don’t see the reason why they shot those three men.”
Once Inmate #57 was transferred to Hunt Correctional Facility, he was given no food until
he could “fight my way off the field.” Inmate #57 reports that inmates were fighting each
other, and that guards were not intervening. Inmate #57 reports that one inmate was beaten
by 10 other inmates, and that when he tried to escape by getting off the field, “he was shot
by Hunt’s [sic] officers.” After that, he was placed in the back of a truck and was beaten by
more Hunt officers.
Inmate #58 reports being housed in HOD Unit Southside 3rd Floor during the hurricane. He
had been in OPP for 14 months at the time of the storm. At midnight on August 28, rain and
wind began to enter cells 1, 2 & 3 in HOD. Power was immediately lost, but it was backed
up by a generator for a short period of time before that failed. By 2:30 - 3:00 am, the inmates
were frantic and panicking. On the morning of August 29, “there was’nt [sic] a sing [sic] of
any deputies, nor were we given nurishment [sic].” Inmate #58 reports that when he finally
saw deputies, they were “armed guards, who shot and asked questions afterwards, even as
we were behind locked bars.” The guards reportedly refused to answer questions about food,
and left once they had handcuffed the cells shut. Inmate #58 reports that some inmates tied
bed sheets together to climb down. He reports that guards fired at some of the men, and that
they shot one inmate who was attempting to swim to them. When they were going to be
evacuated, armed guards were unable to open the cells because the handcuffs that had been
placed on the doors had rusted, and the cells were jammed. The guards eventually took the
inmates to the roof where they sat with the hands above their heads. One inmate couldn’t
do it, so they guards “sprayed mase [sic] in to [sic] the whole crowd our eyes burning from
peper [sic] spray. No water we suffered [sic], some inmates paniced [sic] and they were beat
[sic] repeatedly.” The inmates were then moved to the garage, where “the smell of gas
caused a few men to pass completely out. Guards thought it was funny. Still no medical
attention.”
On the overpass, Inmate #58 was given a sandwich and a cup of water. He remained
on the overpass for over 14 hours, and he received no medical attention. He was taken by
bus to Hunt where he was given a blanket and had to sleep outside in the rain and muddy
water. He did not eat until the next day when he had a sandwich. Inmates were verbally
abused repeatedly during this period. He was then brought to Angola State Prison.
Inmate #59 was housed on South White Street during the hurricane. He had been in OPP for
3 and a half months prior to the hurricane. Inmate #59 reports that the lights went out the
first night, and they came back temporarily about 12 hours later. The next morning, water
started to come in from the back door. Inmate #59 was told to help place sand bags, and was
then sent back to the dorm. Inmate #59 went to bed and was awakened by banging from the
cell next door. The water began rising quickly, first over the top of the lockers and then up
to the bottom bunk. Inmates were kicking on the door to get the attention of the guards, but
no one responded. A guard eventually came to give the inmates plastic bags for their
belongings. The water rose above the toilets, and the water was filled with sewage. After
48 hours of this, the inmates were moved higher up to the Fish Farm. They were supposed
to wait for rescue, and they still got no food. They were given contaminated water to drink.

At 4 or 5 the next morning, officers brought boxes of frozen smoked sausages to the inmates,
and they tossed it into the crowd “like Mardi Gras deblooms [sic].” It was not enough food
for everyone.
The inmates were eventually told to walk 2 blocks in neck-high water until they got
to Central Lock-Up. At that point, they saw guards armed with rifles and machine guns, who
demanded that they remain still and drop their belongings. The inmates then began to get
into the boat. “They hit some us with the muzzel [sic] of the guns and shove some in the
back.” Once they got to the Broad St. overpass, they were marched with their hands in the
air, and were told to sit back-to-back. “This was all done in a violent and vulger [sic]
manner.” Inmate #59 was given no food or water as he sat in the hot sun on the overpass.
He was transferred to Hunt, where he ate sandwiches and drank some water. After that he
was transferred to Rapides Parish Detention Center. Inmate #59 says he feels the inmates
“were tramatized [sic] to the point of true fright and also to the point we felt death would be
our next and only consequence of this desaster [sic].”
Inmate #60 was housed in Templeman III during the hurricane. He reports that he did not
eat for four days and had no water during that period. Inmate #60 also reports that inmates
were breaking out of the jail. Inmate #60 reports that he was on the Interstate 10 bridge for
2 to 3 days until he was transferred to Hunt and then Rapides Parish Detention Center 3.
Inmate #61 was housed in Conchetta Unit 1-1 during the hurricane, and she had been in OPP
for six months at the time of the hurricane. Inmate #61 reports that the lights went out on
August 28, and that the water level rose to the top of the second floor, which forced the first
floor to move to the second floor. The guards were scared, so they had locked the inmates
into the cells and screamed and hollered at the inmates. Some of the inmates broke windows
to get air, and also tried to “flag someone down to come rescue us.”
The deputies
threatened to mace the inmates, but they did not mace anyone. Inmate #61 reports that she
had no food and water for 4 and a half days, and that the medications were all on the first
floor, and were floating in the water. Some inmates tried to escape, and others left and
returned. Inmate #61 reports that inmates broke a window and even burned one part down
to get out. Inmate #61 reports that there was shooting, but she was “too afraid to look.” She
states that “[w]hile we were being rescued I seen [sic] bodies floating in the water.”
Inmate #61 reports being evacuated by Angola officials. Once Inmate #61 made it to the
Interstate 10 overpass, she reports that the inmates “were hot, tired, passing out fainting
catching seizures.” Inmate #61 reports that she received food and lots of water and was
treated okay on the overpass. She reports receiving medication once she got to Angola
prison.
Inmate #62 was housed in Old Parish Prison Unit C-3 and then C-4 during the storm. He had
been in OPP for 35 days prior to the storm. Inmate #62 reports that power was lost two days
prior to the storm. During the four days he spent in the jail before being evacuated, Inmate
#62 reports that deputies only checked on them four times. The deputies told inmates “I
don’t care if you die or kill each other.” Inmate #62 also reports that deputies told inmates
to burn out the windows and rip down electrical piping to bust windows. Inmate #62 reports
that inmates nearly killed each other with iron pipes. After two or three days with no power,

no air, and no guards, Inmate #62 reports that a riot broke out. “Riot squat [sic] stormed in
violently with M-16 & shotguns and held people at gunpoint.” They also had beanbags,
electric shields, and tasers. Inmate #62 reports that the inmates were evacuated. He was
bused to Hunt Correctional Facility, where he was placed on another bus to Rapides Parish
prison before he had a chance to get food. At Rapides he received water and hot food.
Inmate #63 was detained in Old Parish Prison (Templeman III) for three days prior to
Hurricane Katrina. On the Sunday prior to the hurricane, he and 232 other inmates were
brought to a gym facility where some food and water was provided; however, he was not able
to get any because the amount was insufficient for the number of inmates. That was the last
time he had access to clean water for 88 hours. Deputies then provided an insufficient
number of mats for the people present in the gym, and left the facility with no supervision.
Water began entering the facility the next morning and was waist-deep by afternoon.
Deputies intermittently entered the gym to count the inmates or promise food, or eventually
throw some loaves of bread to the inmates and move them out of the rising water. He was
brought to an overcrowded cell in a higher floor which gradually filled with water as well.
“The water was filthy sewage as people had to relieve themselves.” Some of the inmates
became violent and there was no protection. On Wednesday, guards escorted inmates from
the cells at gunpoint. “I waded through slimy, grease, trash-filled sewage water up to my
neck…” He was brought by boat to the overpass, where he waited for 9 ½ hours without
food or water. He was hit in the head, chest, and arm by mace that a guard was directing at
a different inmate. Riot police arrived in the morning and fired tear gas that burned his
lungs, eyes, and face. He was then taken by boat to buses that transferred him to Hunt
Correctional Facility. With insufficient shelter at Hunt, he was forced to sleep on the grass.
On September 2, he was transferred to Angola, where he sleeps on a mat on the floor, has
suffered physical abuse from guards, and has not had access to phone privileges since he
arrived.
Inmate #64 was detained in Old Parish Prison (Templeman III) for eleven months prior to
Hurricane Katrina. On Saturday night or early Sunday morning, his building lost power, and
later lost water. The last meal that he received was on Monday morning. Deputies left their
posts after the hurricane hit. Water entered the cells and on Monday evening, he and other
inmates on his floor were moved to a higher floor. During the move, SID officers shot at
some inmates with beanbag shotguns and hit some inmates in the face. He was hit in the ribs
three times during the move. He suffers from asthma and did not have access to necessary
medication. He saw some inmates being shot at as they tried to escape. “We were in the
Templeman III building without power, food, or water for at least three days. It was total
chaos inside the building. Everyone that was not locked in a cell searched the dark building
for food. We had to set fires just to be able to see. The building had no air so windows were
broken out for ventilation. (Still no staff.) We tried to get the attention of people outside by
waving sheets outside the window, but staff members just looked and did nothing.” He and
others were evacuated on Wednesday night, but others were left behind because they were
locked in cells. During the evacuation, he had to wade through water up to neck level. He
was taken by boat to the overpass where he waited another twenty-two hours without food,
water, or medical attention. The guards on the bridge “shot at us with beanbag shotguns and

pepper sprayed us at random. They stockpiled water in plain sight and refused to give us
any. Instead they teased us and gave the dogs water.” He saw one man shot in the head with
a beanbag gun “just for standing up” and another “attacked with dogs for being too weak to
move.” He was maced three times. After twenty-two hours on the bridge, he was told to
climb down a fifty-foot scaffold, taken to the interstate, given a bottle of water and two
sandwiches, and waited for buses to transfer him to Hunt Correctional Facility. At Hunt, he
had to sleep on the grass “that smelled of urine and there was human feces everywhere.” He
lived in this yard for three days in total chaos. “Everywhere you looked there were fights,
people getting stabbed, people getting raped… When they did come with food, they threw
it to us from scaffolds like they were at Mardi Gras.”
Inmate #65 was detained in Old Parish Prison for a month (Templeman III) before Hurricane
Katrina. The deputies abandoned their posts Friday before the hurricane hit. He was not
evacuated but left on his own through a window that they had removed to allow air to enter
the cell. When he escaped from the locked cell, he was shot at a number of times. He turned
himself in after his escape and was brought to the overpass after a day. He had no food or
water there and some were so thirsty they drank the flood water. Deputies and DOC officers
assaulted some inmates who were asking for food and water; one was shot with a taser gun.
Inmates passed out around him. He was brought to Hunt Correctional Facility which was
violent and chaotic. He stayed there for two days and slept in the yard. He was then
transported by van to Sabinz Parish Detention Center where he had been on lock-down 23
hours a day.
Inmate #66 was detained for 32 days in Old Parish Prison (HOD) prior to Hurricane Katrina.
Two days before the storm, inmates did not have access to phones in the prison and thus had
very limited information. He was maced in the prison for asking for food and water. “They
even shot up and down the hall. They even shot a couple of guys with rubber bullets for
nothing at all.” When he was evacuated on Thursday, they brought him to the roof where he
was told to sit for hours in water and sludge with his hands over his head. “We haven’t eaten
in days and some of us was just too weak for that. Some of us just couldn’t take it anymore
and pass out on the roof.” Eventually, he was transported by boat at gunpoint to the bridge
where he stayed for hours before being transported to Angola.
Inmate #67 was detained for seventeen days in Old Parish Prison (Templeman I) prior to
Hurricane Katrina. He had his last meal on Sunday morning. By mid-morning the deputies
had left their posts and detainees were left unsupervised, with guards only passing through
intermittently. After the storm hit, the power went out. On Monday night, armed SID guards
“came in firing bean bags and ordered us to face down in the slick muck that covered the
floor.” They left after removing two inmates who later returned soaked to the chest. On
Tuesday afternoon, inmates broke out windows for ventilation. The inmates were moved
down two flights of stairs into chest-high water. Inmate #67 waited for 5 ½ hours standing
in sewage before being brought by boat to the bridge where he was ordered to sit with his
knees to his chest all night. When he asked to relieve himself, he was told to “go where I sat.
Anyone who stood up to stretch was threatened at gunpoint.” He waited twelve hours for the
bus and “saw countless inmates pepper sprayed.” At some point “about 20-30 riot dressed

correction officers and swat team police stormed past us and surrounded us. They started
making us on [gunpoint]. I was sprayed for what reason I don’t know.” Inmates passed out
around him. When the second night came, he was again told to sit knees to chest. “Anyone
who got up was shot with beanbags, or shells from shotguns containing pepper spray. Some
inmates were pulled from the crowd, handcuffed, maced and I even saw one man who was
hog-tied, maced, bitten by a K-9 while cuffed….I saw others maced at point-blank range.”
When he was allowed to leave the bridge, he was moved to the overpass, told to scale a
scaffold, and transported to Hunt Correctional Facility. He received two sandwiches at Hunt
where he and others were left in a big yard. He was eventually transported again to East
Carroll. He was being held on a probation violation and his day to return to court to be
released came and went. At the time of mailing, he had already served 65 days on a 30-day
sentence.
Inmate #68 was detained at Orleans Parish Prison (Templeman III) prior to Hurricane
Katrina. The unit lost power before the storm hit. His tier filled with five feet of water and
he was abandoned by deputies. He was left locked in the cell for three days. He was
assaulted with pepper spray and rubber bullets by SID and OPP deputies. He was denied
food or water for three days, and did not receive treatment for chronic back pain and an ulcer
that left him in pain. Three days after the storm, he was evacuated out of a locked cell by
OPP Deputies who took him through flood water to the overpass where he waited for two
more days without food, water, or medication. OPP deputies beat him and left a bruise on
the left side of his face and a swollen lip. He was taken to Hunt Correctional Facility where
he stayed for three days, unsupervised by officers, outside on a football field.
Inmate #69 was detained at Orleans Parish Prison (Templeman III) for two weeks prior to
Hurricane Katrina. The guards opened his cell on Monday morning and about 20 prisoners
ran into the hallway. An SID officer came to the hallway, maced and tasered inmates who
were chanting, “we want food!” SID fought the inmates back into the cellblock. Inmate #69
ate once on Monday morning, and resorted to eating mustard packs with his cellmate at
night. On Tuesday, about forty inmates from Templeman I and II were brought into
Templeman III. They told of neck-high water and dead people. On Tuesday, Templeman
lost electricity, ventilation, and running water. Guards abandoned their posts. Some inmates
broke glass to enter the hallway. He had no ventilation and it was so hot that “the walls were
sweating.” Some of the inmates who had already broken into the hallway passed a crowbar
to allow him to break the window to allow some ventilation in. Some inmates were able to
break a hole in the gym and swim out into the flood waters. He heard that the inmates that
were swimming out of the cell were being shot at and could hear the shots being fired and
helicopters overhead. His “cellmate waved a white sheet out of our cell window. It was a
cry for help. Nobody helped us, but the prisoners in the dayroom. We were abandoned, like
we was not human.” Some were burning plastic plates to create light, but they also created
a lot of smoke. Some inmates were able to break Inmate #69's cell door open. “The cell
block smelled like urine and defecation. Broken glass was everywhere.” On Wednesday
morning, SID came with guns, mace, shields, and tear gas to evacuate the inmates. They
verbally assaulted the inmates. He had to walk downstairs in five feet of water and was
brought to the overpass, but given no food or water and forced to sit in 100-degree heat. The

guards themselves, however, had drinking water. When people asked for food and water,
guards swore at them and maced them. Guards also allowed dogs to bite people and sprayed
tear gas on inmates, including him. At night, he was transported from the Broad Street
Bridge to the Mississippi River Bridge down the scaffold. He was forced to sit there and was
finally given food and water on Wednesday night. Prisoners were still being maced on the
bridge at that point as they began to be taken to Hunt Correctional Facility. He slept outside
on the ground at the Hunt prison yard without a blanket. He was provided food and water
at Hunt. He was told he would be brought to another facility with an opportunity to bathe,
eat, and sleep; but was only transported to another prison yard at Hunt. On Friday, buses
brought inmates to other facilities. In the process of being transferred, prisoners were getting
stabbed in fights.
Inmate #70 was detained at Orleans Parish Prison (Templeman I). The telephones were cut
two days before the storm. There was no electricity or ventilation. Deputies left their posts.
When inmates were beating the doors and walls, deputies arrived and maced and beat
prisoners, but did not provide any food or drink. On the second day, the deputies returned
to move the inmates. They walked into chest-deep water and had to stand there for several
hours. “Deputies are pushing some prisoners down in this water, spraying mace, shooting
beanbags at some prisoners while other prisoners are around in hitting the wrong prisoners.”
In some areas, the water was so deep, he had to walk on his toes to avoid swallowing water.
He and other inmates were then evacuated by boat to a bridge, where he waited for a day and
a half. On the bridge, “deputies was making [sic] prisoners just for standing up. Other
correctional officers was making [sic] there [sic] dogs bit [sic] prisoners for no reason.”
Though deputies and officers were eating and drinking, they would mace or hit with the taser
inmates who asked for water or food. On the bridge, he saw prisoners waving white rags out
of their cell windows yelling for help. “Prisoners was [sic] being thrown in the water for
passing out by the order of the correctional officer.” He was brought to Hunt where he was
made to sleep in the mud and not allowed a bath until September 3 when he was at Bossier
Correctional Center. At Bossier, the officers would spray mace in a prisoner’s face for
asking to speak with the warden. At Bossier, prisoners were verbally and physically abused
and denied basic essentials. On September 29, he was brought to Richwood Correctional
Center
Inmate #71 was housed in OPP (Templeman III Unit F-3) for three months prior to Hurricane
Katrina. He went without food and water for several days. His cell filled with water and he
was eventually moved to a higher floor. Prisoners were helping each other out of their cells
and then they would venture off in search of food. Inmate #71 says that Special
Investigations Division deputies were assaulting inmates. He claims that they “handled three
inmates really bad” because one inmate cursed at the officer. The power went out the day
of the hurricane and after that inmate #71 says “we suffered like slaves.” After two days
passed, inmate #71 was evacuated to the Interstate 10 overpass. He spent sixteen hours on
the overpass and at no point was he given food or water.
Inmate #72 was housed in OPP prior to Hurricane Katrina. He was housed on the third floor
where 100 to 150 inmates were crammed into a thirty-nine man unit. According to Inmate

#72, the deputies left their posts on Saturday August 27th and did not return until Tuesday
August 30th. Prior to abandoning their posts, the deputies locked the prisoners in Inmate
#72's unit into their cells. When the deputies came back (along with officers from the
Special Investigation Division), Inmate #72 says they were macing prisoners and shooting
them with bean bags. Inmate #72's building lost power early Sunday morning and received
food and water for the last time late Saturday evening. Medicine was not made available to
prisoners who needed it. He witnessed prisoners attempting to escape and being shot at by
deputies. After three or four days in OPP, the deputies finally came to evacuate Inmate #72.
In order to evacuate he had to stand in four feet of polluted flood water for about three hours.
Once Inmate #72 reached the Interstate 10 overpass, prisoners were again shot with bean
bags and maced. After three to four hours, Inmate #72 was taken to Hunt Correctional
Facility where he was placed on a yard with thousands of other inmates. Inmate #72
witnessed stabbings and fights out on the yard and the officers refused to intervene or listen
to prisoners’ complaints.
Inmate #73 was housed in OPP prior to Hurricane Katrina. Inmate #73 has a plate in his hip
and says that he developed a major infection because of the seven foot high flood waters.
He says he went three or four days without food, water, medication or assistance. Inmate #73
says the staff members “ran out and left me to die, and beat me and mace me....” He was
eventually evacuated to Hunt Correctional Facility where he slept on the yard and there were
stabbings, fights and a lack of medical care. Inmate #73 is now housed at Wade where he
is unable to get pain medication for the condition with his hip.
Inmate #74 was housed in OPP (Templeman II Unit F-1) for approximately six weeks prior
to Hurricane Katrina. He was housed on the bottom level of the jail and there was flood
water up to his waist. After the storm, Inmate #74's unit had no ventilation, no water, no
food and no deputies. F-1 was designed to house 39 inmates and after Katrina struck, the
unit was housing twice that number. Due to the lack of ventilation, Inmate #74 says
prisoners began kicking out windows to get air to breathe. Inmate #74 reports that many
prisoners were getting sick - but there was no medical care available to them. Inmate #74
began thinking of suicide while housed in Templeman II. During the evacuation, Inmate #74
says deputies were macing prisoners and shooting them with bean bags. There were dead
bodies in the water. Inmate #74 almost drowned when prisoners began stampeding from the
building to the bridge. Inmate #74 says that while on the interstate 10 overpass he was
maced four or five times. He was on the overpass for two days and he was not fed or given
water to drink.
Inmate #75 was housed in OPP (Templeman I Unit D1) for a year prior to Hurricane Katrina.
He was locked on his tier for three days without food, water or power. Inmate #75 says he
passed out for three minutes, but because the deputies had abandoned their posts, there was
no one around to provide him with medical care. When the deputies did return to evacuate
inmate #75, he walked through 4 feet of flood water contaminated with gasoline and oil. He
now suffers from rashes and sores all over his body, in addition to blurry vision. By the time
the deputies reached Unit D1, Inmate #75 reports that prisoners had already begun to pass
out. Inmate #75 was transported to the Interstate 10 overpass by boat. His boat turned over

and when Inmate #75 made his way back to the boat he was beaten and maced by guards.
Inmate #75 had a particularly ugly interaction with a deputy while on the overpass. “I ask
a deputy for some water and he told me to shut the f**k up you better be glad you not dead
and lucky we came got ya’ll so when he told me that I was p**s off so I told him God Bless
you and he turned around and punch me in the face and mace me once....” Inmate #75 asked
another deputy for water and was told that there was no water for inmates, only for deputies;
out of desperation, inmate #75 drank the polluted water. While still on the overpass, Inmate
#75 witnessed another inmate shot several times with bean bags in his chest; the other inmate
received no medical care. Inmate #75 sat on the overpass for three days without food or
water. Eventually, Inmate #75 was transferred to Hunt Correctional Facility where he did
not receive medical assistance

 

 

CLN Subscribe Now Ad 450x600
PLN Subscribe Now Ad 450x450
Prison Phone Justice Campaign