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Ice Facility Audits 2003-2008

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Office of Detention and Removal Operations
U.S. Department of Homeland Security
425 I Street, NW
Washington, DC 20536

MEMORANDUM FOR:

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Officer-In-Charge (OIC)
San Diego Contract Detention Facility
FROM:

John P. Torres
Director

SUBJECT:

Recent Reaccredidation Review of the San Diego
Contract Detention Facility

Congratulations on the recent review by the American Correctional Association (ACA) of the
San Diego Contract Detention Facility (CDF).
During the review, it was noted that the sanitation was Outstanding, the relationship between
Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) and Corrections Corporation of America (CCA)
was excellent, and overall the ACA reviewers were extremely impressed. The recommended
score achieved was 100% on all Mandatory Standards and 97.2% on all Non-Mandatory
Standards.
It is apparent that you work closely with ICE and CCA employees to ensure and enforce a
healthy and humane living environment for detainees and working conditions for employees.
Congratulations on a job well done. Good luck with continued success as you prepare for your
upcoming Commission hearing in January 2008.

www.ice.gov

COMMISSION ON ACCREDITATION FOR CORRECTIONS
STANDARDS COMPLIANCE REACCREDITATION AUDIT
Department of Homeland Security
El Paso Service Processing Center
El Paso, Texas
October 16-18, 2006
VISITING COMMITTEE MEMBERS
Chairperson
Correctional Consultant
713 Moraine Avenue
Midwest City, Oklahoma 73130
(405)
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C

t

1958 Parallel Road
Lexington, Kentucky 40511
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(859)
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Correctional Consultant
1229 Westward Drive
Miami Springs, Florida 33166
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(305)

A.

Introduction
The audit of the Department of Homeland Security El Paso Service Processing Center
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was conducted on October 16-18, 2006 by the following team:
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Chairperson;
Member; and
Member.
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B.

Facility Demographics
Rated Capacity: 1.070
Actual Population: 771
Average Daily Population for the last 12 months: 771
Average Length of Stay: 1 month (no average stay at this time, new mission goal)
Security/Custody Level: Federal Administrative Detainees
Age Range of Offenders: 22-59 years
Gender: Male/Female detainees
Full-Time Staff: 234
76 Administrative, 113 Security, Program staff 16, and 29 other

C.

Facility Description
The El Paso Processing Center is a part of the Homeland Security, Bureau of
Immigration and Customs Enforcement, Detention and Removal Operations. The
facility is located in the city of El Paso, Texas. The facility is located approximately half
miles south of the El Paso International Airport. The El Paso Processing Center and
the United States Border Patrol occupies and shares 27 acres of land. The facility is
the holding and processing facility for detainees while they are processed regarding their
right to remain in the United States.
The facility was opened in 1968 under the Bureau of Immigration and Custom
Enforcement. The name of the facility and its’ mission was changed twice with the last
change to Immigration and Customs Enforcement El Paso Processing Center in 2003
and was placed under the Department of Homeland Security by an act of congress. The
normal rated capacity for the facility is 861 and the emergency capacity is 1,221. El
Paso Processing Center houses both male and female detainees with each being housed
separately.
The El Paso Processing Center (EP/ICE) is enclosed by a double wire fence which is
has razor wire on both the top and bottom. There are no towers or roving vehicles. The
facility houses, classifies and remove detainees from other countries who have not be
authorized to stay in America. The average stay of a detainee is 20-45 days.
There are 33 buildings, three single cells with 90 square footage, 17 segregation cells
and 14 open bay dormitories. Buildings seven and eight are housing units that consist
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of four pods, each with the capacity to house sixty-four detainees. Buildings one to four
are barrack style living units with the same capacity. Buildings five and six are special
housing and temporary housing units. The new Special Housing Unit was opened on
the second day of this audit.
The mission of the facility is: To promote public safety and national security by
ensuring the departure from the United States of all removable aliens through the fair
and effective enforcement of the nation’s immigration laws.
D.

Pre-Audit Meeting
The chairperson divided standards into the following groups:
Standards # 4ALDF-1A-01 to # 4ALDF-2C-06
Standards # 4ALDF-2D-01 to # 4ALDF-5A-10
Standards # 4ALDF-5B-01 to # 4ALDF-7F-07

E.

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Chairperson
Member
, Member

The Audit Process
1.

The team reviewed the pre-audit materials provided by the facility, and met in the
City of El Paso on October 15, 2006 to discuss the information.
The team was escorted to the facility by
Officer.

2.

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, Health and Safety

Interview
The audit team proceeded to the office of
Officer in Charge
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(OIC). The team expressed the apprec
ssociation for the
opportunity to be involved with Immigration and Customs Enforcement El Paso
Center in the accreditation process.
Officer in Charge b6,b7c was informed that the team would be at the facility for
all shifts and wou
o review all programs and talk with as many staff and
offenders as time would allow and that the end of each day the team would inform
the warden of our findings and plans for the next day.
OIC
entry

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escorted the team to the Multi-Purpose Room where the formal
was held. The following persons were in attendance:
, Field Officer Director
, Officer in Charge
Health/Safety Officer
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Assistant Field Office Director
, Assistant Field Office Director
, Chief
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, Health Services Administrator
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Assistant Officer in Charge
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, Assistant Officer in Charge
Project Manager DECO Security
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aintenance supervisor
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, DECO Security Captain
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ood Supervisor
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, Training Officer
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, ACA Manager
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, ACA Team Member
IEA
ACA Team Member
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IEA
CA Team Member
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IEA
ACA Team Member
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It was explained that the goal of the visiting team was to be as helpful and nonintrusive as possible during the conduct of the audit. The chairperson emphasized
the goals of accreditation toward the efficiency and effectiveness of correctional
systems throughout the United States. The schedule was also discussed at this
time.
3.

Facility Tour
The team toured the facility from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. and again from 2:15
p.m. to 3:45 p.m. The following persons accompanied the team on the tour and
responded to the team's questions concerning facility operations.
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4.

IOC
CA Manager
IEA
IEA
, IEA
, IEA
, Health and Safety Officer/IEA

Conditions of Confinement/Quality of Life
Security
The facility contracts with the DECO for security personnel that oversee the
detainees in the daily operations of the facility. There are 290 uniformed officers
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and ten supervisors. The unformed staff works three to eight hour shifts and is
trained in accordance to the Immigration Service Agency policies and procedures.
Detainees are classified using Levels I-III and are dressed in specific colors for
security and identification purposes.
The facility has a well stored fire arm storage areas and equipment is maintained
and there is good documentation.
Environmental Conditions
Housing units are well organized and free of clutter. There are ample showers,
sinks and commodes. Each housing unit has a day room area for inmates to relax,
write letter, read and watch telephone. Lighting and noise levels are in acceptable
levels. Each housing unit is equipped with space for staff to conduct their duties
with restroom facilities that are separated from the offenders.
Sanitation
Sanitation at El Paso Processing Center is being maintained at a high level. The
facility has a system of control and accountability of the caustic that is to be
commented. Cleaning supplies are delivered to the different areas at a specific
time and are returned before the end of the day shift.
Fire Safety
The fire and safety regulations are being followed with the documentation of fire
drills and follow-up from the local fire departments. The facility is equipped with
fire alarms, fire extinguishers and posted fire exit signs throughout the facility.
The facility has good procedures in the handling and control of the cleaning
supplies and other toxic materials. At no time are detainees allowed to handle the
maintenance tools with out the immediate supervision of staff.
Food Service
The team sampled the lunch meals on two days of the audit. The food was found
it to be have the properly temperatures, was tasteful and was found to be more that
the daily requirement of calories. The agency philosophy is that most of the
detainees diets were lacking in the calories needed for good health. Thus the
detainees are given more food than is required. Normal daily calories are 2400
and the facility gives 3000 calories per day. The cost of a meal is $1.41. Sack
lunches are provided for detainees arriving after normal working hours. The
facility offers special meals to include medical, kosher and Muslim.
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The facility has a dining room areas and detainees are allowed time to complete
their meals. The detainees and staff workers were clean and equipped with
required clothing and other equipment to perform their jobs. Temperatures for
the freezer and other storage areas were well maintained.
Medical Care
The facility has a seven bed infirmary and three isolation units. There is a full
time doctor, dentist, position for a social worker (currently vacant), and a host of
nursing staff. All psychological problems are referred to the Thompson General
Hospital located approximately five minutes from the facility. The medical staff
dispenses medication 24 hour per day and sick call is conducted five days a week.
The facility has a small waiting room and utilizes an outdoor recreation yard for
the detainees while they wait to be seen by the staff. The medication and
equipment was controlled and well documented. However, it was recommended
that the area that the medication carts were being stored needed to be placed
behind a locked door. The carts are locked, but they are stored in a room that has
no door.
Recreation
The facility has two full-time Recreation Specialists. Recreational opportunities
are available to the detainees in the form of yards, with weight/exercise equipment,
indoor and outdoor games, and televisions that are mounted in each housing unit.
The facility does not have a gymnasium, however, each housing unit and the
medical unit has yards for the detainee to exercise and participate in physical
fitness activities.
Religious Programming
Religious services are available to the detainee in their native language and are
provided by three religious staff members and a host of religious volunteers.
Offender Work Programs
Detainee workers are utilized on a voluntary basis. Detainees are given
opportunities to work in the food service area, law and leisure library, outside/
inside maintenance crews paint and wax the floors, and dorm laundry. The facility
has a “woman laundry” detail that cleans the facility. Other detainees are
encouraged to keep their living areas clean. Each working detainee is paid $1
(one dollar) a day that he or she can keep in their personal belongings. The money
is paid in cash. Worker detainees are dressed in specific colors for identification
purposes.
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Academic and Vocational Education
There is no educational or vocational programming at the El Paso Processing
center.
Social Services
Social Services are provided to the detainees by the Immigration Enforcement
personnel who assist the detainees in maintaining ties with their families and
country agencies. In services include, but is not limited to assisting the detainees
with help in obtain birth certificates, them to know rights and procedures,
visitation approval and translators services.
Visitation
Visitation is held seven days a week, during the evening hours. Detainees are
allowed contact visitation with families. Attorney and special visitation are
approved in advance. The facility has two visitation areas for the detainees to visit.
The facility has ample room equipped with vending machines, lockers for visitors’
property and an area for the children of the offenders. Visitation is conducted
indoor only.
Library Services
Library services are provided to the detainees seven days a week. The main library
has a small but an ample amount of books and periodical for the population. The
facility has one law clerk and one office clerk. The library is equipped with both
computers and typewriter for the detainees to use.
Laundry
Detainees are issued one set of clothing upon arrival to the unit. There is an
institutional laundry that cleans the clothing and each housing unit has a washer
and dryer for the use of the detainees per an approved schedule. The facility has
an ample supply of replacement clothing in case of emergencies.
F.

Examination of Records
Following the facility tour, the team proceeded to the Multi-Purpose Room to review
the accreditation files and evaluate compliance levels of the policies and procedures. The
facility has no notices of non-compliance with local, state, or federal laws or regulations.

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1.

Litigation
Over the last three years, the facility had no consent decrees, class action lawsuits
or adverse judgments.

2.

Significant Incidents/Outcome Measures
The facility has thirteen detainees- on- detainee assaults for this reporting period.
No weapons were uses. There was on detainee assault on staff and that was not a
direct assault. There were no escapes, suicides, or attempts. Based upon the
professional judgment and experience of the team the small numbers of incidents
represents a well ran facility in which the mission is being upheld and policy being
followed making the facility safe for both the staff and offenders.

3.

Departmental Visits
Team members revisited the following departments to review conditions relating to
departmental policy and operations:
Department Visited
Control room

**Person(s) Contacted
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Officers

SHU
Law Library
Messhall
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DOS
Deportations
OIC
Yard Maintenance
Armory
C-Unit
Recreation
Intake
Processing
Classification/DACS
Identification
Property Officer
Armed Post
Jail Run
Medical

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Rover
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4.

Shifts
a.

Day Shift
The team was present at the facility during the day shift from 7:55 a.m. to
4:00 p.m. The team was present and observed detainees in various activities
from being processed into the facility, in their living areas, on the many
recreational yards and in medical. The team was also present to observe a
court proceeding.

b.

Evening Shift
The team was present at the facility during the evening shift from 3:00 p.m.
to 4:30 p.m. The team observed the feeding of the evening meal, detainees
in the law/leisure library, and in the living areas playing their musical
instruments, and watching the community televisions. A shift change and
briefing was made and the team members spoke with the on-coming shift
concerning the ACA process and meanings.

c.

Night Shift
The team was present at the facility during the night shift from 7:00 a.m. to
8:00 a.m. The team was present during the change of shift and to talk with
the staff on the first shift as they completed their shift. Staff was eager to
share with the team how they felt about the facility, the new mission, and the
administration team.

5.

Status of Previously Non-compliant Standards/Plans of Action
The team reviewed the status of standards previously found non-compliant, for
which a waiver not granted, and found the following: This is the facility first audit
under the fourth edition standards. During the course of the audit, team members
met with both staff and offenders to verify observations and/or to clarify questions
concerning facility operations.

G.

Interviews
1.

Offender Interview
The team interviewed approximately 87 offenders. The team received few
complaints from the detainees and the ones that were heard had been addressed by
the approximate staff member. Most of the detainees appeared to be at eased in
the environment and in their interactions with the staff.
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2.

Staff Interviews
The team spoke with approximately 52 staff members. Most expressed how
pleased they are to be working at the facility especially with recent changes in the
mission, population and administration. This was noticed in both the ICE staff
and the contract staff as well.

H.

Exit Discussion
The exit interview was held at 11:00 a.m. in the Multi-Purpose Room with the Officer
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in Charge,
and 15 staff in attendance.
The following persons were also in attendance:
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Field Office Director
eputy Field Officer Director
Assistant Field Director
Asst. OIC
, Assistant OIC
Project Manager DECO Security

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COMMISSION ON ACCREDITATION FOR CORRECTIONS
AND THE
AMERICAN CORRECTIONAL ASSOCIATION

COMPLIANCE TALLY

Manual Type

Adult Local Detention Facilities, fourth edition

Supplement

2006 Standards Supplement

Facility/Program
Audit Dates
Auditor(s)

El Paso Service Processing Center
October 16-18, 2006
Chairperson;

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and

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MANDATORY

NON-MANDATORY

Number of Standards in Manual

61

322

Number Not Applicable

0

37

Number Applicable

61

285

Number Non-Compliance

0

1

Number in Compliance

61

284

Percentage (%) of Compliance

100%

99.6%

•

Number of Standards minus Number of Not Applicable equals Number Applicable

•

Number Applicable minus Number Non-Compliance equals Number Compliance

•

Number Compliance divided by Number Applicable equals Percentage of Compliance

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COMMISSION ON ACCREDITATION FOR CORRECTIONS
Department of Homeland Security
El Paso Service Processing Center
El Paso, Texas
October 16-18, 2006
Visiting Committee Findings
Non-Mandatory Standards
Non-Compliance
Standard # 4ALDF-2A-35
INMATES NOT SUITABLE FOR HOUSING IN MULTIPLE OCCUPANCY
CELLS ARE HOUSED IN SINGLE OCCUPANCY CELLS. NO LESS THAN
TEN PERCENT OF THE RATED CAPACITY OF THE FACILITY IS
AVAILABLE FOR SINGLE OCCUPANCY.
FINDINGS
Inmates not suitable for housing in multiple occupancy cells are housed in single
occupancy cells are housed in single occupancy cells. No less than ten percent of the rated
capacity of the facility is available for single occupancy.
The EP/ICE does not meet rated capacity. The total population is 759 with seven single
cell units.
AGENCY RESPONSE
Plan of action
Congress has allocated funding for the drafting and design of a new 203 single cell secure
dorm. The drafting and design plans have been completed and approved for a 203 bed
single cell secure dorm. We are currently pending additional congressional allocations
which will include funding for the 203 bed single cell unit.
AUDITOR RESPONSE
The visiting committee does not find the plan of action acceptable.
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COMMISSION ON ACCREDITATION FOR CORRECTIONS
Department of Homeland Security
El Paso Service Processing Center
El Paso, Texas
October 16-18, 2006
Visiting Committee Findings
Mandatory Standards
Not Applicable
Standard #4-ALDF-2A-36
INMATES PARTICIPATING IN WORK OR EDUCATIONAL RELEASE
PROGRAMS ARE SEPARATED FROM INMATES IN THE GENERAL
POPULATION.
FINDINGS
Inmates participating in work or educational release programs are separated from inmates
in the general population.
Standard #4-ALDF-2A-38
IF YOUTHFUL OFFENDERS ARE HOUSED IN THE FACILITY, THEY ARE
HOUSED IN A SPECIALIZED UNIT FOR YOUTHFUL OFFENDERS
EXCEPT WHEN:
• VIOLENT, PREDATORY YOUTHFUL OFFENDER POSES AN UNDUE
RISK OF HARM TO OTHERS WITHIN THE SPECIALIZED UNIT, OR
• A QUALIFIED MEDICAL OR MENTAL-HEALTH SPECIALIST
DOCUMENTS THAT THE YOUTHFUL OFFENDER WOULD BENEFIT
FROM PLACEMENT OUTSIDE THE UNIT
A WRITTEN STATEMENT IS PREPARED DESCRIBING THE SPECIFIC
REASONS FOR HOUSING A YOUTHFUL OFFENDER OUTSIDE THE
SPECIALIZED UNIT AND A CASE-MANAGEMENT PLAN SPECIFYING
WHAT BEHAVIORS NEED TO BE MODIFIED AND HOW THE
YOUTHFUL OFFENDER MAY RETURN TO THE UNIT. THE
STATEMENT OF REASONS AND CASE-MANAGEMENT PLAN MUST
BE APPROVED BY THE FACILITY ADMINISTRATOR OR HIS/HER

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DESIGNEE. CASES ARE REVIEWED AT LEAST QUARTERLY BY THE
CASE MANAGER, THE ADMINISTRATOR OR HIS OR HER DESIGNEE,
AND THE YOUTHFUL OFFENDER TO DETERMINE WHETHER A
YOUTHFUL OFFENDER SHOULD BE RETURNED TO THE
SPECIALIZED UNIT.
FINDINGS
The EP/ICE facility does not house youthful offenders.
Standard #4-ALDF-2A-39
DIRECT SUPERVISION IS EMPLOYED IN THE SPECIALIZED UNIT TO
ENSURE THE SAFETY AND SECURITY OF YOUTHFUL OFFENDERS.
FINDINGS
The EP/ICE unit does not house youthful offenders.
Standard #4-ALDF-2A-40
CLASSIFICATION PLANS FOR YOUTHFUL OFFENDERS DETERMINE
THE LEVEL OF RISK AND PROGRAM NEEDS DEVELOPMENTALLY
APPROPRIATE FOR ADOLESCENTS. CLASSIFICATION PLANS INCLUDE
CONSIDERATION OF PHYSICAL, MENTAL, SOCIAL, AND EDUCATIONAL
MATURITY OF THE YOUTHFUL OFFENDER.
FINDINGS
The EP/ICE unit does not house youthful offenders.
Standard #4-ALDF-2A-41
ADEQUATE PROGRAM SPACE IS PROVIDED TO MEET THE PHYSICAL,
SOCIAL, AND EMOTIONAL NEEDS OF YOUTHFUL OFFENDERS AND
ALLOWS FOR THEIR PERSONAL INTERACTIONS AND GROUPORIENTED ACTIVITIES.
FINDINGS
The EP/ICE unit does not house youthful offenders.

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Standard #4-ALDF-2A-42
YOUTHFUL OFFENDERS IN THE SPECIALIZED UNIT FOR YOUTHFUL
INMATES HAVE NO MORE THAN INCIDENTAL SIGHT OR SOUND
CONTACT WITH ADULT INMATES FROM OUTSIDE THE UNIT IN
LIVING, PROGRAM, DINING, OR OTHER COMMON AREAS OF THE
FACILITY. ANY OTHER SIGHT OR SOUND CONTACT IS MINIMIZED,
BRIEF, AND IN CONFORMANCE WITH APPLICABLE LEGAL
REQUIREMENTS.
FINDINGS
The EP/ICE unit does not house youthful offenders.
Standard #4-ALDF-2A-43
PROGRAM PERSONNEL WHO WORK WITH YOUTHFUL OFFENDERS
ARE TRAINED IN THE DEVELOPMENTAL, SAFETY, AND OTHER
SPECIFIC NEEDS OF YOUTHFUL OFFENDERS.
WRITTEN JOB
DESCRIPTIONS AND QUALIFICATIONS REQUIRE TRAINING FOR STAFF
WHO ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR PROGRAMMING OF YOUTHFUL
OFFENDERS IN THE SPECIALIZED UNIT BEING ASSIGNED TO WORK
WITH YOUTHFUL OFFENDERS. TRAINING INCLUDES, BUT IS NOT
LIMITED TO THE FOLLOWING AREAS:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•

ADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT
EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMMING
CULTURAL AWARENESS
CRISIS PREVENTION AND INTERVENTION
LEGAL ISSUES
HOUSING AND PHYSICAL PLANT
POLICIES AND PROCEDURES
MANAGEMENT OF, PROGRAMMING FOR, SEX OFFENDERS
SUBSTANCE-ABUSE SERVICES
COGNITIVE-BEHAVIOR INTERVENTION, INCLUDING ANGER
MANAGEMENT, SOCIAL-SKILLS TRAINING PROBLEM SOLVING
RESISTING PEER PRESSURE
SUICIDE PREVENTION
NUTRITION
MENTAL-HEALTH ISSUES
GENDER-SPECIFIC ISSUES
CASE-MANAGEMENT PLANNING AND IMPLEMENTATION

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FINDINGS
EP/ICE does not house youthful offenders.
Standard #4-ALDF-4A-14
WHEN REQUIRED BY STATUTE, FOOD PRODUCTS THAT ARE GROWN
OR PRODUCED WITHIN THE SYSTEM ARE INSPECTED AND APPROVED
BY THE APPROPRIATE GOVERNMENT AGENCY; THERE IS A
DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM THAT ENSURES PROMPT DELIVERY OF
FOODSTUFFS TO FACILITY KITCHENS.
FINDINGS
El Paso Processing Center does not produce or grow foodstuff to be used in the kitchen.
Standard #4-ALDF-2C-02
WHEN A CANINE-UNIT IS OPERATED BY THE FACILITY:
•
•
•
•
•
•

•

THERE IS A MISSION STATEMENT, INCLUDING GOALS AND
OBJECTIVES
THE CIRCUMSTANCES IN WHICH CANINE UNITS MAY BE USED
ARE CLEARLY DEFINED
EMERGENCY PLANS FOR CANINE USE ARE INTEGRATED INTO
THE OVERALL EMERGENCY PLANS OF THE FACILITY
THERE ARE CRITERIA FOR SELECTION, TRAINING, AND CARING
FOR ANIMALS
THERE ARE CRITERIA FOR THE SELECTING, TRAINING, AND
EVALUATING PHYSICAL FITNESS OF HANDLERS
THERE IS AN APPROVED SANITATION PLAN THAT COVERS
INSPECTION,
HOUSING,
TRANSPORTATION
AND
DAILY
GROOMING FOR THE ANIMALS
THERE ARE DAILY AND CURRENT RECORDS ON TRAINING CARE
OF DOGS, AND SIGNIFICANT EVENTS.

FINDINGS
The El Paso Processing Center does not have a canine unit.
STANDARD #4-ALDF-4C-02
WHEN MEDICAL CO-PAYMENT FEES ARE IMPOSED, THE PROGRAM
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ENSURES THAT, AT A MINIMUM:
•

•

ALL INMATES ARE ADVISED, IN WRITING, AT THE TIME OF
ADMISSION TO THE FACILITY OF THE GUIDELINES OF THE COPAYMENT PROGRAM
CO-PAYMENT FEES ARE WAIVED WHEN APPOINTMENTS OR
SERVICES,
INCLUDING
FOLLOW-UP
APPOINTMENTS,
ARE
INITIATED BY MEDICAL STAFF

FINDINGS
The institution does not charge medical co payments or fees.
Standard #4-ALDF-4C-39
WHEN INMATES HAVE NONPRESCRIPTION MEDICATIONS AVAILABLE
OUTSIDE OF HEALTH SERVICES, THE ITEMS, AND ACCESS, ARE
APPROVED JOINTLY BY THE FACILITY ADMINISTRATOR AND THE
HEALTH AUTHORITY.
THE ITEMS AND ACCESS ARE REVIEWED
ANNUALLY BY THE HEALTH AUTHORITY AND ADMINISTRATOR.
FINDINGS
Per policy, detainees are not allowed to have prescription medication outside of health
services unit.
Standard #4-ALDF-4D-11
UNLESS PROHIBITED BY STATE LAW, INMATES, UNDER STAFF
SUPERVISION, MAY PERFORM FAMILIAL DUTIES COMMENSURATE
WITH THEIR LEVEL OF TRAINING. THESE DUTIES MAY INCLUDE THE
FOLLOWING:
•
•
•
•

•
•
•

PEER SUPPORT AND EDUCATION
HOSPICE ACTIVITIES
ASSISTING IMPAIRED INMATES ON A ONE-ON-ONE BASIS WITH
ACTIVITIES OF DAILY LIVING
SERVING AS SUICIDE COMPANION IF QUALIFIED AND TRAINED
THROUGH A FORMAL PROGRAM THAT IS PART OF A SUICIDE
PREVENTION PLAN
INMATES ARE NOT TO BE USED FOR THE FOLLOWING DUTIES:
PERFORMING DIRECT PATIENT CARE SERVICES
SCHEDULING HEALTH CARE APPOINTMENTS
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•

DETERMINING
ACCESS
TO
SURGICAL
INSTRUMENTS,
SYRINGES, NEEDLES, MEDICATIONS, OR HEALTH RECORDS

FINDINGS
Operating diagnostic or therapeutic equipment except under direct supervision, by
specially trained staff, in a vocational training program.
Detainees are not used in the delivery of medical services.
Standard #4-ALDF-5A-05
THERE IS A TREATMENT PHILOSOPHY WITHIN THE CONTEXT OF THE
TOTAL CORRECTIONAL SYSTEM AS WELL AS GOALS AND
MEASURABLE OBJECTIVES. THESE DOCUMENTS ARE REVIEWED AT
LEAST ANNUALLY AND UPDATED AS NEEDED.
FINDINGS
The EP/ICE unit does not have Therapeutic treatment program.
Standard #4-ALDF-5A-06
THERE IS AN APPROPRIATE RANGE OF PRIMARY TREATMENT
SERVICES FOR ALCOHOL AND OTHER SUBSTANCE-ABUSING
INMATES THAT INCLUDE, AT A MINIMUM, THE FOLLOWING:
•
INMATE DIAGNOSIS
•
IDENTIFIED PROBLEM AREAS
•
INDIVIDUAL TREATMENT OBJECTIVES
•
TREATMENT GOALS
•
COUNSELING NEEDS
•
DRUG EDUCATION PLAN
•
RELAPSE PREVENTION AND MANAGEMENT
•
CULTURALLY
SENSITIVE
TREATMENT
OBJECTIVES,
AS
APPROPRIATE
•
THE PROVISION OF SELF-HELP GROUPS AS AN ADJUNCT TO
TREATMENT
•
PRERELEASE AND TRANSITIONAL SERVICES
•
COORDINATING EFFORTS WITH COMMUNITY SUPERVISION
AND TREATMENT STAFF DURING THE PRERELEASE PHASE TO
ENSURE A CONTINUUM OF SUPERVISION AND TREATMENT

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FINDINGS
ICE/EPC does not have a drug treatment program.
Standard #4-ALDF-5A-07
THE FACILITY USES A COORDINATED STAFF APPROACH TO DELIVER
TREATMENT SERVICE. THIS APPROACH TO SERVICE DELIVERY IS
DOCUMENTED IN TREATMENT PLANNING CONFERENCES AND IN
INDIVIDUAL TREATMENT FILES.
FINDINGS
ICE/EPC des not have a drug treatment program.
Standard #4-ALDF-5A-08
THERE ARE INCENTIVES FOR TARGETED TREATMENT PROGRAMS TO
INCREASE AND MAINTAIN THE INMATE’S MOTIVATION FOR
TREATMENT.
FINDINGS
ICE/EPC does not have a drug treatment program.
Standard #4-ALDF-5A-09
INMATES HAVE ACCESS TO EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS AND, WHEN
AVAILABLE, TO VOCATIONAL COUNSELING AND VOCATIONAL
TRAINING. EDUCATIONAL AND VOCATIONAL PROGRAMS ADDRESS
THE NEEDS OF THE INMATE POPULATION.
FINDINGS
ICE/EPA does not have educational or vocational programming.
Standard #4-ALDF-5A-10
IN FACILITIES OFFERING ACADEMIC AD VOCATIONAL TRAINING
PROGRAMS, CLASSROOMS ARE DESIGNED IN CONSULTATION WITH
SCHOOL
AUTHORITIES.
(RENOVATION,
ADDITION,
NEW
CONSTRUCTION ONLY).

19

FINDINGS
ICE/EPC does not offer educational or vocational programming.
Standard #4-ALDF-5B-14
WHEN THE FACILITY IS DESIGNATED TO OPERATE ANY TYPE OF
PRETRIAL INTERVENTION SERVICE OR OTHER RELEASE PROGRAMS
ITS AUTHORITY AND RESPONSIBILITY ARE STATED BY STATUTE OR
ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATION.
FINDINGS
ICE/EPC does not offer pretrial intervention services.
Standard #4-ALDF-5B-15
WHEN A PRETRIAL INTERVENTION PROGRAM, DIVERSION PROGRAM,
PRETRIAL RELEASE PROGRAM, OR SUPERVISED RELEASE PROGRAM
IS CONDUCTED IN THE FACILITY, SUFFICIENT STAFF, SPACE, AND
EQUIPMENT ARE PROVIDED TO SERVICE THE PROGRAM.
FINDINGS
ICE/EPC does not offer pretrial intervention programming.
Standard #4-ALDF-5B-16
WHERE TEMPORARY RELEASE PROGRAMS EXIST, THE PROGRAMS
HAVE THE FOLLOWING ELEMENTS:
•
•
•
•
•

WRITTEN OPERATIONAL PROCEDURES
CAREFUL SCREENING AND SELECTION PROCEDURES
WRITTEN RULES OF INMATE CONDUCT
A SYSTEM FOR EVALUATING PROGRAM EFFECTIVENESS
EFFORTS TO OBTAIN COMMUNITY COOPERATION
SUPPORT.

FINDINGS
ICE/EPC des not have a temporary release program.

20

AND

Standard #4-ALDF-5B-17
WHERE WORK RELEASE AND/OR EDUCATIONAL RELEASE ARE
AUTHORIZED, THE FACILITY ADMINISTRATOR HAS AUTHORITY TO
APPROVE OR DISAPPROVE PARTICIPATION FOR EACH INMATE.
FINDINGS
EP/ICE does not provide programs related to work release or educational release.
Standard #4-ALDF-5C-07
THE FACILITY REQUIRES ALL SENTENCED INMATES TO WORK IF
THEY ARE NOT ASSIGNED TO PROGRAMS.
FINDINGS
EP/ICE does not require any detainee to perform any work programs.
Standard #4-ALDF-5C-08
PRETRIAL AND UNSENTENCED INMATES ARE NOT REQUIRED TO
WORK EXCEPT TO DO PERSONAL HOUSEKEEPING AND TO CLEAN
THEIR HOUSING AREA. INMATES ARE ALLOWED TO VOLUNTEER FOR
WORK ASSIGNMENTS.
FINDINGS
EP/ICE does not house pretrial or un-sentenced inmates.
Standard #4-ALDF-5C-09
WHERE STATUTE PERMITS, INMATES ARE ASSIGNED TO PUBLIC
WORKS AND COMMUNITY SERVICE PROJECTS.
FINDINGS
Detainees are not allowed to participate in community service projects.
Standard #4-ALDF-5C-13
WHERE AN INDUSTRIES PROGRAM EXISTS, ITS ESTABLISHMENT IS
AUTHORIZED AND AREAS OF AUTHORITY, RESPONSIBILITY, AND
21

ACCOUNTABILITY ARE DELINEATED.
FINDINGS
The facility does not have industry program.
Standard #4-ALDF-5C-14
THE NUMBER OF INMATES ASSIGNED TO INDUSTRIES’ OPERATIONS
MEETS THE REALISTIC WORKLOAD NEEDS OF EACH OPERATING
UNIT.
FINDINGS
EP/ICE does not have an industry program.
Standard #4-ALDF-5C-15
THERE IS A COMPREHENSIVE QUALITY CONTROL PROCESS.
FINDINGS
EP/ICE does not have an industry program.
Standard #4-ALDF-5C-16
A COST ACCOUNTING SYSTEM FOR EACH INDUSTRY UNIT IS
DESIGNED, IMPLEMENTED, AND MAINTAINED IN ACCORDANCE WITH
GENERALLY ACCEPTED ACCOUNTING PRINCIPLES.
FINDINGS
EP/ICE does not have an industry program.
Standard #4-ALDF-5C-25
AN INMATE COMMISSARY OR CANTEEN IS AVAILABLE FROM WHICH
INMATES CAN PURCHASE APPROVED ITEMS THAT ARE NOT
FURNISHED BY THE FACILITY. THE COMMISSARY’S /CANTEEN’S
OPERATIONS ARE STRICTLY CONTROLLED USING STANDARD
ACCOUNTING PROCEDURES. EXCESS REVENUES DERIVED FROM THE
OPERATION OF THE COMMISSARY OR CANTEEN IS USED FOR THE
BENEFIT OF INMATES.

22

FINDINGS
EP/ICE does not have a canteen operation.
Standard #4-ALDF-5C-26
SPACE IS PROVIDED FOR AN INMATE COMMISSARY/CANTEEN, OR
PROVISIONS ARE MADE FOR A COMMISSARY SERVICE.
FINDINGS
EP/ICE does not have a canteen operation.
Standard #4-ALDF-6D-01
THE FACILITY PROVIDES SERVICES AND OPPORTUNITIES THAT
ENCOURAGE INMATES TO TAKE RESPONSIBILITY FOR THEIR
ACTIONS.
OPPORTUNITIES ARE BASED UPON VICTIMS AND
COMMUNITY INPUT AND ARE FASHIONED IN A WAY THAT SEEKS TO
AMELIORATE THE HARM DONE.
FINDINGS
EP/ICE does not provide detainees responsibility programs.
Standard #4-ALDF-7D-16
PROCEDURES GOVERN THE OPERATION OF ANY FUND ESTABLISHED
FOR INMATES. ANY INTEREST EARNED ON MONIES, OTHER THAN
OPERATION FUNDS, ACCRUES TO THE BENEFIT OF THE INMATES.
FINDINGS
EP/ICE does not govern the operation of any fund established for detainees.
Standard #4-ALDF-7D-18
THE CONDUCT OF RESEARCH COMPLIES WITH STATE AND FEDERAL
GUIDELINES FOR THE USE AND DISSEMINATION OF RESEARCH
FINDINGS AND WITH ACCEPTED PROFESSIONAL AND SCIENTIFIC
ETHICS. THE FACILITY ADMINISTRATOR REVIEWS ALL RESEARCH
PROJECTS AND APPROVES THEM BEFORE IMPLEMENTATION TO
ENSURE CONFORMANCE WITH POLICIES OF THE PARENT AGENCY.
23

INMATE PARTICIPATION IN NON-MEDICAL, NON-PHARMACEUTICAL,
AND NON-COSMETIC RESEARCH PROGRAM IS VOLUNTARY.
FINDINGS
EP/ICE does not conduct research projects on detainees.
Standard #4-ALDF-7E-02
THE FACILITY MAINTAINS A CURRENT, CONFIDENTIAL PERSONNEL
RECORD ON EACH EMPLOYEE. INFORMATION OBTAINED AS A PART
OF A REQUIRED MEDICAL EXAMINATION OR INQUIRY REGARDING
THE MEDICAL CONDITION OR HISTORY OF APPLICANTS AND
EMPLOYEE IS COLLECTED AND MAINTAINED ON SEPARATED FORMS
AND IN SEPARATE MEDICAL FILES AND TREATED AS A CONFIDENTIAL
MEDICAL RECORD.
FINDINGS
EP/ICE does not excess to confidential personnel records.
Standard #4-ALDF-7F-03
THE FACILITY ACTIVELY IDENTIFIES AND IMPLEMENTS ACTIVITIES
THAT CONTRIBUTE TO THE COMMUNITY.
FINDINGS
EP/ICE does not have any community projects.
Standard #4-ALDF-7F-07
IF VOLUNTEERS ARE USED IN THE DELIVERY OF HEALTH CARE,
THERE IS A DOCUMENTED SYSTEM FOR SELECTION, TRAINING,
STAFF SUPERVISION, FACILITY ORIENTATION AND DEFINITION OF
TASKS, RESPONSIBILITY AND AUTHORITY THAT IS APPROVED BY THE
HEALTH AUTHORITY. VOLUNTEERS MAY ONLY PERFORM DUTIES
CONSISTENT
WITH
THEIR
CREDENTIALS
AND
TRAINING.
VOLUNTEERS AGREE IN WRITING TO ABIDE BY ALL FACILITY
POLICIES, INCLUDING THOSE RELATING TO THE SECURITY AND
CONFIDENTIALITY OF INFORMATION.

24

FINDINGS
EP/ICE does not provide a health care volunteer program.

25

Significant Incident Summary
This summary is required to be provided to the chair of your audit team upon their arrival. The information contained on this form will also be summarized in the
narrative portion of the visiting committee report and will be incorporated into the final report. It should contain data for the last 12 months; indicate those months
in the boxes provided. Please type the data. If you have questions on how to complete the form, please contact your regional manager.
Facility

El Paso Service Processing Center, El Paso - Texas

Year

November 2005-October 2006
Months

11/05

12/05

01/06

02/06

03/06

04/06

05/06

06/06

07/06

08/06

09/06

10/06

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

N/A

N/A

N/A

S

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

4

4

1

1

2

3

3

1

0

0

0

1

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

P

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Number of Times
Chemical Agents Used

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Number of Times Special
Reaction Team Used

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Indicate type (chair, bed,
board, etc.)

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Offender Medical Referrals
as a Result of Injuries
Sustained

#’s should reflect
incidents on this form,
not rec or other source

1

1

0

1

2

2

2

3

0

0

0

0

Escapes

# Attempted

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

1

1

1

1

2

1

2

0

0

0

0

1

1

0

1

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Incidents
Assault:
Offenders/
Offenders*

Indicate types (sexual**,
physical, etc.)
# With Weapon
# Without Weapon

Assault:
Offender/
Staff

Indicate types (sexual**,
physical, etc.)
# With Weapon
# Without Weapon

Number of Forced
Moves Used***

(Cell extraction or other
forced relocation of
offenders)

Disturbances****

Four/Five Point
Restraints

Number

# Actual
Substantiated
Grievances
(resolved in favor of
offender)
Deaths

Reason (medical, food,
religious, etc.)
Number
Reason (violent, illness,
suicide, natural)
Number

*Any physical contact that involves two or more offenders
**Oral, anal or vaginal copulation involving at least two parties
***Routine transportation of offenders is not considered Aforced@
****Any incident that involves four or more offenders. Includes gang fights, organized multiple hunger strikes,
work stoppages, hostage situations, major fires, or other large scale incidents

26

ALDF Outcome Measure Worksheet
El Paso Service Processing Center, Texas
October 16-18, 2006
STANDARD

4C

OUTCOME
MEASURE

NUMERATOR
DENOMINATOR

VALUE

CALCULATE
D OUTCOME
MEASURE

Inmates maintain good health. Inmates have unimpeded
access to a continuum of health care services so that their
health care needs, including prevention and health
education, are met in a timely and efficient manner.
(1) Number of inmates with a positive tuberculin skin test on
13
admission in the past 12 months.
divided by The number of admissions in the past 12 months.
17,183
(2) Number of inmates diagnosed with active tuberculosis in the
2
past 12 months.
divided by The average daily population in the past 12 months.
805
(3) Number of conversions to a positive tuberculin skin test in the
0
past 12 months.
divided by The number of tuberculin skin tests given in the past 12
0
months.
(4) Number of inmates with a positive tuberculin skin test who
0
complete prophylaxis treatment for tuberculosis in the past 12
months.
divided by The number of inmates with a positive tuberculin skin test on
0
prophylaxis treatment for tuberculosis in the past 12 months.
(5) Number of Hepatitis C positive inmates in the past 12 months.
0
divided by The average daily population in the past 12 months.
805
(6) Number of HIV positive inmates in the past 12 months.
10
divided by The average daily population in the past 12 months.
805
(7) Number of HIV positive inmates who are being treated with
10
highly active antiretroviral treatment in the past 12 months.
divided by The number of known HIV positive inmates in the past 12
10
months.
(8) Number of inmates diagnosed with an Axis I (excluding sole
383
diagnosis of substance abuse) in the past 12 months.
divided by The average daily population in the past 12 months.
805
(9) Number of inmate suicide attempts in the past 12 months.
0
divided by The average daily population in the past 12 months.
805
(10) Number of inmate suicides in the past 12 months.
0
divided by The average daily population in the past 12 months.
805
(11) Number of inmate deaths due to homicide in the past 12
0
months.
divided by The average daily population in the past 12 months.
805
(12) Number of inmate deaths due to injuries in the past 12 months.
0
divided by The average daily population in the past 12 months.
805

27

.0007

.002

0

0

0
.01

1

.47

0

0

0

0

(13) Number of medically expected inmate deaths in the past 12
months.
divided by The average daily population in the past 12 months.
(14) Number of medically unexpected inmate deaths in the past 12
months.
divided by The average daily population in the past 12 months.
(15) Number of inmate admissions to the infirmary (where available)
in the past 12 months.
divided by The average daily population in the past 12 months.
(16) Number of inmate admissions to off-site hospitals in the past 12
months.
divided by The average daily population in the past 12 months.
(17) Number of inmates transported off-site (via an ambulance or
correctional vehicle) for treatment of emergency health
conditions in the past 12 months.
divided by The average daily population in the past 12 months.
(18) Number of inmate specialty consults completed in the past 12
months.
divided by The number of specialty consults (on-site or off-site) ordered by
primary health care provider (MD, NP, PA) in the past 12
months.
(19) Number of inmate grievances about access to health care
services found in favor of the inmate in the past 12 months.
divided by The number of inmate grievances about access to healthcare
services in the past 12 months.
(20) Number of inmate grievances related to the quality of health
care found in favor of inmates in the past 12 months.
divided by The number of inmate grievances related to the quality of
health care in the past 12 months.
(21) Number of inmates’ lawsuits about access to healthcare
services found in favor of inmates in the past 12 months.
divided by The number of inmate’s lawsuits about access to healthcare
services in the past 12 months.
(22) Number of individual sick call encounters in the past 12 months.
divided by The average daily population in the past 12 months.
(23) Number of physician visits in the past 12 months.
divided by The average daily population in the past 12 months.
(24) Number of individualized dental treatment plans in the past 12
months.
divided by The average daily population in the past 12 months.
(25) Number of hypertensive inmates enrolled in a chronic care
clinic in the past 12 months.
divided by The average daily population in the past 12 months.
(26) Number of diabetic inmates enrolled in a chronic care clinic in
the past 12 months.
divided by The average daily population in the past 12 months.
(27) Number of incidents involving pharmaceuticals as contraband
in the past 12 months.
divided by The average daily population in the past 12 months.
(28) Number of cardiac diets received by inmates with cardiac
disease in the past 12 months.
divided by The number of cardiac diets prescribed in the past 12 months.

28

0
805

0

0
805

0

216
805

.26

19
805

.02

41

.05

805
272
272

1

0
5

0

0
0

0

0
0

0

5,603
805

6.9

2,114
805

2.6

0
805

0

170
805

.21

51
805

.06

94
805

.11

0
0

0

(29) Number of hypertensive diets received by inmates with
hypertension in the past 12 months.
divided by The number of hypertensive diets prescribed in the past 12
months.
(30) Number of diabetic diets received by inmates with diabetes in
the past 12 months.
divided by The number of diabetic diets prescribed in the past 12 months.
(31) Number of renal diets received by inmates with renal disease in
the past 12 months.
divided by The number of renal diets prescribed in the past 12 months.
(32) Number of needle-stick injuries in the past 12 months.
divided by The number of employees in the past 12 months.
(33) Number of pharmacy dispensing errors in the past 12 months.

4D

170
170

1

51
51

1

1
1

1

0
30

0

6
divided by The number of prescriptions dispensed by the pharmacy in the 12,132
past 12 months.
(34) Number of nursing medication administration errors in the past
96
12 months.
divided by The number of medications administered in the past 12 months. 40,102
Health services are provided in a professionally acceptable
manner. Staff are qualified, adequately trained, and
demonstrate competency in their assigned duties.
(1) Number of staff with lapsed licensure and/or certification in the
past 12 months.
divided by The number of licensed or certified staff in the past 12 months.
(2) Number of new employees in the past 12 months who
completed orientation training prior to undertaking job
assignments.
divided by The number of new employees in the past 12 months.
(3) Number of employees who completed in-service training
requirements in the past 12 months.
divided by The number of employees eligible in the past 12 months.

.0004

.002

0
26

0

4

0.8

5
5
5

1

1
1

1

2
10

0.2

0
4

0

0

0

(4) Number of MD staff who left employment in the past 12 months.
divided by The number of authorized MD staff positions in the past 12
months.
(5) Number of RN staff who left employment in the past 12 months.
divided by The number of authorized RN staff positions in the past 12
months.
(6) Number of LPN staff who left employment in the past 12
months.
divided by The number of authorized LPN staff positions in the past 12
months.
(7) Number of medical records staff who left employment in the
past 12 months.
divided by The number of authorized medical records staff positions in the
past 12 months.
(8) Number of ancillary staff who left employment in the past 12
months.
divided by The number of authorized ancillary staff positions in the past 12

29

3
0
805

0

months.
(9) Number of alleged sexual misconduct incidents between
volunteers and/or contract personnel and detainees in the past
12 months.
divided by Average daily population in the past 12 months
(10) Number of confirmed sexual misconduct incidents between
staff and detainees in the past 12 months.
divided by Average daily population in the past 12 months
(11) Number of confirmed sexual misconduct incidents between
volunteers and/or contract personnel and detainees in the past
12 months.
divided by Average daily population in the past 12 months
(12) Number of detainees identified as high risk with a history of
sexually assault behavior in the past 12 months.
divided by Average daily population in the past 12 months
(13) Number of detainees identified as at risk for sexual victimization
in the past 12 months.
divided by

30

0

0

805
0
805

0

0

0

805
0
805

0

8
805

.009

b6,b7c

b6

b6,b7c

b6,b7c

b6,b7c

b6

b6,b7c

b6,b7c

b6,b7c

b6

b6,b7c

b6,b7c

COMMISSION ON ACCREDITATION FOR CORRECTIONS
TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE VISIT
Department of Homeland Security
Florence Service Processing Center
Florence, Arizona
July 16-18, 2007

VISITING COMMITTEE MEMBERS
, Chairperson
onsultant
31 Breanna Drive
Paris, Illinois 61944
b6
(217)
b6

b6

C
I
Montgomery County Department of Correction
12500 C Ardennes Avenue
Rockville, Maryland 20852
b6
(240)
b6

Faiver, Campau & Associates
P. O. Box 80406
Lansing, Michigan 48908-0406
b6
(517)Ext. b6

A.

Introduction
The audit of the Florence Service Processing Center was
by the following team: Chairperson,
b6
b6
Member, and
Memb

B.

b6

8, 2007,
,

Facility Demographics
Rated Capacity: 322
Actual Population: 278
Average Daily Population for the last 12 months: 301
Average Length of Stay: 4 days for Mexicans and 21 days for other than Mexican
Security/Custody Level: Minimum security facility, classified into two levels
Age Range of Offenders: 18 to 60
Gender: Male
Full-Time Staff: 413
32 Administrative/Support, 2 Program, 92 (ICE), 277 (AKAL) Security, 10 Other

C.

Facility Description
The Detention Center is located in the town of Florence, Arizona, in rural Pinal County,
approximately 60 miles southeast of Phoenix, Arizona. The facility is a short term
detention center for adult aliens being detained for violations of immigration status and
laws, or pending release under other circumstances. The main purpose of the facility is to
provide a secure environment for those aliens who may abscond pending their
deportation hearings.
The detention facility operates under the Immigration and Customs Enforcement through
the Department of Homeland Security. Statutory authority permits detention of aliens in
removal proceedings for such a time necessary to complete their sentence. The mission
of the facility is “to promote public safety and national security by ensuring the departure
from the United States of all removable aliens through the fair and effective enforcement
of the nation’s immigration laws.”

D.

Pre-Audit Meeting
The team met on July 16, 2007, in Chandler, to discuss the information provided by the
Association staff and the officials from Florence Detention Center, and the Department of
Homeland Security.
The chairperson divided standards into the following groups:
Standards #4-ALDF-5A-01 to 4-ALDF-7F-07
Standards #4-ALDF-1A-01 to 4-ALDF-3A-02
Standards #4-ALDF-4A-01 to 4-ALDF-4D-28

2

b6
b6
b6

, Chairperson
Member
Member

E.

The Audit Process
1.

Transportation
The team was escorted to the facility by
Enforcement Agent (Accreditation Manager).

2.

b6,b7c

Immigration

Entrance Interview
The audit team proceeded to the conference room for a formal meeting with
Officer-in-Charge (OIC) and several staff members from the
b6,b7c
facility. The team expressed the appreciation of the Association for the
opportunity to be involved with the Florence Detention Center on a Technical
Assistance visit.
b6,b7c
expressed how important it is for the facility to be working towards a
reaccreditation. We were made aware that the ACA standards files had been
created, but not all of the documentation for the standards had not been gathered
for the team’s review. The team would also assist the facility on suggested ways
for the set up of ACA files and proper documentation that should be contained in
each file.

Each team member gave a brief description of their professional background and
experience in the correctional field and what standards they would review through
the process. The Chair indicated that a thorough tour of the facility would be
conducted and review of the accreditation documentation to make this visit as
much like a regular audit as possible.
It was also established that the visiting team would meet at the end of the day with
facility representatives to report on the progress of the audit. The following
persons were in attendance:
b6,b7c
b6,b7c
b6,b7c
b6,b7c
b6,b7c
b6,b7c
b6,b7c
b6,b7c
b6,b7c

Officer-in-Charge
Supervisory Detention and Deportation Officer
Supervisory Detention and Deportation Officer
Immigration Enforcement Agent
Immigration Enforcement Agent
, Contract Security Officer
Detention and Deportation Officer
Immigration Enforcement Officer
Immigration Enforcement Agent

It was explained that the goal of the visiting team was to be as helpful and nonintrusive as possible during the technical assistance visit. The chairperson
emphasized the goals of accreditation toward the efficiency and effectiveness of
correctional systems throughout the United States. The audit schedule was also

3

discussed at this time.
3.

Facility Tour
The team toured the entire facility from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on the first day
and from 5:45 a.m. 8:00 a.m. the second day. The following persons
accompanied the team on the tour and responded to the team's questions
concerning facility operations:
b6,b7c
b6,b7c
b6,b7c
b6,b7c
b6,b7c
b6,b7c

Supervisory Detention and Deportation Officer
Immigration Enforcement Agent
Detention and Deportation Officer
Immigration Enforcement Officer
Immigration Enforcement Agent
Immigration Enforcement Agent

and b6,b7c from the El Centro Processing Center, El Centro, CA
accompanied the tour group as ACA/NDS Committee Member observers.
b6,b7c

It is noted that the team also toured the Staging Area (which includes intake
processing and health screenings). A waiver (ruling) was granted by ACA that
the Staging Area is not part of the facility audit.
4.

Conditions of Confinement/Quality of Life
During the tour, the team evaluated the conditions of confinement at the facility.
The team pointed out to the facility staff what to expect from the auditors as they
toured the facility. We emphasized the typical problem areas and emphasized the
need for detailed documentation. The following narrative description of the
relevant programmatic services and functional areas summarizes the findings
regarding the quality of life.
Security
The facility is surrounded by a double chain-link fence with razor ribbon at the
top.
b2High, (b)(7)e
b2High

The perimeter is well lighted at night and monitored by surveillance cameras from
a security surveillance control center. The security surveillance also observes the
housing
(b)(2)High, (b)(7)e

4

(b)(2)High, (b)(7)e

The detention center employs AKAL, a private security contractor to provide the
overall correctional management and supervision of the detainees. Correctional
officers provide direct supervision of detainees in housing units, during
movements, work assignments, and court hearings.
Environmental Conditions
The facility has adequate lighting, climate, and air quality control systems. The
noise level throughout the facility was minimal, especially in the special housing
unit. The furnishings in the housing units were simple, sturdy, and secure. There
are safety and emergency communication systems to increase the safety of staff,
visitors and detainees.
Sanitation
The exterior of the facility is well maintained and no debris or weeds were
between the perimeter fences. The housing units, segregation unit, common
areas, offices and corridors were free of clutter and debris. However, closer
attention needs to be paid to some of the mop and storage closets that were
cluttered and some cleaning supplies in the housing units were not properly
marked. Several mops were not properly hung up to dry in several of the mop
closets.
Problems were noted in at least two of the housing unit lavatories, where some
toilets and urinals were stopped up, emitting a foul odor. Housing staff indicated
that this condition had lasted over a week.
The team felt the overall appearance and sanitation of the facility was good.
Fire Safety
Fire detection panels are located and monitored 24 hours, seven days a week from
the security surveillance control center. All staff are trained on emergency
procedures and the local fire department can respond within in five minutes. It

5

was suggested that the fire department routinely visit the facility for
familiarization exercises.
Fire extinguishers, exit signs, emergency lighting and evacuation signs were
observed throughout the detention center. Required weekly, monthly and annual
inspections were being conducted by qualified and staff.
Caustics and flammables were inspected in there locations and were appropriately
inventoried, controlled and strictly accounted for their use. Areas that use
chemicals were equipped with operable eye wash stations.
Food Service
General population detainees eat their meals in a centrally located dining hall.
Detainees are escorted to and from the housing units and given approximately 25
minutes to eat. All meals are reviewed by a certified dietitian to ensure nutrition
levels are adequate. A lunch meal during the visit was consumed by a team
member. The meal was nutritious and good, with adequate portions. There was
an adequate number of staff available during the meals to provide security and
monitoring of the detainees.
The interview of food service staff indicates there is not a sense of urgency due to
a new food service contract going into place to provide meals. A contract was
signed on July 13, 2007 and has 60 days to be implemented with the new
contractor from that date. Staff were concerned about their current positions with
the agency. Even though this may have something to do with the cleanliness of
the kitchen area, it has led to potential health and safety problems by not
maintaining acceptable levels of sanitation.
The tour of the kitchen prep and dish washing areas were not clean. The floors
needed scrubbing and repaired. There was a large surface hole in the floor near
the end of the floor drain that is a safety and health hazard. It had standing water
which appeared to be old, needed draining and floor repaired. Ovens and back
plates had not been cleaned, and there was evidence of built-up grease and grime.
Inside one oven had leftover food in it, which appeared not to have been clean for
several days. Grill surfaces needed cleaning. Under the cooking kettles, grills,
ovens and storage racks had not been swept under or cleaned. The garbage
disposal had garbage that had not been run since the morning meal in it. It is
suggested that it be cleaned after every meal. Ceiling panels were old and needed
replaced. The sprinkler system had evidence of sprinkler heads being painted
over which was a fire safety concern for operating properly. Mousetraps were
located throughout the kitchen area. There were mouse feces on top of the
dishwashing machine. It is evident that there is a rodent problem in the kitchen
area. It was suggested that a professional, licensed exterminator be contracted for
services.

6

Another area of concern is the detainee work detail. Due to the short stay of the
detainees in the facility, it is hard to have a labor force provide the work necessary
to keep the kitchen at acceptable sanitation levels. Most of the workers, after they
have been screened by health services are only working a couple of weeks before
they are deported or released. The kitchen needs a lot of work in sanitation to
meet acceptable standards for their reaccreditation.
Medical Care
Public Health Services (PHS) provides medical 24 hours, seven days a week, and
dental and mental health care to the detainees. The overall impression of health
services was that they maintain a well-lighted, very clean department and a very
adequate health service program. This department cares for all detainees housed
at this facility and the daily admissions of incoming detainees. Sick call, health
care assessment, triage and continuity of health care are provided for the
detainees. No fees or co-payments are charged to detainees for health services.
Health care records were randomly selected and reviewed in depth based upon
categories of: emergency care, new arrival, regular sick call, and chronic illness.
All records were reviewed were in accordance with ACA Standards and health
care practices. Each Health Standard was reviewed with the Health Services
Administrator. While some of them had documentation, only a few were
arranged in a standard ACA file. Guidance was provided as to the layout of each
file and with proper documentation needed for compliance.
The team found that health services were in compliance as to the control and
inventory of medication and medical tools.
Recreation
Outdoor recreation is provided for the general population and segregation housing
detainees. Each recreation area exceeds the amount of space required. The
outdoor recreation yard for general population detainees is covered, and water
stations are provided for the extreme heat. The general population detainees are
allowed a minimum of one hour a day for recreation. Special housing detainees
are allowed one hour a day of outside recreation, at a minimum of five days per
week.
Religious Programming
A chaplain supervises and directs all religious programming and volunteers at the
facility. The chaplain is from the Jesuit Refugee Service through an Immigration
and Customs Enforcement national contract. Religious services are held in the
dining hall. The chaplain provides pastoral care and counseling to detainees who
request it through group programs and individual services. Special services are
requested through religious volunteers approved by management.

7

Offender Work Programs
Detainees are paid a stipend of $1.00 per day to work. All work assignments
performed by detainees are on a volunteer basis. At the time of this audit, there
were 100 detainees assigned to food service, laundry, facility maintenance,
vehicles, recreation and general housekeeping.
Academic and Vocational Education
There are no academic or vocational educational programs.
Social Services
There are currently no social services within the facility at this time.
Visitation
The facility permits contact visiting between the detainees and visitors on
Saturdays, Sundays and all federal holidays. Detainee visits are scheduled for one
hour depending on available space. Attorney visits are permitted seven days a
week. Special arrangements are made for detainee family’s who travel a greater
distance upon the approval of management.
Library Services
During normal recreation periods, books are available for check out by the
detainees. A mobile cart is used to provide books to the special housing unit
twice a week.
The law library is available from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. and 5:00 p.m. to 7:00
p.m. five days a week. Special housing detainees are afforded the same access
unless there are security and health concerns.
Laundry
The laundry facility has an adequate number of washers and dryers to maintain
detainee laundry and linen needs. Uniforms are exchanged twice a week and
socks, underwear and towels are exchanged daily. Detainees are supervised by a
correctional officer and given instruction on safety of chemicals and equipment.
F.

Examination of Records
Following the facility tour, the team proceeded to the conference room to review the
accreditation files and evaluate compliance levels of the policies and procedures. The
facility has no notices of non-compliance with local, state, or federal laws or regulations.

8

1.

Litigation
Since the last accreditation, the facility had no consent decrees, class action
lawsuits or adverse judgments.

2.

Significant Incidents/Outcome Measures
From June 2006 through June 2007, there have been no major hunger strikes,
work stoppages, hostage situations or fires. There was one escape in April 2007
and a disturbance in July 2006.
The escape that was reported was an administrative escape. Two escorting
officers failed to fill out a Deportation Warrant to validate a Mexican subject
being deported to Mexico through Nogales, Arizona Port of Entry.
The disturbance was due to a verbal altercation between an El Salvadorian and a
correctional officer in a housing unit. An ICE supervisor had the detainee placed
in segregation for investigation. There were between 50 and 60 detainees in the
housing unit trying to break windows out around the control center pod and pry
open the doors. They succeeded in pushing the beds up against the windows to
block the view of staff. The detainees were given several direct orders to cease
and desist. The SRT and DCT teams were mobilized and entered the housing unit
using concussion and stingball grenades. The teams subdued the detainees
without the use of chemical agents and placed them on buses to be transferred to a
nearby ICE detention facility in Eloy, Arizona.
During the same period:
Assault – detainee on detainee, without weapon: 17
Assault – detainee on staff, without weapon: 11
Number of forced cell moves: 2
Number of disturbances: 1
Number of times SRT was used: 1
Number of medical referrals as a result of injuries sustained: 30
Deaths – none
There were no major injuries as a result of assaults: detainee on detainee, detainee
on staff.

3.

Departmental Visits
Team members revisited the following departments to review conditions relating
to departmental policy and operations:
Department Visited

**Person(s) Contacted

9

Medical
Maintenance
Food Service
Security
4.

LTCMDR
b6,b7c
b6
b6,b7c

HSA
, Supervisor
od Service Supervisor
Contract Security Officer
b6

Shifts
a.

Day Shift
The team was present at the facility during the day shift from 8:00 a.m. to
4:30 p.m. and was able to observe the operations within the facility in
addition to conducting interviews with line staff and administrators.

b.

Evening Shift
The team was present at the facility during the evening shift from 2:00
p.m. to 4:30 p.m. and continued to interview line staff and supervisors.

c.

Night Shift
The team was present at the facility during the night shift from 5:30 a.m.
to 7:00 a.m. The team continued to interview staff within the housing
units

G.

Interviews
During the course of the audit, team members met with both staff and offenders to verify
observations and/or to clarify questions concerning facility operations.
Offender Interviews
The audit team spoke to the detainees during the visit. There were no unusual complaints
or consistent complaints. The comments were generally favorable toward their treatment
received from staff.
Staff Interviews
The staff interviewed was found to be knowledgeable and very professional in their
duties. The staff stated that they felt safe within the facility and presented a positive
attitude. There were no issues or complaints from the staff that were interviewed.

H.

Exit Discussion
The exit interview was held at 9:30 a.m. in the conference room with the Supervisory
Detention and Deportation Officer and 14 staff in attendance.
The following persons were also in attendance:

10

b6,b7c
b6,b7c
b6,b7c
b6,b7c

b6,b7c
b6,b7c
b6,b7c
b6
b6,b7c

b6
b6,b7c
b6,b7c
b6,b7c

, Supervisory Detention and Deportation Officer
Supervisory Detention and Deportation Officer
, Supervisory Detention and Deportation Officer
upervisory Detention and Deportation Officer
Detention Operations Supervisor
Detention Operations Supervisor
Immigration Enforcement Agent
mmigration Enforcement Agent
Contract Security Officer
Maintenance Supervisor
Contract Security Program Director
, Director Public Health Services (HSA)
b6
Food Service Supervisor
Detention and Deportation Officer (Guest)
Immigration Enforcement Officer (Guest)
Immigration Enforcement Agent (Guest)

The chairperson explained the procedures that would follow the audit. The team
discussed the observations and reviewed the comments made during the technical
assistance visit. Each auditor discussed compliance levels of the mandatory and nonmandatory standards and reviewed their individual findings with the group. A copy of
the compliance checklist was also given to the facility with our comments on each
standard to bring them in compliance.

b2High

The team expressed their concerns regarding food service and its overall appearance and
sanitation. Everything that was detailed in the food service description was discussed in
detail during this close out. They assured the visiting team that they understood the
problems and would work diligently to correct the problems before the reaccreditation
took place.
The chairperson expressed appreciation for the cooperation of everyone concerned and
congratulated the facility team for the progress made and encouraged them to continue to
strive toward even further professionalism within the correctional field.

11

Significant Incident Summary
This summary is required to be provided to the chair of your audit team upon their arrival. The
information contained on this form will also be summarized in the narrative portion of the
visiting committee report and will be incorporated into the final report. It should contain data for
the last 12 months; indicate those months in the boxes provided. Please type the data. If you
have questions on how to complete the form, please contact your regional manager.
Facility
Florence Service Processing Center
Year July 06 –June 07

7/0
6

8/0
6

9/0
6

10/
06

11/
06

Indicate
types
(sexual**,
physical,
etc.)

P

P

P

P

P

P

#
With
Weapon

0

0

0

0

0

#
Without
Weapon

3

1

0

2

Indicate
types
(sexual**,
physical,
etc.)

P

P

P

#
With
Weapon

0

0

#
Without
Weapon

1

(Cell
extraction or
other forced
relocation of
offenders)

Incidents
Assault:
Offenders/
Offenders*

Assault:
Offender/
Staff

Number
Forced
Moves
Used***

of

Disturbances*
***

Months
12/ 1/0
06
7

2/0
7

3/0
7

4/0
7

5/0
7

6/0
7

P

P

P

P

P

P

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

3

3

3

0

1

0

0

P

P

P

P

P

P

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

1

1

1

2

2

1

1

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

12

Number
of
Times
Chemical
Agents Used

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Number
of
Times Special
Reaction Team
Used

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Offender
#’s should
Medical
reflect
Referrals as a incidents on
Result
of this
form,
not rec or
Injuries
other source
Sustained

4

2

2

3

2

5

5

4

1

2

0

0

Escapes

# Attempted

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

# Actual

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

Reason
(medical,
food,
religious,
etc.)

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Number

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Reason

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Number

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Four/Five
Point
Restraints

Substantiated
Grievances
(resolved
in
favor
of
offender)

Deaths

Number
Indicate type
(chair, bed,
board, etc.)

*Any physical contact that involves two or more offenders
**Oral, anal or vaginal copulation involving at least two parties
***Routine transportation of offenders is not considered Aforced@

13

****Any incident that involves four or more offenders. Includes gang fights, organized multiple
hunger strikes,
work stoppages, hostage situations, major fires, or other large scale incidents

14

b6

b6

b6,b7c

b6,b7c

COMMISSION ON ACCREDITATION FOR CORRECTIONS
STANDARDS COMPLIANCE TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE VISIT AUDIT
U.S. Department of Homeland Security
Port Isabel Detention Center
Los Fresnos, Texas
30 July - 1 August 2007

VISITING COMMITTEE MEMBERS
Chairperson
Assistant Superintendent
Milwaukee County House of Corrections
8885 South 68th Street
Franklin, Wisconsin 53132
b6
(414)
b6

b6

Deputy Superintendent
Hampshire Jail & House of Correction
205 Rocky Hill Road
Northampton, Massachusetts 01061-7000
b6
(413)
b6

Program Manager
MHM Services
250 Meeks Way
Monticello, Florida 32344
b6
850-

A.

Introduction
The technical assistance audit of the Port Isabel Detention Center was conducted on
July 30 - August 1, 2007 by
Chairperson;
and
b6
b6
b6
Members.

B.

Facility Demographics
Rated Capacity

:850 (on first day of audit 1090).

Actual Population

:1090

Average Daily Population for the last 12 months

:800

Average Length of Stay
(audit team believes average length is longer)

:18 days

Security/Custody Level
(Minimum, Medium, Close)

:Level I-II-III

Age Range of Offenders

:18-60

Gender

:Male/Female

Full Time Staff
:174 Immigration and Custom
Enforcement. (3 Administrative, 12 Support, 159 Detention, 414 Contract Security and
29 Other).
C.

Facility Description
The Port Isabel Detention Center is located in the southern part of Texas along Rural
Route 510 in the eastern part of Cameron County, approximately 20 miles north of
Brownsville, Texas and 30 miles east of Harlingen, Texas. The Mexican border is
approximately 22 miles south of the Port Isabel Detention Center.
The Cameron County Airport to the north, the Laguna Atascosa National Wildlife to the
east, agricultural fields and a shrimp farm to the south and agricultural fields to the west
surround the Port Isabel Detention Center.
The Port Isabel Detention Center is on 350 acres with 162 acres of developed land and
188 acres of undeveloped land with wildlife, which includes the endangered Ocelot
species.
Formerly the site was part of the military and used by the Army Air Corps in the 1940’s
as a gunnery training facility. The Navy and Air Force utilized the facility for training
activities, which also included an auxiliary airfield for defense purposes. The facility was

2

closed in the 1960’s. With realignment and closure of the facility portions of the property
was turned over the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) between 19611963. Other portions of the property including the hanger and airfield runways were
turned over to the Cameron County Commissioners for the Port Isabel airport in 1963.
In 1962 to 1963, the INS performed major renovations to several buildings on the site and
established a Border Patrol Training Facility and Detention Center. In 1977, the Training
Academy expanded and relocated to the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center in
Glynco, Georgia and the detention center remained.
Currently, the detention center is a self-supporting facility that continues to house
individuals detained for allegations of violations of the immigration laws of the United
States. These individuals comprise both male and female detainees who will appear
before an administrative immigration judge with the Executive Office for immigration
review. In 2006, the facility experienced an expansion with a new administration and
medical building which also encompasses processing and visitation.
The Port Isabel Detention Center has a rated capacity of 850 beds. At the time of the
technical assistance, there were 1090 detainees. When questioned by the auditors, the
accreditation manager indicated the rated capacity was 1200 but no one could should
documentation to indicate that the rated capacity has expanded. Although a previous
audit indicated an average length of stay to be about 18 days but from the number of
detainees interviewed it appears to be longer. This is an area that needs to be corrected
before the next technical assistance.
The center does not provide housing for detainees awaiting formal criminal prosecution
but it does have a high security level for detainees with a previous history that are
classified as close custody.
D.

Pre-Audit Meeting
The team met on July 29, 2007 in South Padre Island, Texas to discuss the information
provided by the Association staff and officials from the Port Isabel Detention Center.
The chairperson divided standards into the following groups:
Standards #4-ALDF 1A-01-2D-03,
Standards #4-ALDF 3A-01-4D-29,
Standards #4-ALDF 5A-01-7F-07,

E.

b6
b6
b6

(Member)
(Member)
(Member)

The Audit Process
1.

Transportation
The team was picked up at the hotel at 7:30 a.m. by Officer
b6,b7c
Accreditation team member. The team arrived at the Port Isabel Detention Center

3

at 8:00 a.m. and proceeded to the executive conference room where the entrance
interview occurred.
2.

Entrance Interview
The audit team met with
b6,b7c
b6,b7c Acting Officer in Charge, and

Acting Field Office Director, b6,b7c
b6,b7c
Assistant Officer in Charge.

The Chairperson introduced the team and gave a brief background of their
correctional experience as well as outlining how the technical assistance would
proceed. It was emphasized that following the tour a concentrated effort would be
made on scrutinizing the mandatory standards at depth. A pre-audit meeting was
held with the accreditation team of the Port Isabel Detention Center.
The following persons were in attendance:
Assistant Field Office Director
, Acting Officer in Charge
, Assistant Officer in Charge
Acting Chief Immigration Officer
COTR
Accreditation Manager
ACA Team Member
ACA Team Member

b6,b7c
b6,b7c
b6,b7c
b6,b7c
b6
b6
b6

It was explained that the goal of the visiting team was to be as helpful and nonintrusive as possible during the technical assistance visit. The chairperson
emphasized the goals of accreditation toward the efficiency and effectiveness of
correctional systems throughout the United States. The audit schedule was also
discussed at this time.
3.

Facility Tour
The team toured the entire facility from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. The remainder of
the tour was conducted on the following day from 8:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m. on the
following day. The team broke up the tour to review the mandatory standards on
the first day from 3:30 p.m to 6:30 p.m. The following persons accompanied the
team on the tour and responded to questions concerning facility operations.
b6
b6
b6

Accreditation Manager
Accreditation Team Member
Accreditation Team Member
COTR

4

4.

Conditions of Confinement/Quality of Life
During the tour, the team evaluated the conditions of confinement at the facility.
The following narrative description of the relevant programmatic services and
functional areas summarizes the findings regarding the quality of life.
Security
The Port Isabel Detention Center has a contract with uniformed security services
from Asset Protection and Security Services.
Asset Protection and Security Services has had the contract since 2001 and are
presently on a contract extension. From the time of the last audit based on
information provided the staff has doubled. The audit team was significantly
impressed with their training, organization of officers, responsiveness of officers
and documentation of post orders being read, and their techniques of supervising
detainees. All posts were filled. Key control was examined by the audit team and
was found to be very detailed and providing good accountability. Tool control in
food service and maintenance was found to be very acceptable. The armory is
manned by ICE and all weapons and ammunition were accountable. The CERT
team is also staffed by ICE agents. Training and documentation of equipment
was accounted for as observed by the audit team. There is perimeter security with
razor wire. There is a seven-cell segregation area that is double bunked.
Observation sheets were noted appropriately but it was pointed out to possibly
move the segregation board with names and significant identifying information to
another area.
Environmental Conditions
During the tour, the team found the noise levels throughout the facility to be low
with the exception one housing unit Delta Unit. However, the documentation in
the files indicated that noise levels were higher at night. Temperature ranges in
the housing units were well within the comfort level. Lighting conditions in the
housing units were above standards. Overall, the living conditions and general
environmental conditions were above minimum standards.
Sanitation
The team found the overall maintenance and sanitation very acceptable except in
the housing unit showers. There appeared to be little emphasis on the
housekeeping plan when it came to shower areas and lack of soap dispensers
throughout the housing units. With the addition of a new administration and
medical area where sanitation was emphasized it was not adhered to in the living
units. Chemicals were controlled with MSDS sheets. It was pointed out that the
cleaning contract workers should eliminate bleach and have bottles marked
appropriately.

5

Fire Safety
The Port Isabel Detention Center fire department is supervised and operated by a
certified firefighter with collateral duties as safety officer. The department
currently has a Class A fire pumper with a 500 gallon water tank and a rescue
truck with a 400 gallon water capacity. The fire safety officer does a monthly
inspection of the approximately 250 fire extinguishers throughout the facility as
well as vehicles. During the tour, the audit team inspected a number of fire
extinguishers, which were up to date. Monthly fire drills are conducted as
required. The fire safety officer provides adult CPR and first aid training to
include new employee orientation. During the tour, he was observed in the
command center providing orientation to in service contracted employees on the
annunciator panel and pull alarm station. His duties also include the inspection
fire hydrants, training officer fire fighting techniques, and the removal of
biohazard containers.
Food Service
A food service administrator supervises the Food Service Department, with the
assistance of a supervisory cook and twelve food service specialists. They are
responsible along with volunteer detainee labor for all meals served to the
detainee population.
One of the members of the audit team observed special medical diets and
religious diets. This department does provide sack lunches, which consisted of
two sandwiches, fruit, and bag of chips as well as a fruit drink. It was
recommended that all visitors in the kitchen be required to wear hairnets and
beard guards. Temperature ranges in the kitchen were within the required levels.
Detainees eat in a central dining room. Kitchen staff demonstrated tool control,
which was thorough and accountable. On July 30, 2007 the audit team ate lunch
in the officers dining hall. The food was nutritious, wholesome and good. It was
recommended that the dining hall be painted prior to the audit.
Medical Care
The Medical Department at the Port Isabel Detention Center is operated by Public
Health Services with the assistance of 29 full time staff members. Eighteen of the
staff members are commissioned USPHS commissioned officers and 11 are STG
contract employees.
The medical facility is in a new building which opened in 2006 and operates
seven days a week 24 hours per day. The facility provides intake screening and a
radiology unit. It provides an infirmary as well as a special needs unit. At the
time of the audit there were four detainees housed in a separate unit that was
utilized for a tuberculosis unit. On the second day of the audit they were moved
to the infirmary due to mold found in the unit. Physical examinations are
performed by a nurse practitioner and two physician assistants. The new facility

6

has a sick call area and full time pharmacy with a licensed pharmacist. Sick call
is performed five days a week by two registered nurses. In the dormitory areas
located in the pods there is a medical box accessed by nursing staff for sick call
requests.
The medical area has a full time psychologist as well as a full-time dentist. At the
time of the audit the dentist was off-site on temporary duty. However there was a
dental hygienist available. One area of concern was sick calls being done on a
delayed basis. The facility was accredited by the National Commission on
Correctional Health Care in 2006. Sharps are controlled and accounted for.
Additionally the facility was accredited in 2005 by the Joint Commission on
Accreditation on Hospital Accreditation.
Religious Programming
The Port Isabel Detention Center does provide a variety of religious services
through the use of contracted services and volunteers. The center does provide
access to outside religious volunteers who provide a variety of services. There is
an on site chaplain available who is contracted through ICE. Religious diets are
provided when requested by detainees wishing to observe special religious
holidays.
Offender Work Programs
The center does provide volunteer detainee work program. Although the previous
audit report indicated that an ICE agent is responsible for coordinating this
program which provides training, payment of $1.00 per-day for every eight hours
of training and medical screening, there was no documentation available to
substantiate this. It was recommended that documentation be provided to
substantiate this practice. One auditor interviewed several kitchen workers who
indicated that they were not trained.
Academic and Vocational Education
Since the mission of ICE is the detainment and deportation of detainees there are
no academic programs available for ICE detainees. As noted in the last audit
there is a horticultural program that is seasonal and does provide ten detainees to
harvest a garden where the produce is utilized by food service.
Social Services
There are limited social services available to detainees. However when requested
outside eye exams are available, lawyer requested medical examinations and
occasionally outside medical examinations. The center does provide access to
Western Union services by a private Western Union representative and access to
phone cards which can be purchased. Access to deportation officers is also

7

provided. It was noted that deportation officers are not being logged into the pods
logbooks and from the detainees interviewed this is a major issue as they
indicated limited access.
Visitation
The facility does provide contact and non-contact visitation. The visitation area is
part of the new administration building. Visitation hours are Monday through
Friday from 8:30 a.m. - 3:30 p.m. There is no limit to the number of visits that a
detainee may have during the week. Visitors must be on approved visiting list
and children may visit if supervised by an adult.
Library Services
A law library is available for detainee use. The library is in the same area as the
barber shop and beauty shop. Both are scheduled to be moved to another space in
the next few months. The law library is limited but is supervised by a recreation
specialist employed by ICE. There are adequate law library supplies. The law
library can be accessed by detainees upon request which is a written request. The
law library contains a mobile temporary law library for the use by detainees of the
TB unit which are medically isolated from the population.
Laundry
The Laundry services the entire detainee population regarding their clothing
needs. It is operational seven days a week from 6:00 a.m. - 9:00 p.m. and is a
two-man post supervised by the contracted security agency. There are five
commercial washers and five commercial dryers. Chemicals are electronically
fed from bulk containers. There is a change out of clothing once a week and daily
for detainee workers. Linen, bed sheets, towels, mattress covers, and pillowcases
are changed out weekly. Detainee workers were familiar with the requirements of
the laundry.
Team Comments
Overall, the team was impressed with the space of the new building, training
areas, visitation, and medical areas. Sanitation of the facility was good with the
exception of the housing areas particularly in the shower areas. The team was
impressed with the contracted security staff particularly in the areas of training
and knowledge of security techniques and their familiarization and documentation
of post orders. The medical area and professionalism of Public Health Services
and the treatment provided exceeded the standards. Training for ICE was
impressive with particular emphasis on accreditation. Key and tool control in all
areas was impressive. Chemical control was good with the exception of two areas
that was pointed out to the accreditation team. Financial services, classification of
detainees, and human resources were all good.

8

Suggestion to Improve
It was recommended to the accreditation to outline the tour prior to the
accreditation and review all areas that were on the tour. Additionally someone
with keys to all doors should be included on the tour.
F.

Examination of Records
Following the facility tour, the team proceeded to the file room to review the
accreditation files and evaluate levels of compliance on the policies and procedures. The
facility has no notices of non-compliance with local, state, or federal laws or regulation.
1.

Litigation
Over the last three years, the facility had no consent decrees, class action lawsuits
or adverse judgments.
Files
The team reviewed the 62 mandatory standards to determine the status of the files
as this was indicated as a major reason for the technical assistance by the
Association. After review of the files the team found six files to be in compliance
and 56 to be in non-compliance. All of the files found in non-compliance there
was missing documentation for years 05, 06, and 07. The accreditation team
manager, team, and acting OIC and assistant OIC were notified on the first day.
The technical assistance team recommended to the accreditation manager an
attempt be made to fix at least ten files for the next day. This suggestion was not
followed.
On the second day, the technical assistance team reviewed 150 files in the nonmandatory status and founds 115 to be in non-compliance for the same reason.
The American Correctional Association was contacted. The accreditation
manager was replaced with a new accreditation manager
who is the
b6
b6, b7c
COTR. The technical assistance chairperson notified
ICE
Headquarters, Field Office Director from San Antonio, Assistant Field Office
Director, Acting OIC and the Assistant OIC that the technical assistance team
would provide a three-hour training session to the accreditation team and new
accreditation manager on the last day.

2.

Significant Incidents/Outcome Measures
After review of the Outcome Measure Worksheet, it was apparent that the figures
utilized on the Outcome Measure Worksheet were inaccurate. As an example no
grievances were listed and in one section on fire code violations it was noted there
were 72 fire code violations listed for the year 2006. It was recommended during
the training session that the technology department be contacted and set up a

9

monthly spreadsheet. None of the Health Care Outcome Measures were listed.
3.

Departmental Visits
Team members revisited the following departments to review conditions relating
to departmental policy and operations:
Department Visited
Mail Room

**Person(s) Contacted

Intelligence Department

b6

Maintenance

b6

Deportation

b6,b7c

Command Center

b6,b7c

Safety Officer

b6,b7c

Key Control

Mechanic

b6,b7c

Fire and Safety Officer
Security Officer
Security Officer
Security Officer

b6,b7c

b6,b7c

Health Center

b6
b6
b6
b6

Food Service

b6
b6

Special Management

b6
b6,b7c
b6

10

Security Officer
HAS

b6
b6

Bravo Building

Deportation Officer

b6,b7c

Processing
Processing III

ICE Enforcement Agent

b6,b7c

Cleaning Contract

Property Room

Security Officer

b6,b7c

Dental Assistant
PhD
Pharmacist
Medical Records
Physician Assistant
Cook
Cook
, Cook
Barbershop Security Officer
Law Library

Alpha Unit Pod 1

b6,b7c

Alpha Unit Pod 2

b6,b7c

Alpha Core Officer
4.

Security Officer

b6,b7c

Security Officer
Security Officer

Shifts
a.

Day Shift
The team was present at the facility during the day shift from 8:00 a.m. to
4:00 p.m.
The tour was conducted during this shift. Files were reviewed and both
staff and detainees were interviewed. Processing, medication passage,
living units, lunch meal, and change of shift was observed.

b.

Evening Shift
The team was present at the facility during the evening shift from
4:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. A shift briefing was observed and contact was
made with staff and detainees. Staff and detainee interviews were
conducted. A count procedure was observed.

c.

Night Shift
Since the technical assistance was altered due to the inability to provide a
score the technical assistance team opted to skip this shift and prepare to
do a three hour training session on the last day.

5.

Status of Previously Non-compliant Standards
The team reviewed the status of standards previously found non-compliant, for
which a waiver was not granted, and found the following:
Standard #3-ALDF-2C-01: The facility did not build a new SMU. The SMU
does not meet square footage and is double bunked.
Standard #3-ALDF-3C-20: The facility did implement the new policy and
procedure in reference to removing not guilty on disciplinary hearings from the
detainee file.
Standard #3-ALDF-4F-05: The facility did not comply with the plan of action as
outlined.
Standard #3-ALDF-5B-01: The facility did not comply with the plan of action to

11

implement vocational, educational and vocational training. The mission of ICE
changed during the three-year period.
Standard #3-ALDF-5B-02: The facility did not comply with the plan of action to
access community resources.
Standard #3-ALDF-5B-03: The facility did not comply with the plan of action to
access an educational program.
Standard #3-ALDF-5B-04: The facility did not comply with the plan of action to
access vocational tapes.
G.

Interviews
During the course of the audit, team members met with both staff and detainees to verify
observations and to clarify questions concerning facility operations.
Detainee Interviews
During the course of the technical assistance, the team interviewed over sixty detainees.
The biggest issue was the availability of deportation officers in the housing units to
answer questions regarding their status, availability of ICE officers touring the pods, and
responsiveness to grievances filed by the detainees where they did not receive copies of
grievance that they filed. This was brought to the attention of the accreditation team.
Staff Interviews
The team interviewed nearly fifty staff both ICE and contracted security. All of them
were highly professional. They felt safe where they work and that supervisors treat them
professionally. Contracted staff indicated there should be more recreation particularly
soccer for the detainees. Those interviewed indicated that if they were OIC for a day,
they would expand programs and recreation. Many of the ICE employees were looking
forward to more of a law enforcement role as many areas are slotted for private contracts.

H.

Exit Discussion
The formal exit interview was replaced with a three-hour training session for the
accreditation team in which new members had been added within a one-day period by the
Field Director from San Antonio.
Those in attendance were the following:
b6
b6
b6
b6

new Accreditation Manager’
ACA Team Member
ACA Team Member
ACA Team Member

12

Training Asset Security
-Project Manager Asset Security
b6
b6
-ACA Team Member
b6
-PHS
b6
ACA Team Member
-Training Coordinator
b6
b6
Team Member
b6
-ACA Team Member
b6,b7c

Training consisted of the following:
Protocols
Process Indicators
Documentation-each year consistent with the practice.
Highlight the years with a tab procedure.
Reviewing the previous audit.
Acquainting oneself with the 4th edition manaual.
Sanitation issues.
Chemicals.
Key Control
Tool Control
Critical Walk through of the facility.
Involvement of department heads on the tour.
Developing a system of document collection.
Availability of accreditation team to the auditors.
The chairperson complimented the audit team even though this technical assistance did
not develop into a score. He emphasized that in six months when the next technical
assistance occurs they will be fully prepared.
The chairperson expressed appreciation for the cooperation of everyone concerned and
congratulated the facility team for the progress made during the three-day visit and
encouraged them to make accreditation their number one priority during the next six
months.

13

COMMISSION ON ACCREDITATION FOR CORRECTIONS
STANDARDS COMPLIANCE AUDIT
Department of Homeland Security
Florence Service Processing Center
Florence, Arizona
March 29-31, 2003

VISITING COMMITTEE MEMBERS
Chairperson
Correctional Consultant
4409 St. Thomas Drive
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73120
b6
405b6

b6

Correctional Consultant
3326 Upton Avenue North
Minneapolis, Minnesota 55412
b6
612b6

Correctional Consultant
2047 Rolling Meadows
Columbus, Ohio 43228
b6
(614)

A.

Introduction
The audit of the Florence Processing Center was conducted on March 29-31, 2003, by the
following team: Chairperson,
;
, Member; and b6
b6
b6
b6
Member.

B.

Facility Demographics
Rated Capacity: 322
Actual Population: 318
Average Daily Population for the last 12 months: 304
Average Length of Stay: 14 days for Mexican Nationals, 41 days for other than Mexican
Nationals
Security/Custody Level: Minimum security facility, detainees are classified into three
levels
Age Range of Detainees: 18 to 71
Gender: Male
Full-Time Staff: 368
1 Officer in Charge
1 Assistant Officer in Charge
32 Administrative Supports
2 Programs (Recreation Specialists)
223 Contract Security Officers
63 Ice Immigration Enforcement Agents
2 Immigration Judges
3 Trial Attorneys
11 Maintenance
10 ICE Deportation Officers (case managers)
21 United States Public Health Service Staff (to include onsite doctor, dentist,
psychologist, five Registered Nurses, four Licensed Practical Nurses, one pharmacist, and
various other support personnel.
Officers, Security, 223 Contract Security Officers and 63 Immigration Enforcement
Agents

C.

Facility Description
Located 60 miles southeast of Phoenix, Arizona in the town of Florence, the facility
provides primary detention support to Yuma and Tucson Border Patrol Sectors and the
Phoenix Field Office.

2

In 1942, the original site was a Prisoner of War Camp, which held 13,000 Axis Prisoner’s
of War. In 1963, the site was acquired by the Federal Bureau of Prisons and converted to
a minimum security facility. In 1983, it was acquired by the Immigration and
Naturalization Service. Since that date, the facility has had numerous renovations. In
March 2002, the facility was transferred to the Department of Homeland Security,
Immigration and Customs Enforcement.
The facility is a detention center for those being detained for violations of immigration
status and laws. The purpose of the facility is to provide secure detention of aliens who
are likely to abscond pending completion of their deportation/removal cases or pending
release. Due to the appeal process available to detained aliens, detention for some
individuals can range from days to several months. The average length of stay in the
Processing Center is 14 days for Mexicans and 41days for other than Mexicans (OTM).
D.

Pre-Audit Meeting
The team met on March 28, 2004, at Gold Canyon, Arizona, to discuss the information
provided by the Association staff and the officials from Florence Processing Center.
The chairperson divided standards into the following groups:
Standards #3-ALDF-2A-01 to 3-ALDF-2F-03
Standards #3-ALDF-2G-01 to 3-ALDF-4D-13
Standards #3-ALDF-4E-01 to 3-ALDF-5F-10

E.

b6

Chairperson
, Member
Member

The Audit Process
1.

Transportation
The team was escorted to the facility by
Member.

2.

b6

Accreditation Team

Entrance Interview
The audit team proceeded to the office of
, Officer-In-Charge. The
b6,b7c
team expressed the appreciation of the Association for the opportunity to be
involved with Florence Processing Center in the accreditation process.
, Accreditation Manager escorted the team to the conference room
where the formal entry meeting was held.
b6

The following persons were in attendance:
Officer in Charge

3

Assistant Officer in Charge
b6
, Health Services Administrator
b6,b7c
, HQ / Immigration and Customs Enforcement
b6
Accreditation Manager
b6
Accreditation Team Member
, Chief Immigration Enforcement Agent
b6,b7c
Detention Operations Supervisor
b6,b7c
b6
act Security Project Manager
b6,b7c
, Contract Security Supervisor
b6,b7c
, Deportation Officer Supervisor
b6,b7c
, Deportation Officer Supervisor
b6
Health and Safety/Food Service Administrator
b6
, Food Service Administrator
, Maintenance Supervisor
b6
b6
, Electronics Technician
b6
Father
, Chaplain
b6
, Support Services Supervisor
b6,b7c

It was explained that the goal of the visiting team was to be as helpful and nonintrusive as possible during the conduct of the audit. The chairperson emphasized
the goals of accreditation toward the efficiency and effectiveness of correctional
systems throughout the United States. The audit schedule was also discussed at
this time.
3.

Facility Tour
The team toured the entire facility from 9:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. The following
persons accompanied the team on the tour and responded to the team's questions
concerning facility operations:
b6,b7c
b6,b7c
b6,b7c
b6
b6
b6
b6

4.

Officer in Charge
, Assistant Officer in Charge
Chief Immigration Enforcement Agent
Contract Manager (Private Security)
Accreditation Manager
Accreditation Team Member
Accreditation Team Member

Conditions of Confinement/Quality of Life
During the tour, the team evaluated the conditions of confinement at the facility.
The following narrative description of the relevant programmatic services and
functional areas summarizes the findings regarding the quality of life.
Security

4

The facility is surrounded by a double chain-link fence with razor wire at the top.
The perimeter is well-lighted and monitored by the security surveillance control
center through the use of video cameras. A security check of the perimeter is
conducted each evening to ensure that the fence is intact and that the cameras and
alarms are functioning properly. Additional checks are conducted whenever an
alarm is activated. The perimeter is also monitored by a motion sensor security
system within the perimeter fence.
The security surveillance control center also monitors activities via video cameras
throughout housing units, food service, recreation yard, and other key locations
throughout the facility.
Security keys are controlled through a computerized system called “The Key

(b)(2)High, (b)(7)e

Environmental Conditions
During the tour, the team found that noise levels throughout the facility, including
those in the detainee housing areas, were extremely low. Temperature ranges in
the housing units were well-within comfort zones. Lighting conditions in the
cells and other housing areas were above standards.
Sanitation
The landscape surrounding the exterior of the facility was well-manicured and the
area between the perimeter fences was clear of debris. The team noted that the
facility’s common areas, corridors and all housing areas were found to be clean
and well-maintained. The dormitories were without clutter. The facility also
provides for the storage and inventory of the chemicals utilized for the sanitation
of the facility. Cleaning equipment and chemicals are inventoried at the
beginning of each shift and are provided to detainees during all three shifts. The
team felt the overall maintenance and sanitation of the facility to be excellent.
Fire Safety
There are fire alarm pull stations in all areas of the facility and a sprinkler system
covers all areas. The installation of state of the art fire alarm and automatic
detection system was completed in January 2004.
Fire extinguishers, lighted exit signs and evacuation route maps were observed
throughout the facility. All required weekly, monthly and annual inspections are
being conducted by trained staff.

5

Food Service
The kitchen is more than adequate with a high level of organization and excellent
tool control. Temperature ranges were found to be well-within the appropriate
levels.
All detainees eat in one central dining room and are allotted sufficient time to
consume their meals. On March 29, the team ate lunch in the dining hall. The
food was nutritious, wholesome, and very good. There is more than an adequate
number of contract security staff and Immigration Agents monitoring detainees in
the dining hall. The team felt the entire food service operation was excellent.
Medical Care
Medical care is provided 24-hours a day, seven days a week through the
utilization of medical staff from the United States Public Health Service, Division
of Immigration Health Services. Sick call is held Monday through Friday. A
physician is on site 40 hours each week. At other times, detainees may request
medical service by submitting a sick-call slip, or by making a verbal request to
any officer. There is no charge for health care. The facility also maintains a fulltime dentist and mental health care provider on site.
Recreation
Outdoor recreation is provided to the detainees housed in the facility through two
recreation areas. One is used for the general population and the other for those
detainees in special housing. Each area exceeds required space requirements, and
has covered portions. Detainees are provided a minimum of one hour of outdoor
recreation each day. The team felt the main recreation yard to be excellent and
felt the recreation time could be expanded into the early evening hours; thus,
alleviating detainee idleness.
Religious Programming
The facility has a full-time volunteer chaplain provided by the Jesuit Refugee
Service. Catholic, Islamic, and Protestant services are provided to the general
population each week. The team felt with the quality of the new chaplain,
religious programming will become a dynamic program. The team recommended
that this could occur quicker with the use of additional volunteers.
Detainee Work Programs
Detainees are paid a stipend of one dollar per day for their participation in the
following programs:
Food Service Department

50 detainees

6

General Housekeeping
Facility Grounds Maintenance
Vehicle Cleaning/Detailing
Misc. Workers
Laundry

70 detainees
12 detainees
6 detainees
10 detainees
6 detainees

Detainee Programs
The following programs are offered at the facility:
Beyond Anger
Values and Personal Responsibility
Managing Money
Refusal Skills
Looking for Work
Making Decisions
9-5 beats 10-Life
Spanish Substance Abuse Program
OK Ex-inmate now that you have a job, keep it
Tough Questions and Straight Answers
Visitation
The facility permits contact visits between the detainees and visitors. There is no
maximum number of visits and visitors must be on the detainee’s approved visitor
list. Depending on the available space, a detainee may receive several visits in
one day. Additionally, if a detainee has family visiting from out of state, then
additional visits are granted. Normal visiting days are Saturday, Sunday, and
federal holidays.
Library Services
During daily recreation, books are available in the recreation yard for detainees to
check out. A book cart is also delivered twice weekly to the segregation units.
The facility maintains contact with local libraries and receives donations from
various community resources.
The law library is available from 9:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. each day. Detainees can
request access to use the law library through their housing unit officer.
Laundry
The laundry facility has an adequate number of washers and dryers to service the
entire population. Chemical accountability was good. The facility maintains a
sufficient amount of stock to service 100 percent of the population. Detainees
employed in the laundry receive adequate instruction on the safe operation of the
equipment.

7

Commissary
Detainees utilize vending machines for their commissary.
Team Observations
The team felt the overall maintenance, sanitation, and organization of the facility
to be excellent. Most staff functions in a professional, courteous manner and
exhibit a good work ethic. Security staff is knowledgeable of their posts and
function with a high emphasis on the overall security aspect of the facility. There
seems to be an excellent working relationship between AKAL security staff and
ICE (Immigration and Customs Enforcement) staff.
Key control and tool control are outstanding. Food service functions at a high
level of efficiency sanitation and product quality. There were very few
complaints from the detainees concerning food service. The amount and quality
of training provided staff is progressing to a high level. Medical treatment is very
good and there seems to be a true concern for the treatment of detainees. The
TEIE psychiatry program is outstanding. The entire facility seemed to function
with a team effort. Quality of life for both staff and detainees is very good. The
appearance of the facility, both inside and outside is excellent. Control of
flammables, toxic, and caustic inventories is excellent. Maintenance, warehouse,
mail room and the administration area are doing a yeoman’s job. The overall
cooperation among all departments is phenomenal.
Issues of concern:
Look at developing more programs for the detainees. Take into consideration the
short stay of the detainees when looking at this. The volunteer program needs to
be expanded in developing more programs. Recreation could very easily be
expanded into the early evening to help alleviate detainee idleness. There seems
to be somewhat of a telephone problem for the detainees, a little more education
of the use of the telephone would help with this problem. The mini-control
centers in each of the living pods need a better way of communicating with staff
and detainees in the detainee living areas. This is almost non-existent at this time.
The training officer position should be filled as soon as possible. The policies and
procedures need to be looked at and a continued streamlining of them needs to
occur.
F.

Examination of Records
Following the facility tour, the team proceeded to the conference room to review the
accreditation files and evaluate compliance levels of the policies and procedures. The
facility has no notices of non-compliance with local, state, or federal laws or regulations.

8

1.

Litigation
Over the last three years, the facility had no consent decrees, class action lawsuits
or adverse judgments.

2.

Significant Incidents/Outcome Measures
From March 2003, through February 2004, there have been no major
disturbances, hunger strikes, hostage situations, work stoppages, or fires. During
the same period:
Assault – detainee on detainee, without weapon: 21
Assault – detainee on staff, without weapon: 12
Number of forced cell moves: 13
Number of times chemical agent used: 1
4 point restraints: 1
Offender medical referrals as a result of injuries sustained: 24
There were no major injuries as a result of assaults, detainee on detainee, or
detainee on staff. The section asking for detainee medical referrals as a result of
injuries sustained are a list of all referrals as required by policy that anytime there
has been any kind of assault, they are referred to health services.

3.

Departmental Visits
Team members revisited the following departments to review conditions relating
to departmental policy and operations:
Department Visited
Medical

Person(s) Contacted
b6
b6
b6

M.D.
Asst. Hospital Admin.

, PA
, PA
, RN Nurse Manager
b6
RN
b6
b6
RN
b6
RN
,
Infection
Control
b6
, LPN
b6
LPN
b6
Dr. b6 , Dentist
b6
, Dental Assistant
b6
Dr.
, Psychologist
, Pharmacist
b6
b6
Pharmacy Technician
b6

b6

9

b6
b6
b6
b6

Administrative Assistant
Chaplain
Maintenance
Security
Food Service

b6

Father

Detention, Chief
Detention Officer
Detention Officer
Immig Enforce. Agent
Immig Enforcement Agent
Immig Enforcement Agent
Immig Enforcement Agent
ImmigEnforcement Agent
Immig Enforcement Agent
Immig Enforcement Agent
Immigration Enforc Agent
Contract Security Off
Contract Security Off
Contract Security Off
Contract Security Off
Contract Security Officer
Contract Security Officer
Contract Security Officer
Contract Security Officer
Contract Security Officer
Contract Security Officer
Contract Security Officer
Contract Security Officer
Contract Security Officer
Contract Security Officer
Contract Security Officer
Contract Security Officer
Contract Security Officer
Contract Security Officer
Contract Security Officer
Contract Security Officer
Contract Security Officer
4.

b6

b6, b7c

Shifts
a.

, Admin. Assistant
MRT
MRT
MRT

Day Shift

10

The team was present at the facility during the day shift from 8:00 a.m.
until 4:00 p.m. The lunch meal, detainee work, living units, and detainees
being processed in were observed.
b.

Evening Shift
The team was present at the facility during the evening shift from 9:30
p.m. until 11:45 p.m. The team observed the evening briefing, contact
was made with staff, and the shift change was observed.

c.

Night Shift
The team was present at the facility during the night shift from 6:45 a.m.
to 8:00 a.m. Contact was made with staff. The living units, control center,
medical, and the shift change, were observed.

G.

Interviews
During the course of the audit, team members met with both staff and detainees to verify
observations and/or to clarify questions concerning facility operations.
1.

Detainee Interviews
The team interviewed 75 detainees. The overall morale of the detainee population
was very good. There were no prior requests to meet with the audit team so the
detainees were interviewed at random. They stated that most staff treat them in a
professional manner and feel the detention center to be a safe place. The team felt
the overall pulse of the detainee population to be very good.
Issue of concern:
Issues of concern expressed by the detainee population were mainly issues
concerning their cases. What would happen to them? When would their case be
heard? They would like more programs and more recreation time. They
expressed concern about the telephones and the lack of responsiveness from the
deportation officers. They would like larger portions in food service and rice
offered more frequently. They would also like a quicker response to see medical.

2.

Staff Interviews
There were numerous staff interviewed. The following summarizes their
comments and concerns. Staff morale was very good to excellent. All staff
interviewed was well-trained and knowledgeable of their jobs. The majority of
staff like their jobs and think the facility is a good place to work. They stated that
the accreditation process had raised the level of sanitation and overall made for a

11

much more professional operation. All were very supportive of the top
administration and supervisory staff. Supervisory staff were very supportive of
the line staff and impressed with the team work and work ethic of most staff.
Staff commented that they liked the additional training they were receiving. They
all felt the facility to be a safe place to work. The professionalism demonstrated
by both groups was indicative of a very well run detention facility.
Issues of concern:
Issues of concern expressed by staff were that they would like to see an increase
of staff and some stated that they did not like the amount of overtime they had to
work.
H.

Exit Discussion
The exit interview was held at 11:30 a.m. in the conference room with the officer in
charge and 25 staff in attendance.
The following person were also in attendance:
b6

Headquarters, Immigration and Customs Enforcement

The chairperson explained the procedures that would follow the audit. The team
discussed the compliance levels of the mandatory and non-mandatory standards and
reviewed their individual findings with the group.
The chairperson expressed appreciation for the cooperation of everyone concerned and
congratulated the facility team for the progress made and encouraged them to continue to
strive toward even further professionalism within the correctional field.

12

COMMISSION ON ACCREDITATION FOR CORRECTIONS
AND THE
AMERICAN CORRECTIONAL ASSOCIATION

COMPLIANCE TALLY

Manual Type
Supplement
Facility/Program
Audit Dates

Adult Local Detention Facilities, third edition
2002 Standards Supplement
Florence Service Processing Center
March 29-31, 2004

Auditor(s)

Chairperson;
ber

b6
b6

b6

Member;

b6

MANDATORY

NON-MANDATORY

Number of Standards in Manual

41

399

Number Not Applicable

0

29

Number Applicable

41

370

Number Non-Compliance

0

7

Number in Compliance

41

363

Percentage (%) of Compliance

100%

98%

!

Number of Standards minus Number of Not Applicable equals Number Applicable

!

Number Applicable minus Number Non-Compliance equals Number Compliance

!

Number Compliance divided by Number Applicable equals Percentage of Compliance

13

COMMISSION ON ACCREDITATION FOR CORRECTIONS
Department of Homeland Security
Florence Service Processing Center
Florence, Arizona
March 29-31, 2004
Visiting Committee Findings
Non-Mandatory Standards
Non-Compliance

Standard #3-ALDF-2C-01
SINGLE CELLS ARE REQUIRED FOR INMATES ASSIGNED TO MAXIMUM AND
CLOSE CUSTODY.
ALL CELLS IN WHICH INMATES ARE CONFINED
CONFORM WITH THE FOLLOWING REQUIREMENTS:
•
•
•

THERE MUST BE 35 SQUARE FEET OF UNENCUMBERED SPACE FOR
THE SINGLE CELL OCCUPANT.
WHEN CONFINEMENT EXCEEDS TEN HOURS PER DAY, THERE IS AT
LEAST 70 SQUARE FEET OF TOTAL FLOOR SPACE FOR THE
OCCUPANT.
AUNENCUMBERED SPACE@ IS USABLE SPACE THAT IS NOT
ENCUMBERED BY FURNISHING OR FIXTURES. AT LEAST ONE
DIMENSION OF THE UNENCUMBERED SPACE IS NO LESS THAN
SEVEN FEET. IN DETERMINING THE UNENCUMBERED SPACE, ALL
FIXTURES MUST BE IN OPERATIONAL POSITION AND MUST PROVIDE
THE FOLLOWING MINIMUM AREAS PER PERSON: BED, PLUMBING
FIXTURES, DESK, AND LOCKER.

FINDINGS
The Jail Unit has 14 cells with 48 square feet total in each cell. Thirty square feet of
unencumbered space.
AGENCY RESPONSE
Waiver
Persons detained in the general population at the Service Processing Center, Florence are
housed dorm-style. Any detainee who requires segregated housing will be placed in one
of the facility’s 13 single cells located in the Jail Special Housing Unit.

14

The Jail unit was constructed circa 1962. The construction met all building codes and
housing standards in effect at that time. The Jail Special Housing Unit consists of 14
single cells with 48 square feet of floor space in each cell. Each cell has an above-floor
bed, a toilet, sink, and writing surface. The quality of life for a person in the Jail
Segregation Unit is still quite good. Each detainee is offered a minimum of seven hours
of outside recreation each week. In addition, there is an indoor dayroom area adjacent to
each block of cells. All of these dayrooms (except disciplinary segregation) have
televisions. All of the dayrooms have tables and seats that are suitable for letter writing
and similar leisure time activities. Detainees are permitted access to the dayrooms as
much as possible commensurate with their security requirements and the facility’s need
to maintain a safe, clean and orderly segregation environment.
There are no current or pending complaints from detainees concerning the conditions of
confinement I the segregation units. There have been no such complaints in recent
memory and this, combined with the prohibitive cost of bringing the jail segregation cells
into compliance, forms the basis of this request for a waiver to this standard.
AUDITOR’S RESPONSE
The visiting committee supports the waiver.
Standard #3-ALDF-2C-04
AT A MINIMUM, THE SYSTEM IS DESIGNED TO PROVIDE
SINGLE-OCCUPANCY CELLS FOR ONE-THIRD OF THE POPULATION.
FINDINGS
The facility needs over 100 single cells and has only 14.
AGENCY RESPONSE
Waiver
The Service Processing Center, Florence is designed to maintain its general population in
open dorm housing units.
This best serves the mission of the facility, which involves the short-term administrative
confinement of an ethnically diverse population with an extremely varied, and to a large
degree, unknown range of criminal sophistication. The open dormitory style affords the
greatest degree of detainee supervision and, therefore, provides the greatest amount of
detainee safety in the unique DHS detention environment.
There are no current or pending complaints from detainees concerning the conditions of
confinement in the dormitory housing units. There have been no such complaints in
recent memory and this, combined with the prohibitive cost of bringing the facility into

15

compliance, forms the basis of this request for a waiver to this standard.
AUDITOR’S RESPONSE
The visiting committee supports the waiver.
Standard #3-ALDF-2C-12
ALL CELLS/ROOMS IN SEGREGATION PROVIDE A MINIMUM OF 70 SQUARE
FEET, OF WHICH 35 SQUARE FEET IS UNENCUMBERED SPACE.
FINDINGS
The cells in the Segregation Jail Unit have 48 square feet of which 30 square feet is
unencumbered space.
AGENCY RESPONSE
Waiver
Persons detained in the general population at the Service Processing Center, Florence are
housed dorm-style. Any detainee who requires segregated housing will be placed in one
of the facility’s 14 single cells located in the Jail Unit. The Jail Unit was constructed
circa 1962. The construction met all building codes and housing standards in effect at
that time. The Jail Special Housing Unit consists of 14 single cells with 48 square feet of
floor space in each cell. Each cell has an above-floor bed, a toilet and a sink.
The quality of life for a person in the Jail Segregation Unit is still quite good. Each
detainee is offered a minimum of 7 hours of outside recreation each week. In addition,
there is an indoor dayroom area adjacent to each block of Segregation Cells. All of these
dayrooms (except jail Disciplinary Segregation) have televisions. All of the dayrooms
have tables and seats that are suitable for letter writing and similar leisure time activities.
Detainees are permitted access to the dayroom as much as possible commensurate with
their security requirements and the facility’s need to maintain a safe, clean and orderly
segregation environment.
There are no current or pending complaints from detainees concerning the conditions of
confinement in the Segregation Units. There have been no such detainee complaints in
recent memory and this, combined with the prohibitive cost of bringing the Jail
Segregation Cells into compliance forms the basis for a waiver to Standard 3-ALDF 2C12.
AUDITOR’S RESPONSE
The visiting committee supports the waiver.

16

Standard #3-ALDF-4B-04
WRITTEN POLICY, PROCEDURE, AND PRACTICE PROHIBIT THE
CONFINEMENT OF JUVENILES UNDER THE AGE OF 18 WITHIN THE
FACILITY.
FINDINGS
Facility by statute will house juveniles adjudicated as adults and do so from time to time.
AGENCY RESPONSE
Waiver
Effective 2-24-97, the Immigration and Naturalization Service changed certain
procedures relating to the detention, release and treatment of minors in its custody. These
changes came out of a settlement agreement arising from a class action lawsuit (Flores v.
Reno) that was ultimately adjudicated by the U.S. Supreme Court. Among other things,
the settlement mandated that all juvenile aliens who have been convicted as adults in
criminal court and are subsequently arrested for violations of U.S. Immigration laws, be
detained at Immigration and Customs Enforcement facilities pending removal
proceedings.
Any such juveniles detained at this facility will be placed in a Protective Custody status
and housed in Administrative Segregation. This segregation will not be punitive, but
solely for the purpose of keeping juveniles separate from the more sophisticated and
often predatory, adult criminals. As a component on Immigration and Customs
Enforcement, the Service Processing Center, Florence is bound by this mandate thus
requiring this facility to request a waiver to Standard 3-ALDF-4B-04.
AUDITOR’S RESPONSE
The visiting committee supports the waiver.
Standard #3-ALDF-4B-04-3
WRITTEN POLICY, PROCEDURE, AND PRACTICE PROVIDE FOR
CLASSIFICATION PLANS FOR YOUTHFUL OFFENDERS THAT DETERMINE
LEVEL OF RISK AND PROGRAM NEEDS DEVELOPMENTALLY APPROPRIATE
FOR ADOLESCENTS.
CLASSIFICATION PLANS SHALL INCLUDE
CONSIDERATION OF PHYSICAL, MENTAL, SOCIAL, AND EDUCATIONAL
MATURITY OF THE YOUTHFUL OFFENDER.
FINDINGS
Facility only uses one classification plan that is applied to all detainees. Does not have a

17

specific classification plan for youthful offenders.
AGENCY RESPONSE
Plan of Action
Copies of classification plans have been received from various juvenile detention
facilities. A specific classification plan for juveniles which will retain all requirements of
current classification plan is being developed. As this plan will need to be approved at
the headquarters level it may take several additional months. Until this goal is
accomplished, juveniles will remain classified as protective custody and housed
administrative segregation.
Task
Develop classification plan
Responsible Agency
FSPC
Assigned Staff
b6

Anticipated Completion Date
October 1, 2005
AUDITOR’S RESPONSE
The visiting committee supports the plan of action.
Standard #3-ALDF-4B-04-6
WRITTEN, POLICY, PROCEDURE, AND PRACTICE REQUIRE THAT PROGRAM
PERSONNEL WHO WORK WITH YOUTHFUL OFFENDERS FROM THE
SPECIALIZED UNIT BE TRAINED IN THE DEVELOPMENTAL, SAFETY, AND
OTHER SPECIFIC NEEDS OF YOUTHFUL OFFENDERS.
WRITTEN JOB
DESCRIPTIONS AND QUALIFICATIONS REQUIRE TRAINING FOR STAFF
SPECIFICALLY ASSIGNED TO THE UNIT OR STAFF WHO ARE RESPONSIBLE
FOR PROGRAMMING OF YOUTHFUL OFFENDERS IN THE SPECIALIZED UNIT
BEFORE BEING ASSIGNED TO WORK WITH YOUTHFUL OFFENDERS. THE
TRAINING SHOULD INCLUDE BUT NOT BE LIMITED TO THE FOLLOWING
AREAS:
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ADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT

18

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EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMMING
CULTURAL AWARENESS
CRISIS PREVENTION AND INTERVENTION
LEGAL ISSUES
HOUSING AND PHYSICAL PLANT
POLICIES AND PROCEDURES
THE MANAGEMENT OF, AND PROGRAMMING FOR, SEX
OFFENDERS
SUBSTANCE
ABUSE
SERVICES,
COGNITIVE-BEHAVIORAL
INTERVENTIONS,
INCLUDING
ANGER
MANAGEMENT,
SOCIALSKILLS TRAINING, PROBLEM SOLVING, AND RESISTING
PEER PRESSURE, SUICIDE PREVENTION
NUTRITION
MENTAL-HEALTH ISSUES
GENDER-SPECIFIC ISSUES
CASE-MANAGEMENT PLANNING AND IMPLEMENTATION.

FINDINGS
Facility personnel are not trained in required areas needed for youthful offenders.
AGENCY RESPONSE
Plan of Action
The Service Processing Center, Florence will have appropriate staff for the specific tasks
attend training in the areas of adolescent development, educational programming, cultural
awareness, crisis prevention and intervention, legal issues, housing and physical plant,
policies and procedures, the management of, and programming for, sex offenders,
substance abuse services, cognitive behavioral interventions, including anger
management, social skills training, problem solving and resisting peer pressure, suicide
prevention, nutrition, mental health issues, gender-specific issues, case management
planning and implementation. This will enable the facility to address these issues with
any youthful offenders which may be placed into our custody. A course of instruction
will be developed by the training officer to cover these areas. Staff required to work with
juvenile detainee will receive this training.
Task
Training
Responsible Agency
Immigration and Customs Enforcement
Assigned Staff

19

Medical, Recreation, Detention
Anticipated Completion Date
October 30, 2004
AUDITOR’S RESPONSE
The visiting committee supports the plan of action.
Standard #3-ALDF-4D-08
WRITTEN POLICY, PROCEDURE, AND PRACTICE PROVIDE FOR THE ISSUE
OF SUITABLE CLOTHING TO ALL INMATES. CLOTHING IS PROPERLY
FITTED, CLIMACTICALLY SUITABLE, DURABLE, AND PRESENTABLE.
FINDINGS
Practice supports the needed cleaning but no policy and procedure directing needed
cleaning to be done.
AGENCY RESPONSE
Plan of Action
Detainee notices were posted in each housing unit informing them of the availability of
laundry services to clean their personal clothing. This information will also be added to
the detainee handbook during it’s annual review/update. This is scheduled to occur in
September.
Task
Update Detainee Handbook
Responsible Agency
FSPC
Assigned Staff
b6

Anticipated Completion Date
Information was posted immediately in housing units. Will be added to handbook in

20

September.
AUDITOR’S RESPONSE
The visiting committee supports the plan of action.

21

COMMISSION ON ACCREDITATION FOR CORRECTIONS
Department of Homeland Security
Florence Service Processing Center
Florence, Arizona
March 29-31, 2004
Visiting Committee Findings
Non-Mandatory Standards
Not Applicable

Standard #3-ALDF-1A-07
WHEN THE FACILITY ADMINISTRATOR POSITION IS FILLED BY
APPOINTMENT, THE FACILITY ADMINISTRATOR IS APPOINTED BY THE
CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER OR GOVERNING BOARD OF THE PARENT
AGENCY.
FINDINGS
The OIC is a competitive Federal Civil Service position filled through a merit system
process.
Standard #3-ALDF-1A-08
THE QUALIFICATIONS, AUTHORITY, AND RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE
FACILITY ADMINISTRATOR AND OTHER APPOINTED PERSONNEL WHO ARE
NOT COVERED BY MERIT SYSTEMS, CIVIL SERVICE REGULATION, OR
UNION CONTRACT ARE SPECIFIED IN WRITING BY STATUTE OR BY THE
PARENT AGENCY.
FINDINGS
The OIC is covered by Merit System and Civil Service regulation.
Standard #3-ALDF-1B-17
COMMISSARY/CANTEEN
FUNDS
ARE
AUDITED
INDEPENDENTLY
FOLLOWING STANDARD ACCOUNTING PROCEDURES, AND AN ANNUAL
FINANCIAL STATUS REPORT IS AVAILABLE AS A PUBLIC DOCUMENT.
FINDINGS

22

The SPC awards a contract for vending machines and no funds accrue to the SPC and no
on-site bookkeeping or audit responsibilities are generated by the contract. The profits are
split with a designated public charity, by the contract. DES (Department of Economic
Security) would be the auditing sourced of this contract.
Standard #3-ALDF-1B-18
WRITTEN POLICY AND PROCEDURE GOVERN THE OPERATION OF ANY
FUND ESTABLISHED FOR INMATES. ANY INTEREST EARNED ON MONIES
OTHER THAN OPERATING FUNDS ACCRUES TO THE BENEFIT OF THE
INMATES.
FINDINGS
The SPC is an illegal alien detention center and the detainees are held for a short time.
The funds of each detainee are held at the facility and at the time of departure of the
detainees, cash in the amount the detainee had upon arrival is given at departure.
Standard #3-ALDF-1E-03
WRITTEN POLICY, PROCEDURE, AND PRACTICE PROVIDE THAT INMATE
TIME IS ACCURATELY COMPUTED AND RECORDED IN CONFORMANCE
WITH APPLICABLE STATUTES AND REGULATIONS.
FINDINGS
Since no sentence is being served, no statutory or regulatory authority exists within
Department of Homeland Security to provide for sentence computation.
Standard #3-ALDF-2C-14
INMATES PARTICIPATING IN
PROGRAMS ARE SEPARATED
POPULATION.

WORK OR EDUCATIONAL RELEASE
FROM INMATES IN THE GENERAL

FINDINGS
No statutory or regulatory authority exists within Department of Homeland Security to
provide for work or educational release programs at the SPC.
Standard #3-ALDF-2E-04
IN FACILITIES OFFERING ACADEMIC AND VOCATIONAL TRAINING
PROGRAMS, CLASSROOMS ARE DESIGNED IN CONSULTATION WITH
SCHOOL AUTHORITIES. (RENOVATION, ADDITION, NEW CONSTRUCTION

23

ONLY)
FINDINGS
With the short length of stay of most of the illegal aliens before they are deported back to
the country of origin, academic and vocational programs are not offered.
Standard #3-ALDF-4B-02-1
WRITTEN POLICY, PROCEDURE, AND PRACTICE PROHIBIT DISCRIMINATION
ON THE BASIS OF DISABILITY IN THE PROVISION OF SERVICES, PROGRAMS,
AND ACTIVITIES ADMINISTERED FOR PROGRAM BENEFICIARIES AND
PARTICIPANTS.
FINDINGS
Detainees with disabilities that preclude them from participation in services, because of
physical plant limitations are housed in other appropriate facilities. This determination is
made by the facility health care personnel.
Standard #3-ALDF-4C-12
WHEN REQUIRED BY STATUTE, FOOD PRODUCTS THAT ARE GROWN OR
PRODUCED WITHIN THE SYSTEM ARE INSPECTED AND APPROVED BY THE
APPROPRIATE GOVERNMENT AGENCY; THERE IS A DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM
THAT ENSURES PROMPT DELIVERY OF FOODSTUFFS TO FACILITY
KITCHENS.
FINDINGS
Food products are not grown or produced within system and not required by statute.
Standard #3-ALDF-4E-13
IN FACILITIES WITHOUT FULL-TIME, QUALIFIED HEALTH PERSONNEL, A
HEALTH-TRAINED STAFF MEMBER COORDINATES THE HEALTH CARE
DELIVERY IN THE FACILITY UNDER THE JOINT SUPERVISION OF THE
RESPONSIBLE HEALTH AUTHORITY AND FACILITY ADMINISTRATOR.
FINDINGS
Florence Service Processing Center has full time medical personnel in charge of
Medical/Health services.
Standard #3-ALDF-4E-15

24

WRITTEN POLICY, PROCEDURE, AND PRACTICE PROVIDE THAT ANY
STUDENTS OR INTERNS DELIVERING HEALTH CARE IN THE FACILITY
WORK UNDER DIRECT STAFF SUPERVISION, COMMENSURATE WITH THEIR
LEVEL OF TRAINING.
FINDINGS
The Florence Service Processing Center does not use students or interns to deliver health
care to detainees.
Standard #3-ALDF-4E-19-1
WRITTEN POLICY, PROCEDURE AND PRACTICE PROVIDE THAT
PREGNANCY MANAGEMENT IS SPECIFIC AS IT RELATES TO THE
FOLLOWING:
ƒ
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PREGNANCY TESTING
ROUTINE PRENATAL CARE
HIGH-RISK PRENATAL CARE
MANAGEMENT OF THE CHEMICALLY ADDICTED PREGNANT INMATE
POSTPARTUM FOLLOW-UP

FINDINGS
Female detainees are not housed at this facility.
Standard #3-ALDF-4F-04
WRITTEN POLICY, PROCEDURE, AND PRACTICE REQUIRE THAT
COMPREHENSIVE COUNSELING AND ASSISTANCE ARE PROVIDED TO
PREGNANT INMATES IN KEEPING WITH THEIR EXPRESSED DESIRES IN
PLANNING FOR THEIR UNBORN CHILDREN.
FINDINGS
The Florence Service Processing Center does not house pregnant females at this time.
Standard #3-ALDF-4F-06
WHERE A DRUG TREATMENT PROGRAM EXISTS, WRITTEN POLICY,
PROCEDURE AND PRACTICE PROVIDE THAT THE ALCOHOL AND DRUG
ABUSE TREATMENT PROGRAM HAS A WRITTEN TREATMENT PHILOSOPHY
WITHIN THE CONTEXT OF THE TOTAL CORRECTIONAL SYSTEM, AS WELL
AS, GOALS AND MEASURABLE OBJECTIVES. THESE DOCUMENTS ARE
REVIEWED AT LEAST ANNUALLY AND UPDATED AS NEEDED.

25

FINDINGS
There are no drug treatment programs offered.
Standard #3-ALDF-4F-07
WHERE A DRUG TREATMENT PROGRAM EXISTS, WRITTEN POLICY,
PROCEDURE AND PRACTICE PROVIDE FOR AN APPROPRIATE RANGE OF
PRIMARY TREATMENT SERVICES FOR ALCOHOL AND OTHER DRUG
ABUSING OFFENDERS THAT INCLUDE, AT A MINIMUM, THE FOLLOWING:
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OFFENDER DIAGNOSIS
IDENTIFIED PROBLEM AREAS
INDIVIDUAL TREATMENT OBJECTIVES
TREATMENT GOALS
COUNSELING NEEDS
DRUG EDUCATION PLAN
RELAPSE PREVENTION AND MANAGEMENT
CULTURALLY
SENSITIVE
TREATMENT
OBJECTIVES,
AS
APPROPRIATE
THE PROVISION OF SELF-HELP GROUPS AS AN ADJUNCT TO
TREATMENT
PRE-RELEASE AND TRANSITIONAL SERVICE NEEDS
COORDINATION EFFORTS WITH COMMUNITY SUPERVISION AND
TREATMENT STAFF DURING THE PRE-RELEASE PHASE TO
ENSURE A CONTINUUM OF SUPERVISION AND TREATMENT

FINDINGS
There are no drug treatment programs offered.
Standard #3-ALDF-4F-08
WHERE A DRUG TREATMENT PROGRAM EXISTS, WRITTEN POLICY,
PROCEDURE AND PRACTICE PROVIDE THAT THE FACILITY USES A
COORDINATED STAFF APPROACH TO DELIVER TREATMENT SERVICES.
THIS APPROACH TO SERVICE DELIVERY SHALL BE DOCUMENTED IN
TREATMENT PLANNING CONFERENCES AND IN INDIVIDUAL TREATMENT
FILES.
FINDINGS
There are no drug treatment programs offered.
Standard #3-ALDF-4F-09

26

WHERE A DRUG TREATMENT PROGRAM EXISTS, WRITTEN POLICY,
PROCEDURE AND PRACTICE PROVIDE INCENTIVES FOR TARGETED
TREATMENT PROGRAMS TO INCREASE AND MAINTAIN THE OFFENDER=S
MOTIVATION FOR TREATMENT.
FINDINGS
There are no drug treatment programs offered.
Standard #3-ALDF-4G-02
WHEN THE FACILITY IS DESIGNATED TO OPERATE ANY TYPE OF PRETRIAL
INTERVENTION SERVICE OR OTHER RELEASE PROGRAM, ITS AUTHORITY
AND RESPONSIBILITY ARE STATED BY STATUTE OR ADMINISTRATIVE
REGULATION
FINDINGS
No statutory or regulatory authority exists within ICE for Service Processing Center to
provide release programs for detainees.
Standard #3-ALDF-4G-03
WHEN A PRETRIAL INTERVENTION PROGRAM, DIVERSION PROGRAM,
PRETRIAL RELEASE PROGRAM, OR PAROLE PROGRAM IS CONDUCTED IN
THE FACILITY, SUFFICIENT STAFF, SPACE, AND EQUIPMENT ARE
PROVIDED TO SERVICE THE PROGRAM.
FINDINGS
The Florence Service Processing Center has no statutory regulating authority to provide
release programming for detainees.
Standard #3-ALDF-4G-04
TEMPORARY RELEASE PROGRAMS ARE REQUIRED TO HAVE THE
FOLLOWING ELEMENTS:
P
P
P
P
P
P

WRITTEN OPERATIONAL PROCEDURES
CAREFUL SCREENING AND SELECTION PROCEDURES
WRITTEN RULES OF INMATE CONDUCT
A SYSTEM OF SUPERVISION
A SYSTEM FOR EVALUATING PROGRAM EFFECTIVENESS
EFFORTS TO OBTAIN COMMUNITY COOPERATION AND
SUPPORT

27

FINDINGS
The Florence Service Processing Center cannot do temporary release programs for
detainees due to the short time frame they are present at this facility.
Standard #3-ALDF-4G-05
WHERE STATUTE PERMITS, WRITTEN POLICY AND PROCEDURE ALLOW
FOR INMATE PARTICIPATION IN WORK OR EDUCATIONAL RELEASE
PROGRAMS.
FINDINGS
There is no Community Custody Level within ICE that would allow the Florence Service
Processing Center to allow temporary work or educational release.
Standard #3-ALDF-5A-09
WHERE STATUTE PERMITS, THE INMATE WORK PLAN PROVIDES FOR
INMATE WORK ASSIGNMENT IN PUBLIC WORKS PROJECTS.
FINDINGS
The Department of Homeland Security classification system does not include a
Community Custody Level that would permit detainees to work in the community.
Standard #3-ALDF-5A-10
WHERE STATUTE PERMITS, THE INMATE WORK PLAN INCLUDES
PROVISION FOR INMATES TO WORK IN VARIOUS NONPROFIT AND
COMMUNITY SERVICE PROJECTS.
FINDINGS
The Department of Homeland Security classification system does not include a level for
community work that would permit the Florence Service Processing Center to do
community release work.
Standard #3-ALDF-5A-14
THERE IS A STATUTE AND/OR WRITTEN POLICY AND PROCEDURE THAT
AUTHORIZES THE ESTABLISHMENT OF AN INDUSTRIES PROGRAM AND
DELINEATES THE AREAS OF AUTHORITY, RESPONSIBILITY, AND
ACCOUNTABILITY FOR THE PROGRAM.
FINDINGS

28

No statutory regulation exists with the Department of Homeland Security to permit
industries programs at the Florence Service Processing Center.
Standard #3-ALDF-5A-15
WRITTEN POLICY, PROCEDURE, AND PRACTICE PROVIDE THAT THE
NUMBER OF INMATES ASSIGNED TO INDUSTRIES OPERATIONS MEET THE
REALISTIC WORKLOAD NEEDS OF EACH INDUSTRIES OPERATING UNIT.
FINDINGS
No statutory or regulating authority exists within the Department of Homeland Security
to provide industries programs for detainees at the Florence Service Processing Center.
Standard #3-ALDF-5A-16
EACH INDUSTRIES OPERATING UNIT HAS A WRITTEN QUALITY CONTROL
PROCEDURE THAT PROVIDES FOR RAW MATERIAL, IN-PROCESS, AND
FINAL PRODUCT INSPECTION.
FINDINGS
No statutory or regulating authority exists within the Department of Homeland Security
to establish an industries program at the Florence Service Processing Center.
Standard #3-ALDF-5A-17
A COST ACCOUNTING SYSTEM FOR EACH OPERATING INDUSTRIES UNIT IS
DESIGNED, IMPLEMENTED, AND MAINTAINED IN ACCORDANCE WITH
GENERALLY ACCEPTED ACCOUNTING PRINCIPLES.
FINDINGS
No statutory or regulating authority exists within the Department of Homeland Security
to establish an industries program at the Florence Service Processing Center.
Standard #3-ALDF-5D-13
WHERE STATUTE PERMITS, WRITTEN POLICY, PROCEDURE, AND PRACTICE
PROVIDE FOR EXTENDED VISITS BETWEEN INMATES AND THEIR FAMILIES.
FINDINGS
Federal regulation prohibits extended visit between a detainee and his/her family
members.

29

Standard #3-ALDF-5D-14
WHERE STATUTE PERMITS, WRITTEN POLICY, PROCEDURE, AND PRACTICE
PROVIDE THAT INMATES WITH APPROPRIATE SECURITY CLASSIFICATIONS
ARE ALLOWED FURLOUGHS TO THE COMMUNITY TO MAINTAIN
COMMUNITY AND FAMILY TIES, SEEK EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES, AND
FOR OTHER PURPOSES CONSISTENT WITH THE PUBLIC INTEREST.
FINDINGS
Federal regulations prohibit detainee’s furloughs into the community.

30

Significant Incident Summary
This summary is required to be provided to the chair of your audit team upon their arrival. The information contained on this form will also be
summarized in the narrative portion of the visiting committee report and will be incorporated into the final report. It should contain data for the
last 12 months; indicate those months in the boxes provided. Please type the data. If you have questions on how to complete the form, please
contact your regional manager.
Facility

Florence Processing Center

2003-2004

Year

Months
Incidents

6-03

7-03

8-03

9-03

10-03

11-03

12-03

1-04

2-04

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

2

1

4

2

1

0

1

3

1

0

0

P

0

P

P

P

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

2

0

2

4

2

0

0

0

1

1

1

1

0

0

2

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

Indicate type (chair,
bed, board, etc.)

0

0

0

0

0

BED

0

0

0

0

0

0

Offender Medical
Referrals as a Result of
Injuries Sustained

#’s should reflect
incidents on this form,
not rec or other source

1

3

3

4

0

2

1

3

2

3

1

Escapes

# Attempted

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

3-03

4-03

P

P

0

0

1

2

P

0

0

0

2

0

3

4

0

0

Number of Times
Chemical Agents Used

0

Number of Times
Special Reaction Team
Used

Assault:
Offenders/
Offenders*

Indicate types
(sexual**, physical,
etc.)
# With Weapon
# Without Weapon
Indicate types
(sexual**, physical,
etc.)

Assault:
Offender/
Staff

# With Weapon
# Without Weapon
Number of Forced
Moves Used***

(Cell extraction or
other forced relocation
of offenders)

Disturbances****

Four/Five Point
Restraints

Number

# Actual
Substantiated
Grievances
(resolved in favor of
offender)

Deaths

Reason (medical,
food, religious, etc.)
Number
Reason (violent,
illness, suicide,
Number

5-03

P

0
3

1

*Any physical contact that involves two or more offenders

31

**Oral, anal or vaginal copulation involving at least two parties
***Routine transportation of offenders is not considered Aforced@
****Any incident that involves four or more offenders. Includes gang fights, organized multiple hunger strikes,
work stoppages, hostage situations, major fires, or other large scale incidents

32

COMMISSION ON ACCREDITATION FOR CORRECTIONS
TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE REPORT
Willacy County Processing Center
Raymondville, Texas
October 8-9, 2007

VISITING COMMITTEE MEMBER

Chairperson
Assistant to the Superintendent/ACA Manager
Indian River Juvenile Correctional Facility
2775 Indian River Rd. SW
Massillon, OH 44646
b6
(330)
b6

A.

Introduction
The technical assistance for the Food Service Department of the Willacy Detention
Center in Raymondville, Texas was conducted October 8 – 9, 2007 by
b6
The technical assistance was conducted on behalf of the Department of Homeland
Security – ICE for the facility that is privately run by MTC – Management & Training
Corp.

B.

Facility Demographics
Rated Capacity: 2000 detainees
Actual Population: 960 detainees: 730 male & 230 female
Average Length of Stay: Approx. 21 + days
Security/Custody Level: Level 1 & 2 (non-criminal – awaiting deportation)
Age Range of Offenders: All
Gender: Male & Female
Full-Time Staff: ICE Staff – 1 Officer in Charge, 1 Asst. Officer in Charge, 2 Duty
Operations Supervisors, 6 Supervisors – Immigration Enforcement Agents, 16
Deportation Officers, 31 Immigration Enforcement Agents, 2 Supervisors, and 11
Deportation & Removal Assistants.

C.

Facility Description
MTC was awarded a contract for operations and management of the Willacy County
Detention Center by Willacy County, Texas. MTC is responsible for all aspects of
detention services including providing security personnel, housing and transportation in
compliance with the Intergovernmental Service Agreement between Willacy County and
United States Department of Homeland Security, Immigration and Customs Enforcement
(ICE). Services are provided in accordance with the most current editions of ICE
National Detention Requirements.
ICE required the 2,000 bed facility to be operational within 90 days of contract award.
The project was delivered in three operational phases: The first 500 beds in 40 days;
1,000 beds operational in 60 days; and 2,000 beds operational in 90 days. MTC and HaleMills Construction completed each phase of the project on time. The fast-track work
order came after President Bush provided Congress with his proposed FY2007 budget.
In that 28% growth in illegal immigrant bed space for ICE. The architecture, designed
for speed of construction is the first of its kind for ICE. The project includes 10 pod-like
domes, each housing 200 detainees. The domes are constructed of steel beams covered
with a tough synthetic-type fabric. The facility is currently under construction to

2

construct additional work space & Offices along with an additional 1000 beds, 86
segregation rooms, 2 indoor recreation areas, and a new kitchen and cafeteria.
Willacy is not accredited with the American Correctional Association; however, has
plans for the future to pursue accreditation.
D.

Pre-Audit Meeting
Due to the nature of the visit, there was not a pre-audit meeting.

E.

The Audit Process
1.

b6
Transportation –
was picked up Monday morning by
b6
b6
, who was on special assignment from the Port Isabel Detention Center to
assist the Willacy Detention Center with developing a corrective action plan to
address issues identified in the food service department at the facility.

2.

Entrance Interview
There was not a formal Entrance Interview due to the nature of the visit and due
to October 8th being the Observed holiday for Columbus Day.

3.

Facility Tour
The Auditor was given
b6, b7c
and
b6
Officer. Food Service Administrator,
Service department.

F.

b6
acility.
was accompanied by
, Supervisor, Detention & Deportation
b6
, joined the tour of the Food

Food Service Technical Assistance
1

Purpose of Technical Assistance:
The technical assistance visit was requested by the Department of Homeland
Security – Immigration & Customs Enforcement on behalf of the Willacy
Detention Center, which is a private-run facility by Management & Training
Corporation (MTC). The request was in response to media reports which were
reporting conditions of the facility for immigrants, specifically the food service
department. Immigrants reported maggots in the food as well as reporting that the
quality and quantity of food was deplorable.

2.

Overview of Food Service Department: The Food Service Department serves 3
meals: Breakfast, Lunch, & Dinner. The menu is a 5-week cycle menu that has
been reviewed and approved by a Contract Registered Dietitian. The department
feeds the detainees via satellite. The meals are prepared, assembled, and
packaged in Thermal Trays and delivered to the pods. The food trays are passed

3

out to the detainee’s on unit where the meal is consumed. Religious & Medical
Diets are also prepared as prescribed.
3.

Observations & Recommendations:
There was standing water throughout the department due to poor drainage. It is
recommended that a wet-vacuum be purchased to assist in reducing the excess
water on the floor. The water presents a safety issue for staff that may slip & fall
as well as attracting gnats, which were observed in the dish room and food prep
areas. Self-contained bug lights were recently installed in the kitchen. Sufficient
drainage should be considered as the new food service department is constructed.
Cooler temperatures were not within acceptable range according to ACA standard
as well as the Texas Department of Health Standards. Acceptable Cooler
temperature range is 35 to 40 degrees. In reviewing temperature logs, there were
several entries that reported the cooler in the kitchen was above 40 degrees.
Additionally, the freezer, cooler, & dry storage temperatures were being recorded
on Dish machine Final Rinse Temperature logs. Note: The temperature logs
were replaced following discussion of the temperature logs. It is also encouraged
that the facility ensure that the coolers & freezers be a part of a Preventative
Maintenance plan to ensure efficient operation of the equipment, including an
inspection of the condensing units and gaskets around the doors. Gaskets should
be cleaned & sanitized as needed. A second thermometer should be laced inside
the cooler as a secondary source for monitoring the temperature.
Limited Storage – foods in the dry storage area as well as the freezer are stacked
too high. The boxes on the bottom of those stacks are collapsing and/or crushing.
The facility currently receives food orders twice per month. It is recommended
that the facility consider ordering weekly to alleviate the limited storage. The
storage and coolers were clean and stored properly – 6” off the floor and 18” from
the ceiling. Continue to ensure that foods are rotated. The temperatures of the
freezer and dry storage areas were well within acceptable standards.
Satellite Feeding – Observed assembly & delivery of food. Food temperatures are
taken by the security or food service staff and logged before & during the
assembly of the trays to ensure that they are within acceptable food standards.
Staff were observed wearing proper hair restraints and food handling gloves. One
concern observed was that the food was being portioned into damp food trays.
While observing the tray assembly, it was observed that dry bread was being
placed in a damp compartment, thus causing the bread to absorb the water. Trays
were damp due to the final rinse temperature of the dish machine not meeting the
required 180 degree temperature. Food Service Administrator reported that he
has placed several maintenance work orders for the final rinse temperature. It is
recommended that the final rinse temperature be corrected and a rinse dry agent
be added.

4

Cups – beverage cups are placed in plastic bags in quantity of 50. Moisture was
observed in the plastic bags containing the cups. Temperature & moisture are 2
conditions ideal for the growth of bacteria. It was recommended that an
alternative way of storing and delivering cups to the pods be considered. It was
suggested that the cups be placed in racks or paper/Styrofoam cups be considered.
Chemical Storage – a limited amount of chemicals for the Food Service
Department is stored in the Laundry Department. All chemicals were properly
stored, labeled, and inventoried. MSDS Sheets were readily available. It is
encouraged that the facility maintains the perpetual inventory on a daily basis. An
aerosol can of Solarcaine was found in the Dry Storage area with the First Aid
kits. Aerosols are discouraged due to their flammability. According to an MSDS
Sheet for Solarcaine, it contains isobutene and propane. This item should be
stored in a flammable cabinet if the facility continues to stock this product. Burn
Creams are available and is recommended as a safer alternative.
Electrical Panels – Open electric panels in a high traffic area is not the ideal
location and/or situation. With the high traffic, transportation of metal carts, and
water on the floor, presents a concern for employee safety. It was also noted that
excess water was seeping through the walls and out into the hallway outside of the
Food Service Department. Electrical Panels should have a 2 ½ foot clearance in
accordance with OSHA.
1910.306(b) (4) Clearance. The dimension of the working space in the direction
of access to live part that may require examination, adjustment, servicing, or
maintenance while alive shall be a minimum of 762 mm (2.5 ft). Where controls
are enclosed in cabinets, the doors shall either open at least 90 degrees or be
removable.
Cambro Drink Containers – Cambro Beverage containers are used to transport
and dispense beverages to the detainee’s. The Food Service Administrator, Mr.
reported that the containers are cleaned every other day. Ideally, the
(b)(6)
containers should be washed after each use.
Cycle Menu – The menu is based on a 5-week cycle menu, which has been
reviewed and approved by a Registered Dietitian. Weeks 1, 3, & 5 are the same
as well as Weeks 2 & 4. In essence, this represents a 2-week cycle menu. With
Weeks 1 & 5 being the same, detainees are served the same menu two
consecutive weeks. ACA standards require “determination of and responsiveness
to inmate eating preferences” (4-ALDF-4A-05). It is recommended that detainees
and staff be surveyed quarterly for input on the menus. In addition, “Menu
evaluations are conducted at least quarterly by food service supervisory staff to
verify adherence to the established basic daily servings” (4-ALDF-4A-07), which
is currently not done at the facility. The facility was not able to provide a
nutritional analysis of the menu upon request. Additional information will be
provided with the Detainee interviews.

5

Tool Control – the tool storage area is located in a caged area of the Dry Storage
room. This is a restricted area with access limited. Knives are in a locked cabinet
and all tools are labeled, numbered, and shadowed. Tools are signed in/out using
the Chit system as well as logged on a sign in/out sheet. The chits are a laminated
picture of the staff member.
Some tools are no longer in use or out of service and should be tagged as such on
the shadow board so it is not confused as a missing tool.
4.

Meals – Assembly of trays for lunch and dinner was observed. The lunch Menu
was Chicken & Vegetables with White Rice, Lettuce, Yellow Cake, and Beans
with turkey ham. Fruit punch was served on unit along with the meal. Dinner
was Chicken Salad with White Bread, Raw Carrot slices, pudding, Lettuce, and
Onions & Pickles.
Review of Standards:
Standard #4A-05
“Determination of & responsiveness to inmate eating preferences”– facility is
encouraged to interview/survey detainees for input on the menus.
Standard #4A-07 (Mandatory)
“Menu evaluations are conducted at least quarterly by food service supervisory
staff to verify adherence to the established basic daily servings”. Facility is not
completing menu evaluations at this time. Facility is encouraged to complete
menu evaluations as standard recommends.
Standard #4A-11 (Mandatory)
There is documentation by an independent, outside source that food service
facilities and equipment meet established governmental health and safety codes.
Corrective action is taken on deficiencies, if any”. Recent health inspection had
several corrective actions. It is encouraged that any time a deficiency is noted in a
health inspection, the Food Service Administrator in consultation with the facility
administrator, should develop a corrective action plan and document that the
deficiency has been corrected.
Standard #4A-12
“All staff, contractors, and inmate workers are trained in the use of equipment
safety procedures to be followed in the food service department.” Continue to
document all food service related training including the use & cleaning of all
equipment on an annual basis. Keep in mind ACA Standard 1D-11, which
requires 16 hours of annual training for Food Service staff.
Standard #4A-16 Mandatory
“‘Stored shelf goods are maintained at 45 degrees to 80 degrees Fahrenheit, and
frozen foods at 0 degrees Fahrenheit or below, unless national or state health

6

codes specify otherwise”. “Temperatures are checked and recorded daily.”
Correction action is recommended on coolers when temperatures are noted above
40 degrees.
Standard #4A-17
“Meals are prepared, delivered, and served under staff supervision”. Please note
Texas Health Law regarding “Person-in-charge”. Ensure adequate training is
conducted that meets the requirements of “Person in charge” 229.163c of the
Health laws.
G.

Interviews
Following lunch, interviews of the detainee’s were conducted.
and
b6
accompanied the auditor to conduct the interviews.
served as
b6
b6, b7c
for the interviews as a majority of the Detainees do NOT speak English
fluently. Detainee’s were asked for their Opinion and input on the food served at
Willacy.
1.

Female Detainee Responses:
Too many sandwiches and no condiments (ketchup, mustard, mayo) too many
onions – onions smell up the food & tray no variety – they serve the same food all
the time too many eggs – would like some variety. Would like to have cheese and
jalapeno peppers, and tomatoes/salsa added to the Scrambled Eggs. Delicious.
Grateful for the food. Love it!

2.

Male Detainee Responses
Not as good; today was ok.
Too many sandwiches (Cold Cuts)
Too many eggs
Rice – over/under cooked
Want more coffee
Vegetarian reports no variety. Lunch today was Baked potato & Rice
Salad – no dressing
Bland – no spice/enhancements
Cups & spoons – not washed properly
Want more than just white bread for sandwiches – want more tortillas
Milk is outdated – beyond dates
Would like to supplement food from commissary – i.e. Cup-a-Soup & Ramen
Noodles.

3.

Suggestions:
Recommend a 4 week Cycle Menu (this accommodates the 21 day average
Length of Stay. Ensure all 4 weeks are different.

7

Enhance Meals – Put icing on cake; add condiments to sandwiches; rotate
white/wheat bread, tortilla to make Wrap Sandwiches, Hamburger Buns,
Croissants, etc.
Survey the detainee’s and staff for input in developing menu.
Use Standardized Recipes to ensure consistency in products as well as control
food costs.
Allow Food Service staff flexibility to switch up food items to enhance the meal.
Concern: While interviewing the detainee’s, we were secured on one of the pods.
When we were ready to leave, the staff remaining on the unit did NOT have a key
to let us out. The staff had to radio to another security officer to come let us off
the unit. This is not only a safety concern, it is a legal liability. Staff on each unit
should have a key to exit the unit. If a fire were to break out, the staff and
detainees would be trapped until a staff member let them out. Furthermore, if a
riot or hostage situation were to take place, the staff would be unable to get away.
It is an area of concern that the facility is encouraged to take into consideration
(b)(6), b7c
and develop an action plan to address this issue.
and
(b)(6)
informed me that this is the practice and not an isolated incident.
H.

Exit Discussion
The exit interview was held at 9:45 a.m. in the Conference Room.
The following persons were also in attendance:
Supervisor, Detention & Deportation Officer
, Food Service Assistant Supervisor
b6
Jr., Food Service Administrator
Acting Officer in Charge
b6, b7c
b6
QA Coordinator
b6, b7c
Supervisor Detention & Deportation Officer
b6
, ICE PIDC Supervisory Cook
b6, b7c
Detention, Operations Supervisor
b6, b7c
Supervisory Immigration Enforcement Agent
b6, b7c
b6

The chairperson thanked the Administrators of ICE for involving the American
Correctional Association (ACA) with the technical assistance of the Food Service
Department at Willacy Detention Center. The purpose of this technical assistance was to
conduct an inspection and assist the facility in developing an action plan to address any
deficiencies. The issues reported by the media were not observed during this technical
assistance.
While there are many improvement opportunities based on the
recommendations made during this technical assistance; however, conditions were not as
bad as the media had portrayed. It is evident that the media took a small part of the

8

situation and highlighted the isolated report of maggots and portrayed it as more than
what it really was. Conditions were not found to be in deplorable conditions as reported.
The Auditor shared his observations and recommendations with the staff in attendance.
The Department of Homeland Security – ICE has agreed in conjunction with the staff of
MTC, to address all issues noted. The facility was encouraged to pursue accreditation
following the completion of their construction and expansion projects. A follow up
phone call from Mr. (b)(6) following the Technical Assistance has assured this auditor
that the facility has a
ddressed many of the recommendations and has made initial
attempts to work with the Dietitian on the cycle menu. The staff of ICE & MTC were
very receptive and cooperative throughout the entire technical assistance.
The chairperson expressed appreciation for the cooperation of everyone concerned and
congratulated the facility team for the progress made and encouraged them to continue to
strive toward even further professionalism within the correctional field.

9

 

 

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