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Inspector's Field Manual, Part B, US Customs and Border Protection, 2010

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Group (1)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (2)
28. Recognized Medical Specializations (including, but not limited to: Anesthesiology, AUdiology,
Cardiography, Cardiology, Dermatology, Embryology, Epidemiology, Forensic Medicine, Gastroenterology,
Hematology, Immunology, Internal Medicine, Neurological Surgery, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Oncology,
Ophthalmology, Orthopedic Surgery, Otolaryngology, Pathology, Pediatrics, Pharmacology and
Pharmaceutics, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiology, Plastic Surgery, Preventive Medicine,
Proctology, Psychiatry and Neurology, Radiology, Speech Pathology, Sports Medicine, Surgery, Thoracic
Surgery, Toxicology, Urology and Virology)
2C. Veterinary Medicine
2D. Emergency Medicine
2E. Nuclear Medicine
2F. Geriatrics
2G. Nursing (including, but not limited to registered nurses,
practical nurses, physician's receptionists and medical records clerks)
21. Dentistry
2M. Medical Cybernetics
2N. All Therapies, Prosthetics and Healing (except Medicine, Osteopathy or Osteopathic Medicine,
Nursing, Dentistry, Chiropractic and Optometry)

20. Medical Statistics and Documentation
2P. Cancer Research
20. Medical Photography
2R. Environmental Health
Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (4)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (5)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (6)
6A. Sociology (except Economics and including Criminology)
68. Psychology (including, but not limited to Child Psychology, Psychometrics and Psychobiology)
6C. History (including Art History)
60. Philosophy (including Humanities)
6E. Anthropology and Archaeology
6F. Demography
6G. Government and Politics (including, but not limited to International Relations)
6H. Economics
61. Literature
6J. Instructional Media and Technology
6K. Fine Arts (including, but not limited to Music, Theater, Sculpture, Motion Picture Arts and Sciences,

and Photography)
6L. Estate Management
6M. Linguistics
Group (7)
7A. Teaching and Religious Education
7B. Educational Testing, Evaluation and Measurement
7C. Primary School Teaching (including, but not limited to Nursery Schools and Kindergartens)
7F. College and University Teaching in Natural Sciences, Mathematics, Engineering and Technology
(except Agriculture)
7G. College and University Teaching of Social Sciences, Liberal Arts and Literature (including Foreign
Language Education)
7H. College and University Teaching of Education

71. College and University Teaching of Business
7J. Agricultural School Teaching
7K. Education of the Physically Handicapped (including Education of the Mentally Retarded and
Emotionally Disturbed)
7L. Education of Exceptional Children
7M. Physical Education and Recreation (including, but not limited to Coaching)
7N. Teaching in Medical Schools (including, but not limited to lecturers)
7P. Career Guidance and Counseling
Group (8)
8B. Communication Media (including Television and Film)
8C. Electrical Communication Technology

80. Radio Operation
8E. Airplane Piloting (including, but not limited to Airline Piloting)
8F. Merchant Marine
81. Construction-Project Management
Group (9)
9A. Industrial and Business Administration and Management (including, but not limited to: programmers
and Project Development, Business, Total Quality Management)
9B. International Business and Commerce
9C. Industrial Organization
90. Labor and Industrial Relations
9E. Economic Development and Planning (including Rural Development)
9F. Economic Information Analysis (including, but not limited to Management Studies)
9G. Accounting
9H. Cybernetic Technology
91. Statistics
9K. Administration of Financial Institutions (including, but not limited to Savings and Loan Organizations
and Credit Unions)
9L. Financial Planning
9M. Operations Research
90. Farm Management and Administration
9P. Hotel and Motel Management

People's Republic of China
Please note that the skills list for the People's Republic of China does not apply to the citizens of
Taiwan.
Group (1)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (2)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (4)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (5)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (6)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (7)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (8)

All fields listed in part l.
Group (9)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (10)
All fields listed in part I.

Colombia

Group (1)
1A. Public Administration (including but not limited to: City Planning, Urban Studies/Planning, Urban
Transportation, and Public Health)
1B. Public Social Administration (including, but not limited to: Welfare, Dietetics, Nutrition, Family
Planning and Public Health)
1C. Public Social Services
1D. Sanitation
1E. Drug Abuse and Narcotics Control
1F. International Health
1G. Tourism and Travel
1H. Law Enforcement and Corrections (including, but not
limited to the Administration of Justice)

11. Parks and Recreation Management (including, but not limited to Wildlife Management)
1J. Primary School Administration
1K. Secondary School Administration
1L. College, University and Higher Education Administration
1M. Technical or Vocational School Administration
10. Labor Union Administration

Group (2)
28. Recognized Medical Specializations (including, but not limited to: Anesthesiology, AUdiology,
Cardiography, Cardiology, Dermatology, Embryology, Epidemiology, Forensic Medicine, Gastroenterology,
Hematology, Immunology, Internal Medicine, Neurological Surgery, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Oncology,
Ophthalmology, Orthopedic Surgery, Otolaryngology, Pathology, Pediatrics, Pharmacology and
Pharmaceutics, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiology, Plastic Surgery, Preventive Medicine,
Proctology, Psychiatry and Neurology, Radiology, Speech Pathology, Sports Medicine, Surgery, Thoracic
Surgery, Toxicology, Urology and Virology)
2C. Veterinary Medicine
20. Emergency Medicine
2E. Nuclear Medicine
2F. Geriatrics
2G. Nursing (including, but not limited to registered nurses, practical nurses, physician's receptionists
and medical records clerks)
2H. Medical Instruments and Technology
21. Dentistry
2J. Dental Technology
2M. Medical Cybernetics
20. Medical Statistics and Documentation
2P. Cancer Research

20. Medical Photography
2R. Environmental Health
Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (4)

4A. Aerospace Engineering
4B. Cartography
4C. Chemical Engineering
4E. Communication Engineering
4F. Computer Engineering and Technologies
41. Energy Engineering (but not including Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering and Technology)
4J. Genetic and Biomedical Engineering
4K. Industrial Engineering
4L. Marine and Aeronautical Engineering and Technology (including, but not limited to: marine and flight
engineers)
4M. Materials Engineering and Sciences (including, but not limited to: textiles, plastics, wood, paper and
metal, but not including Metal Fabrication)
40. Mining and Lumbering Engineering and Technology
4P. Navigation and Transportation Engineering
40. Optical Engineering (including, but not limited to: light and sound technology)
4R. Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering and Technology
4S. Printing and Photographic Engineering and Technology
Group (5)
5C. Study of Drugs and Allied Sciences
5E. Genetics
5H. Metal Fabrication (including, but not limited to skilled metal crafts workers)
51. Atmospheric-Hydrospheric Sciences (including, but not limited to: Marine Science, Meteorology and
Oceanography)

5J. Astronomy and Space Technology
5M. Food Science and Technology
5N. Zoology (including Animal Behavior and Physiology)
50. Forestry
5P. Fisheries (or other marine products)
50. Geology (including all branches and specialties, e.g. Oceanology, and all branches of Applied
Geology including geophysicists and geochemists)
5S. Ecology and Environmental Protection (including Conservation)
5U. Population Studies
Group (6)
6C. History (including Art History)
60. Philosophy (including Humanities)
6E. Anthropology and Archaeology
6F. Demography
6G. Government and Politics (including, but not limited to International Relations)
61. Literature
6J. Instructional Media and Technology
6K. Fine Arts (including, but not limited to Music, Theater, Sculpture, Motion Picture Arts and Sciences,
and Photography)
6L. Estate Management
6M. Linguistics
Group (7)
7A. Teaching and Religious Education

7B. Educational Testing, Evaluation and Measurement
7C. Primary School Teaching (including, but not limited to Nursery Schools and Kindergartens)
70. Secondary School Teaching (including, but not limited to Remedial Teaching and Teaching of
English as a Foreign Language)
7E. Vocational and Technical School Teaching
7F. College and University Teaching in Natural Sciences, Mathematics, Engineering and Technology
(except Agriculture)

71. College and University Teaching of Business
7J. Agricultural School Teaching
7K . Education of the Physically Handicapped (including Education of the Mentally Retarded and
Emotionally Disturbed)
7L. Education of Exceptional Children
7M. Physical Education and Recreation (including, but not limited to Coaching)
7P. Career Guidance and Counseling
Group (8)
8B. Communication Media (including Television and Film)
8F. Merchant Marine
81. Construction-Project Management
Group (9)
9A. Industrial and Business Administration and Management (including, but not limited to: programmers
and Project Development, Business, Total Quality Management)
9B. International Business and Commerce
9C. Industrial Organization

90. Labor and Industrial Relations
9E. Economic Development and Planning (including Rural Development)
9F. Economic Information Analysis (including, but not limited to Management Studies)
9G. Accounting
9H. Cybernetic Technology
91. Statistics
9L. Financial Planning
9M. Operations Research
90. Farm Management and Administration
9P. Hotel and Motel Management
Group (10)
10A. Library Science (including, but not limited to Electronic Data Storage and Retrieval)

Costa Rica

Group (1)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (2)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (4)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (5)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (6)
6A. Sociology (except Economics and including Criminology)
6C. History (including Art History)
60. Philosophy (including Humanities)
6E. Anthropology and Archaeology
6F. Demography
6G. Government and Politics (including, but not limited to International Relations)

6H. Economics
61. Literature
6J. Instructional Media and Technology
6K. Fine Arts (including, but not limited to Music, Theater, Sculpture, Motion Picture Arts and Sciences,
and Photography)
6L. Estate Management
6M. Linguistics
60. Theology
6P. Cultural Diversity (inclUding, but not limited to Women's, Minority, Ethnic and Area Studies)
60. Fashion and Textile Design
6R. Graphic Design
6S. Geography
6T. Home Economics
6U. Language Studies
Group (7)
7 A. Teaching and Religious Education
7B. Educational Testing, Evaluation and Measurement
7C. Primary School Teaching (including, but not limited to Nursery Schools and Kindergartens)
70. Secondary School Teaching (including, but not limited to Remedial Teaching and Teaching of
English as a Foreign Language)
7E. Vocational and Technical School Teaching
7F. College and University Teaching in Natural Sciences, Mathematics, Engineering and Technology
(except Agriculture)

7G. College and University Teaching of Social Sciences, Liberal Arts and Literature (including Foreign
Language Education)
7H. College and University Teaching of Education
71. College and University Teaching of Business
7J. Agricultural School Teaching
7K. Education of the Physically Handicapped (including Education of the Mentally Retarded and
Emotionally Disturbed)
7L. Education of Exceptional Children
7M. Physical Education and Recreation (including, but not limited to Coaching)
7N. Teaching in Medical Schools (including, but not limited to lecturers)
7P. Career Guidance and Counseling
7Q. Camp Counselor
7R. Educational Technology (Instructional Systems Technology)
7S. Educational Psychology
7T. Curriculum Planning
Group (8)
8A. Journalism (including, but not limited to editors and reporters, and including text-book writers,
interpreters and translators)
8B. Communication Media (including Television and Film)
8C. Electrical Communication Technology
8F. Merchant Marine
81. Construction-Project Management
8K. Skilled Operation of Construction Machines

8L. Telecommunications
Group (9)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (10)
10A. Library Science (including, but not limited to Electronic Data Storage and Retrieval)

Cote d'ivoire (formerly Ivory Coast)

Group (1)
1A. Public Administration (including, but not limited to: City Planning, Urban Studies/Planning, Urban
Transportation, and Public Health)
1B. Public Social Administration (including, but not limited to: Welfare, Dietetics, Nutrition, Family
Planning and Public Health)
1C. Public Social Services
1D. Sanitation
1E. Drug Abuse and Narcotics Control
1F. International Health
1G. Tourism and Travel
1H. Law Enforcement and Corrections (including, but not limited to the Administration of Justice)
11. Parks and Recreation Management (including, but not limited to Wildlife Management)
1J. Primary School Administration
1K. Secondary School Administration
1L. College, University and Higher Education Administration
1M. Technical or Vocational School Administration
1N. Hospital Administration
Group (2)

2A. General Practice of Medicine (including Osteopaths who also practice medicine)
28. Recognized Medical Specializations (including, but not limited to: Anesthesiology, Audiology,
Cardiography, Cardiology, Dermatology, Embryology, Epidemiology, Forensic Medicine, Gastroenterology,
Hematology, Immunology, Internal Medicine, Neurological Surgery, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Oncology,
Ophthalmology, Orthopedic Surgery, Otolaryngology, Pathology, Pediatrics, Pharmacology and
Pharmaceutics, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiology, Plastic Surgery, Preventive Medicine,
Proctology, Psychiatry and Neurology, Radiology, Speech Pathology, Sports Medicine, Surgery, Thoracic
Surgery, Toxicology, Urology and Virology)
2C. Veterinary Medicine
2D. Emergency Medicine
2E. Nuclear Medicine
2F. Geriatrics
2G. Nursing (including, but not limited to registered nurses, practical nurses, physician's receptionists
and medical records clerks)
2H. Medical Instruments and Technology
21. Dentistry
2J. Dental Technology
2K. Optometry
2M. Medical Cybernetics
2N. All Therapies, Prosthetics and Healing (except Medicine,Osteopathy or Osteopathic Medicine,
Nursing, Dentistry, Chiropractic and Optometry)
20. Medical Statistics and Documentation
2P. Cancer Research

20. Medical Photography
2R. Environmental Health

Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (4)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (5)
5A. Chemistry (including all branches and specialties in Chemistry, except in Pharmacy and Chemical
Engineering)
5B. Life Sciences (including, but not limited to: Pharmacy and Biology)
5C. Study of Drugs and Allied Sciences
5D. Optics and Physics (including physical chemists, metallurgists and all branches and specialties in
Physics)
5E. Genetics
5F. Mathematics
5G. Laboratory Technology (including, but not limited to: physical and chemistry laboratory technicians)
5H. Metal Fabrication (including, but not limited to skilled metal crafts workers)
51. Atmospheric-Hydrospheric Sciences (including, but not limited to: Marine Science, Meteorology and
Oceanography)
5J. Astronomy and Space Technology
5K. Repair and Maintenance Technology
5L. Agriculture and Agronomy (including, but not limited to: veterinarians, plant pathologists, poultry and
dairy scientists, animal husbandry and animal nutrition)
5M. Food Science and Technology
5N. Zoology (including Animal Behavior and Physiology)
50. Forestry

5P. Fisheries (or other marine products)
50. Geology (including all branches and specialties, e.g. Oceanology, and all branches of Applied
Geology including geophysicists and geochemists)
5R. Hydrology (including, but not limited to Water Pollution)
5S. Ecology and Environmental Protection (including Conservation)
5U. Population Studies
Group (6)
6A. Sociology (except Economics and including Criminology)
68. Psychology (including, but not limited to Psychometrics, Child Psychology and Psychobiology)
6C. History (including Art History)
60. Philosophy (including Humanities)
6E. Anthropology and Archaeology
6F. Demography
6G. Government and Politics (including, but not limited to International Relations)
6H. Economics
61. Literature
6J. Instructional Media and Technology
6K. Fine Arts (including, but not limited to Music, Theater, Sculpture, Motion Picture Arts and Sciences,
and Photography)
6L. Estate Management
6M. linguistics
Group (7)
All fields listed in part I.

Group (8)
8A. Journalism (including, but not limited to editors and reporters, and including text-book writers,
interpreters and translators)
8B. Communication Media (including Television and Film)
8C. Electrical Communication Technology
80. Radio Operation
8F. Merchant Marine
8G. Architecture (including Marine Architecture)
8H. Construction (including but not limited to builders, but not including skilled and unskilled laborers)
81. Construction-Project Management
8J. Drafting
8K. Skilled Operation of Construction Machines
Group (9)
9A. Industrial and Business Administration and Management (including, but not limited to: programmers
and Project Evaluation, Business, Total Quality Management)
9B. International Business and Commerce
9C. Industrial Organization
90. Labor and Industrial Relations
9E. Economic Development and Planning (including Rural Development)
9F. Economic Information Analysis (including, but not limited to Management Studies)
9G. Accounting
9H. Cybernetic Technology
91. Statistics

9K. Administration of Financial Institutions (including, but not limited to Savings and Loan Organizations
and Credit Unions)
9L. Financial Planning
9M. Operations Research
9N. Banking
90. Farm Management and Administration
9P. Hotel and Motel Management
Group (10)
10A. Library Science (including, but not limited to Electronic Data Storage and Retrieval)

Croatia
Group (1)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (2)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (4)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (5)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (6)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (7)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (8)
All fields listed in part I.

Group (9)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (10)
All fields listed in part I.

Cyprus

Group (1)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (2)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (4)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (5)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (6)
6A. Sociology (except Economics and including Criminology)
68. Psychology (including, but not limited to, Psychometrics, Child Psychology and Psychobiology)
6C. History (including Art History)
60. Philosophy (including Humanities)
6E. Anthropology and Archaeology

6F. Demography
6G. Government and Politics (including, but not limited to International Relations)
6H. Economics
61. Literature
6J. Instructional Media and Technology
6K. Fine Arts (including, but not limited to Music, Theater, Sculpture, Motion Picture Arts and Sciences,
and Photography)
6L. Estate Management
6M. Linguistics
Group (7)
7A. Teaching and Religious Education
7B. Educational Testing, Evaluation and Measurement
7C. Primary School Teaching (including, but not limited to Nursery Schools and Kindergartens)
70. Secondary School Teaching (including, but not limited to Remedial Teaching and Teaching of
English as a Foreign Language)
7E. Vocational and Technical School Teaching

71. College and University Teaching of Business
7K. Education of the Physically Handicapped (including Education of the Mentally Retarded and
Emotionally Disturbed)
7L. Education of Exceptional Children
7M. Physical Education and Recreation (including, but not limited to Coaching)
7P. Career Guidance and Counseling
Group (8)

8B. Communication Media (including Television and Film)
8C. Electrical Communication Technology
80. Radio Operation
8E. Airplane Piloting (including, but not limited to Airline Piloting)
8F. Merchant Marine
8G. Architecture (including Marine Architecture)
8H. Construction (including, but not limited to builders, but not including skilled and unskilled laborers)
81. Construction-Project Management
8J. Drafting
8K. Skilled Operation of Construction Machines
Group (9)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (10)
10A. Library Science (including, but not limited to Electronic Data Storage and Retrieval)

Dominican Republic
Group (1)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (2)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (4)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (5)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (6)
6A. Sociology (except Economics and including Criminology)
68. Psychology (including, but not limited to Psychometrics, Child Psychology and Psychobiology)
6C. History (including Art History)
60. Philosophy (including Humanities)
6E. Anthropology and Archaeology

6F. Demography
6G. Government and Politics (including, but not limited to International Relations)
6H. Economics
61. Literature
6J. Instructional Media and Technology
6K. Fine Arts (including, but not limited to Music, Theater, Sculpture, Motion Picture Arts and Sciences,
and Photography)
6L. Estate Management
6M. Linguistics
60. Religion and Theology (including, but not limited to Ministry)
Group (7)
7A. Teaching and Religious Education
7B. Educational Testing, Evaluation and Measurement
7C. Primary School Teaching (including, but not limited to Nursery Schools and Kindergartens)
70. Secondary School Teaching (including, but not limited to Remedial Teaching and Teaching of
English as a Foreign Language)
7E. Vocational and Technical School Teaching
7F. College and University Teaching in Natural Sciences, Mathematics, Engineering and Technology
(except Agriculture)
7H. College and University Teaching of Education
71. College and University Teaching of Business
7J. Agricultural School Teaching
7K . Education of the Physically Handicapped (including Education of the Mentally Retarded and
Emotionally Disturbed)

7L. Education of Exceptional Children
7M. Physical Education and Recreation (including, but not limited to Coaching)
7N. Teaching in Medical Schools (including, but not limited to lecturers)
7P. Career Guidance and Counseling
Group (8)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (9)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (10)
10A. Library Science (including, but not limited to Electronic Data Storage and Retrieval)

Ecuador
Group (1)
1A. Public Administration (including, but not limited to: City Planning, Urban Studies/Planning, Urban
Transportation, and Public Health)
1C. Public Social Services
1D. Sanitation
1E. Drug Abuse and Narcotics Control
1F. International Health
1G. Tourism and Travel
1H. Law Enforcement and Corrections (including, but not limited to the Administration of Justice)

11. Parks and Recreation Management (including, but not limited to Wildlife Management)
1J. Primary School Administration
1K. Secondary School Administration
1L. College, University and Higher Education Administration
1M. Technical or Vocational School Administration
Group (2)
2C. Veterinary Medicine
20. Emergency Medicine

2E. Nuclear Medicine
2F. Geriatrics
2H. Medical Instruments and Technology
2J. Dental Technology
2M. Medical Cybernetics
20. Medical Statistics and Documentation
2P. Cancer Research
20. Medical Photography
2R. Environmental Health
Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (4)
4A. Aerospace Engineering
4B. Cartography
4C. Chemical Engineering
4E. Communication Engineering
4F. Computer Engineering and Technologies
4G. Electrical Engineering
4H. Electronic Engineering (including Radio Engineering)
41. Energy Engineering (but not including Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering and Technology)
4J. Genetic and Biomedical Engineering
4K. Industrial Engineering

4L. Marine and Aeronautical Engineering and Technology (including, but not limited to: Marine and Flight
Engineers)
4M. Materials Engineering and Sciences (including, but not limited to: textiles, Plastics, Wood, Paper and
Metal, but not including Metal Fabrication)
4N. Mechanical Engineering (including, but not limited to: Systems, safety, and production engineers,
and including Automatic Data Processing)
40. Mining and Lumbering Engineering and Technology
4P. Navigation and Transportation Engineering
40. Optical Engineering (including, but not limited to: light and sound technology)
4R. Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering and Technology
4S. Printing and Photographic Engineering and Technology
Group (5)
5A. Chemistry (including all branches and specialties in Chemistry, except in Pharmacy and Chemical
Engineering)
5C. Study of Drugs and Allied Sciences
5E. Genetics
5F. Mathematics
5G. Laboratory Technology (including, but not limited to: physical and chemistry laboratory technicians)
5H. Metal Fabrication (including, but not limited to skilled metal crafts workers)
51. Atmospheric-Hydrospheric Sciences (including, but not limited to: Marine Science, Meteorology and
Oceanography)
5J. Astronomy and Space Technology
5K. Repair and Maintenance Technology
5L. Agriculture and Agronomy (including, but not limited to: veterinarians, plant pathologists, poultry and
dairy scientists, animal husbandry and animal nutrition)

5M. Food Science and Technology
5N. Zoology (including Animal Behavior and Physiology)
50. Forestry
5P. Fisheries (or other marine products)
50. Geology (including all branches and specialties, e.g. Oceanology, and all branches of Applied
Geology including geophysicists and geochemists)
5R. Hydrology (including, but not limited to Water Pollution)
5S. Ecology and Environmental Protection (including Conservation)
5T. Desalinization
5U. Population Studies
Group (6)
6A. Sociology (except Economics and including Criminology)
6B. Psychology (including, but not limited to Psychometrics, Child Psychology and Psychobiology)
6C. History (including Art History)
60. Philosophy (including Humanities)
6E. Anthropology and Archaeology
6F. Demography
6G. Government and Politics (including, but not limited to International Relations)
61. Literatu re
6J. Instructional Media and Technology
6K. Fine Arts (including, but not limited to Music, Theater, Sculpture, Motion Picture Arts and Sciences
and Photography)
6L. Estate Management

8M. Linguistics
Group (7)
7A. Teaching and Religious Education
7B. Educational Testing, Evaluation and Measurement
7E. Vocational and Technical School Teaching
7F. College and University Teaching in Natural Sciences, Mathematics, Engineering and Technology
(except Agriculture)
7H. College and University Teaching of Education

71. College and University Teaching of Business
7K. Education of the Physically Handicapped (including Education of the Mentally Retarded and
Emotionally Disturbed)
7L. Education of Exceptional Children
7M. Physical Education and Recreation (including, but not limited to Coaching)
7P. Career Guidance and Counseling
Group (8)
8B. Communication Media (including Television and Film)
8C. Electrical Communication Technology
80. Radio Operation
8F. Merchant Marine
8H. Construction (including, but not limited to builders, but not including skilled and unskilled laborers)
81. Construction-Project Management
8J. Drafting
8K. Skilled Operation of Construction Machines

Group (9)
9A. Industrial and Business Administration and Management (including, but not limited to: programmers
and Project Development, Business, Total Quality Management)
9B. International Business and Commerce
9C. Industrial Organization
90. Labor and Industrial Relations
9E. Economic Development and Planning (including Rural Development)
9F. Economic Information Analysis (inclUding, but not limited to Management Studies)
9G. Accounting
9H. Cybernetic Technology
91. Statistics
9K. Administration of Financial Institutions (including, but not limited to Savings and Loan Organizations
and Credit Unions)
9L. Financial Planning
9M. Operations Research
90. Farm Management and Administration
9P. Hotel and Motel Management
Group (10)
10A. Library Science (including, but not limited to Electronic Data Storage and Retrieval)

EI Salvador

Group (1)
1A. Public Administration (including, but not limited to: City Planning, Urban Studies/Planning, Urban
Transportation, and Public Health)
1B. Public Social Administration (including, but not limited to: Welfare, Dietetics, Nutrition, Family
Planning and Public Health)
1C. Public Social Services
1D. Sanitation
1E. Drug Abuse and Narcotics Control
1F. International Health
1G. Tourism and Travel
1H. Law Enforcement and Corrections (including, but not limited to the Administration of Justice)
11. Parks and Recreation Management (including, but not limited to Wildlife Management)
1J. Primary School Administration
1K. Secondary School Administration
1L. College, University and Higher Education Administration
1M. Technical or Vocational School Administration
1N. Hospital Administration
Group (2)

2A. General Practice of Medicine (including Osteopaths who also practice medicine)
28. Recognized Medical Specializations (including, but not limited to: Anesthesiology, Audiology,
Cardiography, Cardiology, Dermatology, Embryology, Epidemiology, Forensic Medicine, Gastroenterology,
Hematology, Immunology, Internal Medicine, Neurological Surgery, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Oncology,
Ophthalmology, Orthopedic Surgery, Otolaryngology, Pathology, Pediatrics, Pharmacology and
Pharmaceutics, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiology, Plastic Surgery, Preventive Medicine,
Proctology, Psychiatry and Neurology, Radiology, Speech Pathology, Sports Medicine, Surgery, Thoracic
Surgery, Toxicology, Urology and Virology)
2C. Veterinary Medicine
2D. Emergency Medicine
2E. Nuclear Medicine
2F. Geriatrics
2G. Nursing (including, but not limited to registered nurses, practical nurses, physician's receptionists
and medical records clerks)
2H. Medical Instruments and Technology
21. Dentistry
2J. Dental Technology
2K. Optometry
2M. Medical Cybernetics
2N. All Therapies, Prosthetics and Healing (except Medicine, Osteopathy or Osteopathic Medicine,
Nursing, Dentistry, Chiropractic and Optometry)
20. Medical Statistics and Documentation
2P. Cancer Research
20. Medical Photography
2R. Environmental Health

Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (4)
4A. Aerospace Engineering
4B. Cartography
4C. Chemical Engineering
4E. Communication Engineering
4F. Computer Engineering and Technologies
41. Energy Engineering (but not including Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering and Technology)
4J. Genetic and Biomedical Engineering
4K. Industrial Engineering
4L. Marine and Aeronautical Engineering and Technology (including, but not limited to: Marine and Flight
Engineers)
4M. Materials Engineering and Sciences (including, but not limited to: textiles, plastics, wood, paper and
metal, but not including Metal Fabrication)
4P. Navigation and Transportation Engineering
40. Optical Engineering (including, but not limited to: light and sound technology)
4R. Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering and Technology
4S. Printing and Photographic Engineering and Technology
Group (5)
5A. Chemistry (including all branches and specialties in Chemistry, except in Pharmacy and Chemical
Engineering)
5C. Study of Drugs and Allied Sciences

5E. Genetics
5H. Metal Fabrication (including, but not limited to skilled metal crafts workers)
51. Atmospheric-Hydrospheric Sciences (including, but not limited to: Marine Science, Meteorology and
Oceanography)
5J. Astronomy and Space Technology
5K. Repair and Maintenance Technology
5L. Agriculture and Agronomy (including, but not limited to: veterinarians, plant pathologists, poultry and
dairy scientists, animal husbandry and animal nutrition)
5M. Food Science and Technology
5N. Zoology (including Animal Behavior and Physiology)
50. Forestry
5P. Fisheries (or other marine products)
50. Geology (including all branches and specialties, e.g. Oceanology, and all branches of Applied
Geology including geophysicists and geochemists)
5R. Hydrology (including, but not limited to Water Pollution)
5S. Ecology and Environmental Protection (including Conservation)
5T. Desalinization
5U. Population Studies
Group (6)
6C. History (including Art History)
60. Philosophy (including Humanities)
6E. Anthropology and Archaeology
6F. Demography

6G. Government and Politics (including, but not limited to International Relations)
61. Literature
6J. Instructional Media and Technology
6K. Fine Arts (including, but not limited to Music, Theater, Sculpture, Motion Picture Arts and Sciences,
and Photography)
6L. Estate Management
6M. Linguistics
Group (7)
7A. Teaching and Religious Education
7B. Educational Testing, Evaluation and Measurement
70. Secondary School Teaching (including, but not limited to Remedial Teaching and Teaching of
English as a Foreign Language)
7E. Vocational and Technical School Teaching
7F. College and University Teaching in Natural Sciences, Mathematics, Engineering and Technology
(except Agriculture)
7H. College and University Teaching of Education
7J. Agricultural School Teaching
7K. Education of the Physically Handicapped (including Education of the Mentally Retarded and
Emotionally Disturbed)
7L. Education of Exceptional Children
7M. Physical Education and Recreation (including, but not limited to Coaching)
7N. Teaching in Medical Schools (including, but not limited to lecturers)
7P. Career Guidance and Counseling
Group (8)

8B. Communication Media (including Television and Film)
8E. Airplane Piloting (including, but not limited to Airline Piloting)
8F. Merchant Marine
81. Construction-Project Management
Group (9)
9B. International Business and Commerce
9C. Industrial Organization
90. Labor and Industrial Relations
9E. Economic Development and Planning (including Rural Development)
9F. Economic Information Analysis (including, but not limited to Management Studies)
9G. Accounting
9H. Cybernetic Technology
9L. Financial Planning
9M. Operations Research
90. Farm Management and Administration
9P. Hotel and Motel Management

Equatorial Guinea
Group (1)
1A. Public Administration (including, but not limited to: City Planning, Urban Studies/Planning, Urban
Transportation, and Public Health)
1B. Public Social Administration (including, but not limited to: Welfare, Dietetics, Nutrition, Family
Planning and Public Health)
1C. Public Social Services
1D. Sanitation
1E. Drug Abuse and Narcotics Control
1F. International Health
1G. Tourism and Travel
1H. Law Enforcement and Corrections (including, but not limited to the Administration of Justice)
11. Parks and Recreation Management (including, but not limited to Wildlife Management)
1J. Primary School Administration
1K. Secondary School Administration
1L. College, University and Higher Education Administration
1M. Technical or Vocational School Administration
1N. Hospital Administration
Group (2 )

All fields listed in part I.
Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (4)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (5)
5A. Chemistry (including all branches and specialties in Chemistry, except in Pharmacy and Chemical
Engineering)
5B. Life Sciences (including, but not limited to: Pharmacy and Biology)
5C. Study of Drugs and Allied Sciences
5E. Genetics
5F. Mathematics
5G. Laboratory Technology (including, but not limited to: Physical and chemistry laboratory technicians)
5H. Metal Fabrication (including, but not limited to skilled metal crafts workers)
51. Atmospheric-Hydrospheric Sciences (including, but not limited to: Marine Science, Meteorology and
Oceanography)
5J. Astronomy and Space Technology
5K. Repair and Maintenance Technology
5L. Agriculture and Agronomy (including, but not limited to: veterinarians, plant pathologists, poultry and
dairy scientists, animal husbandry and animal nutrition)
5M. Food Science and Technology
5N. Zoology (including Animal Behavior and Physiology)
50. Forestry

5P. Fisheries (or other marine products)
5Q. Geology (including all branches and specialties, e.g. Oceanology, and all branches of Applied
Geology including geophysicists and geochemists)
5R. Hydrology (including, but not limited to Water Pollution)
5S. Ecology and Environmental Protection (including Conservation)
5U. Population Studies
Group (6)
6A. Sociology (except Economics and including Criminology)
68. Psychology (including, but not limited to Psychometrics, Child Psychology and Psychobiology)
6C. History (including Art History)
60. Philosophy (including Humanities)
6E. Anthropology and Archaeology
6F. Demography
6G. Government and Politics (including, but not limited to International Relations)
6H. Economics
61. Literature
6J. Instructional Media and Technology
6K. Fine Arts (including, but not limited to Music, Theater, Sculpture, Motion Picture Arts and Sciences,
and Photography)
6L. Estate Management
6M. Linguistics
Group (7)
All fields listed in part I.

Group (8)
8A. Journalism (including, but not limited to editors and reporters, and including textbook writers,
interpreters and translators)
8B. Communication Media (including Television and Film)
8C. Electrical Communication Technology
80. Radio Operation
8F. Merchant Marine
8G. Architecture (including Marine Architecture)
8H. Construction (including, but not limited to builders, but not including skilled and unskilled laborers)
81. Construction-Project Management
8J. Drafting
8K. Skilled Operation of Construction Machines
Group (9)
9A. Industrial and Business Administration and Management (including, but not limited to: programmers
and Project Evaluation, Business, Total Quality Management)
9B. International Business and Commerce
9C. Industrial Organization
90. Labor and Industrial Relations
9E. Economic Development and Planning (including Rural Development)
9F. Economic Information Analysis (including, but not limited to Management Studies)
9G. Accounting
9H. Cybernetic Technology
91. Statistics

9K. Administration of Financial Institutions (including, but not limited to Savings and Loan Organizations
and Credit Unions)
9L. Financial Planning
9M. Operations Research
9N. Banking
90. Farm Management and Administration
9P. Hotel and Motel Management
Group (10)
10A. Library Science (including, but not limited to Electronic Data Storage and Retrieval)

Ethiopia

Group (1)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (2)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (4)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (5)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (6)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (7)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (8)
All fields listed in part I.

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Fiji

Group (1)
1A. Public Administration (including, but not limited to: City Planning, Urban Studies/Planning and Public
Health)
1B. Public Social Administration (including, but not limited to: Welfare, Dietetics, Nutrition, Family
Planning and Public Health)
1C. Public Social Services
1D. Sanitation
1E. Drug Abuse and Narcotics Control
1F. International Health
1G. Tourism and Travel
1H. Law Enforcement and Corrections (including, but not limited to the Administration of Justice)
11. Parks and Recreation Management (including, but not limited to Wildlife Management)
1L. College, University and Higher Education Administration
1M. Technical or Vocational School Administration
1N. Hospital Administration
10. Labor Union Administration
Group (2)
2B. Recognized Medical Specializations (including, but not limited to: Anesthesiology, Audiology,

Cardiography, Cardiology, Dermatology, Embryology, Epidemiology, Forensic Medicine, Gastroenterology,
Hematology, Immunology, Internal Medicine, Neurological Surgery, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Oncology,
Ophthalmology, Orthopedic Surgery, Otolaryngology, Pathology, Pediatrics, Pharmacology and
Pharmaceutics, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiology, Plastic Surgery, Preventive Medicine,
Proctology, Psychiatry and Neurology, Radiology, Speech Pathology, Sports Medicine, Surgery, Thoracic
Surgery, Toxicology, Urology and Virology)
2C. Veterinary Medicine
20. Emergency Medicine
2E. Nuclear Medicine
2F. Geriatrics
2H. Medical Instruments and Technology
21. Dentistry
2J. Dental Technology
2K. Optometry
2L. Chiropractic and Osteopathy (not including Osteopathic Physicians who also practice medicine)
2M. Medical Cybernetics
2N. All Therapies, Prosthetics and Healing (except Medicine, Osteopathy or Osteopathic Medicine,
Nursing, Dentistry, Chiropractic and Optometry)
20. Medical Statistics and Documentation
2P. Cancer Research
20. Medical Photography
2R. Environmental Health
Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (4)

All fields listed in part I.
Group (5)
5A. Chemistry (including all branches and specialties in Chemistry, except in Pharmacy and Chemical
Engineering)
5B. Life Sciences (including, but not limited to: Pharmacy and Biology)
5C. Study of Drugs and Allied Sciences
50. Optics and Physics (including physical chemists, metallurgists and all branches and specialties in
Physics)
5E. Genetics
5F. Mathematics
51. Atmospheric-Hydrospheric Sciences (including, but not limited to: Marine Science, Meteorology and
Oceanography)
5J. Astronomy and Space Technology
5K. Repair and Maintenance Technology
5L. Agriculture and Agronomy (including, but not limited to: veterinarians, plant pathologists, poultry and
dairy scientists, animal husbandry and animal nutrition)
5M. Food Science and Technology
5N. Zoology (including Animal Behavior and Physiology)
50. Forestry
5P. Fisheries (or other marine products)
50. Geology (including all branches and specialties, e.g. Oceanology, and all branches of Applied
Geology including geophysicists and geochemists)
5R. Hydrology (including, but not limited to Water Pollution)
5S. Ecology and Environmental Protection (including Conservation)

5T. Desalinization
5U. Population Studies
Group (6)
All fields listed in part 1.
Group (7)
7A. Teaching and Religious Education
7B. Educational Testing, Evaluation and Measurement
7C. Primary School Teaching (including, but not limited to Nursery Schools and Kindergartens)
70. Secondary School Teaching (including, but not limited to Remedial Teaching and Teaching of
English as a Foreign Language)
7E. Vocational and Technical School Teaching
7F. College and University Teaching in Natural Sciences, Mathematics, Engineering and Technology
(except Agriculture)
7H. College and University Teaching of Education
71. College and University Teaching of Business
7K. Education of the Physically Handicapped (including Education of the Mentally Retarded and
Emotionally Disturbed)
7L. Education of Exceptional Children
7M. Physical Education and Recreation (including, but not limited to Coaching)
7N. Teaching in Medical Schools (including, but not limited to lecturers)
70. Teaching in Law Schools (including, but not limited to lecturers)
7P. Career Guidance and Counseling
Group (8)

8B. Communication Media (including Television and Film)
8C. Electrical Communication Technology
80. Radio Operation
8E. Airplane Piloting (including, but not limited to Airline Piloting)
8F. Merchant Marine
8G. Architecture (including Marine Architecture)
81. Construction-Project Management
8J. Drafting
Group (9)
9A. Industrial and Business Administration and Management (including, but not limited to: programmers
and Project Evaluation, Business, Total Quality Management)
9B. International Business and Commerce
9C. Industrial Organization
90. Labor and Industrial Relations
9E. Economic Development and Planning (including Rural Development)
9F. Economic Information Analysis (including, but not limited to Management Studies)
9G. Accounting
9H. Cybernetic Technology
91. Statistics
9J. Insurance (including Actuaries)
9K. Administration of Financial Institutions (including, but not limited to Savings and Loan Organizations
and Credit Unions)
9L. Financial Planning

9M. Operations Research
9N. Banking
90. Farm Management and Administration
9P. Hotel and Motel Management
Group (10)
10A. Library Science (including, but not limited to Electronic Data Storage and Retrieval)

Gabon
Group (1)
1A. Public Administration (including, but not limited to: City Planning, Urban Studies/Planning, Urban
Transportation, and Public Health)
1B. Public Social Administration (including, but not limited to: Welfare, Dietetics, Nutrition, Family
Planning and Public Health)
1C. Public Social Services
1D. Sanitation
1E. Drug Abuse and Narcotics Control
1F. International Health
1G. Tourism and Travel
1H. Law Enforcement and Corrections (including, but not limited to the Administration of Justice)
11. Parks and Recreation Management (including, but not limited to Wildlife Management)
1J. Primary School Administration
1K. Secondary School Administration
1L. College, University and Higher Education Administration
1M. Technical or Vocational School Administration
1N. Hospital Administration
Group (2)

All fields listed in part I.
Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (4)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (5)
5A. Chemistry (including all branches and specialties in Chemistry, except in Pharmacy and Chemical
Engineering)
5B. Life Sciences (including, but not limited to: Pharmacy and Biology)
5C. Study of Drugs and Allied Sciences
5E. Genetics
5F. Mathematics
5G. Laboratory Technology (including, but not limited to: physical and chemistry laboratory technicians)
5H. Metal Fabrication (including, but not limited to skilled metal crafts workers)
51. Atmospheric-Hydrospheric Sciences (including, but not limited to Marine Science, Meteorology and
Oceanography)
5J. Astronomy and Space Technology
5K. Repair and Maintenance Technology
5L. Agriculture and Agronomy (including, but not limited to: veterinarians, plant pathologists, poultry and
dairy scientists, animal husbandry and animal nutrition)
5N. Zoology (including Animal Behavior and Physiology)
50. Forestry
5P. Fisheries (or other marine products)

50. Geology (including all branches and specialties, e.g. Oceanology, and all branches of Applied
Geology including geophysicists and geochemists)
5R. Hydrology (including, but not limited to Water Pollution)
5S. Ecology and Environmental Protection (including Conservation)
5U. Population Studies
Group (6)
6A. Sociology (except Economics and including Criminology)
6B. Psychology (including, but not limited to Psychometrics, Child Psychology, and Psychobiology)
6C. History (including Art History)
60. Philosophy (including Humanities)
6E. Anthropology and Archaeology
6F. Demography
6G. Government and Politics (including, but not limited to International Relations)
6H. Economics
61. Literature
6J. Instructional Media and Technology
6K. Fine Arts (including, but not limited to Music, Theater, Sculpture, Motion Picture Arts and Sciences,
and Photography)
6L. Estate Management
6M. Linguistics
Group (7)
All fields listed in part I.

Group (8)
8A. Journalism (including, but not limited to editors and reporters, and including text-book writers,
interpreters and translators)
8B. Communication Media (including Television and Film)
8C. Electrical Communication Technology
80. Radio Operation
8F. Merchant Marine
8G. Architecture (including Marine Architecture)
8H. Construction (including, but not limited to builders, but not including skilled and unskilled laborers)
81. Construction-Project Management
8J. Drafting
8K. Skilled Operation of Construction Machines
Group (9)
9A. Industrial and Business Administration and Management (including, but not limited to programmers
and Project Evaluation, Business, Total Quality Management)
9B. International Business and Commerce
9C. Industrial Organization
90. Labor and Industrial Relations
9E. Economic Development and Planning (including Rural Development)
9F. Economic Information Analysis (including, but not limited to Management Studies)
9G. Accounting
9H. Cybernetic Technology
91. Statistics

9K. Administration of Financial Institutions (including, but not limited to Savings and Loan Organizations
and Credit Unions)
9L. Financial Planning
9M. Operations Research
9N. Banking
90. Farm Management and Administration
9P. Hotel and Motel Management

Gambia
Group (1)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (2)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (4)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (5)
5A. Chemistry (including all branches and specialties in Chemistry, except in Pharmacy and Chemical
Engineering)
5B. Life Sciences (including, but not limited to Pharmacy and Biology)
5C. Study of Drugs and Allied Sciences
50. Optics and Physics (including physical chemists, metallurgists and all branches and specialties in
Physics)
5E. Genetics
5F. Mathematics

5G. Laboratory Technology (including, but not limited to physical and chemistry laboratory technicians)
5H. Metal Fabrication (including, but not limited to skilled metal crafts workers)
51. Atmospheric-Hydrospheric Sciences (including, but not limited to Marine Science, Meteorology and
Oceanography)
5J. Astronomy and Space Technology
5K. Repair and Maintenance Technology
5L. Agriculture and Agronomy (including, but not limited to veterinarians, plant pathologists, poultry and
dairy scientists, animal husbandry and animal nutrition)
5M. Food Science and Technology
5N. Zoology (including Animal Behavior and Physiology)
50. Forestry
5P. Fisheries (or other marine products)
50. Geology (including all branches and specialties, e.g. Oceanology, and all branches of Applied
Geology including geophysicists and geochemists)
5R. Hydrology (including, but not limited to Water Pollution)
5S. Ecology and Environmental Protection (including Conservation)
5U. Population Studies
Group (6)
6A. Sociology (except Economics and including Criminology)
6B. Psychology (including, but not limited to Psychometrics, Child Psychology and Psychobiology)
6C. History (including Art History)
60. Philosophy (including Humanities)
6E. Anthropology and Archaeology

6F. Demography
6G. Government and Politics (including, but not limited to International Relations)
6H. Economics
61. Literature
6J. Instructional Media and Technology
6K. Fine Arts (including, but not limited to Music, Theater, Sculpture, Motion Picture Arts and Sciences,
and Photography)
6L. Estate Management
6M. Linguistics
6N. Law (including Judicature and all branches and specialties in the practice of Law, except in Law
Enforcement)
Group (7)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (8)
8A. Journalism (including, but not limited to editors and reporters, and including text-book writers,
interpreters and translators)
8B. Communication Media (including Television and Film)
8C. Electrical Communication Technology
80. Radio Operation
8F. Merchant Marine
8G. Architecture (including Marine Architecture)'
8H. Construction (including, but not limited to builders, but not including skilled and unskilled laborers)
81. Construction-Project Management

8J. Drafting
8K. Skilled Operation of Construction Machines
Group (9)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (10)
10A. Library Science (including, but not limited to Electronic Data Storage and Retrieval)

Ghana

Group (1)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (2)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (4)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (5)
5A. Chemistry (including all branches and specialties in Chemistry, except in Pharmacy and Chemical
Engineering)
5B. Life Sciences (including, but not limited to: Pharmacy and Biology)
5C. Study of Drugs and Allied Sciences
50. Optics and Physics (including physical chemists, metallurgists and all branches and specialties in
Physics)
5E. Genetics
5F. Mathematics

5G. Laboratory Technology (including, but not limited to: physical and chemistry laboratory technicians)
5H. Metal Fabrication (including, but not limited to skilled metal crafts workers)
51. Atmospheric-Hydrospheric Sciences (including, but not limited to: Marine Science, Meteorology and
Oceanography)
5J. Astronomy and Space Technology
5K. Repair and Maintenance Technology
5L. Agriculture and Agronomy (including, but not limited To: veterinarians, plant pathologists, poultry and
dairy scientists, animal husbandry and animal nutrition)
5M. Food Science and Technology
5N. Zoology (including Animal Behavior and Physiology)
50. Forestry
5P. Fisheries (or other marine products)
50. Geology (including all branches and specialties, e.g. Oceanology, and all branches of Applied
Geology including geophysicists and geochemists)
5R. Hydrology (including, but not limited to Water Pollution)
5S. Ecology and Environmental Protection (including Conservation)
5U. Population Studies
Group (6)
6A. Sociology (except Economics and including Criminology)
6B. Psychology (including, but not limited to Psychometrics, Child Psychology, and Psychobiology)
6C. History (including Art History)
60. Philosophy (including Humanities)
6E. Anthropology and Archaeology

6F. Demography
6G. Government and Politics (including, but not limited to International Relations)
6H. Economics
61. Literature
6J. Instructional Media and Technology
6K. Fine Arts (including, but not limited to Music, Theater, Sculpture, Motion Picture Arts and Sciences,
and Photography)
6L. Estate Management
6M. Linguistics
Group (7)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (8)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (9)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (10)
10A. Library Science (including, but not limited to Electronic Data Storage and Retrieval)

Guatemala
Group (1)
1A. Public Administration (including, but not limited to: City Planning, Urban Studies/Planning, Urban
Transportation and Public Health)
1B. Public Social Administration (including, but not limited to: Welfare, Dietetics, Nutrition, Family
Planning and Public Health)
1C. Public Social Services
1D. Sanitation
1E. Drug Abuse and Narcotics Control
1F. International Health
1G. Tourism and Travel
1H. Law Enforcement and Corrections (including, but not limited to the Administration of Justice)

11. Parks and Recreation Management (including, but not limited to Wildlife Management)
1J. Primary School Administration
1K. Secondary School Administration
1L. College, University and Higher Education Administration
1M. Technical or Vocational School Administration
10. Labor Union Administration
Group (2)

2A. General Practice of Medicine (including Osteopaths who also practice medicine)
28. Recognized Medical Specializations (including, but not limited to: Anesthesiology, Audiology,
Cardiography, Cardiology, Dermatology, Embryology, Epidemiology, Forensic Medicine, Gastroenterology,
Hematology, Immunology, Internal Medicine, Neurological Surgery, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Oncology,
Ophthalmology, Orthopedic Surgery, Otolaryngology, Pathology, Pediatrics, Pharmacology and
Pharmaceutics, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiology, Plastic Surgery, Preventive Medicine,
Proctology, Psychiatry and Neurology, Radiology, Speech Pathology, Sports Medicine, Surgery, Thoracic
Surgery, Toxicology, Urology and Virology)
2C. Veterinary Medicine
2D. Emergency Medicine
2E. Nuclear Medicine
2F. Geriatrics
2G. Nursing (including, but not limited to registered nurses, practical nurses, physician's receptionists
and medical records clerks)
2H. Medical Instruments and Technology
21. Dentistry
2J. Dental Technology
2M. Medical Cybernetics
2N. All Therapies, Prosthetics and Healing (except Medicine, Osteopathy or Osteopathic Medicine,
Nursing, Dentistry, Chiropractic and Optometry)
20. Medical Statistics and Documentation
2P. Cancer Research
20. Medical Photography
2R. Environmental Health
Group (3)

All fields listed in part I.
Group (4)
4A. Aerospace Engineering
4B. Cartography
4C. Chemical Engineering
4E. Communication Engineering
4F. Computer Engineering and Technologies
41. Energy Engineering (but not including Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering and Technology)
4J. Genetic and Biomedical Engineering
4K. Industrial Engineering
4L. Marine and Aeronautical Engineering and Technology (including, but not limited to: Marine and Flight
Engineers)
4M. Materials Engineering and Sciences (including, but not limited to: textiles, plastics, wood, paper and
metal, but not inclUding Metal Fabrication)
40. Mining and Lumbering Engineering and Technology
4P. Navigation and Transportation Engineering

40. Optical Engineering (including, but not limited to: light and sound technology)
4R. Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering and Technology
4S. Printing and Photographic Engineering and Technology
Group (5)
5B. Life Sciences (including, but not limited to: Pharmacy and Biology)
5C. StUdy of Drugs and Allied Sciences
5E. Genetics

5H. Metal Fabrication (including, but not limited to skilled metal crafts workers)
51. Atmospheric-Hydrospheric Sciences (including, but not limited to: Marine Science, Meteorology and
Oceanography)
5J. Astronomy and Space Technology
5M. Food Science and Technology
5N. Zoology (including Animal Behavior and Physiology)
5P. Fisheries (or other marine products)
5S. Ecology and Environmental Protection (including Conservation)
5U. Population Studies
Group (6)
6C. History (including Art History)
60. Philosophy (including Humanities)
6E. Anthropology and Archaeology
6F. Demography
6G. Government and Politics (including, but not limited to International Relations)
61. Literature
6J. Instructional Media and Technology
6K. Fine Arts (including, but not limited to Music, Theater, Sculpture, Motion Picutre Arts and Sciences,
and Photography)
6L. Estate Management
6M. Linguistics
Group (7)
7A. Teaching and Religious Education

7B. Educational Testing, Evaluation and Measurement

71. College and University Teaching of Business
7K. Education of the Physically Handicapped (including Education of the Mentally Retarded and
Emotionally Disturbed)
7L. Education of Exceptional Children
7M. Physical Education and Recreation (including, but not limited to Coaching)
7N. Teaching in Medical Schools (including, but not limited to lecturers)
7P. Career Guidance and Counseling
Group (8)
8B. Communication Media (including Television and Film)
8F. Merchant Marine
81. Construction-Project Management
8K. Skilled Operation of Construction Machines
Group (9)
9A. Industrial and Business Administration and Management (including, but not limited to Programmers
and Project Evaluation, Business, Total Quality Management)
9B. International Business and Commerce
9C. Industrial Organization
90. Labor and Industrial Relations
9E. Economic Development and Planning (including Rural Development)
9F. Economic Information Analysis (including, but not limited to Management Studies)
9G. Accounting
9H. Cybernetic Technology

9K. Administration of Financial Institutions (including, but not limited to Savings and Loan Organizations
and Credit Unions)
9L. Financial Planning
9M. Operations Research
9N. Banking
90. Farm Management and Administration
9P. Hotel and Motel Management

Guinea
Group (1)
1A. Public Administration (including, but not limited to: City Planning, Urban Studies/Planning, Urban
Transportation, and Public Health)
1B. Public Social Administration (including, but not limited to: Welfare, Dietetics, Nutrition, Family
Planning and Public Health)
1C. Public Social Services
1D. Sanitation
1E. Drug Abuse and Narcotics Control
1F. International Health
1G. Tourism and Travel
1H. Law Enforcement and Corrections (including, but not limited to the Administration of Justice)
11. Parks and Recreation Management (including, but not limited to Wildlife Management)
1J. Primary School Administration
1K. Secondary School Administration
1L. College, University and Higher Education Administration
1M. Technical or Vocational School Administration
1N. Hospital Administration
Group (2)

All fields listed in part I.
Group (3)
All fields listed in part l.
Group (4)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (5)
5A. Chemistry (including all branches and specialties in Chemistry, except in Pharmacy and Chemical
Engineering)
5B. Life Sciences (including, but not limited to: Pharmacy and Biology)
5C. Study of Drugs and Allied Sciences
5E. Genetics
5F. Mathematics
5G. Laboratory Technology (including, but not limited to: physical and chemistry laboratory technicians)
5H. Metal Fabrication (including, but not limited to skilled metal crafts workers)
51. Atmospheric-Hydrospheric Sciences (including, but not limited to: Marine Science, Meteorology and
Oceanography)
5J. Astronomy and Space Technology
5K. Repair and Maintenance Technology
5L. Agriculture and Agronomy (including, but not limited to: veterinarians, plant pathologists, poultry and
dairy scientists, animal husbandry and animal nutrition)
5M. Food Science and Technology
5N. Zoology (including Animal Behavior and Physiology)
50. Forestry

5P. Fisheries (or other marine products)
50. Geology (including all branches and specialties, e.g., Oceanology, and all branches of Applied
Geology including geophysicists and geochemists)
5R. Hydrology (including, but not limited to Water Pollution)
5S. Ecology and Environmental Protection (including Conservation)
5U. Population Studies
Group (6)
6A. Sociology (except Economics and including Criminology)
68. Psychology (including, but not limited to Psychometrics, Child Psychology, and Psychobiology)
6C. History (including Art History)
60. Philosophy (including Humanities)
6E. Anthropology and Archaeology
6F. Demography
6G. Government and Politics (including, but not limited to International Relations)
6H. Economics
61. Literatu re
6J. Instructional Media and Technology
6K. Fine Arts (including, but not limited to Music, Theater, Sculpture, Motion Picture Arts and Sciences,
and Photography)
6L. Estate Management
6M. Linguistics
Group (7)

All fields listed in part I.
Group (8)
8A. Journalism (including, but not limited to editors and reporters, and including text-book writers,
interpreters and translators)
8B. Communication Media (including Television and Film)
8C. Electrical Communication Technology
80. Radio Operation
8F. Merchant Marine
8G. Architecture (including Marine Architecture)
8H. Construction (including, but not limited to builders, but not including skilled and unskilled laborers)
81. Construction-Project Management
8J. 0 rafti ng
8K. Skilled Operation of Construction Machines
Group (9)
9A. Industrial and Business Administration and Management (including, but not limited to: programmers
and Project Evaluation, Business, Total Quality Management)
9B. International Business and Commerce
9C. Industrial Organization
90. Labor and Industrial Relations
9E. Economic Development and Planning (including Rural Development)
9F. Economic Information Analysis (including, but not limited to Management Studies)
9G. Accounting
9H. Cybernetic Technology

91. Statistics
9K. Administration of Financial Institutions (including, but not limited to Savings and Loan Organizations
and Credit Unions)
9L. Financial Planning
9M. Operations Research
9N. Banking
90. Farm Management and Administration
9P. Hotel and Motel Management

Guinea-Bissau
Group (1)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (2)
2A. General Practice of Medicine (including Osteopaths who also practice medicine)
28. Recognized Medical Specializations (including, but not limited to: Anesthesiology, AUdiology,
Cardiography, Cardiology, Dermatology, Embryology, Epidemiology, Forensic Medicine, Gastroenterology,
Hematology, Immunology, Internal Medicine, Neurological Surgery, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Oncology,
Ophthalmology, Orthopedic Surgery, Otolaryngology, Pathology, Pediatrics, Pharmacology and
Pharmaceutics, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiology, Plastic Surgery, Preventive Medicine,
Proctology, Psychiatry and Neurology, Radiology, Speech Pathology, Sports Medicine, Surgery, Thoracic
Surgery, Toxicology, Urology and Virology)
2C. Veterinary Medicine
20. Emergency Medicine
2G. Nursing (including, but not limited to registered nurses, practical nurses, physician's receptionists
and medical records clerks)
2H. Medical Instruments and Technology
21. Dentistry
2J. Dental Technology
2K. Optometry
2L. Chiropractic and Osteopathy (not including osteopathic physicians who also practice medicine)

2N. All Therapies, Prosthetics and Healing (except Medicine, Osteopathy or Osteopathic Medicine,
Nursing, Dentistry, Chiropractic and Optometry)
20. Medical Statistics and Documentation
Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (4)
48. Cartography
40. Civil Engineering (including Airport Engineering)
4E. Communication Engineering
4F. Computer Engineering and Technologies
4G. Electrical Engineering
4H. Electronic Engineering (including Radio Engineering)
41. Energy Engineering and Technology (but not including
Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering and Technology)
4K. Industrial Engineering
4M. Materials Engineering and Sciences (including, but not limited to: textiles, plastics, wood, paper and
metal, but not including Metal Fabrication)
40. Mining and Lumbering Engineering and Technology
4P. Navigation and Transportation Engineering
4S. Printing and Photographic Engineering and Technology
4T. Surveying (including Oceanography)
Group (5)
5A. Chemistry (including all branches and specialties in Chemistry, except in Pharmacy and Chemical

Engineering)
5B. Life Sciences (including, but not limited to: pharmacy and Biology)
5C. Study of Drugs and Allied Sciences
50. Optics and Physics (including physical chemists, metallurgists and all branches and specialties in
Physics)
5F. Mathematics
5G. Laboratory Technology (including, but not limited to: physical and chemistry laboratory technicians)
5H. Metal Fabrication (including, but not limited to skilled metal crafts workers)
51. Atmospheric-Hydrospheric Sciences (including, but not limited to: Marine Science, Meteorology and
Oceanography)
5K. Repair and Maintenance Technology
5L. Agriculture and Agronomy (including, but not limited to: veterinarians, plant pathologists, poultry and
dairy scientists, animal husbandry and animal nutrition)
5M. Food Science and Technology
5N. Zoology (including Animal Behavior and Physiology)
50. Forestry
5P. Fisheries (or other marine products)
5Q. Geology (including all branches and specialties, e.g. Oceanology, and all branches of Applied
Geology including geophysicists and geochemists)
5R. Hydrology (including, but not limited to Water Pollution)
5S. Ecology and Environmental Protection (including Conservation)
5T. Desalinization
5U. Population Studies
Group (6)

6A. Sociology (except Economics and including Criminology)
68. Psychology (including, but not limited to Psychometrics, Child Psychology and Psychobiology)
6G. Government and Politics (including, but not limited to International Relations)
6H. Economics
6J. Instructional Media and Technology
6N. Law (including Judicature and all branches and specialties in the practice of Law, except in Law
Enforcement)
60. Religion and Theology (including, but not limited to Ministry)
Group (7)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (8)
8A. Journalism (including, but not limited to editors and reporters, and including text-book writers,
interpreters and translators)
88. Communication Media (including Television and Film)
8C. Electrical Communication Technology
80. Radio Operation
8E. Airplane Piloting (including, but not limited to Airline
Piloting)
8F. Merchant Marine
8G. Architecture (including Marine Architecture)
8H. Construction (including, but not limited to builders, but not including skilled and unskilled laborers)
81. Construction-Project Management
8J. Drafting

8K. Skilled Operation of Construction Machines
8L. Telecommunications
Group (9)
9A. Industrial and Business Administration and Management (including, but not limited to: programmers
and Project Evaluation, Business, Total Quality Management)
9B. International Business and Commerce
9C. Industrial Organization
90. Labor and Industrial Relations
9E. Economic Development and Planning (including Rural Development)
9F. Economic Information Analysis (including, but not limited to Management Studies)
9G. Accounting
91. Statistics
9J. Insurance (including Actuaries)
9K. Administration of Financial Institutions (including, but not limited to Savings and Loan Organizations
and Credit Unions)
9L. Financial Planning
9M. Operations Research
9N. Banking
90. Farm Management and Administration
9P. Hotel and Motel Management
Group (10)
10A. Library Science (including, but not limited to Electronic Data Storage and Retrieval)

Guyana
Group (1)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (2)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (3)
All fields listed in part l.
Group (4)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (5)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (6)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (7)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (8)
All fields listed in part I.

Group (9)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (10)
All fields listed in part I.

Haiti
Group (1)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (2)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (4)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (5)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (6)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (7)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (8)
All fields listed in part I.

Group (9)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (10)

All fields listed in part I.

Honduras
Group (1)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (2)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (4)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (5)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (6)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (7)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (8)
All fields listed in part I.

Group (9)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (10)
All fields listed in part I.

Hungary
Group (1)
1A. Public Administration (including, but not limited to: City Planning, Urban Studies/Planning, Urban
Transportation, and Public Health)
1B. Public Social Administration (including, but not limited to: Welfare, Dietetics, Nutrition, Family
Planning and Public Health)
1C. Public Social Services
1D. Sanitation
1E. Drug Abuse and Narcotics Control
1F. International Health
1G. Tourism and Travel
1H. Law Enforcement and Corrections (including, but not limited to the Administration of Justice)
11. Parks and Recreation Management (including, but not limited to Wildlife Management)
1L. College, University and Higher Education Administration
1N. Hospital Administration
Group (2)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.

Group (4)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (5)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (6)
6A. Sociology (except Economics and including Criminology)
6B. Psychology (including, but not limited to Psychometrics, Child Psychology, and Psychobiology)
6C. History (including Art History)
60. Philosophy (including Humanities)
6E. Anthropology and Archaeology
6F. Demography
6G. Government and Politics (including, but not limitedto International Relations)
6H. Economics
61. Literature
6J. Instructional Media and Technology
6K. Fine Arts (including, but not limited to Music, Theater, Sculpture, Motion Picture Arts and Sciences,
and Photography)
6L. Estate Management
6M. Linguistics
Group (7)
7B. Educational Testing, Evaluation and Measurement
70. Secondary School Teaching (including, but not limited to Remedial Teaching and Teaching of

English as a Foreign Language)
7E. Vocational and Technical School Teaching
7F. College and University Teaching in Natural Sciences, Mathematics, Engineering and Technology
(except Agriculture)
7G. College and University Teaching of Social Sciences, Liberal Arts and Literature (including Foreign
Language Education)
7H. College and University Teaching of Education

71. College and University Teaching of Business
7J. Agricultural School Teaching
7K. Education of the Physically Handicapped (including Education of the Mentally Retarded and
Emotionally Disturbed)
7L. Education of Exceptional Children
7M. Physical Education and Recreation (including, but not limited to Coaching)
7N. Teaching in Medical Schools (including, but not limited to lecturers)
70. Teaching in Law Schools (including, but not limited to lecturers)
7P. Career Guidance and Counseling
Group (8)
8A. Journalism (including, but not limited to editors and reporters, and including text-book writers,
interpreters and translators)
88. Communication Media (including Television and Film)
8C. Electrical Communication Technology
80. Radio Operation
8F. Merchant Marine
8G. Architecture (including Marine Architecture)

8H. Construction (including, but not limited to builders, but not including skilled and unskilled laborers)
81. Construction-Project Management
8J. Drafting
8K. Skilled Operation of Construction Machines
Group (9)
9A. Industrial and Business Administration and Management (including, but not limited to: programmers
and Project Evaluation, Business, Total Quality Management)
9B. International Business and Commerce
9C. Industrial Organization
90. Labor and Industrial Relations
9E. Economic Development and Planning (including Rural Development)
9F. Economic Information Analysis (including, but not limited to Management Studies)
9G. Accounting
9H. Cybernetic Technology
91. Statistics
9J. Insurance (including Actuaries)
9L. Financial Planning
9M. Operations Research
90. Farm Management and Administration
9P. Hotel and Motel Management
Group (10)
10A. Library Science (including, but not limited to Electronic Data Storage and Retrieval)

India

Group (1)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (2)
2A. General Practice of Medicine (including Osteopaths who also practice medicine)
28. Recognized Medical Specializations (including, but not limited to: Anesthesiology, Audiology,
Cardiography, Cardiology, Dermatology, Embryology, Epidemiology, Forensic Medicine, Gastroenterology,
Hematology, Immunology, Internal Medicine, Neurological Surgery, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Oncology,
Ophthalmology, Orthopedic Surgery, Otolaryngology, Pathology, Pediatrics, Pharmacology, and
Pharmaceutics, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiology, Plastic Surgery, Preventive Medicine,
Proctology, Psychiatry and Neurology, Radiology, Speech Pathology, Sports Medicine, Surgery, Thoracic
Surgery, Toxicology, Urology and Virology)
2C. Veterinary Medicine
2E. Nuclear Medicine
2F. Geriatrics
2G. Nursing (including, but not limited to registered nurses, practical nurses, physician's receptionists
and medical records clerks)
2H. Medical Instruments and Technology
21. Dentistry
2J. Dental Technology
2K. Optometry

2M. Medical Cybernetics
20. Medical Statistics and Documentation
2P. Cancer Research

20. Medical Photography
2R. Environmental Health
Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (4)
4A. Aerospace Engineering
4B. Cartography
4C. Chemical Engineering
4E. Communication Engineering
4F. Computer Engineering and Technologies
41. Energy Engineering (but not including Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering and Technology)
4J. Genetic and Biomedical Engineering
4K. Industrial Engineering
4M. Materials Engineering and Sciences (including, but not limited to: textiles, plastics, wood, paper and
metal, but not including Metal Fabrication)
40. Mining and Lumbering Engineering and Technology
4P. Navigation and Transportation Engineering

40. Optical Engineering (including, but not limited to: light and sound technology)
4R. Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering and Technology

4S. Printing and Photographic Engineering and Technology
4T. Surveying (including Oceanography)
Group (5)
5A. Chemistry (including all branches and specialties in Chemistry, except in Pharmacy and Chemical
Engineering)
5C. Study of Drugs and Allied Sciences
5E. Genetics
5F. Mathematics
5G. Laboratory Technology (including, but not limited to: physical and chemistry laboratory technicians)
5H. Metal Fabrication (including, but not limited to skilled metal crafts workers)
51. Atmospheric-Hydrospheric Sciences (including, but not limited to: Marine Science, Meteorology and
Oceanography)
5J. Astronomy and Space Technology
5L. Agriculture and Agronomy (including, but not limited To: veterinarians, plant pathologists, poultry and
dairy scientists, animal husbandry and animal nutrition)
5M. Food Science and Technology
5N. Zoology (including Animal Behavior and Physiology)
5Q. Geology (inclUding all branches and specialties, e.g. Oceanology, and all branches of Applied
Geology including geophysicists and geochemists)
5R. Hydrology (inclUding, but not limited to Water Pollution)
5S. Ecology and Environmental Protection (including Conservation)
5T. Desalinization
5U. Population Studies
Group (6)

6C. History (including Art History)
60. Philosophy (including Humanities)
6E. Anthropology and Archaeology
6F. Demography
6G. Government and Politics (including, but not limited to International Relations)
61. Literature
6J. Instructional Media and Technology
6K. Fine Arts (inclUding, but not limited to Music, Theater, SCUlpture, Motion Picture Arts and Sciences,
and Photography)
6L. Estate Management
6M. Linguistics
Group (7)
7A. Teaching and Religious Education
7B. Educational Testing, Evaluation and Measurement
7F. College and University Teaching in Natural Sciences, Mathematics, Engineering and Technology
(except Agriculture)
7H. College and University Teaching of Education

71. College and University Teaching of Business
7J. Agricultural School Teaching
7K. Education of the Physically Handicapped (including Education of the Mentally Retarded and
Emotionally Disturbed)
7L. Education of Exceptional Children
7M. Physical Education and Recreation (including, but not limited to Coaching)

7N. Teaching in Medical Schools (including, but not limited to lecturers)
7P. Career Guidance and Counseling
Group (8)
8B. Communication Media (including Television and Film)
8C. Electrical Communication Technology
80. Radio Operation
8F. Merchant Marine
81. Construction-Project Management
8K. Skilled Operation of Construction Machines
Group (9)
9A. Industrial and Business Administration and Management (including, but not limited to: programmers
and Project Evaluation, Business, Total Quality Management)
9B. International Business and Commerce
9C. Industrial Organization
90. Labor and Industrial Relations
9E. Economic Development and Planning (including Rural Development)
9F. Economic Information Analysis (including, but not limited to Management Studies)
9G. Accounting
9H. Cybernetic Technology
9K. Administration of Financial Institutions (including, but not limited to Savings and Loan Organizations
and Credit Unions)
9L. Financial Planning
9M. Operations Research

9N. Banking
90. Farm Management and Administration
9P. Hotel and Motel Management

Indonesia
Group (1)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (2)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (4)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (5)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (6)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (7)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (8)
All fields listed in part I.

Group (9)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (10)
All fields listed in part I.

Jamaica

Group (1)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (2)
2A. General Practice of Medicine (including Osteopaths who also practice medicine)
28. Recognized Medical Specializations (including, but not limited to: Anesthesiology, Audiology,
Cardiography, Cardiology, Dermatology, Embryology, Epidemiology, Forensic Medicine, Gastroenterology,
Hematology, Immunology, Internal Medicine, Neurological Surgery, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Oncology,
Ophthalmology, Orthopedic Surgery, Otolaryngology, Pathology, Pediatrics, Pharmacology and
Pharmaceutics, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiology, Plastic Surgery, Preventive Medicine,
Proctology, Psychiatry and Neurology, Radiology, Speech Pathology, Sports Medicine, Surgery, Thoracic
Surgery, Toxicology, Urology and Virology)
2C. Veterinary Medicine
20. Emergency Medicine
2E. Nuclear Medicine
2F. Geriatrics
2G. Nursing (including, but not limited to registered nurses, practical nurses, physician's receptionists
and medical records clerks)
2H. Medical Instruments and Technology
21. Dentistry
2J. Dental Technology

2K. Optometry
2M. Medical Cybernetics
2N. All Therapies, Prosthetics and Healing (except Medicine, Osteopathy or Osteopathic Medicine,
Nursing, Dentistry, Chiropractic and Optometry)
20. Medical Statistics and Documentation
2P. Cancer Research
20. Medical Photography
2R. Environmental Health
Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (4)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (5)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (6)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (7)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (8)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (9)
All fields listed in part I.

Group (10)
All fields listed in part I.

Jordan

Group (1)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (2)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (4)
4A. Aerospace Engineering
48. Cartography
4C. Chemical Engineering
40. Civil Engineering (including Airport Engineering)
4E. Communication Engineering
4F. Computer Engineering and Technologies
4G. Electrical Engineering
4H. Electrical Engineering (including Radio Engineering)
41. Energy Engineering and Technology (but not inclUding Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering and
Technology)

4J. Genetic and Biomedical Engineering
4K. Industrial Engineering
4M. Materials Engineering and Sciences (including, but not limited to: textiles, plastics, wood, paper and
metal, but not including Metal Fabrication)
4N. Mechanical Engineering (including, but not limited to: systems, safety, and production engineers, and
including Automatic Data Processing)
4P. Navigation and Transportation Engineering
40. Optical Engineering (including, but not limited to: light and sound technology)
4R. Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering and Technology
4S. Printing and Photographic Engineering and Technology
4U. Agricultural Engineering
4V. Nuclear Engineering
4W. Natural Resource Management Engineering (including but not limited to Water Resource
Management)
4X. Environmental Engineering
Group (5)
SA. Chemistry (including all branches and specialties in Chemistry, except in Pharmacy and Chemical
Engineering)
5B. Life Sciences (including, but not limited to: Pharmacy and Biology)
5C. Study of Drugs and Allied Sciences
50. Optics and Physics (including Physical Chemists, Metallurgists and all branches and specialties in
Physics)
5E. Genetics
SF. Mathematics

5G. Laboratory Technology (including, but not limited to: physical and chemistry laboratory technicians)
51. Atmospheric-Hydrospheric Sciences (including but not limited to: Marine Science, Meteorology and
Oceanography)
5J. Astronomy and Space Technology
5K. Repair and Maintenance Technology
5L. Agriculture and Agronomy (including, but not limited to:
veterinarians, plant pathologists, poultry and dairy scientists, animal husbandry and animal nutrition)
5M. Food Science and Technology
5N. Zoology (including Animal Behavior and Physiology)
50. Forestry
5Q. Geology (including all branches and specialties, e.g. Oceanology, and all branches of Applied
Geology including geophysicists and geochemists)
5R. Hydrology (including, but not limited to Water Pollution)
5S. Ecology and Environmental Protection (including Conservation)
5T. Desalinization
5U. Population Studies
5V. Botany
5W. Entomology
Group (6)
6C. History (including Art History)
60. Philosophy (including Humanities)
6E. Anthropology and Archaeology
6F. Demography

6G. Government and Politics (including, but not limited to International Relations)
6H. Economics
61. Literatu re
6J. Instructional Media and Technology
6K. Fine Arts (including, but not limited to Music, Theater, Sculpture, Motion Picture Arts and Sciences,
and Photography)
6L. Estate Management
6M. Linguistics
6N. Law (including Judicature and all branches and specialties in the practice of Law, except in Law
Enforcement)
60. Theology
6P. Cultural Diversity (including, but not limited to Women's, Minority, Ethnic and Area Studies)

60. Fashion and Textile Design
6R. Graphic Design
6S. Geography
61. Home Economics
6U. Language Studies
Group (7)
7A. Teaching and Religious Education
7B. Educational Testing, Evaluation and Measurement
7F. College and University Teaching in Natural Sciences, Mathematics, Engineering and Technology
(except Agriculture)
71. College and University Teaching of Business

7 J. Agricultural School Teaching
7K. Education of the Physically Handicapped (including Education of the Mentally Retarded and
Emotionally Disturbed)
7L. Education of Exceptional Children
7M. Physical Education and Recreation (including, but not limited to Coaching)
7P. Career Guidance and Counseling
70. Camp Counselor
7R. Educational Technology (Instructional Systems Technology)
7S. Educational Psychology
71. Curriculum Planning
Group (8)
8B. Communication Media (including Television and Film)
8C. Electrical Communication Technology
8F. Merchant Marine
81. Construction-Project Management
8K. Skilled Operation of Construction Machines
8L. Telecommunications
Group (9)
All files listed in Part I.
Group (10)
All files listed in Part I.

Kazakstan
Group (1)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (2)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (3)
3A. Computer Science
3B. Information Science and Systems Analysis
3C. Data Processing (including, but not limited to the use of data in analyzing census, financial planning
and feasibility studies)
Group (4)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (5)
5B. Life Sciences (including, but not limited to: Pharmacy and Biology)
5D. Optics and Physics (including physical chemists, metallurgists and all branches and specialties in
Physics)
5F. Mathematics
5H. Metal Fabrication (including, but not limited to skilled metal crafts workers)

51. Atmospheric-Hydrospheric Sciences (including, but not limited to: Marine Science, Meteorology and
Oceanography)
5L. Agriculture and Agronomy (including, but not limited to: veterinarians, plant pathologists, poultry and
dairy scientists, animal husbandry and animal nutrition)
5M. Food Science and Technology
5N. Zoology (including Animal Behavior and Physiology)
50. Forestry

50. Geology (including all branches and specialties, e.g. Oceanology, and all branches of Applied
Geology including geophysicists and geochemists)
5R. Hydrology (including, but not limited to Water Pollution)
5S. Ecology and Environmental Protection (including Conservation)
5T. Desalinization
5U. Population Studies
Group (6)
6F. Demography
6G. Government and Politics (including, but not limited to International Relations)
6H. Economics
6M. Linguistics
6N. Law (including Judicature and all branches and specialties in the practice of Law, except in Law
Enforcement)
6U. Language Studies
Group (7)
7B. Educational Testing, Evaluation and Measurement
7C. Primary School Teaching (including, but not limited to Nursery Schools and Kindergartens)

70. Secondary School Teaching (including, but not limited to Remedial Teaching and Teaching of
English as a Foreign Language)
7F. College and University Teaching in Natural Sciences, Mathematics, Engineering and Technology
(except Agriculture)
7G. College and University Teaching of Social Sciences, Liberal Arts and Literature (including Foreign
Language Education)

71. College and University Teaching of Business
7J. Agricultural School Teaching
7N. Teaching in Medical Schools (including, but not limited to lecturers)
70. Teaching in Law Schools (including, but not limited to lecturers)
7P. Career Guidance and Counseling
7R. Educational Technology (Instructional Systems Technology)
Group (8)
8A. Journalism (including, but not limited to editors and reporters, and including text-book writers,
interpreters and translators)
8C. Electrical Communication Technology
8G. Architecture (including Marine Architecture)
8H. Construction (inclUding, but not limited to builders, but not including skilled and unskilled laborers)
81. Construction-Project Management
8J. Drafting
8K. Skilled Operation of Construction Machines
8L. Telecommunications
Group (9)
All fields listed in part I.

Group (10)
10A. Library Science (including, but not limited to Electronic Data Storage and Retrieval)

Kenya
Group (1)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (2)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (4)
All fields listed in part l.
Group (5)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (6)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (7)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (8)
All fields listed in part I.

Group (9)

All fields listed in part I.
Group (10)

All fields listed in part I.

Korea
Group (1)
1C. Public Social Services
1D. Sanitation
1E. Drug Abuse and Narcotics Control
1F. International Health
1G. Tourism and Travel
1H. Law Enforcement and Corrections (including, but not limited to the Administration of Justice)
11. Parks and Recreation Management (including, but not limited to Wildlife Management)
1L. College, University and Higher Education Administration
Group (2)
2A. General Practice of Medicine (including Osteopaths who also practice medicine)
2C. Veterinary Medicine
20. Emergency Medicine
2E. Nuclear Medicine
2F. Geriatrics
2G. Nursing (including, but not limited to registered nurses, practical nurses, physician's receptionists
and medical records clerks)

2H. Medical Instruments and Technology
2M. Medical Cybernetics
20. Medical Statistics and Documentation
2P. Cancer Research

20. Medical Photography
2R. Environmental Health
Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (4)
4A. Aerospace Engineering
4B. Cartography
4C. Chemical Engineering
40. Civil Engineering (including Airport Engineering)
4E. Communication Engineering
4F. Computer Engineering and Technologies
4G. Electrical Engineering
4H. Electronic Engineering (including Radio Engineering)
41. Energy Engineering and Technology (but not including Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering and
Technology)
4J. Genetic and Biomedical Engineering
4K. Industrial Engineering
4M. Materials Engineering and Sciences (including, but not limited to: textiles, plastics, wood, paper and
metal, but not including Metal Fabrication)

4N. Mechanical Engineering (including, but not limited to: systems, safety,and production engineers, and
including Automatic Data Processing)
4P. Navigation and Transportation Engineering
40. Optical Engineering (including, but not limited to: light and sound technology)
4R. Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering and Technology
4S. Printing and Photographic Engineering and Technology
Group (5)
5A. Chemistry (including all branches and specialties in Chemistry, except in Pharmacy and Chemical
Engineering)
5C. Study of Drugs and Allied Sciences
50. Optics and Physics (including physical chemists, metallurgists and all branches and specialties in
Physics)
5E. Genetics
5F. Mathematics
5G. Laboratory Technology (including, but not limited to: physical and chemistry laboratory technicians)
5H. Metal Fabrication (including, but not limited to skilled metal crafts workers)
51. Atmospheric-Hydrospheric Sciences (including, but not limited to: Marine Science, Meteorology and
Oceanography)
5J. Astronomy and Space Technology
5M. Food Science and Technology
5N. Zoology (including Animal Behavior and Physiology)
5S. Ecology and Environmental Protection (including Conservation)
5U. Population Studies
Group (6)

6C. History (including Art History)
60. Philosophy (including Humanities)
6E. Anthropology and Archaeology
6F. Demography
6G. Government and Politics (including, but not limited to International Relations)
61. Literature
6J. Instructional Media and Technology
6K. Fine Arts (including, but not limited to Music, Theater, Sculpture, Motion Picture Arts and Sciences,
and Photography)
6L. Estate Management
6M. lingUistics
Group (7)
7A. Teaching and Religious Education
7B. Educational Testing, Evaluation and Measurement
7E. Vocational and Technical School Teaching
7F. College and University Teaching in Natural Sciences, Mathematics, Engineering and Technology
(except Agriculture)

71. College and University Teaching of Business
7K. Education of the Physically Handicapped (including Education of the Mentally Retarded and
Emotionally Disturbed)
7L. Education of Exceptional Children
7M. Physical Education and Recreation (including, but not limited to Coaching)
7P. Career Guidance and Counseling

Group (8)
8B. Communication Media (including Television and Film)
80. Radio Operation
8F. Merchant Marine
8G. Architecture (including Marine Architecture)
8H. Construction (including, but not limited to builders, but not including skilled and unskilled laborers)
81. Construction-Project Management
8J. Drafting
8K. Skilled Operation of Construction Machines
Group (9)
9A. Industrial and Business Administration and Management (including, but not limited to: programmers
and Project Evaluation, Business, Total Quality Management)
9B. International Business and Commerce
9C. Industrial Organization
90. Labor and Industrial Relations
9E. Economic Development and Planning (including Rural
Development)
9F. Economic Information Analysis (including, but not limited to Management Studies)
9G. Accounting
9H. Cybernetic Technology
91. Statistics
9L. Financial Planning
9M. Operations Research

90. Farm Management and Administration
9P. Hotel and Motel Management

Kuwait
Group (1)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (2)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (4)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (5)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (6)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (7)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (8)
All fields listed in part I.

Group (9)
All fields listed in part I.

Group (10)
All fields listed in part I.

Laos
Group (1)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (2)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (4)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (5)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (6)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (7)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (8)
All fields listed in part I.

Group (9)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (10)
All fields listed in part I.

Lebanon

Group (1)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (2)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (4)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (5)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (6)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (7)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (8)
All fields listed in part I.

Group (9)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (10)
All fields listed in part I.

Lesotho
Group (1)
1A. Public Administration (including, but not limited to: City Planning, Urban Studies/Planning, Urban
Transportation and Public Health)
1B. Public Social Administration (including, but not limited to: Welfare, Dietetics, Nutrition, Family
Planning and Public Health)
1C. Public Social Services
1D. Sanitation
1E. Drug Abuse and Narcotics Control
1F. International Health
1G. Tourism and Travel
1H. Law Enforcement and Corrections (including, but not limited to the Administration of Justice)
11. Parks and Recreation Management (including, but not limited to Wildlife Management)
1J. Primary School Administration
1K. Secondary School Administration
1L. College, University and Higher Education Administration
1M. Technical or Vocational School Administration
10. Labor Union Administration
Group (2)

2C. Veterinary Medicine
2D. Emergency Medicine
2E. Nuclear Medicine
2F. Geriatrics
2G. Nursing (including, but not limited to registered nurses, practical nurses, physician's receptionists
and medical records clerks)
2H. Medical Instruments and Technology
20. Medical Statistics and Documentation
2P. Cancer Research
20. Medical Photography
2R. Environmental Health
Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (4)
4A. Aerospace Engineering
4B. Cartography
4C. Chemical Engineering
4D. Civil Engineering (including Airport Engineering)
4E. Communication Engineering
4F. Computer Engineering and Technologies
41. Energy Engineering (but not including Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering and Technology)
4J. Genetic and Biomedical Engineering

4K. Industrial Engineering
4M. Materials Engineering and Sciences (including, but not limited to: textiles, plastics, wood, paper and
metal, but not including Metal Fabrication)
4P. Navigation and Transportation Engineering
40. Optical Engineering (including, but not limited to: light and sound technology)
4R. Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering and Technology
4S. Printing and Photographic Engineering and Technology
Group (5)
5A. Chemistry (including all branches and specialties in Chemistry, except in Pharmacy and Chemical
Engineering)
5B. Life Sciences (including, but not limited to: Pharmacy and Biology)
5C. Study of Drugs and Allied Sciences
5E. Genetics
51. Atmospheric-Hydrospheric Sciences (including, but not limited to: Marine Science, Meteorology and
Oceanography)
5J. Astronomy and Space Technology
5L. Agriculture and Agronomy (including, but not limited to: veterinarians, plant pathologists, poultry and
dairy scientists, animal husbandry and animal nutrition)
5M. Food Science and Technology
5N. Zoology (including Animal Behavior and Physiology)
50. Forestry
5R. Hydrology (including, but not limited to Water Pollution)
5S. Ecology and Environmental Protection (including Conservation)
5U. Population Studies

Group (6)
6A. Sociology (except Economics and including Criminology)
6C. History (including Art History)
60. Philosophy (including Humanities)
6E. Anthropology and Archaeology
6F. Demography
6G. Government and Politics (including, but not limited to International Relations)
6H. Economics
61. Literature
6J. Instructional Media and Technology
6K. Fine Arts (including, but not limited to Music, Theater, Sculpture, Motion Picture Arts and Sciences,
and Photography)
6L. Estate Management
6M. Linguistics
6N. Law (including Judicature and all branches and specialties in the practice of Law, except in Law
Enforcement)
Group (7)
7A. Teaching and Religious Education
7B. Educational Testing, Evaluation and Measurement
7E. Vocational and Technical School Teaching
7F. College and University Teaching in Natural Sciences, Mathematics, Engineering and Technology
(except Agriculture)
7G. College and University Teaching of Social Sciences, Liberal Arts and Literature (including Foreign

Language Education)
7H. College and University Teaching of Education

71. College and University Teaching of Business
7J. Agricultural School Teaching
7K. Education of the Physically Handicapped (including Education of the Mentally Retarded and
Emotionally Disturbed)
7L. Education of Exceptional Children
7M. Physical Education and Recreation (including, but not limited to Coaching)
7P. Career Guidance and Counseling
Group (8)
8A. Journalism (including, but not limited to editors and reporters, and inclUding text-book writers,
interpreters and translators)
8B. Communication Media (including Television and Film)
8F. Merchant Marine
81. Construction-Project Management
Group (9)
9A. Industrial and Business Administration and Management (including, but not limited to: programmers
and Project Evaluation, Business, Total Quality Management)
9B. International Business and Commerce
9C. Industrial Organization
90. Labor and Industrial Relations
9E. Economic Development and Planning (including Rural Development)
9F. Economic Information Analysis (including, but not limited to Management Studies)
9G. Accounting

9H. Cybernetic Technology
91. Statistics
9K. Administration of Financial Institutions (including, but not limited to Savings and Loan Organizations
and Credit Unions)
9L. Financial Planning
9M. Operations Research
9N. Banking
90. Farm Management and Administration
9P. Hotel and Motel Management
Group (10)
10A. library Science (including, but not limited to Electronic Data Storage and Retrieval)

Liberia
Group (1)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (2)
2A. General Practice of Medicine (including Osteopaths who also practice medicine)
2B. Recognized Medical Specializations (including, but not limited to: Anesthesiology, Audiology,
Cardiography, Cardiology, Dermatology, Embryology, Epidemiology, Forensic Medicine, Gastroenterology,
Hematology, Immunology, Internal Medicine, Neurological Surgery, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Oncology,
Ophthalmology, Orthopedic Surgery, Otolaryngology, Pathology, Pediatrics, Pharmacology and
Pharmaceutics, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiology, Plastic Surgery, Preventive Medicine,
Proctology, Psychiatry and Neurology, Radiology, Speech Pathology, Sports Medicine, Surgery, Thoracic
Surgery, Toxicology, Urology and Virology)
2C. Veterinary Medicine
20. Emergency Medicine
2E. Nuclear Medicine
2F. Geriatrics
2G. Nursing (including, but not limited to registered nurses, practical nurses, physician's receptionists
and medical records clerks)
2H. Medical Instruments and Technology
21. Dentistry
2K. Optometry

2L. Chiropractic and Osteopathy (not including osteopathic physicians who also practice medicine)
2M. Medical Cybernetics
2N. All Therapies, Prosthetics and Healing (except Medicine, Osteopathy or Osteopathic Medicine,
Nursing, Dentistry, Chiropractic and Optometry)
20. Medical Statistics and Documentation
2P. Cancer Research
20. Medical Photography
2R. Environmental Health
Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (4)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (5)
5A. Chemistry (including all branches and specialties in Chemistry, except in Pharmacy and Chemical
Engineering)
5B. Life Sciences (including, but not limited to: Pharmacy and Biology)
5C. Study of Drugs and Allied Sciences
50. Optics and Physics (including physical chemists, metallurgists and all branches and specialties in
Physics)
5E. Genetics
5F. Mathematics
5G. Laboratory Technology (including, but not limited to: physical and chemistry laboratory technicians)
51. Atmospheric-Hydrospheric Sciences (including, but not limited to: Marine Science, Meteorology and

Oceanography)
5J. Astronomy and Space Technology
5K. Repair and Maintenance Technology
5L. Agriculture and Agronomy (including, but not limited to: veterinarians, plant pathologists, poultry and
dairy scientists, animal husbandry and animal nutrition)
5M. Food Science and Technology
5N. Zoology (including Animal Behavior and Physiology)
50. Forestry
5P. Fisheries (or other marine products)
50. Geology (including all branches and specialties, e.g. Oceanology, and all branches of Applied
Geology including geophysicists and geochemists)
5R. Hydrology (including, but not limited to Water Pollution)
5S. Ecology and Environmental Protection (inclUding Conservation)
5U. Population Studies
Group (6)
6A. Sociology (except Economics and including Criminology)
6B. Psychology (including, but not limited to Psychometrics, Child Psychology, and Psychobiology)
6C. History (including Art History)
60. Philosophy (inclUding Humanities)
6E. Anthropology and Archaeology
6F. Demography
6G. Government and Politics (including, but not limited to International Relations)
6H. Economics

61. Literature
6J. Instructional Media and Technology
6K. Fine Arts (including, but not limited to Music, Theater, Sculpture, Motion Picture Arts and Sciences,
and Photography)
6L. Estate Management
6M. Linguistics
Group (7)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (8)
88. Communication Media (including Television and Film)
8C. Electrical Communication Technology
80. Radio Operation
8F. Merchant Marine
8G. Architecture (including Marine Architecture)
8H. Construction (including, but not limited to builders, but not including skilled and unskilled laborers)
81. Construction-Project Management
8J. Drafting
8K. Skilled Operation of Construction Machines
Group (9)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (10)
10A. Library Science (including, but not limited to Electronic Data Storage and Retrieval)

Macedonia
Group (1)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (2)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (4)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (5)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (6)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (7)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (8)
All fields listed in part I.

Group (9)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (10)
All fields listed in part I.

Madagascar
Group (1)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (2)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (4)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (5)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (6)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (7)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (8)
All fields listed in part I.

Group (9)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (10)
All fields listed in part I.

Malawi

Group (1)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (2)
28. Recognized Medical Specializations (including, but not limited to: Anesthesiology, Audiology,
Cardiography, Cardiology, Dermatology, Embryology, Epidemiology, Forensic Medicine, Gastroenterology,
Hematology, Immunology, Internal Medicine, Neurological Surgery, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Oncology,
Ophthalmology, Orthopedic Surgery, Otolaryngology, Pathology, Pediatrics, Pharmacology, and
Pharmaceutics, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiology, Plastic Surgery, Preventive Medicine,
Proctology, Psychiatry and Neurology, Radiology, Speech Pathology, Sports Medicine, Surgery, Thoracic
Surgery, Toxicology, Urology and Virology)
2C. Veterinary Medicine
20. Emergency Medicine
2E. Nuclear Medicine
2F. Geriatrics
21. Dentistry
2M. Medical Cybernetics
2N. All Therapies, Prosthetics and Healing (except Medicine, Osteopathy or Osteopathic Medicine,
Nursing, Dentistry, Chiropractic and Optometry)
20. Medical Statistics and Documentation
2P. Cancer Research

2Q. Medical Photography
2R. Environmental Health
Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (4)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (5)
5A. Chemistry (including all branches and specialties in Chemistry, except in Pharmacy and Chemical
Engineering)
5B. Life Sciences (including, but not limited to: Pharmacy and Biology)
5C. Study of Drugs and Allied Sciences
5E. Genetics
51. Atmospheric-Hydrospheric Sciences (including, but not limited to: Marine Science, Meteorology, and
Oceanography)
5J. Astronomy and Space Technology
5K. Repair and Maintenance Technology
5L. Agriculture and Agronomy (including, but not limited to: veterinarians, plant pathologists, poultry and
dairy scientists, animal husbandry and animal nutrition)
5M. Food Science and Technology
5N. Zoology (including Animal Behavior and Physiology)
50. Forestry
5P. Fisheries (or other marine products)
5Q. Geology (including all branches and specialties, e.g. Oceanology, and all branches of Applied

Geology including geophysicists and geochemists)
5R. Hydrology (including, but not limited to Water Pollution)
5S. Ecology and Environmental Protection (including Conservation)
5U. Population Studies
Group (6)
68. Psychology (including, but not limited to Psychometrics, Child Psychology, and Psychobiology)
6C. History (including Art History)
60. Philosophy (including Humanities)
6E. Anthropology and Archaeology
6F. Demography
6G. Government and Politics (including, but not limited to International Relations)
6H. Economics
61. Literature
6J. Instructional Media and Technology
6K. Fine Arts (including, but not limited to Music, Theater, Sculpture, Motion Picture Arts and Sciences,
and Photography)
6L. Estate Management
6M. Linguistics
6N. Law (including Judicature and all branches and specialties in the practice of Law, except in Law
Enforcement)
Group (7)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (8)

8B. Communication Media (including Television and Film)
80. Radio Operation
8E. Airplane Piloting (including, but not limited to Airline Piloting)
8F. Merchant Marine
8G. Architecture (including Marine Architecture)
81. Construction-Project Management
8K. Skilled Operation of Construction Machines
Group (9)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (10)
10A. Library Science (including, but not limited to Electronic Data Storage and Retrieval)

Malaysia
Group (1)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (2)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (4)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (5)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (6)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (7)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (8)
All fields listed in part I.

Group (9)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (10)
All fields listed in part I.

Mali
Group (1)
1A. Public Administration (including, but not limited to: City Planning, Urban Studies/Planning, Urban
Transportation, and Public Health)
1B. Public Social Administration (including, but not limited to: Welfare, Dietetics, Nutrition, Family
Planning and Public Health)
1C. Public Social Services
1D. Sanitation
1E. Drug Abuse and Narcotics Control
1F. International Health
1G. Tourism and Travel
1H. Law Enforcement and Corrections (including, but not limited to the Administration of Justice)
11. Parks and Recreation Management (including, but not limited to Wildlife Management)
1J. Primary School Administration
1K. Secondary School Administration
1L. College, University and Higher Education Administration
1M. Technical or Vocational School Administration
1N. Hospital Administration
Group (2)

All fields listed in part I.
Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (4)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (5)
5A. Chemistry (including all branches and specialties in Chemistry, except in Pharmacy and Chemical
Engineering)
5B. Life Sciences (including, but not limited to: Pharmacy and Biology)
5C. Study of Drugs and Allied Sciences
5E. Genetics
5F. Mathematics
5G. Laboratory Technology (including, but not limited to: physical and chemistry laboratory technicians)
5H. Metal Fabrication (including, but not limited to skilled metal crafts workers)
51. Atmospheric-Hydrospheric Sciences (including, but not limited to: Marine Science, Meteorology and
Oceanography)
5J. Astronomy and Space Technology
5K. Repair and Maintenance Technology
5L. Agriculture and Agronomy (including, but not limited to: veterinarians, plant pathologists, poultry and
dairy scientists, animal husbandry and animal nutrition)
5M. Food Science and Technology
5N. Zoology (including Animal Behavior and Physiology)
50. Forestry

5Q. Geology (including all branches and specialties, e.g. Oceanology, and all branches of Applied
Geology including geophysicists and geochemists)
5R. Hydrology (including, but not limited to Water Pollution)
5S. Ecology and Environmental Protection (including Conservation)
5U. Population Studies
Group (6)
6A. Sociology (except Economics and including Criminology)
68. Psychology (including, but not limited to Psychometrics, Child Psychology and Psychobiology)
6C. History (including Art History)
60. Philosophy (including Humanities)
6E. Anthropology and Archaeology
6F. Demography
6G. Government and Politics (including, but not limited to
International Relations)
6H. Economics
61. Literature
6J. Instructional Media and Technology
6K. Fine Arts (including, but not limited to Music, Theater, Sculpture, Motion Picture Arts and Sciences,
and Photography)
6L. Estate Management
6M. Linguistics
6N. Law (including Judicature and all branches and specialties in the practice of Law, except in Law
Enforcement)

Group (7)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (8)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (9)
9A. Industrial and Business Administration and Management (including, but not limited to: programmers
and Project Evaluation, Business, Total Quality Management)
9B. International Business and Commerce
9C. Industrial Organization
90. Labor and Industrial Relations
9E. Economic Development and Planning (including Rural Development)
9F. Economic Information Analysis (including, but not limited to Management Studies)
9G. Accounting
9H. Cybernetic Technology
91. Statistics
9K. Administration of Financial Institutions (including, but not limited to Savings and Loan Organizations
and Credit Unions)
9L. Financial Planning
9M. Operations Research
9N. Banking
90. Farm Management and Administration
9P. Hotel and Motel Management
Group (10)

10A. Library Science (including, but not limited to Electronic Data Storage and Retrieval)

Malta

Group (1)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (2)
28. Recognized Medical Specializations (including, but not limited to: Anesthesiology, Audiology,
Cardiography, Cardiology, Dermatology, Embryology, Epidemiology, Forensic Medicine, Gastroenterology,
Hematology, Immunology, Internal Medicine, Neurological Surgery, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Oncology,
Ophthalmology, Orthopedic Surgery, Otolaryngology, Pathology, Pediatrics, Pharmacology, and
Pharmaceutics, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiology, Plastic Surgery, Preventive Medicine,
Proctology, Psychiatry and Neurology, Radiology, Speech Pathology, Sports Medicine, Surgery, Thoracic
Surgery, Toxicology, Urology and Virology)
2C. Veterinary Medicine
20. Emergency Medicine
2E. Nuclear Medicine
2F. Geriatrics
2G. Nursing (including, but not limited to registered nurses, practical nurses, physician's receptionists
and medical records clerks)
2H. Medical Instruments and Technology
21. Dentistry
2J. Dental Technology
2M. Medical Cybernetics

20. Medical Statistics and Documentation
2P. Cancer Research

20. Medical Photography
2R. Environmental Health
Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (4)
4A. Aerospace Engineering
4B. Cartography
4C. Chemical Engineering
4D. Civil Engineering (including Airport Engineering)
4E. Communication Engineering
4F. Computer Engineering and Technologies
4G. Electrical Engineering
4H. Electronic Engineering (including Radio Engineering)
41. Energy Engineering and Technology (but not including Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering and
Technology)
4J. Genetic and Biomedical Engineering
4K. Industrial Engineering
4L. Marine and Aeronautical Engineering and Technology (including, but not limited to: Marine and Flight
Engineers)
4M. Materials Engineering and Sciences (including, but not limited to: textiles, plastics, wood, paper and
metal, but not including Metal Fabrication)

4N. Mechanical Engineering (including, but not limited to: systems, safety, and production engineers, and
including Automatic Data Processing)
4P. Navigation and Transportation Engineering

40. Optical Engineering (including, but not limited to: light and sound technology)
4R. Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering and Technology
4S. Printing and Photographic Engineering and Technology
Group (5)
5A. Chemistry (including all branches and specialties in Chemistry, except in Pharmacy and Chemical
Engineering)
5B. Life Sciences (including, but not limited to: Pharmacy and Biology)
5C. Study of Drugs and Allied Sciences
50. Optics and Physics (including physical chemists, metallurgists and all branches and specialties in
Physics)
5E. Genetics
5F. Mathematics
5G. Laboratory Technology (including, but not limited to: physical and chemistry laboratory technicians)
5H. Metal Fabrication (including, but not limited to skilled metal crafts workers)
51. Atmospheric-Hydrospheric Sciences (including, but not limited to: Marine Science, Meteorology and
Oceanography)
5J. Astronomy and Space Technology
5K. Repair and Maintenance Technology
5L. Agriculture and Agronomy (including, but not limited to: veterinarians, plant pathologists, poultry and
dairy scientists, animal husbandry and animal nutrition)
5M. Food Science and Technology

5N. Zoology (including Animal Behavior and Physiology)
5P. Fisheries (or other marine products)
50. Geology (including all branches and specialties, e.g., Oceanology, and all branches of Applied
Geology including geophysicists and geochemists)
5R. Hydrology (including, but not limited to Water Pollution)
5S. Ecology and Environmental Protection (including Conservation)
5T. Desalinization
5U. Population Studies
Group (6)
6A. Sociology (except Economics and including Criminology)
6B. Psychology (including, but not limited to Psychometrics, Child Psychology and Psychobiology)
6C. History (including Art History)
60. Philosophy (including Humanities)
6E. Anthropology and Archaeology
6F. Demography
6G. Government and Politics (including, but not limited to International Relations)
6H. Economics
61. Literatu re
6J. Instructional Media and Technology
6K. Fine Arts (including, but not limited to Music, Theater, Sculpture, Motion Picture Arts and Sciences,
and Photography)
6L. Estate Management
6M. Linguistics

Group (7)
7A. Teaching and Religious Education
7B. Educational Testing, Evaluation and Measurement
7F. College and University Teaching in Natural Sciences, Mathematics, Engineering and Technology
(except Agriculture)
7G. College and University Teaching of Social Sciences, Liberal Arts and Literature (including Foreign
Language Education)
7H. College and University Teaching of Education

71. College and University Teaching of Business
7J. Agricultural School Teaching
7K. Education of the Physically Handicapped (including Education of the Mentally Retarded and
Emotionally Disturbed)
7L. Education of Exceptional Children
7M. Physical Education and Recreation (including, but not limited to Coaching)
7N. Teaching in Medical Schools (including, but not limited to lecturers)
7P. Career Guidance and Counseling
Group (8)
8A. Journalism (including, but not limited to editors and reporters, and including textbook writers,
interpreters and translators)
8B. Communication Media (including Television and Film)
8C. Electrical Communication Technology
80. Radio Operation
8E. Airplane Piloting (including, but not limited to Airline Piloting)
8F. Merchant Marine

81. Construction-Project Management
Group (9)
All fields listed in part I.

Mauritania
Group (1)
1A. Public Administration (including, but not limited to: City Planning, Urban Studies/Planning, Urban
Transportation, and Public Health)
1B. Public Social Administration (including, but not limited to: Welfare, Dietetics, Nutrition, Family
Planning and Public Health)
1C. Public Social Services
1D. Sanitation
1E. Drug Abuse and Narcotics Control
1F. International Health
1G. Tourism and Travel
1H. Law Enforcement and Corrections (including, but not limited to the Administration of Justice)
11. Parks and Recreation Management (including, but not limited to Wildlife Management)
1J. Primary School Administration
1K. Secondary School Administration
1L. College, University and Higher Education Administration
1M. Technical or Vocational School Administration
1N. Hospital Administration
Group (2)

2A. General Practice of Medicine (including Osteopaths who also practice medicine)
28. Recognized Medical Specializations (including, but not limited To: Anesthesiology, Audiology,
Cardiography, Cardiology, Dermatology, Embryology, Epidemiology, Forensic Medicine, Gastroenterology,
Hematology, Immunology, Internal Medicine, Neurological Surgery, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Oncology,
Ophthalmology, Orthopedic Surgery, Otolaryngology, Pathology, Pediatrics, Pharmacology and
Pharmaceutics, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiology, Plastic Surgery, Preventive Medicine,
Proctology, Psychiatry and Neurology, Radiology, Speech Pathology, Sports Medicine, Surgery, Thoracic
Surgery, Toxicology, Urology and Virology)
2C. Veterinary Medicine
20. Emergency Medicine
2E. Nuclear Medicine
2F. Geriatrics
2G. Nursing (including, but not limited to registered nurses, practical nurses, physician's receptionists
and medical records clerks)
2H. Medical Instruments and Technology
21. Dentistry
2J. Dental Technology
2K. Optometry
2L. Chiropractic and Osteopathy (not including osteopathic physicians who also practice medicine)
2M. Medical Cybernetics
2N. All Therapies, Prosthetics and Healing (except Medicine, Osteopathy or Osteopathic Medicine,
Nursing, Dentistry, Chiropractic and Optometry)
20. Medical Statistics and Documentation
2P. Cancer Research
20. Medical Photography

2R. Environmental Health
Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (4)
4A. Aerospace Engineering
4B. Cartography
4C. Chemical Engineering
40. Civil Engineering (including Airport Engineering)
4E. Communication Engineering
4F. Computer Engineering and Technologies
4G. Electrical Engineering
4H. Electronic Engineering (including Radio Engineering)
41. Energy Engineering and Technology (but not including Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering and
Technology)
4J. Genetic and Biomedical Engineering
4K. Industrial Engineering
4L. Marine and Aeronautical Engineering and Technology (including, but not limited to: Marine and Flight
Engineers)
4M. Materials Engineering and Sciences (including, but not limited to: textiles, plastics, wood, paper and
metal, but not including Metal Fabrication)
4N. Mechanical Engineering (including, but not limited to: systems, safety, and production engineers, and
including Automatic Data Processing)
4P. Navigation and Transportation Engineering
40. Optical Engineering (including, but not limited to: light

and sound technology)
4R. Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering and Technology
4S. Printing and Photographic Engineering and Technology
4T. Surveying (including Oceanography)
Group (5)
5A. Chemistry (including all branches and specialties in Chemistry, except in Pharmacy and Chemical
Engineering)
5B. Life Sciences (including, but not limited to: Pharmacy and Biology)
5C. Study of Drugs and Allied Sciences
5E. Genetics
5F. Mathematics
5G. Laboratory Technology (including, but not limited to: physical and chemistry laboratory technicians)
51. Atmospheric-Hydrospheric Sciences (including, but not limited to: Marine Science, Meteorology and
Oceanography)
5J. Astronomy and Space Technology
5K. Repair and Maintenance Technology
5L. Agriculture and Agronomy (including, but not limited to: veterinarians, plant pathologists, poultry and
dairy scientists, animal husbandry and animal nutrition)
5M. Food Science and Technology
5N. Zoology (including Animal Behavior and Physiology)
5P. Fisheries (or other marine products)
5Q. Geology (including all branches and specialties, e.g. Oceanology, and all branches of Applied
Geology including geophysicists and geochemists)
5R. Hydrology (including, but not limited to Water Pollution)

5S. Ecology and Environmental Protection (including Conservation)
5T. Desalinization
5U. Population Studies
Group (6)
6A. Sociology (except Economics and including Criminology)
6B. Psychology (including, but not limited to Psychometrics, Child Psychology and Psychobiology)
6C. History (including Art History)
6D. Philosophy (including Humanities)
6E. Anthropology and Archaeology
6F. Demography
6G. Government and Politics (including, but not limited to International Relations)
6H. Economics
61. Literature
6J. Instructional Media and Technology
6K. Fine Arts (including, but not limited to Music, Theater, Sculpture, Motion Picture Arts and Sciences,
and Photography)
6L. Estate Management
6M. Linguistics
Group (7)
7A. Teaching and Religious Education
7B. Educational Testing, Evaluation and Measurement
7C. Primary School Teaching (including, but not limited to Nursery Schools and Kindergartens)

70. Secondary School Teaching (including, but not limited to Remedial Teaching and Teaching of
English as a Foreign Language)
7E. Vocational and Technical School Teaching

71. College and University Teaching of Business
7J. Agricultural School Teaching
7K. Education of the Physically Handicapped (including Education of the Mentally Retarded and
Emotionally Disturbed)
7L. Education of Exceptional Children
7M. Physical Education and Recreation (including, but not limited to Coaching)
7P. Career Guidance and Counseling
Group (8)
8A. Journalism (including, but not limited to editors and reporters, and including text-book writers,
interpreters and translators)
8B. Communication Media (including Television and Film)
8C. Electrical Communication Technology
80. Radio Operation
8F. Merchant Marine
8G. Architecture (including Marine Architecture)
8H. Construction (including, but not limited to builders, but not including skilled and unskilled laborers)
81. Construction-Project Management
8J. Drafting
8K. Skilled Operation of Construction Machines
Group (9)

9A. Industrial and Business Administration and Management (inclUding, but not limited to: programmers
and Project Evaluation, Business, Total Quality Management)
9B. International Business and Commerce
9C. Industrial Organization
90. Labor and Industrial Relations
9E. Economic Development and Planning (inclUding Rural Development)
9F. Economic Information Analysis (inclUding, but not limited to Management StUdies)
9G. Accounting
9H. Cybernetic Technology
91. Statistics
9K. Administration of Financial Institutions (inclUding, but not limited to Savings and Loan Organizations
and Credit Unions)
9L. Financial Planning
9M. Operations Research
9N. Banking
90. Farm Management and Administration
9P. Hotel and Motel Management

Mauritius
Group (1)
1A. Public Administration (including, but not limited to: City Planning, Urban Studies/Planning, Urban
Transportation, and Public Health)
1B. Public Social Administration (including, but not limited to: Welfare, Dietetics, Nutrition, Family
Planning and Public Health)
1C. Public Social Services
1D. Sanitation
1E. Drug Abuse and Narcotics Control
1F. International Health
1G. Tourism and Travel
1H. Law Enforcement and Corrections (including, but not limited to the Administration of Justice)
11. Parks and Recreation Management (including, but not limited to Wildlife Management)
1J. Primary School Administration
1K. Secondary School Administration
1L. College, University and Higher Education Administration
1M. Technical or Vocational School Administration
1N. Hospital Administration
Group (2)

2A. General Practice of Medicine (including Osteopaths who also practice medicine)
2B. Recognized Medical Specializations (including, but not limited to: Anesthesiology, Audiology,
Cardiography, Cardiology, Dermatology, Embryology, Epidemiology, Forensic Medicine, Gastroenterology,
Hematology, Immunology, Internal Medicine, Neurological Surgery, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Oncology,
Ophthalmology, Orthopedic Surgery, Otolaryngology, Pathology, Pediatrics, Pharmacology and
Pharmaceutics, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiology, Plastic Surgery, Preventive
Medicine,Proctology, Psychiatry and Neurology, Radiology, Speech Pathology, Sports Medicine, Surgery,
Thoracic Surgery, Toxicology, Urology and Virology)
2C. Veterinary Medicine
2D. Emergency Medicine
2E. Nuclear Medicine
2F. Geriatrics
2G. Nursing (including, but not limited to registered nurses, practical nurses, physician's receptionists
and medical records clerks)
2H. Medical Instruments and Technology
21. Dentistry
2J. Dental Technology
2K. Optometry
2L. Chiropractic and Osteopathy (not including osteopathic physicians who also practice medicine)
2M. Medical Cybernetics
2N. All Therapies, Prosthetics and Healing (except Medicine,Osteopathy or Osteopathic Medicine,
Nursing, Dentistry, Chiropractic and Optometry)
20. Medical Statistics and Documentation
2P. Cancer Research
20. Medical Photography

2R. Environmental Health
Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (4)
4A. Aerospace Engineering
4B. Cartography
4C. Chemical Engineering
40. Civil Engineering (including Airport Engineering)
4E. Communication Engineering
4F. Computer Engineering and Technologies
4G. Electrical Engineering
4H. Electronic Engineering and Technology (including Radio Engineering)
41. Energy Engineering (but not including Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering and Technology)
4J. Genetic and Biomedical Engineering
4K. Industrial Engineering
4L. Marine and Aeronautical Engineering and Technology (including, but not limited to: Marine and Flight
Engineers)
4M. Materials Engineering and Sciences (including, but not limited to: textiles, plastics, wood, paper and
metal, but not including Metal Fabrication)
4N. Mechanical Engineering (including, but not limited to: systems, safety, and production engineers, and
including Automatic Data Processing)
4P. Navigation and Transportation Engineering
40. Optical Engineering (including, but not limited to: light and sound technology)

4R. Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering and Technology
4S. Printing and Photographic Engineering and Technology
4T. Surveying (including Oceanography)
Group (5)
5A. Chemistry (including all branches and specialties in Chemistry, except in Pharmacy and Chemical
Engineering)
5B. Life Sciences (including, but not limited to: Pharmacy and Biology)
5C. Study of Drugs and Allied Sciences
5E. Genetics
5F. Mathematics
5G. Laboratory Technology (including, but not limited to: physical and chemistry laboratory technicians)
5H. Metal Fabrication (including, but not limited to skilled metal crafts workers)
51. Atmospheric-Hydrospheric Sciences (including, but not limited to: Marine Science, Meteorology and
Oceanography)
5J. Astronomy and Space Technology
5L. Agriculture and Agronomy (including, but not limited to: veterinarians, plant pathologists, poultry and
dairy scientists, animal husbandry and animal nutrition)
5M. Food Science and Technology
5N. Zoology (inclUding Animal Behavior and Physiology)
50. Forestry
5P. Fisheries (or other marine products)
50. Geology (inclUding all branches and specialties, e.g. Oceanology, and all branches of Applied
Geology including geophysicists and geochemists)
5R. Hydrology (including, but not limited to Water Pollution)

5S. Ecology and Environmental Protection (including Conservation)
51. Desalinization
5U. Population Studies
Group (6)
6A. Sociology (except Economics and including Criminology)
6B. Psychology (including, but not limited to Psychometrics, Child Psychology and Psychobiology)
6C. History (including Art History)
60. Philosophy (including Humanities)
6E. Anthropology and Archaeology
6F. Demography
6G. Government and Politics (including, but not limited to International Relations)
6H. Economics
61. Literature
6J. Instructional Media and Technology
6K. Fine Arts (including, but not limited to Music, Theater, Sculpture, Motion Picture Arts and Sciences,
and Photography)
6L. Estate Management
6M. Linguistics
Group (7)
7A. Teaching and Religious Education
7B. Educational Testing, Evaluation and Measurement
7F. College and University Teaching in Natural Sciences, Mathematics, Engineering and Technology
(except Agriculture)

7G. College and University Teaching of Social Sciences, Liberal Arts and Literature (including Foreign
Language Education)
7H. College and University Teaching of Education
71. College and University Teaching of Business
7J. Agricultural School Teaching
7K. Education of the Physically Handicapped (including Education of the Mentally Retarded and
Emotionally Disturbed)
7L. Education of Exceptional Children
7M. Physical Education and Recreation (including, but not limited to Coaching)
7N. Teaching in Medical Schools (including, but not limited to lecturers)
70. Teaching in Law Schools (including, but not limited to lecturers)
7P. Career Guidance and Counseling
Group (8)
8B. Communication Media (including Television and Film)
8C. Electrical Communication Technology
80. Radio Operation
8F. Merchant Marine
8G. Architecture (including Marine Architecture)
8H. Construction (including, but not limited to builders, but not including skilled and unskilled laborers)
81. Construction-Project Management
8J. Drafting
8K. Skilled Operation of Construction Machines
Group (9)

All fields listed in part I.

Morocco

Group (1)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (2)
2A. General Practice of Medicine (including Osteopaths who also practice medicine)
28. Recognized Medical Specializations (including, but not limited to: Anesthesiology, AUdiology,
Cardiography, Cardiology, Dermatology, Embryology, Epidemiology, Forensic Medicine, Gastroenterology,
Hematology, Immunology, Internal Medicine, Neurological Surgery, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Oncology,
Ophthalmology, Orthopedic Surgery, Otolaryngology, Pathology, Pediatrics, Pharmacology, and
Pharmaceutics, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiology, Plastic Surgery, Preventive Medicine,
Proctology, Psychiatry and Neurology, Radiology, Speech Pathology, Sports Medicine, Surgery, Thoracic
Surgery, Toxicology, Urology and Virology)
2C. Veterinary Medicine
20. Emergency Medicine
2E. Nuclear Medicine
2F. Geriatrics
2G. Nursing (including, but not limited to registered nurses, practical nurses, physician's receptionists
and medical records clerks)
2H. Medical Instruments and Technology
21. Dentistry
2J. Dental Technology

2K. Optometry
2M. Medical Cybernetics
2N. All Therapies, Prosthetics and Healing (except Medicine, Osteopathy or Osteopathic Medicine,
Nursing, Dentistry, Chiropractic and Optometry)
20. Medical Statistics and Documentation
2P. Cancer Research
20. Medical Photography
2R. Environmental Health
Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (4)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (5)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (6)
6A. Sociology (except Economics and including Criminology)
68. Psychology (including, but not limited to Psychometrics, Child Psychology and Psychobiology)
6C. History (including Art History)
60. Philosophy (including Humanities)
6E. Anthropology and Archaeology
6F. Demography
6G. Government and Politics (including, but not limited to International Relations)

6H. Economics
61. Literature
6J. Instructional Media and Technology
6K. Fine Arts (including, but not limited to Music, Theater, Sculpture, Motion Picture Arts and Sciences,
and Photography)
6L. Estate Management
6M. Linguistics
Group (7)
7A. Teaching and Religious Education
7B. Educational Testing, Evaluation and Measurement
70. Secondary School Teaching (including, but not limited to Remedial Teaching and Teaching of
English as a Foreign Language)
7E. Vocational and Technical School Teaching
7F. College and University Teaching in Natural Sciences, Mathematics, Engineering and Technology
(except Agriculture)
7H. College and University Teaching of Education
71. College and University Teaching of Business
7J. Agricultural School Teaching
7K. Education of the Physically Handicapped (including Education of the Mentally Retarded and
Emotionally Disturbed)
7L. Education of Exceptional Children
7M. Physical Education and Recreation (including, but not limited to Coaching)
7N. Teaching in Medical Schools (including, but not limited to lecturers)
7P. Career Guidance and Counseling

Group (8)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (9)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (10)
10A. Library Science (including, but not limited to Electronic Data Storage and Retrieval)

Myanmar

Group (1)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (2)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (4)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (5)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (6)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (7)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (8)
All fields listed in part I.

Group (9)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (10)
All fields listed in part I.

Nepal
Group (1)
1A. Public Administration (including, but not limited to: City Planning, Urban Studies/Planning, Urban
Transportation, and Public Health)
1B. Public Social Administration (including, but not limited to: Welfare, Dietetics, Nutrition, Family
Planning and Public Health)
1C. Public Social Services
1D. Sanitation
1E. Drug Abuse and Narcotics Control
1F. International Health
1G. Tourism and Travel
1H. Law Enforcement and Corrections (including, but not limited to the Administration of Justice)
11. Parks and Recreation Management (including, but not limited to Wildlife Management)
1M. Technical or Vocational School Administration
1N. Hospital Administration
Group (2)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.

Group (4)
4A. Aerospace Engineering
4B. Cartography
4C. Chemical Engineering
4D. Civil Engineering (including Airport Engineering)
4E. Communication Engineering
4F. Computer Engineering and Technologies
4G. Electrical Engineering
4H. Electronic Engineering (including Radio Engineering)
41. Energy Engineering and Technology (but not including Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering and
Technology)
4J. Genetic and Biomedical Engineering
4K. Industrial Engineering
4M. Materials Engineering and Sciences (including, but not limited to: textiles, plastics, wood, paper and
metal, but not including Metal Fabrication)
4N. Mechanical Engineering (including, but not limited to: systems, safety, and production engineers, and
including Automatic Data Processing)
40. Mining and Lumbering Engineering and Technology
4P. Navigation and Transportation Engineering
40. Optical Engineering (including, but not limited to: light and sound technology)
4R. Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering and Technology
4S. Printing and Photographic Engineering and Technology
4T. Surveying (including Oceanography)

Group (5)
5A. Chemistry (including all branches and specialties in Chemistry, except in Pharmacy and Chemical
Engineering)
5B. Life Sciences (including, but not limited to: Pharmacy and Biology)
5C. Study of Drugs and Allied Sciences
5E. Genetics
5G. Laboratory Technology (including, but not limited to: physical and chemistry laboratory technicians)
5H. Metal Fabrication (including, but not limited to skilled metal crafts workers)
51. Atmospheric-Hydrospheric Sciences (including, but not limited to: Marine Science, Meteorology and
Oceanography)
5J. Astronomy and Space Technology
5K. Repair and Maintenance Technology
5L. Agriculture and Agronomy (including, but not limited to: veterinarians, plant pathologists, poultry and
dairy scientists, animal husbandry and animal nutrition)
5M. Food Science and Technology
5N. Zoology (including Animal Behavior and Physiology)
50. Forestry
5Q. Geology (including all branches and specialties, e.g. Oceanology, and all branches of Applied
Geology including geophysicists and geochemists)
5R. Hydrology (including, but not limited to Water Pollution)
5S. Ecology and Environmental Protection (including Conservation)
5U. Population Studies
Group (6)
6C. History (including Art History)

60. Philosophy (including Humanities)
6E. Anthropology and Archaeology
6F. Demography
6G. Government and Politics (including, but not limited to International Relations)
6H. Economics
61. Literature
6J. Instructional Media and Technology
6K. Fine Arts (including, but not limited to Music, Theater, Sculpture, Motion Picutre Arts and Sciences,
and Photography)
6L. Estate Management
6M. Linguistics
Group (7)
7A. Teaching and Religious Education
7B. Educational Testing, Evaluation and Measurement
7C. Primary School Teaching (including, but not limited to Nursery Schools and Kindergartens)
70. Secondary School Teaching (including, but not limited to Remedial Teaching and Teaching of
English as a Foreign Language)
7E. Vocational and Technical School Teaching
7F. College and University Teaching in Natural Sciences, Mathematics,Engineering and Technology
(except Agriculture)
7H. College and University Teaching of Education
71. College and University Teaching of Business
7J. Agricultural School Teaching

7K. Education of the Physically Handicapped (including Education of the Mentally Retarded and
Emotionally Disturbed)
7L. Education of Exceptional Children
7M. Physical Education and Recreation (including, but not limited to Coaching)
7N. Teaching in Medical Schools (including, but not limited to lecturers)
7P. Career Guidance and Counseling
Group (8)
8B. Communication Media (including Television and Film)
8C. Electrical Communication Technology
8F. Merchant Marine
81. Construction-Project Management
8K. Skilled Operation of Construction Machines
Group (9)
9B. International Business and Commerce
9C. Industrial Organization
90. Labor and Industrial Relations
9E. Economic Development and Planning (including Rural Development)
9F. Economic Information Analysis (including, but not limited to Management Studies)
9G. Accounting
9H. Cybernetic Technology
91. Statistics
9K. Administration of Financial Institutions (including, but not limited to Savings and Loan Organizations
and Credit Unions)

9L. Financial Planning
9M. Operations Research
90. Farm Management and Administration
9P. Hotel and Motel Management
Group (10)
10A. Library Science (including, but not limited to Electronic Data Storage and Retrieval)

Nicaragua

Group (1)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (2)
28. Recognized Medical Specializations (including, but not limited to: Anesthesiology, Audiology,
Cardiography, Cardiology, Dermatology, Embryology, Epidemiology, Forensic Medicine, Gastroenterology,
Hematology, Immunology, Internal Medicine, Neurological Surgery, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Oncology,
Ophthalmology, Orthopedic Surgery, Otolaryngology, Pathology, Pediatrics, Pharmacology and
Pharmaceutics, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiology, Plastic Surgery, Preventive Medicine,
Proctology, Psychiatry and Neurology, Radiology, Speech Pathology, Sports Medicine, Surgery, Thoracic
Surgery, Toxicology, Urology and Virology)
2C. Veterinary Medicine
20. Emergency Medicine
2E. Nuclear Medicine
2F. Geriatrics
2G. Nursing (including, but not limited to registered nurses, practical nurses, physician's receptionists
and medical records clerks)
2H. Medical Instruments and Technology
2J. Dental Technology
2L. Chiropractic and Osteopathy (not including osteopathic physicians who also practice medicine)
2M. Medical Cybernetics

20. Medical Statistics and Documentation
2P. Cancer Research
20. Medical Photography
2R. Environmental Health
Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (4)
4A. Aerospace Engineering
4B. Cartography
4C. Chemical Engineering
4E. Communication Engineering
4F. Computer Engineering and Technologies
4G. Electrical Engineering
41. Energy Engineering and Technology (but not including Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering and
Technology)
4J. Genetic and Biomedical Engineering
4K. Industrial Engineering
4M. Materials Engineering and Sciences (including, but not limited to: textiles, plastics, wood, paper and
metal, but not including Metal Fabrication)
4N. Mechanical Engineering (including, but not limited to: systems, safety, and production engineers, and
including Automatic Data Processing)
4P. Navigation and Transportation Engineering
40. Optical Engineering (including, but not limited to: light and sound technology)

4R. Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering and Technology
4S. Printing and Photographic Engineering and Technology
Group (5)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (6)
6C. History (including Art History)
60. Philosophy (including Humanities)
6E. Anthropology and Archaeology
6F. Demography
6G. Government and Politics (including, but not limited to International Relations)
6H. Economics
61. Literatu re
6J. Instructional Media and Technology
6K. Fine Arts (including, but not limited to Music, Theater, Sculpture, Motion Picture Arts and Sciences,
and Photography)
6L. Estate Management
6M. Linguistics
Group (7)
7 A. Teaching and Religious Education
78. Educational Testing, Evaluation and Measurement
7C. Primary School Teaching (including, but not limited to Nursery Schools and Kindergartens)
70. Secondary School Teaching (including, but not limited to Remedial Teaching and Teaching of
English as a Foreign Language)

7E. Vocational and Technical School Teaching
7F. College and University Teaching in Natural Sciences, Mathematics, Engineering and Technology
(except Agriculture)
7H. College and University Teaching of Education

71. College and University Teaching of Business
7J. Agricultural School Teaching
7K. Education of the Physically Handicapped (including Education of the Mentally Retarded and
Emotionally Disturbed)
7L. Education of Exceptional Children

7M. Physical Education and Recreation (inclUding, but not limited to Coaching)
7N. Teaching in Medical Schools (including, but not limited to lecturers)
7P. Career Guidance and Counseling
Group (8)
8B. Communication Media (including Television and Film)
8C. Electrical Communication Technology
8F. Merchant Marine
8G. Architecture (including Marine Architecture)
81. Construction-Project Management
8K. Skilled Operation of Construction Machines
Group (9)
9A. Industrial and Business Administration and Management (including, but not limited to: programmers
and Project Evaluation, Business, Total Quality Management)
9B. International Business and Commerce

9C. Industrial Organization
90. Labor and Industrial Relations
9E. Economic Development and Planning (including Rural Development)
9F. Economic Information Analysis (including, but not limited to Management Studies)
9G. Accounting
9H. Cybernetic Technology
91. Statistics
9J. Insurance (including Actuaries)
9K. Administration of Financial Institutions (including, but not limited to Savings and Loan Organizations
and Credit Unions)
9L. Financial Planning
9M. Operations Research
90. Farm Management and Administration
9P. Hotel and Motel Management
Group (10)
10A. Library Science (including, but not limited to Electronic Data Storage and Retrieval)

Niger
Group (1)
1A. Public Administration (including, but not limited to: City Planning, Urban Studies/Planning, Urban
Transportation, and Public Health)
1B. Public Social Administration (including, but not limited to: Welfare, Dietetics, Nutrition, Family
Planning and Public Health)
1C. Public Social Services
1D. Sanitation
1E. Drug Abuse and Narcotics Control
1F. International Health
1G. Tourism and Travel
1H. Law Enforcement and Corrections (including, but not limited to the Administration of Justice)
11. Parks and Recreation Management (inclUding, but not limited to Wildlife Management)
1L. College, University and Higher Education Administration
1N. Hospital Administration
Group (2)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.

Group (4)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (5)
5A. Chemistry (including all branches and specialties in Chemistry, except in Pharmacy and Chemical
Engineering)
5B. Life Sciences (including, but not limited to: Pharmacy and Biology)
5C. Study of Drugs and Allied Sciences
5E. Genetics
5F. Mathematics
5G. Laboratory Technology (including, but not limited to: physical and chemistry laboratory technicians)
5H. Metal Fabrication (including, but not limited to skilled metal crafts workers)
51. Atmospheric-Hydrospheric Sciences (including, but not limited to: Marine Science, Meteorology and
Oceanography)
5J. Astronomy and Space Technology
5K. Repair and Maintenance Technology
5L. Agriculture and Agronomy (including, but not limited to: veterinarians, plant pathologists, poultry and
dairy scientists, animal husbandry and animal nutrition)
5M. Food Science and Technology
5N. Zoology (including Animal Behavior and Physiology)
50. Forestry

50. Geology (including all branches and specialties, e.g. Oceanology, and all branches of Applied
Geology including geophysicists and geochemists)
5R. Hydrology (including, but not limited to Water Pollution)

5S. Ecology and Environmental Protection (including Conservation)
5U. Population Studies
Group (6)
6A. Sociology (except Economics and inclUding Criminology)
6B. Psychology (including, but not limited to Psychometrics, Child Psychology and Psychobiology)
6C. History (including Art History)
60. Philosophy (including Humanities)
6E. Anthropology and Archaeology
6F. Demography
6G. Government and Politics (including, but not limited to International Relations)
6H. Economics
61. Literature
6J. Instructional Media and Technology
6K. Fine Arts (including, but not limited to Music, Theater, Sculpture Motion Picture Arts and Sciences,
and Photography)
6L. Estate Management
6M. Linguistics
60. Religion and Theology (including, but not limited to Ministry)
Group (7)
7A. Teaching and Religious Education
7B. Educational Testing, Evaluation and Measurement
7C. Primary School Teaching (including, but not limited to Nursery Schools and Kindergartens)

70. Secondary School Teaching (including, but not limited to Remedial Teaching and Teaching of
English as a Foreign Language)
7E. Vocational and Technical School Teaching
7F. College and University Teaching in Natural Sciences, Mathematics, Engineering and Technology
(except Agriculture)
7G. College and University Teaching of Social Sciences, Liberal Arts and Literature (including Foreign
Language Education)
7H. College and University Teaching of Education
71. College and University Teaching of Business
7J. Agricultural School Teaching
7K. Education of the Physically Handicapped (including Education of the Mentally Retarded and
Emotionally Disturbed)
7L. Education of Exceptional Children
7M. Physical Education and Recreation (including, but not limited to Coaching)
7N. Teaching in Medical Schools (including, but not limited to lecturers)
70. Teaching in Law Schools (including, but not limited to lecturers)
7P. Career Guidance and Counseling
Group (8)
8A. Journalism (including, but not limited to editors and reporters, and including text-book writers,
interpreters and translators)
8B. Communication Media (including Television and Film)
8C. Electrical Communication Technology
8F. Merchant Marine
8G. Architecture (including Marine Architecture)

8H. Construction (including, but not limited to builders, but not including skilled and unskilled laborers)
81. Construction-Project Management
8J. Drafting
8K. Skilled Operation of Construction Machines
Group (9)
9B. International Business and Commerce
9C. Industrial Organization
90. Labor and Industrial Relations
9E. Economic Development and Planning (including Rural Development)
9F. Economic Information Analysis (including, but not limited to Management Studies)
9G. Accounting
9H. Cybernetic Technology
91. Statistics
9K. Administration of Financial Institutions (including, but not limited to Savings and Loan Organizations
and Credit Unions)
9L. Financial Planning
9M. Operations Research
9N. Banking
90. Farm Management and Administration
9P. Hotel and Motel Management

Nigeria

Group (1)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (2)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (4)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (5)
5A. Chemistry (including all branches and specialties in Chemistry, except in Pharmacy and Chemical
Engineering)
5B. Life Sciences (including, but not limited to: Pharmacy and Biology)
5C. Study of Drugs and Allied Sciences
50. Optics and Physics (including physical chemists, metallurgists and all branches and specialties in
Physics)
5E. Genetics
5F. Mathematics

5G. Laboratory Technology (including, but not limited to: physical and chemistry laboratory technicians)
5H. Metal Fabrication (including, but not limited to skilled metal crafts workers)
51. Atmospheric-Hydrospheric Sciences (including, but not limited to: Marine Science, Meteorology, and
Oceanography)
5J. Astronomy and Space Technology
5K. Repair and Maintenance Technology
5L. Agriculture and Agronomy (including, but not limited to: veterinarians, plant pathologists, poultry and
dairy scientists, animal husbandry and animal nutrition)
5M. Food Science and Technology
5N. Zoology (including Animal Behavior and Physiology)
50. Forestry
5P. Fisheries (or other marine products)
50. Geology (including all branches and specialties, e.g. Oceanology, and all branches of Applied
Geology including geophysicists and geochemists)
5R. Hydrology (including, but not limited to Water Pollution)
5S. Ecology and Environmental Protection (including Conservation)
5U. Population Studies
Group (6)
6A. Sociology (except Economics and including Criminology)
6B. Psychology (including, but not limited to Psychometrics, Child Psychology and Psychobiology)
6C. History (including Art History)
60. Philosophy (including Humanities)
6E. Anthropology and Archaeology

----r·"· -------- r ----. --- - -_. -----

~

6F. Demography
6G. Government and Politics (including, but not limited to International Relations)
6H. Economics
61. Literatu re
6J. Instructional Media and Technology
6K. Fine Arts (including, but not limited to Music, Theater, Sculpture, Motion Picture Arts and Sciences,
and Photography)
6L. Estate Management
6M. Linguistics
Group (7)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (8)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (9)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (10)
10A. Library Science (including, but not limited to Electronic Data Storage and Retrieval)

Oman

Group (1)
1A. Public Administration (including, but not limited to: City Planning, Urban Studies/Planning, Urban
Transportation, and Public Health)
1B. Public Social Administration (including, but not limited to: Welfare, Dietetics, Nutrition, Family
Planning and Public Health)
1C. Public Social Services
1D. Sanitation
1E. Drug Abuse and Narcotics Control
1F. International Health
1G. Tourism and Travel
1H. Law Enforcement and Corrections (including, but not limited to the Administration of Justice)
11. Parks and Recreation Management (including, but not limited to Wildlife Management)
1K. Secondary School Administration
1L. College, University and Higher Education Administration
1M. Technical or Vocational School Administration
1N. Hospital Administration
Group (2)
All fields listed in part I.

Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (4)
4A. Aerospace Engineering
4B. Cartography
4C. Chemical Engineering
40. Civil Engineering (including Airport Engineering)
4E. Communication Engineering
4F. Computer Engineering and Technologies
4G. Electrical Engineering
4H. Electronic Engineering (including Radio Engineering)
41. Energy Engineering and Technology (but not including Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering and
Technology)
4J. Genetic and Biomedical Engineering
4K. Industrial Engineering
4L. Marine and Aeronautical Engineering and Technology (including, but not limited to: Marine and Flight
Engineers)
4M. Materials Engineering and Sciences (including, but not limited to: textiles, plastics, wood, paper and
metal, but not including Metal Fabrication)
4N. Mechanical Engineering (including, but not limited to: systems, safety, and production engineers, and
including Automatic Data Processing)
4P. Navigation and Transportation Engineering
40. Optical Engineering (including, but not limited to: light and sound technology)

4R. Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering and Technology
4S. Printing and Photographic Engineering and Technology
Group (5)
5A. Chemistry (including all branches and specialties in Chemistry, except in Pharmacy and Chemical
Engineering)
5B. Life Sciences (including, but not limited to: Pharmacy and Biology)
5C. Study of Drugs and Allied Sciences
50. Optics and Physics (including physical chemists, metallurgists and all branches and specialties in
Physics)
5E. Genetics
5F. Mathematics
5G. Laboratory Technology (including, but not limited to: physical and chemistry laboratory technicians)
5H. Metal Fabrication (including, but not limited to skilled metal crafts workers)
51. Atmospheric-Hydrospheric Sciences (including, but not limited to: Marine Science, Meteorology and
Oceanography)
5J. Astronomy and Space Technology
5K. Repair and Maintenance Technology
5L. Agriculture and Agronomy (including, but not limited to: veterinarians, plant pathologists, poultry and
dairy scientists, animal husbandry and animal nutrition)
5M. Food Science and Technology
5N. Zoology (including Animal Behavior and Physiology)
5P. Fisheries (or other marine products)
5Q. Geology (including all branches and specialties, e.g. Oceanology, and all branches of Applied
Geology including geophysicists and geochemists)

5S. Ecology and Environmental Protection (including Conservation)
5U. Population Studies
Group (6)
6C. History (including Art History)
60. Philosophy (including Humanities)
6E. Anthropology and Archaeology
6F. Demography
6G. Government and Politics (including, but not limited to International Relations)
6H. Economics
61. Literature
6J. Instructional Media and Technology
6K. Fine Arts (including, but not limited to Music, Theater, SCUlpture, Motion Picture Arts and Sciences,
and Photography)
6L. Estate Management
6M. Linguistics
6N. Law (inclUding Judicature and all branches and specialties in the practice of Law, except in Law
Enforcement)
Group (7)
7A. Teaching and Religious Education
7B. Educational Testing, Evaluation and Measurement
7C. Primary School Teaching (including, but not limited to Nursery Schools and Kindergartens)
70. Secondary School Teaching (including, but not limited to Remedial Teaching and Teaching of
English as a Foreign Language)

7E. Vocational and Technical School Teaching
71. College and University Teaching of Business
7K. Education of the Physically Handicapped (including
Education of the Mentally Retarded and Emotionally Disturbed)
7L. Education of Exceptional Children
7M. Physical Education and Recreation (including, but not limited to Coaching)
7P. Career Guidance and Counseling
Group (8)
8B. Communication Media (including Television and Film)
8C. Electrical Communication Technology
80. Radio Operation
8F. Merchant Marine
8G. Architecture (including Marine Architecture)
8H. Construction (including, but not limited to builders, but not including skilled and unskilled laborers)
81. Construction-Project Management
8J. Drafting
8K. Skilled Operation of Construction Machines
Group (9)
9B. International Business and Commerce
9C. Industrial Organization
90. Labor and Industrial Relations
9E. Economic Development and Planning (including Rural Development)

9F. Economic Information Analysis (including, but not limited to Management Studies)
9G. Accounting
9H. Cybernetic Technology
91. Statistics
9K. Administration of Financial Institutions (including, but not limited to Savings and Loan Organizations
and Credit Unions)
9L. Financial Planning
9M. Operations Research
90. Farm Management and Administration
9P. Hotel and Motel Management

Pakistan

Group (1)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (2)
2A. General Practice of Medicine (including Osteopaths who also practice medicine)
28. Recognized Medical Specializations (including, but not limited to: Anesthesiology, Audiology,
Cardiography, Cardiology, Dermatology, Embryology, Epidemiology, Forensic Medicine, Gastroenterology,
Hematology, Immunology, Internal Medicine, Neurological Surgery, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Oncology,
Ophthalmology, Orthopedic Surgery, Otolaryngology, Pathology, Pediatrics, Pharmacology and
Pharmaceutics, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiology, Plastic Surgery, Preventive Medicine,
Proctology, Psychiatry and Neurology, Radiology, Speech Pathology, Sports Medicine, Surgery, Thoracic
Surgery, Toxicology, Urology and Virology)
2C. Veterinary Medicine
2D. Emergency Medicine
2E. Nuclear Medicine
2F. Geriatrics
2G. Nursing (including, but not limited to Registered Nurses, Practical Nurses, Physician's Receptionists
and Medical Records Clerks)
2H. Medical Instruments and Technology

21. Dentistry
2J. Dental Technology

2K. Optometry
2M. Medical Cybernetics
20. Medical Statistics and Documentation
2P. Cancer Research

20. Medical Photography
2R. Environmental Health
Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (4)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (5)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (6)
6C. History (including Art History)
60. Philosophy (including Humanities)
6E. Anthropology and Archaeology
6F. Demography
6G. Government and Politics (including, but not limited to International Relations)
6H. Economics
61. Literature
6J. Instructional Media and Technology
6K. Fine Arts (including, but not limited to Music, Theater, Sculpture, Motion Picture Arts and Sciences,

and Photography)
6L. Estate Management
6M. Linguistics
Group (7)
7A. Teaching and Religious Education
7B. Educational Testing, Evaluation and Measurement
7C. Primary School Teaching (including, but not limited to Nursery Schools and Kindergartens)
70. Secondary School Teaching (including, but not limited to Remedial Teaching and Teaching of
English as a Foreign Language)
7E. Vocational and Technical School Teaching
7F. College and University Teaching in Natural Sciences, Mathematics, Engineering and Technology
(except Agriculture)
7G. College and University Teaching of Social Sciences, Liberal Arts and Literature (including Foreign
Language Education)
7H. College and University Teaching of Education

71. College and University Teaching of Business
7J. Agricultural School Teaching
7K. Education of the Physically Handicapped (including Education of the Mentally Retarded and
Emotionally Disturbed)
7L. Education of Exceptional Children
7M. Physical Education and Recreation (including, but not limited to Coaching)
7N. Teaching in Medical Schools (including, but not limited to lecturers)
7P. Career Guidance and Counseling
Group (8)

8B. Communication Media (including Television and Film)
8C. Electrical Communication Technology
8E. Airplane Piloting (including, but not limited to Airline Piloting)
8F. Merchant Marine
8G. Architecture (including Marine Architecture)
8H. Construction (including, but not limited to builders, but not including skilled and unskilled laborers)
81. Construction-Project Management
8J. Drafting
8K. Skilled Operation of Construction Machines
Group (9)
9B. International Business and Commerce
9C. Industrial Organization
90. Labor and Industrial Relations
9E. Economic Development and Planning (including Rural Development)
9F. Economic Information Analysis (including, but not limited to Management Studies)
9G. Accounting
9H. Cybernetic Technology
91. Statistics
9K. Administration of Financial Institutions (including, but not limited to Savings and Loan Organizations
and Credit Unions)
9L. Financial Planning
9M. Operations Research

9N. Banking

90. Farm Management and Administration
9P. Hotel and Motel Management

Panama
Group (1)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (2)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (4)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (5)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (6)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (7)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (8)
All fields listed in part I.

Group (9)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (10)
All fields listed in part I.

Papua New Guinea
Group (1)
1A. Public Administration (including, but not limited to: City Planning, Urban Studies/Planning, Urban
Transportation, and Public Health)
1C. Public Social Services
1D. Sanitation
1E. Drug Abuse and Narcotics Control
1F. International Health
1G. Tourism and Travel
1H. Law Enforcement and Corrections (including, but not limited to the Administration of Justice)
11. Parks and Recreation Management (including, but not limited to Wildlife Management)
1L. College, University and Higher Education Administration
Group (2)
2B. Recognized Medical Specializations (including, but not limited to: Anesthesiology, Audiology,
Cardiography, Cardiology, Dermatology, Embryology, Epidemiology, Forensic Medicine, Gastroenterology,
Hematology, Immunology, Internal Medicine, Neurological Surgery, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Oncology,
Ophthalmology, Orthopedic Surgery, Otolaryngology, Pathology, Pediatrics, Pharmacology and
Pharmaceutics, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiology, Plastic Surgery, Preventive Medicine,
Proctology, Psychiatry and Neurology, Radiology, Speech Pathology, Sports Medicine, Surgery, Thoracic
Surgery, Toxicology, Urology and Virology)
2C. Veterinary Medicine

20. Emergency Medicine
2E. Nuclear Medicine
2F. Geriatrics
2G. Nursing (including, but not limited to Registered Nurses, Practical Nurses, Physician's Receptionists
and Medical Records Clerks)
2H. Medical Instruments and Technology
21. Dentistry
2J. Dental Technology
2M. Medical Cybernetics
20. Medical Statistics and Documentation
2P. Cancer Research
20. Medical Photography
2R. Environmental Health
Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (4)
4A. Aerospace Engineering
48. Cartography
4C. Chemical Engineering
40. Civil Engineering (including Airport Engineering)
4E. Communication Engineering
4F. Computer Engineering and Technologies

4G. Electrical Engineering
4H. Electronic Engineering (including Radio Engineering)
41. Energy Engineering and Technology (but not including Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering and
Technology)
4J. Genetic and Biomedical Engineering
4K. Industrial Engineering
4M. Materials Engineering and Sciences (including, but not limited to: textiles, plastics, wood, paper and
metal, but not including Metal Fabrication)
4P. Navigation and Transportation Engineering
40. Optical Engineering (including, but not limited to: light and sound technology)
4R. Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering and Technology
4S. Printing and Photographic Engineering and Technology
4T. Surveying (including Oceanography)
Group (5)
5A. Chemistry (including all branches and specialties in Chemistry, except in Pharmacy and Chemical
Engineering)
5B. Life Sciences (including, but not limited to: Pharmacy and Biology)
5C. Study of Drugs and Allied Sciences
5E. Genetics
5G. Laboratory Technology (including, but not limited to: physical and chemistry laboratory technicians)
51. Atmospheric-Hydrospheric Sciences (including, but not limited to: Marine Science, Meteorology and
Oceanography)
5J. Astronomy and Space Technology
5L. Agriculture and Agronomy (including, but not limited To: veterinarians, plant pathologists, poultry and

dairy scientists, animal husbandry and animal nutrition)
5M. Food Science and Technology
5N. Zoology (including Animal Behavior and Physiology)
50. Forestry
5S. Ecology and Environmental Protection (including Conservation)
5U. Population Studies
Group (6)
6C. History (including Art History)
60. Philosophy (including Humanities)
6E. Anthropology and Archaeology
6F. Demography
6G. Government and Politics (including, but not limited to International Relations)
61. Literature
6J. Instructional Media and Technology
6K. Fine Arts (including, but not limited to Music, Theater, Sculpture, Motion Picture Arts and Sciences
and Photography)
6L. Estate Management
6M. Linguistics
Group (7)
7A. Teaching and Religious Education
7B. Educational Testing, Evaluation and Measurement

71. College and University Teaching of Business
7K . Education of the Physically Handicapped (including Education of the Mentally Retarded and

Emotionally Disturbed)
7L. Education of Exceptional Children
7M. Physical Education and Recreation (including, but not limited to Coaching)
7P. Career Guidance and Counseling
Group (8)
8B. Communication Media (including Television and Film)
80. Radio Operation
8E. Airplane Piloting (including, but not limited to Airline Piloting)
8F. Merchant Marine
81. Construction-Project Management
8J. Drafting
Group (9)
9A. Industrial and Business Administration and Management (including, but not limited to: programmers
and Project Evaluation, Business, Total Quality Management)
9B. International Business and Commerce
9C. Industrial Organization
90. Labor and Industrial Relations
9E. Economic Development and Planning (including Rural Development)
9F. Economic Information Analysis (including, but not limited to Management Studies)
9G. Accounting
9H. Cybernetic Technology
91. Statistics
9L. Financial Planning

9M. Operations Research
90. Farm Management and Administration
9P. Hotel and Motel Management

Paraguay
Group (1)
1B. Public Social Administration (including, but not limited to: Welfare, Dietetics, Nutrition, Family
Planning and Public Health)
1C. Public Social Services
1D. Sanitation
1E. Drug Abuse and Narcotics Control
1F. International Health
1G. Tourism and Travel
1H. Law Enforcement and Corrections (including, but not limited to the Administration of Justice)
11. Parks and Recreation Management (including, but not limited to Wildlife Management)
1L. College, University and Higher Education Administration
1N. Hospital Administration
Group (2)
2B. Recognized Medical Specializations (including, but not limited to: Anesthesiology, Audiology,
Cardiography, Cardiology, Dermatology, Embryology, Epidemiology, Forensic Medicine, Gastroenterology,
Hematology, Immunology, Internal Medicine, Neurological Surgery, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Oncology,
Ophthalmology, Orthopedic Surgery, Otolaryngology, Pathology, Pediatrics, Pharmacology and
Pharmaceutics, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiology, Plastic Surgery, Preventive Medicine,
Proctology, Psychiatry and Neurology, Radiology, Speech Pathology, Sports Medicine, Surgery, Thoracic
Surgery, Toxicology, Urology and Virology)

2C. Veterinary Medicine
2D. Emergency Medicine
2E. Nuclear Medicine
2F. Geriatrics
2G. Nursing (including, but not limited to registered nurses, practical nurses, physician's receptionists
and medical records clerks)
2H. Medical Instruments and Technology
2J. Dental Technology
2M. Medical Cybernetics
2N. All Therapies, Prosthetics and Healing (except Medicine, Osteopathy or Osteopathic Medicine,
Nursing, Dentistry, Chiropractic and Optometry)
20. Medical Statistics and Documentation
2P. Cancer Research
20. Medical Photography
2R. Environmental Health
Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (4)
4A. Aerospace Engineering
48. Cartography
4C. Chemical Engineering
4E. Communication Engineering
4F. Computer Engineering and Technologies

41. Energy Engineering and Technology (but not including Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering and
Technology)
4J. Genetic and Biomedical Engineering
4K. Industrial Engineering
4M. Materials Engineering and Sciences (including, but not limited to: textiles, plastics, wood, paper and
metal, but not including Metal Fabrication)
40. Mining and Lumbering Engineering and Technology
4P. Navigation and Transportation Engineering
40. Optical Engineering (including, but not limited to: light and sound technology)
4R. Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering and Technology
4S. Printing and Photographic Engineering and Technology
Group (5)
5C. Study of Drugs and Allied Sciences
5E. Genetics
51. Atmospheric-Hydrospheric Sciences (including, but not limited to: Marine Science, Meteorology and
Oceanography)
5J. Astronomy and Space Technology
5M. Food Science and Technology
5N. Zoology (including Animal Behavior and Physiology)
5S. Ecology and Environmental Protection (including Conservation)
5U. Population Studies
Group (6)
6A. Sociology (except Economics and including Criminology)

6B. Psychology (including, but not limited to Psychometrics, Child Psychology and Psychobiology)
6C. History (including Art History)
60. Philosophy (including Humanities)
6E. Anthropology and Archaeology
6F. Demography
6G. Government and Politics (including, but not limited to International Relations)
61. Literature
6J. Instructional Media and Technology
6K. Fine Arts (including, but not limited to Music, Theater, Sculpture, Motion Picture Arts and Sciences,
and Photography)
6L. Estate Management
6M. Linguistics
60. Religion and Theology (including, but not limited to Ministry)
Group (7)
7A. Teaching and Religious Education
7B. Educational Testing, Evaluation and Measurement
70. Secondary School Teaching (including, but not limited to Remedial Teaching and Teaching of
English as a Foreign Language)
7E. Vocational and Technical School Teaching
7F. College and University Teaching in Natural Sciences, Mathematics, Engineering and Technology
(except Agriculture)
7G. College and University Teaching of Social Sciences, Liberal Arts and Literature (including Foreign
Language Education)
71. College and University Teaching of Business

7J. Agricultural School Teaching
7K. Education of the Physically Handicapped (including Education of the Mentally Retarded and
Emotionally Disturbed)
7L. Education of Exceptional Children
7M. Physical Education and Recreation (including, but not limited to Coaching)
7P. Career Guidance and Counseling
Group (8)
8B. Communication Media (including Television and Film)
8F. Merchant Marine
81. Construction-Project Management
8K. Skilled Operation of Construction Machines
Group (9)
9A. Industrial and Business Administration and Management (including, but not limited to: programmers
and Project Evaluation, Business, Total Quality Management)
9B. International Business and Commerce
9C. Industrial Organization
90. Labor and Industrial Relations
9E. Economic Development and Planning (including Rural Development)
9F. Economic Information Analysis (including, but not limited to Management Studies)
9G. Accounting
9H. Cybernetic Technology
9L. Financial Planning
9M. Operations Research

90. Farm Management and Administration
9P. Hotel and Motel Management

Peru
Group (1)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (2)
All fields listed in part J.
Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (4)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (5)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (6)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (7)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (8)
All fields listed in part I.

Group (9)
All fields listed in part l.
Group (10)
All fields listed in part I.

Philippines

Group (1)
All fields listed in part I and the following:
1P. Special Child Development Administration *
1Q. Negotiation Skills *
1R. Organizational Development (including, but not limited to: Human Resource Development and
Human Resource Managaement *
Group (2)
2A. General Practice of Medicine (including Osteopaths who also practice medicine)
28. Recognized Medical Specializations (including, but not limited to: Anesthesiology, Audiology,
Cardiography, Cardiology, Dermatology, Embryology, Epidemiology, Forensic Medicine, Gastroenterology,
Hematology, Immunology, Internal Medicine, Neurological Surgery, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Oncology,
Ophthalmology, Orthopedic Surgery, Otolaryngology, Pathology, Pediatrics, Pharmacology and
Pharmaceutics, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiology, Plastic Surgery, Preventive Medicine,
Proctology, Psychiatry and Neurology, Radiology, Speech Pathology, Sports Medicine, Surgery, Thoracic
Surgery, Toxicology, Urology and Virology)
2C. Veterinary Medicine
20. Emergency Medicine
2E. Nuclear Medicine
2F. Geriatrics
2G. Nursing (including, but not limited to Registered Nurses, Practical Nurses, Physician's Receptionists

and Medical Records Clerks)
2H. Medical Instruments and Technology
21. Dentistry
2K. Optometry
2M. Medical Cybernetics
2N. All Therapies, Prosthetics and Healing (except Medicine, Osteopathy or Osteopathic Medicine,
Nursing, Dentistry, Chiropractic and Optometry
20. Medical Statistics and Documentation
2P. Cancer Research
20. Medical Photography
2R. Environmental Health
2T. Genetic and Biomedical Engineering*
Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (4)
4A. Aerospace Engineering
4B. Cartography
4C. Chemical Engineering
40. Civil Engineering (including Airport Engineering)
4E. Communication Engineering
4F. Computer Engineering and Technologies
4G. Electrical Engineering
4H. Electrical Engineering (including Radio Engineering)

41. Energy Engineering and Technology (but not including Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering and
Technology)
4K. Industrial Engineering
4L. Marine and Aeronautical Engineering and Technology (including, but not limited to: Marine and Flight
Engineers)
4M. Materials Engineering and Sciences (including, but not limited to: textiles, plastics, wood, paper and
metal, but not including Metal Fabrication)
4N. Mechanical Engineering (including, but not limited to: systems, safety, and production engineers, and
including Automatic Data Processing)
40. Mining and Lumbering Engineering and Technology
4P. Navigation and Transportation Engineering
40. Optical Engineering (including, but not limited to: light and sound technology)
4R. Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering and Technology
4S. Printing and Photographic Engineering and Technology
4T. Surveying (including Oceanography)
4U. Agricultural Engineering
4V. Nuclear Engineering
4W. Natural Resource Management Engineering (including but not limited to Water Resource
Management)
4X. Environmental Engineering
4Y. Metals Research and Fabrication (including, but not limited to: Tool and Die, Pattern Making, Casting
and Risering-Casting Design, Investment Casting, Molds and Die Design, Welding Technology and
Preventive Maintenance)*
4Z. Management of Technology*
Group (5)

All fields listed in part l.
Group (6)
6A. Sociology (except Economics and including Criminology)
68. Psychology (including, but not limited to Psychometrics, Child Psychology, and Psychobiology)
6C. History (including Art History)
60. Philosophy (including Humanities)
6E. Anthropology and Archaeology
6F. Demography
6G. Government and Politics (including, but not limited to International Relations)
6H. Economics
61. Literature
6J. Instructional Media and Technology
6K. Fine Arts (including, but not limited to Music, Theater, Sculpture, Motion Picture Arts and Sciences,
and Photography)
6L. Estate Management
6M. Linguistics
6N. Law (including Judicature and all branches and specialties in the practice of Law, except in Law
Enforcement)
6P. Cultural Diversity (including, but not limited to: Women's, Minority Ethnic and Area Studies)
6U. Language Studies
Group (7)
7A. Teaching and Religious Education
78. Educational Testing, Evaluation and Measurement

7E. Vocational and Technical School Teaching
7F. College and University Teaching in Natural Sciences, Mathematics, Engineering and Technology
(except Agriculture)
7G. College and University Teaching of Social Sciences, Liberal Arts and Literature (including Foreign
Language Education)

71. College and University Teaching of Business
7K. Education of the Physically Handicapped (including Education of the Mentally Retarded and
Emotionally Disturbed)
7L. Education of Exceptional Children
7M. Physical Education and Recreation (including, but not limited to Coaching)
7N. Teaching in Medical Schools (including, but not limited to lecturers)
70. Teaching in Law Schools (including, but not limited to lecturers)
7P. Career Guidance and Counseling
7U. Technical and Vocational Studies in Various Trade Areas (Automotive, Welding, Industrial
Electrician, Electronics, Machine Shop and Refrigeration)*
Group (8)
8B. Communication Media (including Television and Film)
8C. Electrical Communication Technology
8E. Airplane Piloting (including, but not limited to Airline Piloting)
8F. Merchant Marine
8G. Architecture (including Marine Architecture)
81. Construction-Project Management
8K. Skilled Operation of Construction Machines

8M. Interior Design*
Group (9)
All fields listed in part I and the following:
9T. Program Project Management*
9U. Social Planning and Policy Analysis*
9V. Development Financing*
9W. Entrepreneurship Development*
Group (10)
10A. Library Science (including, but not limited to Electronic Data Storage and Retrieval)
*These skills are incorporated for the Philippines only per special request of their embassy.

Poland
Group (1)
1A. Public Administration (including, but not limited to: City Planning, Urban Studies/Planning, Urban
Transportation, and Public Health)
1B. Public Social Administration (including, but not limited to: Welfare, Dietetics, Nutrition, Family
Planning and Public Health)
1C. Public Social Services
1D. Sanitation
1E. Drug Abuse and Narcotics Control
1F. International Health
1G. Tourism and Travel
1H. Law Enforcement and Corrections (including, but not limited to the Administration of Justice)
11. Parks and Recreation Management (including, but not limited to Wildlife Management)
1J. Primary School Administration
1K. Secondary School Administration
1L. College, University and Higher Education Administration
1M. Technical or Vocational School Administration
1N. Hospital Administration
Group (2)

All fields listed in part I.
Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (4)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (5)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (6)
6A. Sociology (except Economics and including Criminology)
6C. History (including Art History)
60. Philosophy (including Humanities)
6E. Anthropology and Archaeology
6F. Demography
6G. Government and Politics (including, but not limited to International Relations)
6H. Economics
61. Literature
6J. Instructional Media and Technology
6K. Fine Arts (including, but not limited to Music, Theater, Sculpture, Motion Picture Arts and Sciences,
and Photography)
6L. Estate Management
6M. Linguistics
Group (7)

All fields listed in part I.
Group (8)
8B. Communication Media (including Television and Film)
8F. Merchant Marine
8H. Construction (including, but not limited to builders, but not including skilled and unskilled laborers)
81. Construction-Project Management
8J. Drafting
8K. Skilled Operation of Construction Machines
Group (9)
9B. International Business and Commerce
9C. Industrial Organization
90. Labor and Industrial Relations
9E. Economic Development and Planning (including Rural Development)
9F. Economic Information Analysis (including, but not limited to Management Studies)
9G. Accounting
9H. Cybernetic Technology
91. Statistics
9L. Financial Planning
9M. Operations Research
90. Farm Management and Administration
9P. Hotel and Motel Management

Qatar
Group (1)
1A. Public Administration (including, but not limited to: City Planning, Urban Studies/Planning, Urban
Transportation, and Public Health)
1B. Public Social Administration (including, but not limited to: Welfare, Dietetics, Nutrition, Family
Planning and Public Health)
1C. Public Social Services
1D. Sanitation
1E. Drug Abuse and Narcotics Control
1F. International Health
1G. Tourism and Travel
1H. Law Enforcement and Corrections (including, but not limited to the Administration of Justice)
11. Parks and Recreation Management (including, but not limited to Wildlife Management)
1K. Secondary School Administration
1L. College, University and Higher Education Administration
1M. Technical or Vocational School Administration
1N. Hospital Administration
Group (2)
All fields listed in part I.

Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (4)
4A. Aerospace Engineering
4B. Cartography
4C. Chemical Engineering
40. Civil Engineering (including Airport Engineering)
4E. Communication Engineering
4F. Computer Engineering and Technologies
4G. Electrical Engineering
4H. Electronic Engineering (including Radio Engineering)
41. Energy Engineering and Technology (but not including
Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering and Technology)
4J. Genetic and Biomedical Engineering
4K. Industrial Engineering
4L. Marine and Aeronautical Engineering and Technology (including, but not limited to: Marine and
Flight Engineers)
4M. Materials Engineering and Sciences (including, but not limited to: textiles, plastics, wood, paper
and metal, but not including Metal Fabrication)
4N. Mechanical Engineering (including, but not limited to: systems, safety, and production engineers,
and including Automatic Data Processing)
4P. Navigation and Transportation Engineering
4Q. Optical Engineering (including, but not limited to: light and sound technology)

4R. Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering and Technology
4S. Printing and Photographic Engineering and Technology
Group (5)
5A. Chemistry (including all branches and specialties in Chemistry, except in Pharmacy and Chemical
Engineering)
5B. Life Sciences (including, but not limited to: Pharmacy and Biology)
5C. Study of Drugs and Allied Sciences
50. Optics and Physics (including Physical Chemists, Metallurgists and all branches and specialties in
Physics)
5E. Genetics
5F. Mathematics
5G. Laboratory Technology (including, but not limited to: physical and chemistry laboratory
technicians)
5H. Metal Fabrication (including, but not limited to skilled metal crafts workers)
51. Atmospheric-Hydrospheric Sciences (including, but not limited to: Marine Science, Meteorology and
Oceanography)
5J. Astronomy and Space Technology
5K. Repair and Maintenance Technology
5M. Food Science and Technology
5N. Zoology (including Animal Behavior and Physiology)
5P. Fisheries (or other marine products)
5Q. Geology (including all branches and specialties, e.g. Oceanology, and all branches of Applied
Geology including geophysicists and geochemists)
5R. Hydrology (including, but not limited to Water Pollution)

5S. Ecology and Environmental Protection (including Conservation)
5T. Desalinization
5U. Population Studies
Group (6)
6C. History (including Art History)
60. Philosophy (including Humanities)
6E. Anthropology and Archaeology
6F. Demography
6G. Government and Politics (including, but not limited to International Relations)
6H. Economics
61. Literature
6J. Instructional Media and Technology
6K. Fine Arts (including, but not limited to Music, Theater, Sculpture, Motion Picture Arts and Sciences,
and Photography)
6L. Estate Management
6M. Linguistics
6N. Law (including Judicature and all branches and specialties in the practice of Law, except in Law
Enforcement)
Group (7)
7A. Teaching and Religious Education
7B. Educational Testing, Evaluation and Measurement
7C. Primary School Teaching (including, but not limited to Nursery Schools and Kindergartens)
70. Secondary School Teaching (including, but not limited to Remedial Teaching and Teaching of

English as a Foreign Language)
7E. Vocational and Technical School Teaching

71. College and University Teaching of Business
7K. Education of the Physically Handicapped (including Education of the Mentally Retarded and
Emotionally Disturbed)
7L. Education of Exceptional Children
7M. Physical Education and Recreation (including, but not limited to Coaching)
7P. Career Guidance and Counseling
Group (8)
8B. Communication Media (including Television and Film)
8C. Electrical Communication Technology
80. Radio Operation
8F. Merchant Marine
8G. Architecture (including Marine Architecture)
8H. Construction (including, but not limited to builders, but not including skilled and unskilled laborers)
81. Construction-Project Management
8J. Drafting
8K. Skilled Operation of Construction Machines
Group (9)
9B. International Business and Commerce
9C. Industrial Organization
90. Labor and Industrial Relations
9E. Economic Development and Planning (including Rural Development)

9F. Economic Information Analysis (including, but not limited to Management Studies)
9G. Accounting
9H. Cybernetic Technology
91. Statistics
9K. Administration of Financial Institutions (including, but not limited to Savings and Loan Organizations
and Credit Unions)
9L. Financial Planning
9M. Operations Research
90. Farm Management and Administration
9P. Hotel and Motel Management
Group (10)
10A. Library Science (including, but not limited to Electronic Data Storage and Retrieval)

Romania
Group (1)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (2)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (4)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (5)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (6)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (7)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (8)
All fields listed in part I.

Group (9)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (10)
All fields listed in part I.

Rwanda

Group (1)
1A. Public Administration (including, but not limited to: City Planning, Urban Studies/Planning, Urban
Transportation, and Public Health)
1B. Public Social Administration (including, but not limited to: Welfare, Dietetics, Nutrition, Family
Planning and Public Health)
1C. Public Social Services
1D. Sanitation
1E. Drug Abuse and Narcotics Control
1F. International Health
1G. Tourism and Travel
1H. Law Enforcement and Corrections (including, but not limited to the Administration of Justice)
11. Parks and Recreation Management (including, but not limited to Wildlife Management)
1J. Primary School Administration
1K. Secondary School Administration
1L. College, University and Higher Education Administration
1M. Technical or Vocational School Administration
1N. Hospital Administration
Group (2)

All fields listed in part I.
Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (4)
4A. Aerospace Engineering
4B. Cartography
4C. Chemical Engineering
40. Civil Engineering (including Airport Engineering)
4E. Communication Engineering
4F. Computer Engineering and Technologies
4G. Electrical Engineering
4H. Electronic Engineering (including Radio Engineering)
41. Energy Engineering and Technology (but not including Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering and
Technology)
4J. Genetic and Biomedical Engineering
4K. Industrial Engineering
4L. Marine and Aeronautical Engineering and Technology (including, but not limited to: Marine and Flight
Engineers)
4N. Mechanical Engineering (including, but not limited to: systems, safety, and production engineers, and
including Automatic Data Processing)
40. Mining and Lumbering Engineering and Technology
4P. Navigation and Transportation Engineering

40. Optical Engineering (including, but not limited to: light and sound technology)

4R. Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering and Technology
4S. Printing and Photographic Engineering and Technology
41. Surveying (including Oceanography)
Group (5)
5A. Chemistry (including all branches and specialties in Chemistry, except in Pharmacy and Chemical
Engineering)
5B. Life Sciences (including, but not limited to: Pharmacy and Biology)
5C. Study of Drugs and Allied Sciences
5E. Genetics
5F. Mathematics
5G. Laboratory Technology (including, but not limited to: physical and chemistry laboratory technicians)
5H. Metal Fabrication (including, but not limited to skilled metal crafts workers)
51. Atmospheric-Hydrospheric Sciences (including, but not limited to: Marine Science, Meteorology and
Oceanography)
5J. Astronomy and Space Technology
5K. Repair and Maintenance Technology
5L. Agriculture and Agronomy (inclUding, but not limited to: veterinarians, plant pathologists, poultry and
dairy scientists, animal husbandry and animal nutrition)
5M. Food Science and Technology
5N. Zoology (inclUding Animal Behavior and Physiology)
50. Forestry
5Q. Geology (inclUding all branches and specialties, e.g. Oceanology, and all branches of Applied
Geology including geophysicists and geochemists)
5R. Hydrology (including, but not limited to Water Pollution)

5S. Ecology and Environmental Protection (including Conservation)
5U. Population Studies
Group (6)
6A. Sociology (except Economics and including Criminology)
6B. Psychology (including, but not limited to Psychometrics, Child Psychology and Psychobiology)
6C. History (including Art History)
60. Philosophy (including Humanities)
6E. Anthropology and Archaeology
6F. Demography
6G. Government and Politics (including, but not limited to International Relations)
6H. Economics
61. Literatu re
6J. Instructional Media and Technology
6K. Fine Arts (including, but not limited to Music, Theater, Sculpture, Motion Picture Arts and Sciences,
and Photography)
6L. Estate Management
6M. Linguistics
Group (7)
7A. Teaching and Religious Education
7B. Educational Testing, Evaluation and Measurement
7C. Primary School Teaching (including, but not limited to Nursery Schools and Kindergartens)
70. Secondary School Teaching (including, but not limited to Remedial Teaching and Teaching of
English as a Foreign Language)

7E. Vocational and Technical School Teaching
7F. College and University Teaching in Natural Sciences, Mathematics, Engineering and Technology
(except Agriculture)
7G. College and University Teaching of Social Sciences, Liberal Arts and Literature (including Foreign
Language Education)
7H. College and University Teaching of Education

71. College and University Teaching of Business
7 J. Agricultural School Teaching
7K. Education of the Physically Handicapped (including Education of the Mentally Retarded and
Emotionally Disturbed)
7L. Education of Exceptional Children
7M. Physical Education and Recreation (including, but not limited to Coaching)
7N. Teaching in Medical Schools (including, but not limited to lecturers)
7P. Career Guidance and Counseling
Group (8)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (9)
9A. Industrial and Business Administration and Management (including, but not limited to: programmers
and Project Evaluation, Business, Total Quality Management)
9B. International Business and Commerce
9C. Industrial Organization
90. Labor and Industrial Relations
9E. Economic Development and Planning (including Rural Development)

9F. Economic Information Analysis (including, but not limited to Management Studies)
9G. Accounting
9H. Cybernetic Technology
91. Statistics
9K. Administration of Financial Institutions (including, but not limited to Savings and Loan Organizations
and Credit Unions)
9L. Financial Planning
9M. Operations Research
9N. Banking
90. Farm Management and Administration
9P. Hotel and Motel Management

Saudi Arabia

Group (1)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (2)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (4)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (5)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (6)
6A. Sociology (except Economics and including Criminology)
68. Psychology (including, but not limited to Psychometrics, Child Psychology and Psychobiology)
6C. History (including Art History)
60. Philosophy (including Humanities)
6E. Anthropology and Archaeology
6F. Demography

6G. Government and Politics (including, but not limited to International Relations)
6H. Economics
61. Literature
6J. Instructional Media and Technology
6K. Fine Arts (including, but not limited to Music, Theater, Sculpture, Motion Picture Arts and Sciences
and Photography)
6L. Estate Management
6M. linguistics
6N. Law (including Judicature and all branches and specialties in the practice of Law, except in Law
Enforcement)
Group (7)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (8)
8B. Communication Media (including Television and Film)
8C. Electrical Communication Technology
80. Radio Operation
8E. Airplane Piloting (including, but not limited to Airline Piloting)
8F. Merchant Marine
8G. Architecture (including Marine Architecture)
8H. Construction (including, but not limited to builders, but not including skilled and unskilled laborers)
81. Construction-Project Management
8J. Drafting
8K. Skilled Operation of Construction Machines

Group (9)
All fields listed in part I.

Senegal
Group (1)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (2)
2A. General Practice of Medicine (including Osteopaths who also practice medicine)
28. Recognized Medical Specializations (including, but not limited to: Anesthesiology, Audiology,
Cardiography, Cardiology, Dermatology, Embryology, Epidemiology, Forensic Medicine, Gastroenterology,
Hematology, Immunology, Internal Medicine, Neurological Surgery, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Oncology,
Ophthalmology, Orthopedic Surgery, Otolaryngology, Pathology, Pediatrics, Pharmacology and
Pharmaceutics, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiology, Plastic Surgery, Preventive Medicine,
Proctology, Psychiatry and Neurology, Radiology, Speech Pathology, Sports Medicine, Surgery, Thoracic
Surgery, Toxicology, Urology and Virology)
2C. Veterinary Medicine
20. Emergency Medicine
2E. Nuclear Medicine
2F. Geriatrics
2G. Nursing (including, but not limited to registered nurses, practical nurses, physician's receptionists
and medical records clerks)
2H. Medical Instruments and Technology
21. Dentistry
2J. Dental Technology

2K. Optometry
2L. Chiropractic and Osteopathy (not including osteopathic physicians who also practice medicine)
2M. Medical Cybernetics
2N. All Therapies, Prosthetics and Healing (except Medicine, Osteopathy or Osteopathic Medicine,
Nursing, Dentistry, Chiropractic and Optometry)
20. Medical Statistics and Documentation
2P. Cancer Research

20. Medical Photography
2R. Environmental Health
Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (4)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (5)
5A. Chemistry (including all branches and specialties in Chemistry, except in Pharmacy and Chemical
Engineering)
5B. Life Sciences (including, but not limited to: Pharmacy and Biology)
5C. Study of Drugs and Allied Sciences
50. Physics (including physical chemists, metallurgists and all branches and specialties in Physics)
5E. Genetics
5F. Mathematics
5G. Laboratory Technology (including, but not limited to: physical and chemistry laboratory technicians)

5H. Metal Fabrication (including, but not limited to skilled metal crafts workers)
51. Atmospheric-Hydrospheric Sciences (including, but not limited to: Marine Science, Meteorology and
Oceanography)
5J. Astronomy and Space Technology
5K. Repair and Maintenance Technology
5L. Agriculture and Agronomy (including, but not limited to: veterinarians, plant pathologists, poultry and
dairy scientists, animal husbandry and animal nutrition)
5M. Food Science and Technology
5N. Zoology (inclUding Animal Behavior and Physiology)
50. Forestry
5P. Fisheries (or other marine products)
50. Geology (including all branches and specialties, e.g. Oceanology, and all branches of Applied
Geology including geophysicists and geochemists)
5R. Hydrology (inclUding, but not limited to Water Pollution)
5S. Ecology and Environmental Protection (including Conservation)
5U. Population Studies
Group (6)
6C. History (including Art History)
60. Philosophy (including Humanities)
6E. Anthropology and Archaeology
6F. Demography
6G. Government and Politics (including, but not limited to International Relations)
6H. Economics

61. Literature
6J. Instructional Media and Technology
6K. Fine Arts (including, but not limited to Music, Theater, Sculpture, Motion Picture Arts and Sciences,
and Photography)
6L. Estate Management
6M. Linguistics
Group (7)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (8)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (9)
All fields listed in part I.

Sierra Leone
Group (1)
1C. Public Social Services
1E. Drug Abuse and Narcotics Control
1G. Tourism and Travel
1N. Hospital Administration
Group (2)
2C. Veterinary Medicine
20. Emergency Medicine
2P. Cancer Research
2R. Environmental Health
Group (3)
38. Information Science and Systems Analysis
Group (4)
48. Cartography
40. Civil Engineering (including Airport Engineering)
4F. Computer Engineering and Technologies
4H. Electronic Engineering (including Radio Engineering)

4J. Genetic and Biomedical Engineering
4K. Industrial Engineering
4L. Marine and Aeronautical Engineering and Technology (including, but not limited to: Marine and Flight
Engineers)
4M. Materials Engineering and Sciences (including, but not limited to: textiles, plastics, wood, paper and
metal, but not including metal fabrication)
40. Mining and Lumbering Engineering and Technology
4P. Navigation and Transportation Engineering
40. Optical Engineering (including, but not limited to: light and sound technology)
4R. Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering and Technology
4S. Printing and Photographic Engineering and Technology
4T. Surveying (including Oceanography)
Group (5)
5A. Chemistry (including all branches and specialties in Chemistry, except in Pharmacy and Chemical
Engineering)
5G. Laboratory Technology (including, but not limited to: physical and chemistry laboratory technicians)
5H. Metal Fabrication (including, but not limited to skilled metal crafts workers)
5L. Agriculture and Agronomy (including, but not limited to: veterinarians, plant pathologists, poultry and
dairy scientists, animal husbandry and animal nutrition)
5M. Food Science and Technology
50. Geology (including all branches and specialties, e.g. Oceanology, and all branches of Applied
Geology including geophysicists and geochemists)
5R. Hydrology (including, but not limited to Water Pollution)
5S. Ecology and Environmental Protection (including Conservation)

5U. Population Studies
Group (6)
6K. Fine Arts (including, but not limited to Music, Theater, Sculpture, Motion Picture Arts and Sciences,
and Photography)
Group (7)
7B. Educational Testing, Evaluation and Measurement
7K. Education of the Physically Handicapped (including Education of the Mentally Retarded and
Emotionally Disturbed)
7L. Education of Exceptional Children
7P. Career Guidance and Counseling
Group (8)
8A. Journalism (including, but not limited to editors and reporters, and including text-book writers,
interpreters and translators)
8G. Architecture (including Marine Architecture)
8H. Construction (including, but not limited to builders, but not including skilled and unskilled laborers)
Group (9)
90. Farm Management and Administration

Singapore
Group (1)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (2)
2A. General Practice of Medicine (including Osteopaths who also practice medicine)
2B. Recognized Medical Specializations (including, but not limited to: Anesthesiology, Audiology,
Cardiography, Cardiology, Dermatology, Embryology, Epidemiology, Forensic Medicine, Gastroenterology,
Hematology, Immunology, Internal Medicine, Neurological Surgery, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Oncology,
Ophthalmology, Orthopedic Surgery, Otolaryngology, Pathology, Pediatrics, Pharmacology and
Pharmaceutics, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiology, Plastic Surgery, Preventive Medicine,
Proctology, Psychiatry and Neurology, Radiology, Speech Pathology, Sports Medicine, Surgery, Thoracic
Surgery, Toxicology, Urology and Virology)
2C. Veterinary Medicine
20. Emergency Medicine
2E. Nuclear Medicine
2F. Geriatrics
2K. Optometry
2M. Medical Cybernetics
2N. All Therapies, Prosthetics and Healing (except Medicine, Osteopathy or Osteopathic Medicine,
Nursing, Dentistry, Chiropractic and Optometry)
20. Medical Statistics and Documentation

2P. Cancer Research

20. Medical Photography
2R. Environmental Health
Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (4)
4A. Aerospace Engineering
48. Cartography
4C. Chemical Engineering
40. Civil Engineering (including Airport Engineering)
4E. Communication Engineering
4F. Computer Engineering and Technologies
4G. Electrical Engineering
4H. Electronic Engineering (including Radio Engineering)
41. Energy Engineering and Technology (but not including Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering and
Technology)
4J. Genetic and Biomedical Engineering
4K. Industrial Engineering
4L. Marine and Aeronautical Engineering and Technology (including, but not limited to: Marine and Flight
Engineers)
4M. Materials Engineering and Sciences (including, but not limited to: textiles, plastics, wood, paper and
metal, but not including Metal Fabrication)
4N. Mechanical Engineering (inclUding, but not limited to: systems, safety, and production engineers, and
including Automatic Data Processing)

4P. Navigation and Transportation Engineering
4Q. Optical Engineering (including, but not limited to: light and sound technology)
4R. Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering and Technology
4S. Printing and Photographic Engineering and Technology
41. Surveying (including Oceanography)
Group (5)
5C. Study of Drugs and Allied Sciences
50. Physics (including physical chemists, metallurgists and all branches and specialties in Physics)
5E. Genetics
5F. Mathematics
5G. Laboratory Technology (including, but not limited to: physical and chemistry laboratory technicians)
5H. Metal Fabrication (including, but not limited to skilled metal crafts workers)
51. Atmospheric-Hydrospheric Sciences (including, but not limited to: Marine Science, Meteorology and
Oceanography)
5J. Astronomy and Space Technology
5K. Repair and Maintenance Technology
5L. Agriculture and Agronomy (including, but not limited to: veterinarians, plant pathologists, poultry and
dairy scientists, animal husbandry and animal nutrition)
5M. Food Science and Technology
5N. Zoology (including Animal Behavior and Physiology)
5P. Fisheries (or other marine products)
5R. Hydrology (including, but not limited to Water Pollution)
5S. Ecology and Environmental Protection (including Conservation)

5T. Desalinization
5U. Population Studies
Group (6)
6B. Psychology (including, but not limited to Psychometrics, Child Psychology and Psychobiology)
6C. History (including Art History)
60. Philosophy (including Humanities)
6E. Anthropology and Archaeology
6F. Demography
6G. Government and Politics (including, but not limited to International Relations)
6H. Economics
61. Literature
6J. Instructional Media and Technology
6K. Fine Arts (including, but not limited to Music, Theater, Sculpture, Motion Picture Arts and Sciences,
and Photography)
6L. Estate Management
6M. linguistics
Group (7)
7A. Teaching and Religious Education
7B. Educational Testing, Evaluation and Measurement
7E. Vocational and Technical School Teaching
7F. College and University Teaching in Natural Sciences, Mathematics, Engineering and Technology
(except Agriculture)
7G. College and University Teaching of Social Sciences, Liberal Arts and Literature (including Foreign

Language Education)
7H. College and University Teaching of Education
71. College and University Teaching of Business
7K. Education of the Physically Handicapped (including Education of the Mentally Retarded and
Emotionally Disturbed)
7L. Education of Exceptional Children
7M. Physical Education and Recreation (including, but not limited to Coaching)
7N. Teaching in Medical Schools (including, but not limited to lecturers)
70. Teaching in Law Schools (including, but not limited to lecturers)
7P. Career Guidance and Counseling
Group (8)
8B. Communication Media (including Television and Film)
8C. Electrical Communication Technology
8E. Airplane Piloting (including, but not limited to Airline Piloting)
8F. Merchant Marine
8G. Architecture (including Marine Architecture)
8H. Construction (including, but not limited to builders, but not including skilled and unskilled laborers)
81. Construction-Project Management
8K. Skilled Operation of Construction Machines
Group (9)
9A. Industrial and Business Administration and Management (including, but not limited to: programmers
and Project Evaluation, Business, Total Quality Management)
9B. International Business and Commerce

9C. Industrial Organization
90. Labor and Industrial Relations
9E. Economic Development and Planning (including Rural Development)
9F. Economic Information Analysis (including, but not limited to Management Studies)
9G. Accounting
9H. Cybernetic Technology
91. Statistics
9J. Insurance (including Actuaries)
9K. Administration of Financial Institutions including, but not limited to Savings and Loan Organizations
and Credit Unions)
9L. Financial Planning
9M. Operations Research
9N. Banking
90. Farm Management and Administration
9P. Hotel and Motel Management

5

Somalia
Group (1)
1A. Public Administration (including but not limited To: City Planning, Urban Studies/Planning, Urban
Transportation, and Public Health)
1B. Public Social Administration (including, but not limited to: Welfare, Dietetics, Nutrition, Family
Planning and Public Health)
1C. Public Social Services
1D. Sanitation
1E. Drug Abuse and Narcotics Control
1F. International Health
1G. Tourism and Travel
1H. Law Enforcement and Corrections (including, but not limited to the Administration of Justice)
11. Parks and Recreation Management (including, but not limited to Wildlife Management)
1J. Primary School Administration
1K. Secondary School Administration
1L. College, University and Higher Education Administration
1M. Technical or Vocational School Administration
1N. Hospital Administration
Group (2)

All fields listed in part I.
Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (4)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (5)
5A. Chemistry (including all branches and specialties in Chemistry, except in Pharmacy and Chemical
Engineering)
5B. Life Sciences (including, but not limited to: Pharmacy and Biology)
5C. Study of Drugs and Allied Sciences
5E. Genetics
5F. Mathematics
5G. Laboratory Technology (including, but not limited to:
physical and chemistry laboratory technicians)
5H. Metal Fabrication (including, but not limited to skilled metal crafts workers)
51. Atmospheric-Hydrospheric Sciences (including, but not limited to: Marine Science, Meteorology and
Oceanography)
5J. Astronomy and Space Technology
5K. Repair and Maintenance Technology
5L. Agriculture and Agronomy (including, but not limited to: veterinarians, plant pathologists, poultry and
dairy scientists, animal husbandry and animal nutrition)
5M. Food Science and Technology
5N. Zoology (including Animal Behavior and Physiology)

50. Forestry
50. Geology (including all branches and specialties, e.g. Oceanology, and all branches of Applied
Geology including geophysicists and geochemists)
5R. Hydrology (including, but not limited to Water Pollution)
5S. Ecology and Environmental Protection (including Conservation)
5T. Desalinization
5U. Population Studies
Group (6)
6A. Sociology (except Economics and including Criminology)
68. Psychology (including, but not limited to Psychometrics, Child Psychology and Psychobiology)
6C. History (including Art History)
60. Philosophy (including Humanities)
6E. Anthropology and Archaeology
6F. Demography
6G. Government and Politics (including, but not limited to International Relations)
6H. Economics
61. Literatu re
6J. Instructional Media and Technology
6K. Fine Arts (including, but not limited to Music, Theater, Sculpture, Motion Picture Arts and Sciences,
and Photography)
6L. Estate Management
6M. Linguistics
6N. Law (including Judicature and all branches and specialties in the practice of Law, except in Law

Enforcement)
Group (7)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (8)
8A. Journalism (including, but not limited to editors and reporters, and including text-book writers,
interpreters and translators)
8B. Communication Media (including Television and Film)
8C. Electrical Communication Technology
80. Radio Operation
8F. Merchant Marine
8G. Architecture (including Marine Architecture)
8H. Construction (including, but not limited to builders, but not including skilled and unskilled laborers)
81. Construction-Project Management
8J. Drafting
8K. Skilled Operation of Construction Machines
Group (9)
9A. Industrial and Business Administration and Management (including, but not limited to: programmers
and Project Evaluation, Business, Total Quality Management)
9B. International Business and Commerce
9C. Industrial Organization
90. Labor and Industrial Relations
9E. Economic Development and Planning (including Rural Development)
9F. Economic Information Analysis (including, but not limited to Management Studies)
9G. Accounting

9H. Cybernetic Technology
91. Statistics
9K. Administration of Financial Institutions (including, but not limited to Savings and Loan Organizations
and Credit Unions)
9L. Financial Planning
9M. Operations Research
9N. Banking
90. Farm Management and Administration
9P. Hotel and Motel Management
Group (10)
10A. Library Science (including, but not limited to Electronic Data Storage and Retrieval)

Sri Lanka (including Maldives)
Group (1)
1A. Public Administration (including, but not limited to Public Health and Urban Studies/Planning and
Urban Transportation)
1C. Public Social Services
1D. Sanitation
1E. Drug Abuse and Narcotics Control
1F. International Health
1G. Tourism and Travel
1H. Law Enforcement and Corrections (including, but not limited to the Administration of Justice)
11. Parks and Recreation Management (including, but not limited to Wildlife Management)
1L. College, University and Higher Education Administration
Group (2)
2A. General Practice of Medicine (inclUding Osteopaths who also practice medicine)
28. Recognized Medical Specializations (including, but not limited to: Anesthesiology, Audiology,
Cardiography, Cardiology, Dermatology, Embryology, Epidemiology, Forensic Medicine, Gastroenterology,
Hematology, Immunology, Internal Medicine, Neurological Surgery, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Oncology,
Ophthalmology, Orthopedic Surgery, Otolaryngology, Pathology, Pediatrics, Pharmacology and
Pharmaceutics, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiology, Plastic Surgery, Preventive Medicine,
Proctology, Psychiatry and Neurology, Radiology, Speech Pathology, Sports Medicine, Surgery, Thoracic
Surgery, Toxicology, Urology and Virology)

2C. Veterinary Medicine
20. Emergency Medicine
2E. Nuclear Medicine
2F. Geriatrics
2G. Nursing (including, but not limited to Registered Nurses, Practical Nurses, Physician's Receptionists
and Medical Records Clerks)
2M. Medical Cybernetics
20. Medical Statistics and Documentation
2P. Cancer Research
20. Medical Photography
2R. Environmental Health
2S. Medical Research
Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (4)
4A. Aerospace Engineering
48. Cartography
4C. Chemical Engineering
40. Civil Engineering (including Airport Engineering)
4E. Communication Engineering
4F. Computer Engineering and Technologies
4G. Electrical Engineering

4H. Electronic Engineering (including Radio Engineering)
41. Energy Engineering and Technology (but not including Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering and
Technology)
4J. Genetic and Biomedical Engineering
4K. Industrial Engineering
4L. Marine and Aeronautical Engineering and Technology (including, but not limited to: Marine and Flight
Engineers)
4M. Materials Engineering and Sciences (including, but not limited to: textiles, Plastics, Wood, Paper and
Metal, but not including Metal Fabrication)
4N. Mechanical Engineering (including, but not limited to: systems, safety, and production engineers, and
including Automatic Data Processing)
4P. Navigation and Transportation Engineering

40. Optical Engineering (inclUding, but not limited to: light and sound technology)
4R. Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering and Technology
4S. Printing and Photographic Engineering and Technology
4U. Agricultural Engineering
4V. Nuclear Engineering
4W. Natural Resource Management Engineering (including, but not limited to Water Resource
Management)
4X. Environmental Engineering
Group (5)
5A. Chemistry (including all branches and specialties in Chemistry, except in Pharmacy and Chemical
Engineering)
58. Life Sciences (including, but not limited to: Pharmacy and Biology)
5C. StUdy of Drugs and Allied Sciences

5D. Optics and Physics (including Physical Chemists,metallurgists and all branches and specialties in
Physics)
5E. Genetics
5F. Mathematics
51. Atmospheric-Hydrospheric Sciences (including, but not limited to: Marine Science, Meteorology and
Oceanography)
5J. Astronomy and Space Technology
5K. Repair and Maintenance Technology
5M. Food Science and Technology
5N. Zoology (including Animal Behavior and Physiology)
5P. Fisheries (or other marine products)
5S. Ecology and Environmental Protection (including
Conservation)
5U. Population Studies
5V. Botany
5W, Entomology
Group (6)
6A. Sociology (except Economics and including Criminology)
6B. Psychology (including, but not limited to Psychometrics, Child Psychology and Psychobiology)
6C. History (including Art History)
6D. Philosophy (inclUding Humanities)
6E. Anthropology and Archaeology
6F. Demography

6G. Government and Politics (including, but not limited to
International Relations)
61. Literature
6J. Instructional Media and Technology
6K. Fine Arts (including, but not limited to Music, Theater, Sculpture, Motion Picture Arts and Sciences,
and Photography)
6L. Estate Management
6M. Linguistics
60. Religion and Theology (including, but not limited to Ministry)
6P. Cultural Diversity (including, but not limited to Women's, Minority, Ethnic and Area Studies)
60. Fashion and Textile Design
6S. Geography
61. Home Economics
6U. Language Studies
Group (7)
7A. Teaching and Religious Education
7B. Educational Testing, Evaluation and Measurement
7C. Primary School Teaching (including, but not limited to Nursery Schools and Kindergartens)
70. Secondary School Teaching (including, but not limited to Remedial Teaching and Teaching of
English as a Foreign Language)
71. College and University Teaching of Business
7K. Education of the Physically Handicapped (including Education of the Mentally Retarded and
Emotionally Disturbed)
7L. Education of Exceptional Children

7M. Physical Education and Recreation (including, but not limited to Coaching)
7N. Teaching in Medical Schools (including, but not limited to lecturers)
70. Teaching in Law Schools (including, but not limited to lecturers)
7P. Career Guidance and Counseling
7R. Educational Technology (Instructional systems Technology)
7S. Educational Psychology
71. Curriculum Planning
Group (8)
8B. Communication Media (including Television and Film)
8F. Merchant Marine
81. Construction-Project Management
8L. Telecommunications
Group (9)
9A. Industrial and Business Administration and Management (including, but not limited to: programmers
and Project Evaluation, Business, Total Quality Management)
9B. International Business and Commerce
9C. Industrial Organization
90. Labor and Industrial Relations
9E. Economic Development and Planning (including Rural
Development)
9F. Economic Information Analysis (including, but not limited to Management Studies)
9G. Accounting
9H. Cybernetic Technology

9L. Financial Planning
9M. Operations Research
90. Farm Management and Administration
9P. Hotel and Motel Management
9R. Marketing
98. Finance

Sudan

Group (1)
1A. Public Administration (including, but not limited to Public Health and Urban Studies/Planning and
Urban Transportation)
1B. Public Social Administration (including, but not limited to: Welfare, Dietetics, Nutrition, Family
Planning and Public Health)
1C. Public Social Services
1D. Sanitation
1E. Drug Abuse and Narcotics Control
1F. International Health
1G. Tourism and Travel
1H. Law Enforcement and Corrections (including, but not limited to the Administration of Justice)

11. Parks and Recreation Management (including, but not limited to Wildlife Management)
1J. Primary School Administration
1K. Secondary School Administration
1L. College, University and Higher Education Administration
1M. Technical or Vocational School Administration
1N. Hospital Administration
Group (2)

All fields listed in part I.
Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (4)
4A. Aerospace Engineering
4B. Cartography
4C. Chemical Engineering
4D. Civil Engineering (including Airport Engineering)
4E. Communication Engineering
4F. Computer Engineering and Technologies
4G. Electrical Engineering
4H. Electronic Engineering (including Radio Engineering)
41. Energy Engineering and Technology (but not including Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering and
Technology)
4J. Genetic and Biomedical Engineering
4K. Industrial Engineering
4L. Marine and Aeronautical Engineering and Technology (including, but not limited to: Marine and Flight
Engineers)
4M. Materials Engineering and Sciences (including, but not limited to: textiles, plastics, wood, paper and
metal, but not including Metal Fabrication)
4N. Mechanical Engineering (including, but not limited to: systems, safety, and production engineers, and
including Automatic Data Processing)
4P. Navigation and Transportation Engineering

4Q. Optical Engineering (including, but not limited to: light and sound technology)
4R. Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering and Technology
4S. Printing and Photographic Engineering and Technology
4T. Surveying (including Oceanography)
Group (5)
5A. Chemistry (including all branches and specialties in Chemistry, except in Pharmacy and Chemical
Engineering)
5B. Life Sciences (including, but not limited to: Pharmacy and Biology)
5C. Study of Drugs and Allied Sciences
50. Optics and Physics (including physical chemists, metallurgists and all branches and specialties in
Physics)
5E. Genetics
5F. Mathematics
5G. Laboratory Technology (including, but not limited to: physical and chemistry laboratory technicians)
51. Atmospheric-Hydrospheric Sciences (including, but not limited to: Marine Science, Meteorology and
Oceanography)
5J. Astronomy and Space Technology
5K. Repair and Maintenance Technology
5L. Agriculture and Agronomy (including, but not limited to: veterinarians, plant pathologists, poultry and
dairy scientists, animal husbandry and animal nutrition)
5M. Food Science and Technology
5N. Zoology (including Animal Behavior and Physiology)
5P. Fisheries (or other marine products)
5Q. Geology (including all branches and specialties, e.g. Oceanology, and all branches of Applied

Geology including geophysicists and geochemists)
5R. Hydrology (including, but not limited to Water Pollution)
5S. Ecology and Environmental Protection (including Conservation)
5T. Desalinization
5U. Population Studies
Group (6)
6A. Sociology (except Economics and including Criminology)
68. Psychology (including, but not limited to Psychometrics, Child Psychology and Psychobiology)
6C. History (including Art History)
60. Philosophy (including Humanities)
6E. Anthropology and Archaeology
6F. Demography
6G. Government and Politics (including, but not limited to International Relations)
6H. Economics
61. Literature
6J. Instructional Media and Technology
6K. Fine Arts (including, but not limited to Music, Theater, Sculpture, Motion Picture Arts and Sciences,
and Photography)
6L. Estate Management
6M. Linguistics
6N. Law (including Judicature and all branches and specialties in the practice of Law, except in Law
Enforcement)
Group (7)

7A. Teaching and Religious Education
7B. Educational Testing, Evaluation and Measurement
7C. Primary School Teaching (including, but not limited to Nursery Schools and Kindergartens)
70. Secondary School Teaching (including, but not limited to Remedial Teaching and Teaching of
English as a Foreign Language)
7E. Vocational and Technical School Teaching
7F. College and University Teaching in Natural Sciences, Mathematics, Engineering and Technology
(except Agriculture)
71. College and University Teaching of Business
7J. Agricultural School Teaching
7K. Education of the Physically Handicapped (including Education of the Mentally Retarded and
Emotionally Disturbed)
7L. Education of Exceptional Children
7M. Physical Education and Recreation (including, but not limited to Coaching)
7N. Teaching in Medical Schools (including, but not limited to lecturers)
7P. Career Guidance and Counseling
Group (8)
8A. Journalism (including, but not limited to editors and reporters, and including textbook writers,
interpreters and translators)
8B. Communication Media (including Television and Film)
8C. Electrical Communication Technology
80. Radio Operation
8E. Airplane Piloting (including, but not limited to Airline Piloting)
8F. Merchant Marine

8G. Architecture (including Marine Architecture)
8H. Construction (including, but not limited to builders, but not including skilled and unskilled laborers)
81. Construction-Project Management
8J. Drafting
8K. Skilled Operation of Construction Machines
Group (9)
9A. Industrial and Business Administration and Management (including, but not limited to: programmers
and Project Evaluation, Business, Total Quality Management)
9B. International Business and Commerce
9C. Industrial Organization
90. Labor and Industrial Relations
9E. Economic Development and Planning (including Rural Development)
9F. Economic Information Analysis (including, but not limited to Management Studies)
9G. Accounting
9H. Cybernetic Technology
91. Statistics
9J. Insurance (including Actuaries)
9K. Administration of Financial Institutions (including, but not limited to Savings and Loan Organizations
and Credit Unions)
9L. Financial Planning
9M. Operations Research
9N. Banking
90. Farm Management and Administration

gP. Hotel and Motel Management

Swaziland
Group (1)
1A. Public Administration (including, but not limited to: City Planning, Urban Studies/Planning, Urban
Transportation, and Public Health)
1B. Public Social Administration (including, but not limited to: Welfare, Dietetics, Nutrition, Family
Planning and Public Health)
1C. Public Social Services
1D. Sanitation
1E. Drug Abuse and Narcotics Control
1F. International Health
1G. Tourism and Travel
1H. Law Enforcement and Corrections (including, but not limited to the Administration of Justice)
11. Parks and Recreation Management (including, but not limited to Wildlife Management)
1J. Primary School Administration
1K. Secondary School Administration
1L. College, University and Higher Education Administration
1M. Technical or Vocational School Administration
1N. Hospital Administration
Group (2)

All fields listed in part I.
Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (4)
4A. Aerospace Engineering
4B. Cartography
4C. Chemical Engineering
4D. Civil Engineering (including Airport Engineering)
4E. Communication Engineering
4F. Computer Engineering and Technologies
4G. Electrical Engineering
4H. Electronic Engineering (including Radio Engineering)
41. Energy Engineering and Technology (but not including Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering and
Technology)
4J. Genetic and Biomedical Engineering
4K. Industrial Engineering
4M. Materials Engineering and Sciences (including, but not limited to: textiles, plastics, wood, paper and
metal, but not including Metal Fabrication)
4N. Mechanical Engineering (including, but not limited to: systems, safety, and production engineers, and
including Automatic Data Processing)
40. Mining and Lumbering Engineering and Technology
4P. Navigation and Transportation Engineering
40. Optical Engineering (inclUding, but not limited to: light and sound technology)

4R. Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering and Technology
4S. Printing and Photographic Engineering and Technology
4T. Surveying (including Oceanography)
Group (5)
5A. Chemistry (including all branches and specialties in Chemistry, except in Pharmacy and Chemical
Engineering)
5B. Life Sciences (including, but not limited to: Pharmacy and Biology)
5C. Study of Drugs and Allied Sciences
50. Optics and Physics (including physical chemists, metallurgists and all branches and specialties in
Physics)
5E. Genetics
5F. Mathematics
5G. Laboratory Technology (including, but not limited to: physical and chemistry laboratory technicians)
5H. Metal Fabrication (including, but not limited to skilled metal crafts workers)
51. Atmospheric-Hydrospheric Sciences (including, but not limited to: Marine Science, Meteorology and
Oceanography)
5J. Astronomy and Space Technology
5K. Repair and Maintenance Technology
5L. Agriculture and Agronomy (including, but not limited to: veterinarians, plant pathologists, poultry and
dairy scientists, animal husbandry and animal nutrition)
5M. Food Science and Technology
5N. Zoology (including Animal Behavior and Physiology)
50. Forestry
50. Geology (including all branches and specialties, e.g. Oceanology, and all branches of Applied

Geology including geophysicists and geochemists)
5R. Hydrology (including, but not limited to Water Pollution)
5S. Ecology and Environmental Protection (including Conservation)
5U. Population Studies
Group (6)
6A. Sociology (except Economics and including Criminology)
68. Psychology (including, but not limited to Psychometrics, Child Psychology and Psychobiology)
6C. History (including Art History)
60. Philosophy (including Humanities)
6E. Anthropology and Archaeology
6F. Demography
6G. Government and Politics (including, but not limited to International Relations)
6H. Economics
61. Literature
6J. Instructional Media and Technology
6K. Fine Arts (including, but not limited to Music, Theater, Sculpture, Motion Picture Arts and Sciences,
and Photography)
6L. Estate Management
6M. linguistics
6N. Law (including Judicature and all branches and specialties in the practice of Law, except in Law
Enforcement)
Group (7)
7A. Teaching and Religious Education

7B. Educational Testing, Evaluation and Measurement
7C. Primary School Teaching (including, but not limited to Nursery Schools and Kindergartens)
70. Secondary School Teaching (including, but not limited to Remedial Teaching and Teaching of
English as a Foreign Language)
7E. Vocational and Technical School Teaching
7F. College and University Teaching in Natural Sciences, Mathematics, Engineering and Technology
(except Agriculture)
7G. College and University Teaching of Social Sciences, Liberal Arts and Literature (including Foreign
Language Education)
7H. College and University Teaching of Education
71. College and University Teaching of Business
7J. Agricultural School Teaching
7K. Education of the Physically Handicapped (including Education of the Mentally Retarded and
Emotionally Disturbed)
7L. Education of Exceptional Children
7M. Physical Education and Recreation including, but not limited to Coaching)
7P. Career Guidance and Counseling
Group (8)
8A. Journalism (including, but not limited to editors and reporters, and including textbook writers,
interpreters and translators)
8B. Communication Media (including Television and Film)
8C. Electrical Communication Technology
80. Radio Operation
8F. Merchant Marine

8G. Architecture (including Marine Architecture)
8H. Construction (including, but not limited to builders, but not including skilled and unskilled laborers)
81. Construction-Project Management
8J. Drafting
8K. Skilled Operation of Construction Machines
Group (9)
9A. Industrial and Business Administration and Management (including, but not limited to: programmers
and Project Evaluation, Business, Total Quality Management)
9B. International Business and Commerce
9C. Industrial Organization
90. Labor and Industrial Relations
9E. Economic Development and Planning (including Rural Development)
9F. Economic Information Analysis (including, but not limited to Management Studies)
9G. Accounting
9H. Cybernetic Technology
91. Statistics
9K. Administration of Financial Institutions (including, but not limited to Savings and Loan Organizations
and Credit Unions)
9L. Financial Planning
9M. Operations Research
9N. Banking
90. Farm Management and Administration
9P. Hotel and Motel Management

Group (10)
10A. Library Science (including, but not limited to Electronic Data Storage and Retrieval)

Tanzania
Group (1)
1A. Public Administration (including, but not limited to: City Planning, Urban Studies/Planning, Urban
Transportation, and Public Health)
1B. Public Social Administration (including, but not limited To: Welfare, Dietetics, Nutrition, Family
Planning and Public Health)
1C. Public Social Services
1D. Sanitation
1E. Drug Abuse and Narcotics Control
1F. International Health
1G. Tourism and Travel
1H. Law Enforcement and Corrections (including, but not
limited to the Administration of Justice)
11. Parks and Recreation Management (including, but not limited to Wildlife Management)
1J. Primary School Administration
1K. Secondary School Administration
1L. College, University and Higher Education Administration
1M. Technical or Vocational School Administration
1N. Hospital Administration

Group (2)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (4)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (5)
5A. Chemistry (including all branches and specialties in Chemistry, except in Pharmacy and Chemical
Engineering)
5B. Life Sciences (including, but not limited to: Pharmacy and Biology)
5C. Study of Drugs and Allied Sciences
5E. Genetics
5F. Mathematics
5G. Laboratory Technology (including, but not limited to: physical and chemistry laboratory technicians)
5H. Metal Fabrication (including, but not limited to skilled metal crafts workers)
51. Atmospheric-Hydrospheric Sciences (including, but not limited to: Marine Science, Meteorology and
Oceanography)
5J. Astronomy and Space Technology
5K. Repair and Maintenance Technology
5L. Agriculture and Agronomy (including, but not limited to: veterinarians, plant pathologists, poultry and
dairy scientists, animal husbandry and animal nutrition)
5M. Food Science and Technology
5N. Zoology (including Animal Behavior and Physiology)

50. Forestry
5P. Fisheries (or other marine products)

50. Geology (including all branches and specialties, e.g. Oceanology, and all branches of Applied
Geology including geophysicists and geochemists)
5R. Hydrology (including, but not limited to Water Pollution)
5S. Ecology and Environmental Protection (including Conservation)
5U. Population Studies
Group (6)
6A. Sociology (except Economics and including Criminology)
68. Psychology (including, but not limited to Psychometrics, Child Psychology and Psychobiology)
6C. History (including Art History)
60. Philosophy (including Humanities)
6E. Anthropology and Archaeology
6F. Demography
6G. Government and Politics (including, but not limited to International Relations)
6H. Economics
61. Literature
6J. Instructional Media and Technology
6K. Fine Arts (including, but not limited to Music, Theater, Sculpture, Motion Picture Arts and Sciences
and Photography)
6L. Estate Management
6M. Linguistics
Group (7)

7A. Teaching and Religious Education
7B. Educational Testing, Evaluation and Measurement
7C. Primary School Teaching (including, but not limited to Nursery Schools and Kindergartens)
70. Secondary School Teaching (including, but not limited to Remedial Teaching and Teaching of
English as a Foreign Language)
7E. Vocational and Technical School Teaching
7F. College and University Teaching in Natural Sciences, Mathematics, Engineering and Technology
(except Agriculture)
7G. College and University Teaching of Social Sciences, Liberal Arts and Literature (including Foreign
Language Education)
7H. College and University Teaching of Education
71. College and University Teaching of Business
7J. Agricultural School Teaching
7K. Education of the Physically Handicapped (including Education of the Mentally Retarded and
Emotionally Disturbed)
7L. Education of Exceptional Children
7M. Physical Education and Recreation (including, but not limited to Coaching)
7N. Teaching in Medical Schools (including, but not limited to lecturers)
70. Teaching in Law Schools (including, but not limited to lecturers)
7P. Career Guidance and Counseling
Group (8)
8A. Journalism (including, but not limited to editors and reporters, and including text-book writers,
interpreters and translators)
8B. Communication Media (including Television and Film)

8C. Electrical Communication Technology
80. Radio Operation
8F. Merchant Marine
8G. Architecture (including Marine Architecture)
8H. Construction (including, but not limited to builders, but not including skilled and unskilled laborers)
81. Construction-Project Management
8J. Drafting
8K. Skilled Operation of Construction Machines
Group (9)
9A. Industrial and Business Administration and Management (including, but not limited to programmers
and Project Evaluation, Business, Total Quality Management)
9B. International Business and Commerce
9C. Industrial Organization
90. Labor and Industrial Relations
9E. Economic Development and Planning (including Rural Development)
9F. Economic Information Analysis (including, but not limited to Management Studies)
9G. Accounting
9H. Cybernetic Technology
91. Statistics
9K. Administration of Financial Institutions (including, but not limited to Savings and Loan Organizations
and Credit Unions)
9L. Financial Planning
9M. Operations Research

9N. Banking
90. Farm Management and Administration
9P. Hotel and Motel Management
Group (10)
10A. Library Science (including, but not limited to Electronic Data Storage and Retrieval)

Thailand
Group (1)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (2)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (4)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (5)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (6)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (7)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (8)
All fields listed in part I.

Group (9)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (10)
All fields listed in part I.

Togo

Group (1)
1A. Public Administration (including, but not limited to: City Planning, Urban Studies/Planning, Urban
Transportation, and Public Health)
1B. Public Social Administration (including, but not limited to: Welfare, Dietetics, Nutrition, Family
Planning and Public Health)
1C. Public Social Services
1D. Sanitation
1E. Drug Abuse and Narcotics Control
1F. International Health
1G. Tourism and Travel
1H. Law Enforcement and Corrections (including, but not limited to the Administration of Justice)

11. Parks and Recreation Management (including, but not limited to Wildlife Management)
1J. Primary School Administration
1K. Secondary School Administration
1L. College, University and Higher Education Administration
1M. Technical or Vocational School Administration
1N. Hospital Administration
Group (2)

All fields listed in part I
Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (4)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (5)
5A. Chemistry (including all branches and specialties in Chemistry, except in Pharmacy and Chemical
Engineering)
5B. Life Sciences (including, but not limited to: Pharmacy and Biology)
5C. Study of Drugs and Allied Sciences
50. Optics and Physics (including physical chemists, metallurgists and all branches and specialties in
Physics)
5E. Genetics
5G. Laboratory Technology (including, but not limited to: physical and chemistry laboratory technicians)
5H. Metal Fabrication (including, but not limited to skilled metal crafts workers)
51. Atmospheric-Hydrospheric Sciences (including, but not limited to: Marine Science, Meteorology and
Oceanography)
5J. Astronomy and Space Technology
5K. Repair and Maintenance Technology
5L. Agriculture and Agronomy (including, but not limited to: veterinarians, plant pathologists, poultry and
dairy scientists, animal husbandry and animal nutrition)
5M. Food Science and Technology
5N. Zoology (including Animal Behavior and Physiology)

50. Forestry
5P. Fisheries (or other marine products)

50. Geology (including all branches and specialties, e.g. Oceanology, and all branches of Applied
Geology including geophysicists and geochemists)
5R. Hydrology (including, but not limited to Water Pollution)
5S. Ecology and Environmental Protection (including Conservation)
51. Desalinization
5U. Population Studies
Group (6)
6C. History (including Art History)
60. Philosophy (including Humanities)
6E. Anthropology and Archaeology
6F. Demography
6G. Government and Politics (including, but not limited to International Relations)
6H. Economics
61. Literature
6J. Instructional Media and Technology
6K. Fine Arts (including, but not limited to Music, Theater, Sculpture, Motion Picture Arts and Sciences,
and Photography)
6L. Estate Management
6M. Linguistics
Group (7)
7A. Teaching and Religious Education

7B. Educational Testing, Evaluation and Measurement
70. Secondary School Teaching (inclUding, but not limited to Remedial Teaching and Teaching of
English as a Foreign Language)
7E. Vocational and Technical School Teaching
7F. College and University Teaching in Natural Sciences, Mathematics, Engineering and Technology
(except Agriculture)
7G. College and University Teaching of Social Sciences, Liberal Arts and Literature (inclUding Foreign
Language Education)
7H. College and University Teaching of Education
71. College and University Teaching of Business
7J. Agricultural School Teaching
7K. Education of the Physically Handicapped (including Education of the Mentally Retarded and
Emotionally Disturbed)
7L. Education of Exceptional Children
7M. Physical Education and Recreation (including, but not limited to Coaching)
7N. Teaching in Medical Schools (including, but not limited to lecturers)
7P. Career Guidance and Counseling
Group (8)
8B. Communication Media (including Television and Film)
8C. Electrical Communication Technology
8E. Airplane Piloting (including, but not limited to Airline Piloting)
8F. Merchant Marine
8G. Architecture (including Marine Architecture)
8H. Construction (including, but not limited to builders, but not including skilled and unskilled laborers)

81. Construction-Project Management
Group (9)
9A. Industrial and Business Administration and Management (including, but not limited to programmers
and Project Evaluation, Business, Total Quality Management)
9B. International Business and Commerce
9C. Industrial Organization
90. Labor and Industrial Relations
9E. Economic Development and Planning (including Rural Development)
9F. Economic Information Analysis (including, but not limited to Management Studies)
9G. Accounting
9H. Cybernetic Technology
91. Statistics
9K. Administration of Financial Institutions (including, but not limited to Savings and Loan Organizations
and Credit Unions)
9L. Financial Planning
9M. Operations Research
9N. Banking
90. Farm Management and Administration
9P. Hotel and Motel Management

Tonga
Group (1)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (2)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (4)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (5)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (6)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (7)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (8)
All fields listed in part I.

Group (9)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (10)
All fields listed in part I.

Trinidad and Tobago

Group (1)
1A. Public Administration (including, but not limited to: City Planning, Urban Studies/Planning, Urban
Transportation, and Public Health)
1B. Public Social Administration (including, but not limited to: Welfare, Dietetics, Nutrition, Family
Planning and Public Health)
1C. Public Social Services
1D. Sanitation
1E. Drug Abuse and Narcotics Control
1G. Tourism and Travel
1H. Law Enforcement and Corrections (including, but not limited to the Administration of Justice)
11. Parks and Recreation Management (including, but not limited to Wildlife Management)
1M. Technical or Vocational School Administration
1N. Hospital Administration
Group (2)
2B. Recognized Medical Specializations (including, but not limited to: Anesthesiology, Audiology,
Cardiography, Cardiology, Dermatology, Embryology, Epidemiology, Forensic Medicine, Gastroenterology,
Hematology, Immunology, Internal Medicine, Neurological Surgery, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Oncology,
Ophthalmology, Orthopedic Surgery, Otolaryngology, Pathology, Pediatrics, Pharmacology and
Pharmaceutics, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiology, Plastic Surgery, Preventive Medicine,
Proctology, Psychiatry and Neurology, Radiology, Speech Pathology, Sports Medicine, Surgery, Thoracic

Surgery, Toxicology, Urology and Virology)
2C. Veterinary Medicine
20. Emergency Medicine
2E. Nuclear Medicine
2F. Geriatrics
2G. Nursing (including, but not limited to Registered Nurses, Practical Nurses, Physician's Receptionists
and Medical Records Clerks)
2H. Medical Instruments and Technology
21. Dentistry
2M. Medical Cybernetics
20. Medical Statistics and Documentation
2P. Cancer Research
20. Medical Photography
2R. Environmental Health
Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (4)
4B. Cartography
4C. Chemical Engineering
40. Civil Engineering (including Airport Engineering)
4E. Communication Engineering
4F. Computer Engineering and Technologies
4H. Electronic Engineering (including Radio Engineering)

41. Energy Engineering and Technology (but not including Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering and
Technology)
4J. Genetic and Biomedical Engineering
4K. Industrial Engineering
4M. Materials Engineering and Sciences (including, but not limited to: textiles, plastics, wood, paper and
metal, but not including Metal Fabrication)
4N. Mechanical Engineering (inclUding, but not limited to: systems, safety, and production engineers, and
including Automatic Data Processing)
40. Mining and Lumbering Engineering and Technology
4P. Navigation and Transportation Engineering
40. Optical Engineering (inclUding, but not limited to: light and sound technology)
4R. Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering and Technology
4S. Printing and Photographic Engineering and Technology
4T. Surveying (including Oceanography)
4U. Agricultural Engineering
4W. Natural Resource Management Engineering (including, but not limited to Water Resource
Management)
4X. Environmental Engineering
Group (5)
5A. Chemistry (including all branches and specialties in Chemistry, except in Pharmacy and Chemical
Engineering)
5B. Life Sciences (including, but not limited to: Pharmacy and Biology)
5C. Study of Drugs and Allied Sciences
50. Optics and Physics (including physical chemists, metallurgists and all branches and specialties in
Physics)

5E. Genetics
5G. Laboratory Technology (including, but not limited to: physical and chemistry laboratory technicians)
5H. Metal Fabrication (including, but not limited to skilled metal crafts workers)
51. Atmospheric-Hydrospheric Sciences (including, but not limited to: Marine Science, Meteorology and
Oceanography)
5L. Agriculture and Agronomy (including, but not limited to: veterinarians, plant pathologists, poultry and
dairy scientists, animal husbandry and animal nutrition)
5M. Food Science and Technology
5N. Zoology (including Animal Behavior and Physiology)
50. Forestry
5P. Fisheries (or other marine products)
50. Geology (including all branches and specialties, e.g. Oceanology, and all branches of Applied
Geology including geophysicists and geochemists)
5R. Hydrology (including, but not limited to Water Pollution)
5S. Ecology and Environmental Protection (including Conservation)
5U. Population Studies
5V. Botany
Group (6)
6E. Anthropology and Archaeology
6F. Demography
6G. Government and Politics (including, but not limited to International Relations)
6J. Instructional Media and Technology
6L. Estate Management

6M. linguistics
Group (7)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (8)
88. Communication Media (including Television and Film)
8C. Electrical Communication Technology
8F. Merchant Marine
8G. Architecture (including Marine Architecture)
8H. Construction (including, but not limited to builders, but not including skilled and unskilled laborers)
81. Construction-Project Management
8K. Skilled Operation of Construction Machines
Group (9)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (10)
10A. Library Science (inclUding, but not limited to Electronic Data Storage and Retrieval)

Tunisia
Group (1)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (2)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (4)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (5)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (6)
6A. Sociology (except Economics and including Criminology)
68. Psychology (including, but not limited to Psychometrics, Child Psychology and Psychobiology)
6C. History (including Art History)
60. Philosophy (including Humanities)
6E. Anthropology and Archaeology

6F. Demography
6G. Government and Politics (including, but not limited to International Relations)
6H. Economics
61. Literature
6J. Instructional Media and Technology
6K. Fine Arts (including, but not limited to Music, Theater, Sculpture, Motion Picture Arts and Sciences,
and Photography)
6L. Estate Management
6M. Linguistics
Group (7)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (8)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (9)
All fields listed in part I.

Turkey
Group (1)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (2)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (4)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (5)
5A. Chemistry (including all branches and specialties in Chemistry, except in Pharmacy and Chemical
Engineering)
5B. Life Sciences (including, but not limited to: Pharmacy and Biology)
5C. Study of Drugs and Allied Sciences
50. Optics and Physics (including physical chemists, metallurgists and all branches and specialties in
Physics)
5E. Genetics
5F. Mathematics

5G. Laboratory Technology (including, but not limited to: physical and chemistry laboratory technicians)
5H. Metal Fabrication (including, but not limited to skilled metal crafts workers)
51. Atmospheric-Hydrospheric Sciences (including, but not limited to: Marine Science, Meteorology and
Oceanography)
5J. Astronomy and Space Technology
5K. Repair and Maintenance Technology
5L. Agriculture and Agronomy (including, but not limited to: veterinarians, plant pathologists, poultry and
dairy scientists, animal husbandry and animal nutrition)
5M. Food Science and Technology
5N. Zoology (inclUding Animal Behavior and Physiology)
5P. Fisheries (or other marine products)
5Q. Geology (including all branches and specialties, e.g. Oceanology, and all branches of Applied
Geology including geophysicists and geochemists)
5R. Hydrology (including, but not limited to Water Pollution)
5S. Ecology and Environmental Protection (including Conservation)
5T. Desalinization
5U. Population Studies
Group (6)
6A. Sociology (except Economics and inclUding Criminology)
6B. Psychology (including, but not limited to Psychometrics, Child Psychology and Psychobiology)
6C. History (including Art History)
60. Philosophy (including Humanities)
6E. Anthropology and Archaeology

6F. Demography
6G. Government and Politics (including, but not limited to International Relations)
6H. Economics
61. Literature
6J. Instructional Media and Technology
6K. Fine Arts (including, but not limited to Music, Theater, Sculpture, Motion Picture Arts and Sciences,
and Photography)
6L. Estate Management
6M. Linguistics
Group (7)
7A. Teaching and Religious Education
7B. Educational Testing, Evaluation and Measurement
7C. Primary School Teaching (including, but not limited to Nursery Schools and Kindergartens)
70. Secondary School Teaching (including, but not limited to Remedial Teaching and Teaching of
English as a Foreign Language)
7E. Vocational and Technical School Teaching
7F. College and University Teaching in Natural Sciences, Mathematics, Engineering and Technology
(except Agriculture)
7G. College and University Teaching of Social Sciences, Liberal Arts and Literature (including Foreign
Language Education)
7H. College and University Teaching of Education

71. College and University Teaching of Business
7J. Agricultural School Teaching
7K. Education of the Physically Handicapped (including Education of the Mentally Retarded and

Emotionally Disturbed)
7L. Education of Exceptional Children
7M. Physical Education and Recreation (including, but not limited to Coaching)
7N. Teaching in Medical Schools (including, but not limited to lecturers)
70. Teaching in Law Schools (including, but not limited to lecturers)
7P. Career Guidance and Counseling
Group (8)
8B. Communication Media (including Television and Film)
8F. Merchant Marine
81. Construction-Project Management
8K. Skilled Operation of Construction Machines
Group (9)
9A. Industrial and Business Administration and Management (including, but not limited to programmers
and Project Evaluation, Business, Total Quality Management)
9B. International Business and Commerce
9C. Industrial Organization
90. Labor and Industrial Relations
9E. Economic Development and Planning (including Rural Development)
9F. Economic Information Analysis (including, but not limited to Management Studies)
9G. Accounting
9H. Cybernetic Technology
91. Statistics

9J. Insurance (including Actuaries)
9L. Financial Planning
9M. Operations Research
90. Farm Management and Administration
9P. Hotel and Motel Management

Uganda
Group (1)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (2)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (4)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (5)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (6)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (7)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (8)
All fields listed in part I.

Group (9)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (10)
All fields listed in part I.

United Arab Emirates
Group (1)
1A. Public Administration (including, but not limited to: City Planning, Urban Studies/Planning, Urban
Transportation, and Public Health)
1B. Public Social Administration (including, but not limited to: Welfare, Dietetics, Nutrition, Family
Planning and Public Health)
1C. Public Social Services
1D. Sanitation
1E. Drug Abuse and Narcotics Control
1F. International Health
1G. Tourism and Travel
1H. Law Enforcement and Corrections (including, but not limited to the Administration of Justice)

11. Parks and Recreation Management (including, but not limited to Wildlife Management)
1K. Secondary School Administration
1L. College, University and Higher Education Administration
1M. Technical or Vocational School Administration
1N. Hospital Administration
Group (2)
All fields listed in part I.

Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (4)
4A. Aerospace Engineering
4B. Cartography
4C. Chemical Engineering
40. Civil Engineering (including Airport Engineering)
4E. Communication Engineering
4F. Computer Engineering and Technologies
4G. Electrical Engineering
4H. Electronic Engineering (including Radio Engineering)
41. Energy Engineering and Technology (but not including Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering and
Technology)
4J. Genetic and Biomedical Engineering
4K. Industrial Engineering
4L. Marine and Aeronautical Engineering and Technology (including, but not limited to: Marine and Flight
Engineers)
4M. Materials Engineering and Sciences (including, but not limited to: textiles, plastics, wood, paper and
metal, but not including Metal Fabrication)
4N. Mechanical Engineering (including, but not limited to: systems, safety, and production engineers, and
including Automatic Data Processing)
4P. Navigation and Transportation Engineering
40. Optical Engineering (including, but not limited to: light and sound technology)

4R. Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering and Technology
4S. Printing and Photographic Engineering and Technology
41. Surveying (inclUding Oceanography)
Group (5)
5A. Chemistry (including all branches and specialties in Chemistry, except in Pharmacy and Chemical
Engineering)
5B. life Sciences (including, but not limited to: Pharmacy and Biology)
5C. Study of Drugs and Allied Sciences
50. Optics and Physics (including physical chemists, metallurgists and all branches and specialties in
Physics)
5E. Genetics
5F. Mathematics
5G. Laboratory Technology (including, but not limited to: physical and chemistry laboratory technicians)
5H. Metal Fabrication (including, but not limited to skilled metal crafts workers)
51. Atmospheric-Hydrospheric Sciences (including, but not limited to: Marine Science, Meteorology and
Oceanography)
5J. Astronomy and Space Technology
5K. Repair and Maintenance Technology
5L. Agriculture and Agronomy (including, but not limited to: veterinarians, plant pathologists, poultry and
dairy scientists, animal husbandry and animal nutrition)
5M. Food Science and Technology
5N. Zoology (including Animal Behavior and Physiology)
5P. Fisheries (or other marine products)
5Q. Geology (including all branches and specialties, e.g. Oceanology, and all branches of Applied

Geology including geophysicists and geochemists)
5R. Hydrology (including, but not limited to Water Pollution)
5S. Ecology and Environmental Protection (including Conservation)
5T. Desalinization
5U. Population Studies
Group (6)
6A. Sociology (except Economics and including Criminology)
68. Psychology (including, but not limited to Psychometrics, Child Psychology and Psychobiology)
6C. History (including Art History)
60. Philosophy (including Humanities)
6E. Anthropology and Archaeology
6F. Demography
6G. Government and Politics (including, but not limited to International Relations)
6H. Economics
61. Literature
6J. Instructional Media and Technology
6K. Fine Arts (including, but not limited to Music, Theater, Sculpture, Motion Picture Arts and Sciences,
and Photography)
6L. Estate Management
6M. Linguistics
6N. Law (including Judicature and all branches and specialties in the practice of Law, except in Law
Enforcement)
Group (7)

7A. Teaching and Religious Education
7B. Educational Testing, Evaluation and Measurement
7C. Primary School Teaching (including, but not limited to Nursery Schools and Kindergartens)
7D. Secondary School Teaching (including, but not limited to Remedial Teaching and Teaching of
English as a Foreign Language)
7E. Vocational and Technical School Teaching

71. College and University Teaching of Business
7K. Education of the Physically Handicapped (including Education of the Mentally Retarded and
Emotionally Disturbed)
7L. Education of Exceptional Children
7M. Physical Education and Recreation (including, but not limited to Coaching)
7P. Career Guidance and Counseling
Group (8)
8A. Journalism (including, but not limited to editors and reporters, and including text-book writers,
interpreters and translators)
8B. Communication Media (including Television and Film)
8C. Electrical Communication Technology
8E. Airplane Piloting (including, but not limited to Airline Piloting)
8F. Merchant Marine
8G. Architecture (including Marine Architecture)
8H. Construction (including, but not limited to builders, but not including skilled and unskilled laborers)
81. Construction-Project Management
8J. Drafting

8K. Skilled Operation of Construction Machines
Group (9)
9A. Industrial and Business Administration and Management (including, but not limited to: programmers
and Project Evaluation, Business, Total Quality Management)
9B. International Business and Commerce
9C. Industrial Organization
90. Labor and Industrial Relations
9E. Economic Development and Planning (including Rural Development)
9F. Economic Information Analysis (inclUding, but not limited to Management Studies)
9G. Accounting
9H. Cybernetic Technology
91. Statistics
9K. Administration of Financial Institutions (including, but not limited to Savings and Loan Organizations
and Credit Unions)
9L. Financial Planning
9M. Operations Research
9N. Banking
90. Farm Management and Administration
9P. Hotel and Motel Management
Group (10)
10A. Library Science (inclUding, but not limited to Electronic Data Storage and Retrieval)

Uruguay

Group (1)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (2)
2C. Veterinary Medicine
2D. Emergency Medicine
2E. Nuclear Medicine
2F. Geriatrics
2M. Medical Cybernetics
20. Medical Statistics and Documentation
2P. Cancer Research
20. Medical Photography
2R. Environmental Health
Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (4)
4A. Aerospace Engineering
48. Cartography

4C. Chemical Engineering
4E. Communication Engineering
4F. Computer Engineering and Technologies
41. Energy Engineering and Technology (but not including Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering and
Technology)
4J. Genetic and Biomedical Engineering
4K. Industrial Engineering
4L. Marine and Aeronautical Engineering and Technology (including, but not limited to: Marine and Flight
Engineers)
4M. Materials Engineering and Sciences (including, but not limited to: textiles, plastics, wood, paper and
metal, but not including Metal Fabrication)
4P. Navigation and Transportation Engineering

40. Optical Engineering (including, but not limited to: light and sound technology)
4R. Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering and Technology
4S. Printing and Photographic Engineering and Technology
Group (5)
5C. Study of Drugs and Allied Sciences
5E. Genetics
51. Atmospheric-Hydrospheric Sciences (including, but not limited to: Marine Science, Meteorology and
Oceanography)
5J. Astronomy and Space Technology
5L. Agriculture and Agronomy (including, but not limited to: veterinarians, plant pathologists, poultry and
dairy scientists, animal husbandry and animal nutrition)
5M. Food Science and Technology

5N. Zoology (including Animal Behavior and Physiology)
5P. Fisheries (or other marine products)
5R. Hydrology (including, but not limited to Water Pollution)
5S. Ecology and Environmental Protection (including Conservation)
5T. Desalinization
5U. Population Studies
Group (6)
6C. History (including Art History)
60. Philosophy (including Humanities)
6E. Anthropology and Archaeology
6F. Demography
6G. Government and Politics (including, but not limited to International Relations)
61. Literature
6J. Instructional Media and Technology
6K. Fine Arts (including, but not limited to Music, Theater, Sculpture, Motion Picture Arts and Sciences,
and Photography)
6L. Estate Management
6M. Linguistics
Group (7)
7A. Teaching and Religious Education
7B. Educational Testing, Evaluation and Measurement

71. College and University Teaching of Business

7K. Education of the Physically Handicapped (including Education of the Mentally Retarded and
Emotionally Disturbed)
7L. Education of Exceptional Children
7M. Physical Education and Recreation (including, but not limited to Coaching)
7P. Career Guidance and Counseling
Group (8)
8A. Journalism (including, but not limited to editors and reporters, and including text-book writers,
interpreters and translators)
8B. Communication Media (including Television and Film)
8C. Electrical Communication Technology
80. Radio Operation
8E. Airplane Piloting (including, but not limited to Airline Piloting)
8F. Merchant Marine
8H. Construction (including, but not limited to builders, but not including skilled and unskilled laborers)
81. Construction-Project Management
8K. Skilled Operation of Construction Machines
Group (9)
9A. Industrial and Business Administration and Management (including, but not limited to: programmers
and Project Evaluation, Business, Total Quality Management)
9B. International Business and Commerce
9C. Industrial Organization
90. Labor and Industrial Relations
9E. Economic Development and Planning (including Rural Development)

9F. Economic Information Analysis (including, but not limited to Management Studies)
9G. Accounting
9H. Cybernetic Technology
9K. Administration of Financial Institutions (including, but not limited to Savings and Loan Organizations
and Credit Unions)
9L. Financial Planning
9M. Operations Research
9N. Banking
90. Farm Management and Administration
9P. Hotel and Motel Management

Venezuela
Group (1)
1A. Public Administration (including, but not limited to Public Health and Urban Studies/Planning and
Urban Transportation)
1B. Public Social Administration (including, but not limited to: Welfare, Dietetics, Nutrition, Family
Planning and Public Health)
1C. Public Social Services
1D. Sanitation
1E. Drug Abuse and Narcotics Control
1F. International Health
Group (2)
2A. General Practice of Medicine (including Osteopaths who also practice medicine)
2B. Recognized Medical Specializations (including, but not limited to: Anesthesiology, Audiology,
Cardiography, Cardiology, Dermatology, Embryology, Epidemiology, Forensic Medicine, Gastroenterology,
Hematology, Immunology, Internal Medicine, Neurological Surgery, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Oncology,
Ophthalmology, Orthopedic Surgery, Otolaryngology, Pathology, Pediatrics, Pharmacology and
Pharmaceutics, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiology, Plastic Surgery, Preventive Medicine,
Proctology, Psychiatry and Neurology, Radiology, Speech Pathology, Sports Medicine, Surgery, Thoracic
Surgery, Toxicology, Urology and Virology)
2C. Veterinary Medicine
2D. Emergency Medicine

2E. Nuclear Medicine
2F. Geriatrics
2G. Nursing (including, but not limited to Registered Nurses, Practical Nurses, Physician's Receptionists
and Medical Records Clerks)
2H. Medical Instruments and Technology
21. Dentistry
2J. Dental Technology
2M. Medical Cybernetics
2N. All Therapies, Prosthetics and Healing (except Medicine, Osteopathy or Osteopathic Medicine,
Nursing, Dentistry, Chiropractic and Optometry)
20. Medical Statistics and Documentation
2P. Cancer Research
20. Medical Photography
2R. Environmental Health
Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (4)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (5)
5A. Chemistry (including all branches and specialties in Chemistry, except in Pharmacy and Chemical
Engineering)
5B. Life Sciences (including, but not limited to: Pharmacy and Biology)
5C. Study of Drugs and Allied Sciences

50. Optics and Physics (including physical chemists, metallurgists and all branches and specialties in
Physics)
5E. Genetics
5F. Mathematics
5G. Laboratory Technology (including, but not limited to: physical and chemistry laboratory technicians)
5H. Metal Fabrication (including, but not limited to skilled metal crafts workers)
51. Atmospheric-Hydrospheric Sciences (including, but not limited to: Marine Science, Meteorology and
Oceanography)
5J. Astronomy and Space Technology
5K. Repair and Maintenance Technology
5L. Agriculture and Agronomy (including, but not limited to: veterinarians, plant pathologists, poultry and
dairy scientists, animal husbandry and animal nutrition)
5M. Food Science and Technology
5N. Zoology (including Animal Behavior and Physiology)
5P. Fisheries (or other marine products)
5Q. Geology (including all branches and specialties, e.g. Oceanology, and all branches of Applied
Geology including geophysicists and geochemists)
5R. Hydrology (including, but not limited to Water Pollution)
5S. Ecology and Environmental Protection (including Conservation)
5U. Population Studies
Group (6)
6A. Sociology (except Economics and including Criminology)
6B. Psychology (including, but not limited to Psychometrics, Child Psychology and Psychobiology)
6C. History (including Art History)

60. Philosophy (including Humanities)
6E. Anthropology and Archaeology
6F. Demography
6G. Government and Politics (including, but not limited to International Relations)
6H. Economics
61. Literature
6J. Instructional Media and Technology
6K. Fine Arts (including, but not limited to Music, Theater, Sculpture, Motion Picture Arts and Sciences,
and Photography)
6L. Estate Management
6M. Linguistics
Group (7)
7A. Teaching and Religious Education
7B. Educational Testing, Evaluation and Measurement
7C. Primary School Teaching (including, but not limited to Nursery Schools and Kindergartens)
70. Secondary School Teaching (including, but Not limited to Remedial Teaching and Teaching of
English as a Foreign Language)
7E. Vocational and Technical School Teaching
7F. College and University Teaching in Natural Sciences, Mathematics, Engineering and Technology
(except Agriculture)
7G. College and University Teaching of Social Sciences, Liberal Arts and Literature (including Foreign
Language Education)
7H. College and University Teaching of Education

71. College and University Teaching of Business
7J. Agricultural School Teaching
7K. Education of the Physically Handicapped (including Education of the Mentally Retarded and
Emotionally Disturbed)
7L. Education of Exceptional Children
7M. Physical Education and Recreation (including, but not limited to Coaching)
7N. Teaching in Medical Schools (including, but not limited to lecturers)
7P. Career Guidance and Counseling
Group (8)
8B. Communication Media (including Television and Film)
8C. Electrical Communication Technology
8F. Merchant Marine
8H. Construction (including, but not limited to builders, but not including skilled and unskilled laborers)
81. Construction-Project Management
8J. Drafting
8K. Skilled Operation of Construction Machines
Group (9)
9A. Industrial and Business Administration and Management (including, but not limited to: programmers
and Project Evaluation, Business, Total Quality Management)
9B. International Business and Commerce
9C. Industrial Organization
90. Labor and Industrial Relations
9E. Economic Development and Planning (including Rural Development)

9F. Economic Information Analysis (including, but not limited to Management Studies)
9G. Accounting
9H. Cybernetic Technology
91. Statistics
9L. Financial Planning
9M. Operations Research
90. Farm Management and Administration
9P. Hotel and Motel Management
Group (10)
10A. Library Science (including, but not limited to Electronic Data Storage and Retrieval)

Western Samoa
Group (1)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (2)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (4)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (5)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (6)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (7)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (8)
All fields listed in part I.

Group (9)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (10)
All fields listed in part I.

Yemen

Group (1)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (2)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (4)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (5)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (6)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (7)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (8)
All fields listed in part I.

Group (9)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (10)
All fields listed in part I.

Zaire

Group (1)
1B. Public Social Administration (including, but not limited to: Welfare, Dietetics, Nutrition, Family
Planning and Public Health)
1C. Public Social Services
1D. Sanitation
1E. Drug Abuse and Narcotics Control
1F. International Health
1G. Tourism and Travel
Group (2)
2A. General Practice of Medicine (including Osteopaths who also practice medicine)
2C. Veterinary Medicine
20. Emergency Medicine
2E. Nuclear Medicine
2F. Geriatrics
2G. Nursing (including, but not limited to Registered Nurses, Practical Nurses, Physician's Receptionists
and Medical Records Clerks)
2H. Medical Instruments and Technology
21. Dentistry

2J. Dental Technology
2K. Optometry
2L. Chiropractic and Osteopathy (not including osteopathic physicians who also practice medicine)
2M. Medical Cybernetics
2N. All Therapies, Prosthetics and Healing (except Medicine,Osteopathy or Osteopathic Medicine,
Nursing, Dentistry, Chiropractic and Optometry)
20. Medical Statistics and Documentation
2P. Cancer Research

20. Medical Photography
2R. Environmental Health
Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (4)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (5)

SA. Chemistry (including all branches and specialties in Chemistry, except in Pharmacy and Chemical
Engineering)
5B. Life Sciences (including, but not limited to: Pharmacy and Biology)
5C. Study of Drugs and Allied Sciences
50. Optics and Physics (including physical chemists, metallurgists and all branches and specialties in
Physics)
5E. Genetics

SF. Mathematics

5G. Laboratory Technology (including, but not limited to: physical and chemistry laboratory technicians)
5H. Metal Fabrication (including, but not limited to skilled metal crafts workers)
51. Atmospheric-Hydrospheric Sciences (including, but not limited to: Marine Science, Meteorology and
Oceanography)
5J. Astronomy and Space Technology
5K. Repair and Maintenance Technology
5L. Agriculture and Agronomy (including, but not limited to: veterinarians, plant pathologists, poultry and
dairy scientists, animal husbandry and animal nutrition)
5M. Food Science and Technology
5N. Zoology (including Animal Behavior and Physiology)
50. Forestry
5P. Fisheries (or other marine products)

50. Geology (including all branches and specialties, e.g. Oceanology, and all branches of Applied
Geology including geophysicists and geochemists)
5R. Hydrology (including, but not limited to Water Pollution)
5S. Ecology and Environmental Protection (including Conservation)
5U. Population Studies
Group (6)
6C. History (including Art History)
60. Philosophy (including Humanities)
6E. Anthropology and Archaeology
6F. Demography
6G. Government and Politics (including, but not limited to International Relations)

6H. Economics
61. Literature
6J. Instructional Media and Technology
6K. Fine Arts (including, but not limited to Music, Theater, Sculpture, Motion Picture Arts and Sciences,
and Photography)
6L. Estate Management
6M. Linguistics
6N. Law (including Judicature and all branches and specialties in the practice of Law, except in Law
Enforcement)
Group (7)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (8)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (9)
9A. Industrial and Business Administration and Management (including, but not limited to: programmers
and Project Development, Business, Total Quality Management)
9B. International Business and Commerce
9C. Industrial Organization
90. Labor and Industrial Relations
9E. Economic Development and Planning (including Rural Development)
9F. Economic Information Analysis (including, but not limited to Management Studies)
9G. Accounting
9H. Cybernetic Technology

91. Statistics
9K. Administration of Financial Institutions (including, but not limited to Savings and Loan Organizations
and Credit Unions)
9L. Financial Planning
9M. Operations Research
9N. Banking
90. Farm Management and Administration
9P. Hotel and Motel Management
Group (10)
10A. Library Science (including, but not limited to Electronic Data Storage and Retrieval)

Zambia

Group (1)
1A. Public Administration (including, but not limited to: City Planning, Urban Studies/Planning, Urban
Transportation, and Public Health)
1B. Public Social Administration (including, but not limited to: Welfare, Dietetics, Nutrition, Family
Planning and Public Health)
1C. Public Social Services
1D. Sanitation
1E. Drug Abuse and Narcotics Control
1F. International Health
Group (2)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (4)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (5)
5A. Chemistry (including all branches and specialties in Chemistry, except in Pharmacy and Chemical
Engineering)

5B. Life Sciences (including, but not limited to: Pharmacy and Biology)
5C. Study of Drugs and Allied Sciences
5E. Genetics
5F. Mathematics
5G. Laboratory Technology (including, but not limited to: physical and chemistry laboratory technicians)
5H. Metal Fabrication (including, but not limited to skilled metal crafts workers)
51. Atmospheric-Hydrospheric Sciences (including, but not limited to: Marine Science, Meteorology and
Oceanography)
5J. Astronomy and Space Technology
5K. Repair and Maintenance Technology
5L. Agriculture and Agronomy (including, but not limited to: veterinarians, plant pathologists, poultry and
dairy scientists, animal husbandry and animal nutrition)
5M. Food Science and Technology
5N. Zoology (including Animal Behavior and Physiology)
50. Forestry
5P. Fisheries (or other marine products)
5Q. Geology (including all branches and specialties, e.g., Oceanology, and all branches of Applied
Geology including geophysicists and geochemists)
5R. Hydrology (including, but not limited to Water Pollution)
5S. Ecology and Environmental Protection (including Conservation)
5U. Population Studies
Group (6)
6A. Sociology (except Economics and including Criminology)

6B. Psychology (including, but not limited to Psychometrics, Child Psychology, and Psychobiology)
6C. History (including Art History)
60. Philosophy (including Humanities)
6E. Anthropology and Archaeology
6F. Demography
6G. Government and Politics (including, but not limited to International Relations)
6H. Economics
61. Literature
6J. Instructional Media and Technology
6K. Fine Arts (including, but not limited to Music, Theater, Sculpture, Motion Picture Arts and Sciences,
and Photography)
6L. Estate Management
6M. Linguistics
Group (7)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (8)
8A. Journalism (including, but not limited to editors and reporters, and including textbook writers,
interpreters and translators)
8B. Communication Media (including Television and Film)
8C. Electrical Communication Technology
80. Radio Operation
8F. Merchant Marine
8G. Architecture (including Marine Architecture)

8H. Construction (including, but not limited to builders, but not including skilled and unskilled laborers)
81. Construction-Project Management
8J. Drafting
8K. Skilled Operation of Construction Machines
Group (9)
9A. Industrial and Business Administration and Management (including, but not limited to: programmers
and Project Evaluation, Business, Total Quality Management)
9B. International Business and Commerce
9C. Industrial Organization
90. Labor and Industrial Relations
9E. Economic Development and Planning (including Rural Development)
9F. Economic Information Analysis (including, but not limited to Management Studies)
9G. Accounting
9H. Cybernetic Technology
91. Statistics
9K. Administration of Financial Institutions (including, but not limited to Savings and Loan Organizations
and Credit Unions)
9L. Financial Planning
9M. Operations Research
9N. Banking
90. Farm Management and Administration
9P. Hotel and Motel Management
Group (10)

10A. Library Science (including, but not limited to Electronic Data Storage and Retrieval)

Zimbabwe

Group (1)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (2)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (3)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (4)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (5)
5A. Chemistry (including all branches and specialties in Chemistry, except in Pharmacy and Chemical
Engineering)
5B. Life Sciences (including, but not limited to: Pharmacy and Biology)
5C. Study of Drugs and Allied Sciences
50. Optics and Physics (including physical chemists, metallurgists and all branches and specialties in
Physics)
5E. Genetics
5F. Mathematics

5G. Laboratory Technology (including, but not limited to: physical and chemistry laboratory technicians)
5H. Metal Fabrication (including, but not limited to skilled metal crafts workers)
51. Atmospheric-Hydrospheric Sciences (including, but not limited to: Marine Science, Meteorology and
Oceanography)
5J. Astronomy and Space Technology
5K. Repair and Maintenance Technology
5L. Agriculture and Agronomy (including, but not limited to: veterinarians, plant pathologists, poultry and
dairy scientists, animal husbandry and animal nutrition)
5M. Food Science and Technology
5N. Zoology (including Animal Behavior and Physiology)
50. Forestry
5P. Fisheries (or other marine products)
5Q. Geology (including all branches and specialties, e.g. Oceanology, and all branches of Applied
Geology including geophysicists and geochemists)
5R. Hydrology (including, but not limited to Water Pollution)
5S. Ecology and Environmental Protection (including Conservation)
5U. Population Studies
Group (6)
6A. Sociology (except Economics and including Criminology)
6B. Psychology (including, but not limited to Psychometrics, Child Psychology and Psychobiology)
6C. History (including Art History)
60. Philosophy (including Humanities)
6E. Anthropology and Archaeology

Page 3 of 4

INS

6F. Demography
6G. Government and Politics (including, but not limited to International Relations)
6H. Economics
61. Literature
6J. Instructional Media and Technology
6K. Fine Arts (including, but not limited to Music, Theater, Sculpture, Motion Picture Arts and Sciences,
and Photography)
6L. Estate Management
6M. Linguistics
Group (7)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (8)
8A. Journalism (including, but not limited to editors and reporters, and including text-book writers,
interpreters and translators)
8B. Communication Media (including Television and Film)
8C. Electrical Communication Technology
80. Radio Operation
8F. Merchant Marine
8G. Architecture (including Marine Architecture)
8H. Construction (including, but not limited to builders, but not including skilled and unskilled laborers)
81. Construction-Project Management
8J. Drafting
8K. Skilled Operation of Construction Machines

http://onlineplus.uscis.dhs.gov/lpbinplus/lpext.dll/infobase/listing/listing-104/listing-9541?f=templates&fn=document-frame.htm...

2/5/2008

Group (9)
All fields listed in part I.
Group (10)
10A. Library Science (including, but not limited to Electronic Data Storage and Retrieval)

Appendix 15-2
Validity of Certain Foreign Passports (Six-month
list)
Revised March 22,2000 (INOO-16)
Under the provisions of section 212(a)(7)(B)(i)(I)) of the Immigration and Nationality Act, a nonimmigrant
alien who makes application for a visa or for admission into the United States is required to be in possession
of a passport which is valid for a minimum period of six months from the date of expiration of the initial period
of his admission into the United States or his contemplated initial period of stay authorizing him to return to
the country from which he came or proceed to and enter some other country during such period. By reason of
the foregoing requirement, certain foreign governments have entered into agreements with the Government of
the United States whereby their passports are recognized as valid for the return of the bearer to the country of
the foreign-issuing authority for a period of six months beyond the expiration date specified in the passport.
These arrangements have the effect of extending the validity period of the foreign passport an additional six
months notwithstanding the expiration date indicated in the passport.
Algeria
Antigua and Barbuda
Argentina
Australia
Austria
Bahamas, The
Bangladesh
Barbados
Belgium
Bolivia
Bosnia -Herzegovina
Brazil
Canada
Chile
Colombia
Costa Rica
Cote D' Ivoire
Croatia

Cuba
Cyprus
Czech Republic
Denmark
Dominica
Dominican Republic
Ecuador
Egypt
EI Salvador
Ethiopia
Finland
France
Germany
Greece
Grenada
Guatemala
Guinea
Guyana
Hong Kong (Certificates of Identity and Passports)
Hungary
Iceland
India
Ireland
Israel
Italy
Jamaica
Japan
Jordan
Korea
Kuwait
Laos
Latvia
Lebanon
Liechtenstein
Luxembourg
Macau
Madagascar
Malaysia
Malta
Mauritius
Mexico
Monaco
Netherlands
New Zealand
Nicaragua
Nigeria
Norway

Oman
Pakistan
Panama
Paraguay
Peru
Philippines
Poland
Portugal
Qatar
Romania
Russia
Senegal
Singapore
Slovak Republic
Slovenia
South Africa
Spain
Sri Lanka
St. Kitts and Nevis
St. Lucia
St. Vincent and the Grenadines
Sudan
Suriname
Sweden
Switzerland
Syria
Taiwan
Thailand
Togo
Trinidad and Tobago
Tunisia
Turkey
United Arab Emirates
United Kingdom
Uruguay
Venezuela
Zimbabwe

In addition, travel documents issued by the Government of the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands are
considered to be valid for the return of the bearer to the Trust Territory for a period of six months beyond the
expiration date specified therein.
Validity of Certain Nonimmigrant Visas

Notice is hereby given that consular officers are authorized to issue, in their discretion, nonimmigrant visas

under section 101 (a)(15)(8) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (temporary visitors for business or
pleasure) valid for an indefinite period of time to otherwise eligible nationals of the countries listed below,
which offer reciprocal or more liberal treatment to nationals of the United States who are in a similar class.
This order, which adds several countries to the list and incorporates recent amendments, will be amended
from time to time to include other countries which accord similar privileges to United States citizens. The
asterisks identify those countries which have been added with this Notice.
In addition, because of recent changes in the treatment of U.S. nationals in certain nonimmigrant classes,
Suriname, formerly Surinam, has been deleted from that list under the provisions of section 101 (a)(15)(8), in
order to accord its nationals the same reciprocal treatment currently accorded U.S. nationals. Note: Effective
May 5,1997, the maximum period of nonimmigrant visa validity is limited to ten years.
Anguilla*
Antigua and Barbuda*
Aruba
Austria
Bahamas
Barbados
Belize
Belgium
Bermuda*
Bolivia*
Botswana
Cayman Islands*
Canada*
Chile
Cyprus
Denmark
Dominica, Commonwealth of
Fiji
Finland
France
Germany, Federal Republic of
Gibraltar*
Greece
Guatemala*
Hong Kong

Iceland
Ireland
Israel
Italy
Jamaica
Lesotho
Liechtenstein
Luxembourg
Malawi
Malaysia*
Maldives, Republic of
Malta
Mauritius*
Mexico
Monaco
Morocco
Netherlands
Netherlands Antilles
New Zealand
Norway
Panama*
Paraguay
Peru*
Philippines*
Portugal
St. Christopher-Nevis*
St. Lucia*
St. Vincent and the Grenadines
Saint Pierre and Miquelon
Seychelles. Republic of
Singapore
San Marino
Spain
Swaziland*
Sweden
Switzerland
Thailand*

Tonga*
Trinidad and Tobago
Tunisia
Turkey
Tuvalu*
United Kingdom
Uruguay
Venezuela*
Virgin Islands*
Public Notice 767 of August 4, 1981, issued at 46 FR 39718 and any amendments thereto are hereby
superseded.

Appendix 15-3
NAFTA, Annex 1603, Appendix 1603.A.1 (Business
Visitors)
Research and Design
Technical, scientific, and statistical researchers conducting independence research or research for an
enterprise located in the territory of another Party.
Growth, Manufacture, and Production
Harvester owner supervising a harvesting crew admitted under applicable law.
Purchasing and production management personnel conducting commercial transactions for an enterprise
located in the territory of another Party.
Marketing
Market researchers and analysts conducting independent research or analysis or research or analysis for
an enterprise located in the territory of another Party.
Trade fair and promotional personnel attending a trade convention.
Sales
Sales representatives and agents taking orders or negotiating contracts for goods or services for an
enterprise located in the territory of another Party but not delivering goods or providing services.
Buyers purchasing for an enterprise located in the territory of another Party.
Distribution
Transportation operators transporting goods or passengers to the territory of a Party from the territory of

another Party or loading and transporting goods or passengers from the territory of a Party, with no unloading
in that territory, to the territory of another Party.
With respect to temporary entry into the territory of the United States, Canadian customs brokers
performing brokerage duties relating to the export of goods from the territory of the United States to or
through the territory of Canada.
With respect to temporary entry into the territory of Canada, United States customs brokers performing
brokerage duties relating to the export of goods from the territory of Canada to or through the territory
of the United States.
Customs brokers providing consulting services regarding the facilitation of the import or export of goods.
After-Sales Service

Installers, repair and maintenance personnel, and supervisors, possessing specialized knowledge
essential to a seller's contractual obligation, performing services or training workers to perform
services, pursuant to a warranty or other service contract incidental to the sale of commercial or
industrial equipment or machinery, including computer software, purchased from an enterprise located
outside the territory of the Party into which temporary entry is sought, during the life of the warranty or
service agreement.
General Service

Professionals engaging in a business activity at a professional level in a profession set out in Appendix

1603.0.1.
Management and supervisory personnel engaging in a commercial transaction for an enterprise located in
the territory of another Party.
Financial services personnel (insurers, bankers or investment brokers) engaging in commercial
transactions for an enterprise located in the territory of another Party.
Public relations and advertising personnel consulting with business associates, or attending or
participating in conventions.
Tourism personnel (tour and travel agents, tour guides or tour operators) attending or participating in
conventions or conducting a tour that has begun in the territory of another Party.
Tour bus operators entering the territory of a Party:

(a) with a group of passengers on a bus tour that has begun in, and will return to, the territory of another
Party;
(b) to meet a group of passengers on a bus tour that will end, and the predominant portion of which will
take place, in the territory of another Party; or
(c) with a group of passengers on a bus tour to be unloaded in the territory of the Party into which
temporary entry is sought, and returning with no passengers or reloading with the group for
transportation to the territory of another Party.
- Translators or interpreters performing services as employees of an enterprise located in the territory
of another Party.

Definitions
For purposes of this Appendix:

territory of another Party means the territory of a Party other than the territory of the Party into which
temporary entry is sought;
tour bus operator means a natural person, including relief personnel accompanying or following to join,
necessary for the operation of a tour bus for the duration of a trip; and
transportation operator means a natural person, other than a tour bus operator, including relief personnel
accompanying or following to join, necessary for the operation of a vehicle for the duration of a trip.

Appendix 15-4
NAFTA, Annex 1603, Appendix 1603.D.l
(Professionals)
PROFESSION 1/

MINIMUM EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS AND ALTERNATIVE CREDENTIALS

General

Accountant

Baccalaureate or licenciatura Degree; or C.P.A., C.A., C.G.A. or C.M.A.

Architect

Baccalaureate or licenciatura Degree; or state/provincial license

Computer System Analyst

Baccalaureate or licenciatura Degree; or Post-Secondary Diploma
Secondary Certificate 4/, and three years experience

Disaster Relief Insurance Claims Adjuster (claims
adjuster employed by an insurance company
located in the territory of a Party, or an
independent claims adjuster)

Baccalaureate or licenciatura Degree, and successful completion of training in the
appropriate areas of insurance adjustment pertaining to disaster relief claims; or
three years experience in claims adjustment and successful completion of training
in appropriate areas of insurance adjustment pertaining to disaster relief claims

Economist

Baccalaureate or licenciatura Degree

Engineer

Baccalaureate or licenciatura Degree; or state/provincial license

Forester

Baccalaureate or licenciatura Degree; or state/provincial license

Graphic Designer

Baccalaureate or licenciatura degree; or Post-Secondary Diploma or PostSecondary Certificate, and three years experience

2/
3/ or Post-

Hotel Manager

Baccalaureate or Licenciatura degree in hotel/restaurant management; or postsecondary diploma or post-secondary certificate in hotel/restaurant management,
and three years experience in hotel/restaurant management

Industrial Designer

Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree; or Post-Secondary Diploma or PostSecondary Certificate, and three years experience

Interior Designer

Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree; or Post-Secondary Diploma or PostSecondary Certificate, and three years experience

Land Surveyor

Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree; or state/provincial/federal license

Landscape Architect

Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree

Lawyer (including Notary in the Province of
Quebec)

LL.B., J.D., LL.L., B.C.L. or Licenciatura Degree (five years); or membership in a
state/provincial bar

Librarian

M.L.S. or B.L.S. (for which another Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree was a
prerequisite)

Management Consultant

Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree; or equivalent professional experience as
established by statement or professional credential attesting to five years
experience as a management consultant, or five years experience in a field of
specialty related to the consulting agreement

Mathematician
(including Statistician)

Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree

Range Manager/Range Conservationalist

Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree

Research Assistant (working in a post-secondary
educational institution)

Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree

Scientific Technician /Technologist 5/

Possession of (a) theoretical knowledge of any of the following disciplines:
agricultural sciences, astronomy, biology, chemistry, engineering, forestry, geology,
geophysics, meteorology or physics; and (b) the ability to solve practical problems
in any of those disciplines, or the ability to apply principles of any of those

disciplines to basic or applied research

Social Worker

Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree

Sylviculturist (including Forestry Specialist)

Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree

Technical Publications Writer

Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree; or Post-Secondary Diploma or PostSecondary Certificate and three years experience

Urban Planner (including Geographer)

Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree

Vocational Counselor

Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree

Medical! Allied Professional

Dentist

D.D.S., D.M.D., Doctor en Odontologia or Doctor en Cirugia Dental; or
state/provincial license

Dietitian

Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree; or state/provincial license

Medical Laboratory Technologist (Canada)/Medical
Technologist (Mexico and the United States) 6!

Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree; or Post-Secondary Diploma or
Post-Secondary Certificate, and three years experience

Nutritionist

Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree

Occupational Therapist

Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree; or state/ provincial license

Pharmacist

Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree; or state/ provincial license

PhysIcian (teaching or research only)

M.D. or Doctor en Medicina; or state/provincial license

Physiotherapist/Physical Therapist

Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree; or state/ provincial license

Psychologist

State/provincial license; or Licenciatura Degree

Recreational Therapist

Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree

Registered Nurse

State/prOVincial license; or Licenciatura Degree

Veterinarian

D.V.M., D.M.V. or Doctor en Veterinaria; or state/ provincial license

Scientist

Agriculturist (including Agronomist)

Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree

Animal Breeder

Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree

Animal Scientist

Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree

Apicu Itu ri st

Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree

Astronomer

Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree

Biochemist

Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree

Biologist

Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree

Chemist

Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree

Dairy Scientist

Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree

Entomologist

Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree

Epidemiologist

Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree

Geneticist

Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree

Geologist

Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree

Geochemist

Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree

Geophysicist (including Oceanographer in
Mexico and the United States)

Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree

Horticulturist

Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree

Meteorologist

Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree

Pharmacologist

Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree

Physicist (including Oceanographer in
Canada)

Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree

Plant Breeder

Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree

Poultry Scientist

Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree

Soil Scientist

Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree

Zoologist

Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree

Teacher

College

Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree

Seminary

Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree

University

Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree

FOOTNOTES FOR APPENDIX 15-4

1/

A business person seeking temporary entry under this Appendix may also perform training functions
relating to the profession, including conducting seminars.

2/

"State/provincial license" and "state/provinciallfederallicense" mean any document issued by a state,
provincial or federal government, as the case may be, or under its authority, but not by a local
government, that permits a person to engage in a regulated activity or profession.

3/

"Post-Secondary Diploma" means a credential issued, on completion of two or more years of postsecondary education, by an accredited academic institution in Canada or the United States.

4/

"Post-Secondary Certificate" means a certificate issued, on completion of two or more years of postsecondary education at an academic institution, by the federal government of Mexico or a state
government in Mexico, an academic institution recognized by the federal government or a state
government, or an acadernic institution created by federal or state law.

5/

A business person in this category must be seeking temporary entry to work in direct support of
professionals in agricultural sciences, astronomy, biology, chemistry, engineering, forestry, geology,
geophysics, meteorology, or physics.

6/

A business person in this category must be seeking temporary entry to perform in a laboratory chemical,
biological, hematological, immunologic, microscopic or bacteriological tests and analyses for
diagnosis, treatment or prevention of disease.

Appendix 15-5
Citizens of the Following Countries Require a Visa
to Enter or Transit Canada (Amended 10/23/97;
IN98-03
Afghanistan
Albania
Algeria
Angola
Argentina
Armenia
Azerbaijan
Bahrain
Bangladesh
Belarus
Belize
Benin
Bhutan
Bolivia
Bosnia-Hercegovina
Brazil
Bulgaria
Burkina-Faso
Burundi
Cambodia
Cameroon
Cape Verde
Central African Republic
Chad
Chile
China-People's Republic
Columbia
Comoros
Congo, Democratic Republic of the
Congo, Republic of the
Costa Rica

Croatia
Cuba
Czech Republic, The
Djibouti
Dominica
Dominican Republic
East Timor
Ecuador
Egypt
EI Salvador
Equatorial Guinea
Estonia
Ethiopia
Fiji
Gabon
Gambia
Georgia
Ghana
Grenada
Guatemala
Guinea
Guinea-Bissau
Guyana
Haiti
Honduras
Hungary
India
Indonesia
Iran
Iraq
Israel
(only Israeli citizens holding valid Israeli orange "Travel Document in Lieu of National Passport")
Ivory Coast
Jamaica
Jordan
Kazakhstan
Kenya
Kiribati
Korea North
Kuwait
Kyrgyzstan
Laos
Latvia
Lebanon
Lesotho
Liberia
Libya
lithuania

Macao S.A.R.
Macedonia
Madagascar
Malawi
Malaysia
Maldives
Mali
Marshall Islands
Mauritania
Mauritius
Micronesia, Federated States of
Moldova
Mongolia
Morocco
Mozambique
Myanmar (Burma)
Nauru
Nepal
Nicaragua
Niger
Nigeria
Oman
Pacific Islands--U.S. Trust Territories
Pakistan
Palau
Palestinian Authority
Panama
Paraguay
Peru
Philippines
Poland
Qatar
Romania
Russia
Rwanda
Sao Tome e Principo
Saudi Arabia
Senegal
Se rbia- Montenegro
Seychelles - The
Sierra Leone
Slovak Republic
Somalia
South Africa
Sri Lanka
Sudan
Surinam

Syria
Taiwan
Tadjikistan
Tanzania
Thailand
Togo
Tonga
Trinidad & Tobago
Tunisia
Turkey
Turkmenistan
Tuvalu
Uganda
Ukraine
United Arab Emirates
Uruguay
Uzbekistan
Vanuatu
Venezuela
Vietnam
Yemen
Zambia
Zimbabwe
For additional information, see http://www.Cic.gc.ca/english/visit/visas/html

Appendix 15-6
list of Consular Posts and Dates of Conversion to
MRV Format
Consular Posts

MRV Conversion

Abidjan

5/15/95

Abu Dhabi

2/28/94

Accra

2/17/95

Addis Ababa

3/14/94

Algiers

7/29/95

Almaty

9/6/94

Amman

5/9/94

Amsterdam

3/4/96

Ankara

4/1/94

Antananarivo

11/15/94

Ashgabat

8/1/95

Asmara

11/1/94

Asuncion

3/25/94

Athens

1/29/93

Auckland

3/31/95

Baku

7/18/95

Bamako

3/16/95

Bandar Seri

9/27/95

Bangkok

11/22/91

Bangui

11/16/94

1/

Banjul

4/7/94

Barranquilla

10/01/92

Beijing

10/22/92

Belfast

6/24/94

Belgrade

10/6/94

Belize

3/21/94

Beirut

5/26/95

Berlin

4/27/92

Bern

1/26/96

Bishkek

10/11/94

Bissau

7/7/95

Bogota

4/15/91

Bombay

11/21/91

Bonn

1/13/93

Brasilia

4/15/93

Bratislava

9/13/95

Brazzaville

11/15/94

Brussels

5/22/92

Bucharest

3/6/95

Budapest

3/20/95

Buenos Aires

6/2/91

Bujumbura

3/10/95

Cairo

3/19/95

Calcutta

2/28/94

Calgary

3/28/95

Capetown

8/8/94

Caracas

10/18/95

Casablanca

7/19/93

Chengdu

5/16/94

Chiang Mai

3/28/94

Chisinau

8/22/94

Ciudad Juarez

11/18/92

Colombo

6/8/94

2/

3/

4/

Copenhagen

2/1/96

Conakry

12/13/94

Cotonou

9/5/95

Dakar

5/13/94

Damascus

1/16/95

Dar el Salaam

2/15/95

Dhaka

4/28/92

Djibouti

8/28/95

Dominica

10/11/02

Doha

3/20/94

Dubai

5/3/95

Dublin

6/16/92

Durban

8/22/94

Dushanbe

6/28/95

Frankfurt

6/26/92

Freetown

4/18/94

Gaborone

12/12/94

Georgetown

3/24/93

Grenada

10/11/02

Guadalajara

9/26/94

Guangzhou

6/1/94

Guatemala

6/13/91

Guayaquil

4/10/95

Halifax

12/3/93

Hamilton

12/2/94

Hanoi

8/1/95

Harare

8/21/95

Havana

11/2/94

Helsinki

1/15/96

HermOSillo

12/12/91

Hong Kong

3/26/92

Hungary

10/11/02

Islamabad

1/25/95

Istanbul

4/4/94

Jakarta

5/10/94

Jeddah

2/12/96

Jerusalem

8/25/92

Kampala

12/14/94

karachi

6/29/92

Kathmandu

8/26/94

5/

Khartoum

8/25/95

6/

Kiev

1/23/95

7/

Kigali

7/21/95

Kingston

1/30/91

Kinshasa

4/21/95

Kiribati

10/11/02

Kolonia

3/16/95

Koror

8/1/95

Krakow

12/7/94

Kuala Lumpur

5/19/93

Kuwait

4/23/94

Lagos

6/2/92

Lahore

2/6/95

La Paz

4/20/93

Libreville

10/26/94

Lilongwe

2/17/95

Lima

6/8/92

Lisbon

4/21/93

Ljubljana

9/13/95

Lima

6/8/92

Lome

11/9/94

London

11/3/92

Luanda

9/18/95

Lusaka

11/30/94

Luxembourg

6/13/94

8/

9/

Madras

4/7/92

Madrid

9/28/92

Majuro

8/16/95

Managua

3/17/93

Manama

12/11/93

Manila

3/26/92

Maputo

12/12/94

Marseille

11/20/95

Maseru

5/23/95

Mbabane

6/2/95

Medan

9/26/94

Merida

3/14/95

Mexico City

5/11/91

Milan

1/14/94

Minsk

7/7/94

Monterrey

11/17/94

Montevideo

4/25/95

Montreal

9/25/91

Monrovia

8/29/95

Moscow

4/19/94

Munich

4/21/93

Muscat

6/15/94

Naha

1/30/95

Nairobi

11/21/91

Naples

9/30/92

Nassau

10/30/95

Nauru

10/11/02

N'Djamena

9/12/95

New Delhi

3/2/91

Niamey

11/8/94

Nicosia

2/13/95

Nouakchott

1/22/95

Osaka-Kobe

3/1/95

10/

11/

Oslo

1/15/95

Ottawa

3/5/95

Ouagadougou

5/16/95

Panama

11/14/94

Paramaribo

12/9/94

Paris

1/20/94

Phnom Penh

4/19/95

Ponta Delgada

10/28/94

Port-au-Prince

6/18/92

Port Louis

9/18/95

Port Moresby

5/26/95

Port of Spain

4/28/95

Porto Alegre

6/8/95

Prague

9/19/95

Praia

2/10/95

Pretoria

6/23/95

Quebec

2/14/94

12/

Quito

5/19/92

13/

Rabat

8/2/93

14/

Rangoon

1/26/95

Recife

9/25/95

Reykjavic

8/4/95

Riyadh

1/29/96

Riga

4/3/95

Rio de Janeiro

5/22/95

Rome

9/21/92

Sanaa

1/23/94

San Jose

8/19/91

San Salvador

8/26/92

Santiago

11/15/94

Santo Domingo

9/21/89

Sao Paolo

5/25/93

Saudi Arabia

10/11/02

15/

Seoul

3/16/92

Shanghai

1/13/95

Shenyang

5/3/94

Singapore

8/8/94

Sofia

4/25/95

St. Petersburg

12/14/94

Surabaya

5/27/94

Suva

12/8/95

AIT Taipei

2/17/95

Talinn

4/28/95

Tashkent

10/3/94

Tblisi

8/29/94

Tegucigalpa

6/14/91

Tel Aviv

10/19/94

Tijuana

1/10/92

Tirana

12/5/94

Tokyo

12/11/95

Toronto

2/5/92

Tunis

12/8/93

Tuvalu

10/11/02

Ulaanbaator

4/11/95

Valletta

12/6/93

Vanuatu

10/11/02

Victoria

6/15/95

Vientiane

5/20/94

Vilnius

3/15/95

Vladivostok

9/23/94

Warsaw

3/3/95

Washington (VO)

3/16/92

Windhoek

11/2/94

Yaounde

5/2/95

Yekaterinburg

11/13/95

16/

17/

Yeravan

8/31/94

Zagreb

2/21/95

Zimbabwe

10/11/02

18/

FOOTNOTES FOR APPENDIX 15-6

1/

Stamped visas 3/15/95 to 3/20/95 and 6/1/95 to 7/17/95.

2/

Ceased operation 9/2/94.

3/

Original installation was 9/26/91, with MRV visas issues only until 9/30/91.

4/

Stamped visas 10/4/95 to 10/6/95.

5/

Ceased visa operations 5/4/95.

6/

Ceased visa operations 2/5/96.

7/

Stamped visas 2/11/95 to 2/14/95.

8/

Stamped visas 10/10/95 to 10/11/95.

9/

Stamped visas 3/4/96 to 3/13/96.

10/

Began issuing laminated SAV 2/18/93.

11/

Stamped visas 8/6/94 to 8/7/94.

12/

Stamped visas 6/27/95 to 6/29/95.

13/

Old MRV foils 8/12/94 to 817?/94; stamped visas 10/10/95 to 10/11/95.

14/

A and G visas only after 6/27/94.

15/

Stamped visas 7/25/94 to 7/31/94.

16/

Stamped visas 10/20/94 to 11/2/94.

17/

Stamped visas 10/20/95 to 10/23/95.

18/

Stamped visas 217/95 to 2/9/95.

Appendix 15-7
Countries whose nationals are considered to have
a "common nationality" with Canadians
Nationals of the countries listed below are considered to have a "common nationality" with citizens of Canada
and the British Overseas Territory of Bermuda. Prior to March 17,2003, they were exempt from the passport
and nonimmigrant visa requirement if they resided in Canada or Bermuda. However, on and after March 17,
2003, this exemption no longer applied and such persons are required to present a valid passport and (unless
eligible for the Visa Waiver Program) a valid visa.
Antigua and Barbuda
Australia
Bahamas
Bangladesh
Barbados
Belize
Botswana
Brunei
Cameroon
Canada
Cyprus
Dominica
Fiji

Gambia
Ghana
Grenada
Guyana
Hong Kong (U.K or British National(Overseas) passport holders only).
India

Ireland
Jamaica
Kenya
Kiribati
Lesotho
Malawi
Malaysia
Maldives
Malta
Mauritius
Namibia
Nauru
New Zealand
Nigeria
Pakistan
Papua New Guinea
St. Kitts and Nevis
St. Lucia
St. Vincent and the Grenadines
Seychelles
Sierra Leone
Singapore
Solomon Islands
South Africa
Sri Lanka
Swaziland
Tanzania
Tonga
Trinidad and Tobago
Tuvalu
Uganda
United Kingdom (including colonies, territories, and dependencies)
Vanuatu
Western Samoa
Zambia
Zimbabwe

Appendix 15-8
Appendix 15-8

Document Mailing List

Document Mailing List

Document Type

Mailing Address

CBP Address Change
AR-11, Alien Change of Address Card - All
P.O. Box 7134
(Including NSEERS and Special Interest
Aliens)
London, KY 40742-7134
EPIC - Attn: ICS
11339 SSG Sims St.
G-329, Documented
Citizenship

False

Claim

to

U.S.
EI Paso, TX 79908-8098

1-89 with immigrant visa
'
Cen t er
. (All. .office and POEs USCIS - T exas S
ervlce
except LAX and SFO as Identified below)
P0 B
850633
All 1-89s with 1-181
. . ox

All I-89s with SB-1

Mesquite, TX 75185-0633

USCIS - California Service Center
1-89 with immigrant visa (Air Ports-of-entry at P.O. Box 30111
Los Angeles [LAX] and San Francisco [SFO]
only)
Laguna Niguel, CA 92607-0111

1-92
1-94

1-95 (Crewman's
Permit)
1-530

Landing FedEx: ACS - CBP SBU
1084-1 South Laurel Rd

1-94T (TWOV)

London, KY 40744
1-736 (Guam Visa Waiver)

1-94W
Waiver)

(Visa

US MAIL: ACS - CBP SBU
P.O. Box 140
London, KY 40741-0140
USCIS - Texas Service Center
P.O. Box 850663

1-407, Abandonment of LPR Status
Mesquite, TX 75185-0633
National Records Center
Attn: Crewman Manifests
1-418, Manifest (seaport)

150 Space Center Loop

Lee's Summit, MO 64064

Border Crossing Card

USCIS - Texas Service Center
P.O. Box 850997

Mesquite, TX 75185-0997

c/o US-VISIT Program
1616 North Fort Myer Drive
IDENT cards sent to the Biometric Support Suite 1800
Center
Arlington, VA 22209
REV 03/04

Appendix 15-9:
Standard Operating Procedures for Aliens
Subject to Special Registration, Also Known as the National Security
Entry Exit Registration System (NSEERS).
The NSEERS system has replaced the previous special interest alien procedures that applied to certain nonimmigrants from Iran, Iraq,
Libya and Sudan. While this SOP does not enumerate the countries whose nationals and citizens will be subject to special registration,
or NSEERS, it does specify the procedures for secondary processing of those who are subject to special registration. These procedures
proced ures
became effective on September 11, 2002. Please refer to parts (a)(l), (a)(2) and (a)(3) of this SOP for a discussion on identification of
the population that will be subject to NSEERS registration. The information contained in this SOP applies to other programs in addition
to Inspections. The regulatory authority for this program can be found at 8 CFR 264.1(f).

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

(a)

~~E...
~J:\E...

Inspections.

(1) Persons Subject to NSEERS Registration Procedures. Except as provided in paragraphs (a)(2) and (a)(3), aliens subject to special
registration are:

•

Those who meet pre-existing, or established criteria determined by the Attorney General, now Secretary of Homeland Security (to
be published via a separate policy memorandum) to indicate that the alien warrants monitoring for national security of law
enforcement interests.

•

Those who a consular officer has determined meet pre-existing criteria as determined by the Secretary of State and are identified
through the Interagency Border Inspection System (IBIS).

•

Those who are identified as being citizens or nationals of a country designated by the Attorney General, now Secretary of
Homeland Security, in consultation with the Secretary of State, and published in the Federal Register (FR).
In addition, with the concurrence of the supervisor or acting supervisor, an officer may exercise discretion
nonimmigrant (other than the exemptions listed in part (a)(2)), provided that the officer has a reason
registration is warranted for national security or law enforcement purposes. For more information and
discretionary registration please refer to part (a)(4)(F) of this SOP.

and register any
to believe that such a
limitations on

(Note: The pre-existing criteria still in effect to date was established by the Attorney General. The powers of the Attorney General,
regarding NSEERS are now vested in the Secretary of Homeland Security. However, the Secretary did not amend the criteria
previously issued by the Attorney General. References to the Attorney General are being changed to Secretary of Homeland Security in
this document.)

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

Aliens subject to domestic, or call-in registration are identified by publication of a notice in the Federal Register (FR). Each notice
outlines who is subject to the notice in the "Scope" section. Furthermore, each notice also incl
includes
udes an "Inapplicability" section, which
articulates those aliens who are not subject to the notice. However, officers should be aware that domestic, or call-in registration
notices are subject to change and each notice must be read in order to determine who is and who is not subject to a particular notice.
Therefore, aliens who are subject domestic, or call-in registration are not necessarily subject to registration upon arrival to the United
States, unless such an alien also meets the identification criteria cited in the policy memorandum, as amended on September 30,
2002.
Federal Register Notice 63 FR 39109, titled "Requirement for Registration and Fingerprinting of Certain Nonimmigrants", published July
21, 1998, stating that nonimmigrants (other than those who apply for admission under section 101(a)(15)(A) or 101(a)(15)(G) of the
Act) from Iran, Iraq, Libya and Sudan are subject to the requirements
req uirements of 8 CFR 264.1(f). The 1998 notice was, in effect, superseded
by the publication of the Federal Register Final Regulation 67 FR 52584, titled "Registration and Monitoring of Certain Nonimmigrants",
published August 12, 2002. Federal Register Notice 67 FR 57032, titled "Registration and Monitoring of Certain Nonimmigrants From
Designated Countries", published September 6, 2002 added Syria to the list of designated countries.
In any case, many special registrants will be identified through application of the established criteria. For this reason, it is imperative
that all officers conducting immigration inspections be familiar with and understand the pre-existing criteria and the pertinent Federal
Register notices. All officers conducting immigration inspections must refer identified special registrants to immigration secondary for
processing.

(b)(2),
(b)(7)(E)

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

It is possible that officers will encounter aliens who fall within one of the categories of aliens subject to registration, (b)(2),

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

(4) Primarylnspections. Aliens subject to special registration must still under
(according to current policy), before being referred for special registration. (b)(2),

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

(b)(7)(E)

(b)(7)(E)

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

Upon referral for special registration, issue the potential registrant with a pamphlet that explains the special registration process.

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

(b)(2),
(b)(7)(E)
In cases where aliens subject to special registration are identified at a POE•
•••
• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • the
registration process occurs in accordance with the procedures outlined in part (a)(ll) of this SOP.
(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

- -

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
--------------------

--

----

---------

--------- ---

--

-

•
• • (b)(7)(E)
•IIII!I
"hether referred to secondary through IBIS or not, the primary officer must ensure that the secondary
•III!I
(b)(2),
officer understands that the alien is being referred for special registration. As usual, the primary officer must also communicate all
known information regarding inadmissibility to the secondary officer.

(b)(2),
(b)(7)(E)
In cases where aliens subject to special registration are identified at a POE
POE•
•••
• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • the
registration process occurs in accordance with the procedures outlined in part (a)(ll) of this SOP.
(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

(b)(2),
(b)(7)(E)
In cases where aliens subject to special registration are identified at a•
•••
• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • the
registration process occurs in accordance with the procedures outlined in part (a)(ll) of this SOP.
(D) Commercial Vehicles. Commercial vehicles will be processed under the same vehicle guidelines outlined in part (A) of this section.
(E) Other Conveyances. (b)(2),

(b)(7)(E)

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

SUblct to special registration will be registered. In cases
Aliens arriving via such conveyances and sUbict
where aliens subject to special registration are identified at a POE (b)(2), (b) the registration process occurs in accordance with the
back-up procedures outlined in part (a)(ll) of this SOP.
(7)(E)

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

(G) Dual Nationality. Federal Register Final Regulation, 67 FR 52584, published August 12, 2002 amended the language regarding dual
nationals. The current policy and regulation cite that if the officer has "reason to believe" that a nonimmigrant alien is a national or a
citizen of a country designated by the Attorney General, in consultation with the Secretary of State, the alien SHALL be specially
registered.
However, clarification is needed for the inspecting officer to determine what constitutes a "reason to believe" that a nonimmigrant alien
is a national or a citizen of a country designated in the FR. If the officer does not have a clear and articulable reason to believe, the
nonimmigrant should not be specially registered.
The supplemental information included with the August 12, 2002 publication of the final regulation enumerates that the officer must
have information that indicates an alien is, in fact, a national or citizen of a designated country. This information must be based on
articulable facts or evidence that would indicate that the nonimmigrant is presently a citizen or national of one of the designated
countries. The fact that a nonimmigrant alien is born in a country designated in the FR does not, in and of itself, constitute a reason to
believe that the alien is a citizen or national of that country.
Some examples of facts that can be articulated in support of a reason to believe that a nonimmigrant alien is a dual national may

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

------

---------- ---- ------

SecondalJ'J.m;pections. The term "secondary inspection" refers to a process rather than a location. At some POEs, special
(5) SecondaD'J.m;pections.
registration might take place in a secondary inspections office, or it might take place at another designated location. Regardless of the
location, the process is outlined below.

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

sorne concern is the repeated admission of prior registrants who have not complied with
Returning NSEERS Violators. Another issue that has been of some
the departure registration requirement. As a reminder, registrants who fail (without good cause) to be examined upon departure shall thereafter
be presumed inadmissible under, but not limited to, 212(a)(3)(A)(ii) of the Act. Officers and their supervisors, as always, have the authority to
take and consider evidence that the registrant had good cause for not being able to comply. However, the concern is repeated departures
without re istration. Good cause will alwa s be a case-b -case determination b the officer throu h the a ro riate chain-of-command. (b)(2),

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

(b)(7)

If the registrant is unable to establish good cause for past failure to register departure, then the registrant must be able to successfully rebut the
(E)
legal presumption that his future trip will be to engage in unlawful activity in order not to be found inadmissible pursuant to section 212(a)(3)(A)
(ii) of the Act. Like the good cause analysis, a determination of whether the registrant has met his burden of proof in this regard should be made
by the officer through the appropriate chain-of-command. The determination of whether the registrant has rebutted the presumption of
unlawfulness should examine all factors surrounding the registrant's prior and return trip to the United States, including, but not limited to, (b)(2),

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

•

•

8RQlicants for Admission NOT Departing from an Authorized POD. When an alien who is subject to NSEERS registration applies for admission and
his or her departure arrangements show that he or she will not depart from an authorized POD, that alien is inadmissible. Pursuant to 8 CFR
214.1(f), as amended on August 12, 2002, compliance with the registration requirements of 8 CFR 264.1 (f) is a condition of admission. This
circumstance is addressed in part (a)(6) of this SOP. However, if otherwise admissible and prior to admission, such an alien should be given the
option to change his or her arrangement to depart through an authorized POD. In addition, where otherwise admissible and where an officer is
satisfied of the alien's bona fide intent, the inspecting officer could admit the alien without a change of departure arrangements if the alien
the departure requirements.
alien must be placed on notice that if the waiver is not granted
he or
must
intends
waiver of
of thie.d.e.p.a.rt.u.re.re.q.u.ir.e.m.e.n.ts
•..The
T.h.e.a.l.ie.n.m.u.s.t.be.p.la.c.e.d.o.n.no.t.ic.e.t.h.a.t.if.th.e.w.a.iv.e.r.is.n.ot
granted he
or she
she must
intends to
to apply
apply for
for a
a waiver
(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
arrangements .•
change departure arrangements
.

(b)(2),
(b)(7)
Waivers. In order for an officer to prepare a well-articulated and legally sufficient case, the officer must have all available i n f o r m
atio
n._
(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
registration requirements, please refer to part (a)(10) of this SOP.

•

(b)(7)
(E)

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

(E)

For additional information regarding waivers of

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

(A) Special Registration / Admissible Alien. After completing a routine secondary inspection, including all arlicable database queries,
each alien identified as a special registration candidate (including crewmen) will be enrolled into (b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
by taking both
_
index fin er rints and a hoto ra h. The re uired data elements will be obtained under oath from the alien, and recorded i n
(b)(2),

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

(b)(7)
(E)

If an index fingerprint is unreadable or injured, an alternate print from the same hand will be utilized, and noted in the liE system.

Special registration does not necessarily bear on the duration of the nonimmigrant alien's period of admission. Therefore, unless other
information is discovered that might otherwise limit the duration of admission (such as a Form 1-515, Notice to Student or Exchange
Visitor, for a student), special registrants should be admitted for the appropriate period of time for their class of admission.
Nonimmigrant aliens who have not complied with the terms of a previous special registration, by not having their departure recorded
by CBP if it was required (departure provisions become effective October 1, 2002), may be presumed inadmissible pursuant (but not
limited) to section 212(a)(3)(A)(ii) of the Act. Officers should carefully consider the totality of circumstances before applying this
ground of inadmissibility. To apply this particular ground of inadmissibility, the officer must know, or have reason to believe, that the
alien seeks to enter the United States to engage in unlawful activity. The 212(a)(3)(A)(ii) charge does not fall into the security grounds
removal procedures cited in section 235(c) of the Act. Inspecting officers may take and consider any evidence that an alien complied
with the terms of his or her previous admission and registration or that failure to do so was beyond his or her control. For example,

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

(B) lDi'ldmissible Aliens. As noted in part (a)(2) of this SOP, NSEERS registration applies to aliens who apply for admission as
nonlmmigrants. During secondary inspection, while the alien is applying for admission as a nonimmigrant, special registration
Information will be captured on aliens who meet the criteria for special registration, before it is officially determined that they are
admissible.
Whether an inadmissible alien is being processed under Expedited Removal (ER) (including credible fear), Visa Waiver Refusal,
Withdrawal of Application for Admission, Security Grounds Removal under section 235(c) of the Act, or Removal Proceedings under
section 240 of the Act, process the alien using the established removal procedures for these cases. Refer to chapter 17 of the IFM for

more information on these processes. However, as stated above, the potentially inadmissible alien (including a crewman who may be
refused) will be fingerprinted and photographed and asked to provide the special registration data prior to the determination of his or
(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
her inadmissibility. This data will be entered i n t o . this includes departure data when the alien is immediately removed from the
United States.

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
(D) Form 1-94 Issuance & FIN Notation. All arriving nonimmigrant aliens subject to special registration, or NSEERS, will be issued the
appropriate Form 1-94 for their class of admission. Land border fees for the appropriate Form 1-94 should be waived, where the sole
reason for issuance of the form is to provide the nonimmigrant evidence of special registration.
(b) (2)

the.hotOgraph, fingerprints, and biographical data must be completed prior to making an official determination of
The collection of the.hotograph,
admissibility (or inadmissibility), if admissible the alien will be issued the appropriate Form 1-94 for his or her class of admission.
(b) (2)

Some locations have the ability to produce a Form 1-94 from the.ystem that includes the alien's photograph. This systemgenerated Form 1-94 is desirable, but not required.

(b) (2)

(b) (2)

f o . a t c h precisely. Theil
screen utilized for special
Officers are to ensure the Form 1-94 and passport information collected fo.atch
Thellscreen
registrants will allow for editing the data.

•

Special Registrant with nonimmigrant visa: Issue Form 1-94.
The Form 1-94 will be annotated with the FIN, placed on the arrival and departure portions of the Form 1-94 above the family
name.
The words "NSEERS REGISTRANT'
REGISTRANT" will be annotated or stamped on the reverse side of the Form 1-94 on both the arrival and
departure portions. On the arrival portion this notation will be placed in the "Itinerary/Comments" section. On the departure
portion this notation will be made in the "Record of Change" portion.
The FIN should be noted on the alien's nonimmigrant visa, but it should not be written over any existing data. When an alien is not
in possession of a nonimmigrant visa, the FIN will be placed in the alien's entry document along with the admission stamp.
This step may be omitted when the alien is not in possession of either a passport or visa.

•

Special Registrant subject to the Visa Waiver Program (VWP): Issue Form I-94W (Nonimmigrant Visa Waiver Arrival-Departure
Document).

The Form I-94W will be annotated with the FIN on the front side of the arrival and departure portions adjacent to the phrase "VISA
WAIVER", which appears on the left side, above space one. This is where the family name is inserted.
The words "NSEERS REGISTRANT" will be annotated or stamped on the reverse side of the Form I-94W across the top of the arrival
portion and on the departure portion, adjacent to the phrase "Departure Record."
The FIN will be placed in the alien's entry document along with the admission stamp.

•

Special Registrant subject to Transit Without Visa (TWOV): Issue Form I-94T (Arrival and Departure Record).

The Form I-94T will be annotated with the FIN on the front side of the arrival portion above the family name. Annotate the FIN on the
front side of the departure portion above the term "I-94T" which appears above the family name, on the left side of the form.
The words "NSEERS REGISTRANT" will be annotated or stamped on the reverse side of the form I-94T across the middle of the arrival
portion, above the word "Authority" and on the departure portion, above the phrase "Departure Information."
The FIN will be placed in the alien's entry document along with the admission stamp.

(E) Advisory Materials. In order for Customs and Border Protection (CBP) to expect that registered aliens comply with the terms of
special registration, or NSEERS registration, it is critical that the registering officer explain those requirements to each registrant
during the service of the walk-away materials. Walk-away materials can be printed from the following web-site:
http://www.immigration.gov/graphics/shared/lawenfor/specialreg/index.htm
-ORhttp://161. 214.87. 31/graphics/shared/lawenfor/specialreg/sri ndivid uals. pdf
Part of the CBP's ability to demonstrate that a registrant should have complied with the departure requirements, as well as every other
registration requirement, is that each registrant is given a set of walk-away materials before departing the POE, or other office in the
case of a call-in registration. It is imperative that each registrant be served with a set of walk-away materials, and that the information
provided in the walk-away materials be explained to the registrant. Additionally, it is important that the registrant understands the
content of the materials and that the registrant's (b)(2), (b)(7)(E) record is marked accordingly, or if the registration is being captured under
the back-up procedure, this information is captured on the Form 1-877. It is also imperative that the registration information, whether
(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
ca
~ or as part of the back-up procedure, is collected under oath and that the registrant's record is so marked either
(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
in _ _ of on the Form 1-877. These two critical pieces of data could be the first step in a criminal or administrative case, where
the burden of proof will be on the U.S. Government. Therefore, it is mandatory that each registrant is given walk-away materials, that
his or her registration information is collected under oath, and that the registrant's record indicates both of these facts. Finally, it is
essential to document the language used during the registration process. Until such time as a system update provides specific fields to
capture this information, each record should reflect the language of the interview, whether an interpreter was used, and the language
of both the walk-away materials and the walk-away fact sheet in the comments screen.
The walk-away materials advise the alien of the following requirements:
To notify the U.S. Government of any change of address, school or employment if the alien is staying 30 days or more, within 10
days of such a change.
To report to the BCIS or ICE office having jurisdiction over his or her place of temporary residence for an interview between the
thirtieth and fortieth days of his or her stay if the alien remains in the United States for 30 days or more. During that
interview the alien will be required to demonstrate that he or she is maintaining their nonimmigrant status. Failure to appear
for interview will constitute a violation of his or her nonimmigrant status and may result in his or her removal.
•

Annually thereafter (on the anniversary of his arrival), similar to the 30 day interview, the alien must report to the BCIS or ICE
office having jurisdiction over his or her temporary residence if the alien remains in the United States that long. Failure to
appear for interview will constitute a violation of his or her nonimmigrant status, and may result in removal from the United
States.
Beginning on October 1, 2002, report to CBP prior to departing the United States to enable the agency to verify his or her
departure. He or she will be told where to report, and what ports of departure are available to him or her. Failure to have his
or her departure verified, or to meet other registration requirements, could render the alien inadmissible in the future or could
preclude him or her from obtaining a visa.

The l/E screen will have a block for the officer to certify that the walk-away materials have been provided to the alien.
(6) Required Participation. Pursuant to 8 CFR 214.1(f), the admission of a nonimmigrant who is subject to special registration is
contingent upon compliance with the requirements of 8 CFR 264.1(f). Upon application for admission, aliens who are subject to special

registration and who refuse to comply with the requirements of the registration process are effectively stating that they do not intend
to comply with the terms of admission that they are seeking. Therefore, such aliens are inadmissible under section 212(a)(7)(A)(i)(I)
or (6)(i)(I1)
(B)(i)(Il) of the Act, as appropriate (if failure to comply with the terms of special registration is the only basis for the alien's
inadmissibility). Such an alien is either not a bona fide nonimmigrant as defined in section 101(a)(15) of the Act, or not in possession
of the appropriate nonimmigrant visa for the intent of his or her trip. They will be subject to Expedited Removal (ER), but should be
allowed to withdraw their application for admission in lieu of ER at the discretion of the Service. Please refer to IFM chapters 17.2 and
17.15 for more information regarding withdraw of application for admission and expedited
removal respectively. Through the
(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
withdrawal of application for admission process, photographs, fingerprints are taken via_enrollment and ~stration data can be
(b) (2)
into_Therefore,
captured via the Question and Answer (Q&A) statement. This information should be obtained and entered into.
Therefore, it must
be made clear to potential special registrants who do not wish to comply with the terms of special registration that they will still be
photographed, fingerprinted and asked to provide additional data. The collection of the photograph, fingerprint and additional data will
be collected as part of the process for their removal from the United States, not under 8 CFR, 264.1(f).
(7) Alternative Inspections. Nonimmigrant aliens who are subject to special registration and have been granted a waiver by an officer
delegated NSEERS waiver authority may participate (if otherwise eligible) in an alternative inspection program, provided that the
waiver has not expired and is valid for multiple entries. See part (a)(10)
(a)( 10) for further gUidance
guidance regarding the issuance of waivers for
aliens who are subject to special registration.

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

er

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

Upon interdiction the alien will be referred to
secondary where they will be registered pursuant to current policy. In addition, the alien will be informed that they may apply to CBP
for a waiver of all or part of the registration requirements. If it is determined that the registrant has been granted a waiver by an
(b)(2),
officer delegated NSEERS waiver authority, and the waiver has not expired and is valid for multiple entries, •
• •(b)(7)(E)
••••••

gr.ailn.te.d.a.w.ailivie.r.bily.ailn.

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
(8) !2eQQrture and Readmission. Upon departure on or after October 1, 2002, including visits to Mexico,
MeXico, Canada or adjacent islands,
the alien must notify CBP of such departure and leave through a designated POD. Aliens who were subject to special registration and
did not report their departure to CBP may not be eligible for readmission, including automatic revalidation, when attempting to return
to the United States.
g the alien intends to avail
determinllparting
Officers conducting departure control pursuant to 8 CFR 264.1(f)(8) must attempt to determin.partin
(b) (2)
him or herself of automatic visa revalidation. In such cases, the departure must be recorded i
but the alien should retain his or
her original Form 1-94. When processing such alien upon his or her return, a new special regis
will be performed. If admissible,
the alien may be admitted for the balance of the previous admission.

(9) Aliens in Transit. Nonimmigrants who are subject to special registration and who are eligible to apply for admission under 8 CFR
212.1(f) (Transit Without Visa) shall be registered as described in this SOP. However, if
jf the alien intends to depart the United States
(b) (2)
from an unauthorized POD, his or her departure information will be collected and entered into.uring the arrival registration. If the
alien is intending to depart the United States through an authorized POD, then the departure information will be collected at the
departure site listed in the walk-away materials. Refer to part (a)(2) for exemption for ITI passengers.
(10) Aliens Requesting Waiver of Special Registration Requirements. A nonimmigrant alien applying for admission that has been
granted a waiver, and the waiver has not expired can be admitted without registration. Therefore, the issuance of waivers of special
registration requirements should be handled in a judicious and expeditious manner. Information on waivers granted to aliens who have
been registered will be updated in (b)(2), (b)(7)(E) 'y the approving office.
Title 8 of the Code of Federal Regulations, part 264.1(f)(7), authorizes district directors of the former Immigration and Naturalization
Service to adjudicate requests for relief (waivers) from the special registration requirements.

The authority to grant waivers from the special registration requirements has been delegated to the CBP Directors and Deputy
Directors, Field Operations, or those officers acting in the capacity of such director or deputy director. The Director or Deputy Director,
Field Operations may further delegate this authority, not lower than the level of Port Director or Deputy Port Director (or an officer
acting in that capacity), at the GS-13 level or higher.
When granted, this relief (or waiver) can encompass all or part of the registration requirements. A registered alien could seek relief
from the NSEERS requirements in many ways. Some of those ways are: 1) Waiver of registration upon arrival; 2) Waiver of 3D-day
and/or annual Interviews; 3) Waiver of Departure Registration (or departure from an unauthorized port); 4) Waiver of all registration
requirements. An alien might also seek relief from a combination of requirements, such as the 3D-day interview and departure
registration.
A waiver request received by the CBP could seek relief from NSEERS requirements that are not part of the CBP function. For example,
a request from a registered alien who is seeking relief only from the 3D-day or annual interview should be forwarded to the Bureau of
Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) and/or the Bureau of Citizenship and Immigration Services (CIS) at the local level and
notify the applicant of the transfer of his or her request. However, CBP must adjudicate all request for relief received, where the
request includes a waiver of arrival and/or departure registration, regardless of whether the request also includes waiver of the 3D-day
or annual interview.
Prior to granting any waiver, the officer delegated NSEERS waiver authority, must confirm that the nonimmigrant alien requesting
relief has been specially registered and their registration information is contained in the automated NSEERS database (b)(2), (b)(7)(E) In
addition, record checks through (b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
as well as local indices, must be performed and
confirmed before rantin a waiver. (b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

For this reason, nonimmigrant aliens making a waiver request at a port of entry (POE) must be made aware that waiver requests are
not adjudicated immediately. Do not adjudicate a waiver application unless the most recent registration record is two weeks old.
(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
Furthermore, if there is no (b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
n the alien's
ecord, the waiver request is to be denied and the alien
informed that he or she may reapply at a later time. While the waiver request is pending, the registrant must continue to comply with
all of the special registration requirements until such time as a waiver is granted.

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

ecord. The waiver field in ENFORCE is a
A critical requirement in this process is the tracking of waivers granted in the alien'
(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
in order to serve as
part of an individual alien's registration record. It is imperative that each granted waiver be tracked in
(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
verification that a waiver has been granted and to provide reports of waivers granted. The
system was modified to allow for
the tracking of specific, detailed, information regarding waivers. These data fields must be populated for each waiver granted. Other
Information relevant to the waiver, not included in the waiver field, should be entered in the comments field.
IS no form prescribed for waiver requests, therefore there is no associated processing fee. However, each waiver
At this time there is
request must be accompanied by appropriate supporting documents, based on the request that is being made. Some examples might
include:
Include:

•

A registered alien who is seeking a waiver from the 3D-day interview for medical reasons should submit medical records, letters. or other appropriate

documentation from his or her physician. The documents described in this example must support the claim that the alien cannot appear before the Service
for the 3D-day interview.
A registered truck driver who makes frequent entries into the United States. Such a registered alien should provide supporting documents indicating
that his of her entries are frequent enough to warrant a waiver, such as log books, invoices or delivery schedules, and a letter from his or her
employer indicating that the entry into the United States is required given the nature of their employment. The documents described in this
example must support the claim that the registration requirements would cause such a hardship to the alien that he or she could no longer
continue employment if registered. This type of waiver would not be appropriate if the alien's entries into the United States are so infrequent that
registration would not impose an undue hardship.
•

A registered student requesting a waiver of the departure reporting requirements should provide a letter from the designated school official certifying
that departure from a designated port of departure would cause economic or other hardship for the student, a certification that the student is
maintaining status, proof of enrollment, or other evidence that the alien is a bona fide student. The documents described in this example must
support the claim that the alien cannot depart from an authorized port of departure.

The type and amount of supporting documents will vary depending on the part of the registration requirements that the alien is
requesting be waived, the class of admission of the registrant and the circumstances regarding the alien's continued stay in, or
departure from, the United States.
The officer delegated NSEERS waiver authority may not waive the requirement that special registrants who remain in the United States
for thirty days or longer must notify the Service of any change of address, employment, or educational institution within ten days of
such a change. Furthermore, the officer delegated NSEERS waiver authority is authorized to cancel or rescind a waiver should
information come to their attention that would cause the nonimmigrant alien to become ineligible for the waiver. Should this occur, the
(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
NSEERS database must be updated immediately. Denials should also be annotated in the comments field of the a
alien's
lien's_
record to prevent the special registrant from "POE/District shopping" for an approval.
Upon receipt of a waiver application (w~includea photograph), ensure that the applicant's information matches the
(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
biometric and biographic information i n ~ waiver applicant may, at the discretion of the officer delegated NSEERS waiver
authority, be required to report for an interview and perform an (b)(2), (b)(7)(E) earch for the alien's NSEERS record and to issue waiver
approval notification.
The approval notification will be issued in the form of a letter signed by the officer delegated NSEERS waiver authority. The body of the
letter will cite the alien's full name, date of birth and Fingerprint Identification Number (FIN); additional numbers such as passport
number, Form 1-94 number, or Alien File number may be included as well. The letter will also state "Special Registration, or NSEERS,
Waiver Authorized". The letter must specify which arts of s ecial re istration are waived the ex iration date of the waiver and
whether the waiver is valid for multi Ie entries
entries.. (b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
•••••••••••••••••iiijijii•••
iiiiiiiijijiijiiiiiii•••ii•••jii.
Should an officer
ques Ion e va I Y
a waiver e er, e a len s registration recor s ou
e c ec e to ensure t at a waiver has, in fact, been
I

0

granted and that the terms of the waiver are properly reflected on the letter. Evaluation of options is ongoing for the creation of a form
containing more enhanced security features for issuance to registered aliens in order to demonstrate that a waiver has been granted.
When evaluating the merits of a waiver request, the threshold to be applied should be the hardship placed on the nonimmigrant alien
weighed against
against the
the national
the United
States. As
As previously
you must
always verify that the specialI
weighed
national security
security concerns
concerns of
of the
United States.
previously mentioned,
mentioned, you
m.uilst.a.l.w.a.y.s.vieilrlllif.y.t.h.a.tlit.h.elis.p.e.c.ia
(b)(7)(E)
registrant was initially registered into the NSEERS database. Furthermore, the local checks as well as•
as (b)(2),
•••
• • • • •" • • •
checks must be performed and confirmed before a waiver may be granted.
The validity of any waiver granted may not exceed one year and remains valid upon departure from the United States. Special
registrants may apply for, and if eligible, be granted an extension of the waiver for a period not to exceed one year per extension.

The following three categories represent a general guide that may warrant approval of a discretionary 8 CFR 264,l(f)(7) waiver. The
officer delegated NSEERS waiver authority may authorize a waiver for anyone of the categories listed below, or may base the waiver
on other situations or information not referenced in these categories.
!~

Category 1 (POE Registration/Departure Waiver)

This category pertains to those nonimmigrant aliens who make frequent crossings on a daily or weekly basis, do not plan to remain in
the United States longer than 29 days upon entry, and request a waiver from registration and from departure verification at the POE.
These individuals may be engaged in employment that requires them to make repeated trips to the United States or short duration.
Similarly, this would apply to individuals who are attending educational institutions who can demonstrate that they make frequent
entries to attend school. This category may also apply to nonimmigrant aliens who are acting in a diplomatic capacity, but are awaiting
the issuance of an "A" or "Gil
"G" class visa. It may also apply to individuals who are entering the United States for medical treatment.
!~

Category 2 (3D-day and/or 1-year Waiver)

This category of nonimmigrant aliens may apply for a waiver from the 30-day and/or annual interview requirements. This would
generally apply to nonimmigrant aliens who are hospitalized or in extended non-ambulatory care and cannot come to the district or
sub-office to report for the interview. It may also apply to nonimmigrant aliens who are acting in a diplomatic capacity, but are
awaiting the issuance of an "A" or "Gil
"G" class visa.
•

Category 3 (Departure Waiver)

This category would apply to nonimmigrant aliens who have been registered but now request to leave the United States from a port
other than a designated port of departure. This may apply to individuals who may have previously purchased a round-trip ticket and
the return transportation does not depart from a designated port. Additionally, this may be a request from a specially registered
nonimmigrant alien who now has to depart the United States from a non-designated port of departure because of unforeseen
circumstances.

It is paramount that should a waiver be granted or denied, a timely update must be made in the NSEERS database. In addition, all
registered aliens who apply for a waiver must be informed that waiver requests cannot be adjudicated immediately and that they will
either have to return to the POE or Service office to pick-up their waiver letter, or it may be mailed to them if there is sufficient reason
to believe that the alien cannot return to a Service office. Until the specially registered alien receives notification that his or her request
has been approved, the nonimmigrant alien must comply with all of the terms of special registration.
Please refer to part (a)(6) of aliens who refuse to participate in registration procedures. See also Appendix 15-10 of this field manual.
If a secondary inspecting officer encounters an alien who has been granted a waiver by an officer delegated NSEERS waiver authority,
it should be noted in th (b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
on the reverse of the Form 1-94 and adjacent to the
passport admission stamp (where a passport is required).
Not to be confused with a waiver, either the Secretary of State, or the Secretary of Homeland Security can exempt individual
nonimmigrants from the special registration requirements upon application for admission to the United States. Some of these
exemptions will be posted in IBIS by the Department of State. In those cases, IBIS will alert the officer that this particular alien is
exempt from special registration (or NSEERS) requirements. Please refer to part (a)(2) of this SOP for current special registration
exemptions.
(11) Backup Procedures.
Backup Procedures.

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

in accordance with current policy. The data that would normally have
every special r e . t alien will be run in (b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
been collected i (b) (2) ill be recorded under oath in question and answer format on Form 1-877. The title of the statement will be
"Special Registration, or National Security Entry-Exit Registration System (NSEERS)."

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

Offices that do not have a sufficient number of systems, or are experiencing other system deficiencies such as long systems response
The back-up procedure is ONLY to be used in cases of emergency, when officers
times, mus (b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
do not have access to (b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
Officers using the back-up system must not deviate from this SOP. The current back-up procedure is specific as to what information
BSe. Officers are required to roll each index fingerprint (or other print if the index is
must be collected and submitted to the BSC.
unavailable, according to current fingerprint policy) on Form FD-258, Applicant
Fingerprint Card (including all applicable masthead information), take a one-inch by one-inch photograph of the alien and collect the
required additional information on the Form 1-877, Record of Sworn Statement in Administrative Proceedings. It is no longer necessary
to send the BSC photocopies of travel documents, or any other document or article that is not specifically called for in the back-up
procedure. (b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
masthead information must be complete.
All registration information sent to the BSC must be marked as either a port of entry registration, a call-in registration, a departure
registration, a 30-day interview, or an annual interview. This will assist the BSC in properly categorizing the materials and entering
(b)(2),
(b)(7)(E)
them efficiently into •
•••
••••
The print from each index finger will be recorded on a Form FD-258, Applicant Fingerprint Card, and a photo taken (digital preferred 1
inch x 1 inch). While the FD-258 will contain some of the same data that will be collected in the Q&A, all of the biographic data on the
FD-258 must be completed. The Q&A and fingerprints will be sent, via Fed-Ex account (number to be provided), from the POE to the
Biometric Support Center (BSC), c/o
cia US-VISIT Program (b) (2)
Mark the
envelope "Attn: Special Registration." Immediately fax all back-up material (FD-258, photographs and Form 1-877) to the BSC at
(b)•(2)
Please refer to part (a)(ll)(E) for forwarding instructions.
•
• • • • • The BSC can be reached at (b) (2)

•••iII•••

In addition to the port code, date and Officer's name, the following data will be collected from the special registrant through
examination of documents and questioning of the alien under oath (underlined items are mandatory):
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
"•
"•
•
"•
"•

Control (family/last) Name,
First (given) Name,
Middle Name,
Nationality (list both if dual national and list first the nationality that the alien is using to apply for admission),
Place of Birth (country &
& city/province),
Sex,
Birth Date,
Height,
Weight,
Hair Color,
Eye Color,
Purpose of Visit,

•

•
•
•

•

•
•

Names of Father & Mother,
Dates of Birth of Father & Mother,
Points of Contact in Alien's country of Origin,
Address While in the United States,
Phone Number While in the United States,
Miscellaneous Numbers (such as 1-94, SSN, perforated document number),
Visa Place of Issuance,
Visa Date of Issuance,
Visa Expiration Date,
Passport Number,
Passport City/Place of Issuance,
Passport Date of Issuance,
Passport Date of Expiration,
Airline and flight number,
Arrival Date,
Vessel Name,
Vessel Country of Registration,
POE Code,
Entry Date & Time,
Entry Status (class of admission if admissible or type of removal process if inadmissible),
Departure Status/Departure Date,
Departure Reported/Verified,
Waiver of Special Registration Requested,
Waiver of Special Registration Granted/Denied,
Walk-Away Materials Issued

Note that passport and visa information are not mandatory fields. Where a special registrant is in possession of either of these
documents, those data elements become mandatory.
Note also that there is a space for "Miscellaneous Numbers," and passport number is listed as an example. "Passport Number" is also
listed as a separate data element. This allows an inspecting officer to capture a preprinted booklet number or perforated passport
number in the "Miscellaneous Numbers" field when that number differs from the issued passport number that is cited on the passport's
biographical page.
In the case of a registration being undertaken where an A-number exists, the A-number should be listed as a Miscellaneous Number as
well.
While both air and sea carrier information is listed as mandatory, it is required that the alien's manner of arrival is included whether is
it by air or sea.
(A) Prints Unobtainable. If an index fingerprint is unreadable/injured, an alternate fingerprint from the same hand will be utilized and
placed in the appropriate block of the Form FD-258.
(B) Photographs. Each special registrant will be photographed (digital preferred). Send the photographs with the documents to the
BSe
(C) No FIN Available. Upon conclusion of the interview, if it is determined the arriving alien is admissible, a Form 1-94 will be issued. It
will be annotated as described in part (a)(5)(D) of this section. However, since the inspecting officer will not have access to I/E, the

FIN will not be available to note on the Form 1-94, the photo, or the visa. In such a case it is not required.
(D) Verification of Walk-away Material Delivery. The alien will be served with walk-away materials in accordance with part (a)(5)(E) of
this section. However, if IjE
I/E is inaccessible or unavailable, verification of service of the walk-away materials will be noted on the Q &A .

.(b)(2),
. . .(b)(7)(E)
. .illiiiiliis.t.ra.t.io.niiMiiiaiilte.r.ia.li.
iTiihe. material collected under this back-up procedure will be faxed immediately to the BSC at
...iiii••
lliiiiliis.tr.a.t.io.n.M.a.te.r.ia.li'iT.he
Ii!!
IIII!
In addition, the hard copy of the material will be sent daily via Federal Express to the
following address:

(b) (2)

(12) Recording
RecQrding DeQ9rture
DeJLarture of Special Registrants.
(A) Authorized PODs. On or after October 1, 2002, and until further notice, special registrants may only depart through specified PODs,
designated in the most recent applicable Federal Register notice, and they must register their departure with the CBP. Failure to
me of their departure could render them inadm
issible upon their next arrival to the United States.
report, in person, to CBP at the ti
time
inadmissible
(B) Additional PODs. Because additional PODs will be added over time, authorized PODs will be published in the Federal Register and
will be cited in the walk-away material described part (a)(5)(E) of this SOP that is provided to the alien.
Federal Register Notice, 68 FR 8046, titled "Notice Designating Additional Ports of Entry for Departure of Aliens Who Are Subject to
Special Registration", was published on February 19,
19,2003.
2003. This notice contains an error and was corrected by Federal Register
Correction 68 FR 8967 published on February 26, 2003. The original notice, as published, does not properly distinguish between the
expanded ports of entry (POEs), designated effective March 3, 2003, for the departure of aliens who are subject to special registration
(registrants) and those POEs that were previously designated on October 1,
1/ 2002. The wording of the notice implies that all of the
POEs listed in the notice have been authorized to provide final registration and departure services since October 1, 2002. This is not
the case.
It is possible that registrants will have attempted to register and depart from one of the newly designated POEs before the March 3,
2003/
2003, effective date of the notice. If a registrant 1) departed the United States from one of the newly designated POEs between
February 19,
2003 (the date of publication of the incorrect notice) and February 26, 2003 (the date of publication of the corrected
19,2003
notice); 2) was not registered upon departure; 3) reapplies for admission; and 4) claims to have attempted to locate the departure
registration location prior to departure, such a case should be construed to have good cause for the failure to register upon departure.

(C) Departure Examination. Registered aliens must be examined at the time of their departure from the United States. The phrase "at
the time of their departure" will be interpreted to mean the day of their departure, and to depart from a port of entry (POE) that has
been designated, by publication in the Federal Register, as an authorized port of departure (POD). Registered aliens may not register
their departure at an authorized POD and actually depart from any other location.
The exceptions to this policy are registered aliens who have been granted a waiver (if the waiver includes departure requirements),
crewmen, and aliens applying for admission under the transit without visa program, as outlined in part (a)(2) of this SOP. Any of these
circumstances must be thoroughly documented in the alien's
alien/s (b)(2), (b)(7)(E) ecord. Therefore, all other specially registered aliens must be
examined by a Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officer at an authorized POD and depart from that site on the same day.
(D) Tracking Departure. The NSEERS departure requirement places the burden on the registrant to register their departure from the

United States. An NSEERS registrant who fails to register departure is presumed inadmissible upon the next aPilication
arplication for admission
to the United States. Registrants subject to NSEERS, for whom no departure data is contained in (b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

As part of an efforttoensu~thatNSEERS~relcjoiridls~a.cjciu~~ltje~I~~jfjlelclt~dle~a~rjtu~~.s~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~i
efforttoensu~thatNSEERS~r~ejcjo~~is~a,cjculr~a~tje~I~~~fjlejCjt~d~e~a.rtiu~rjeis~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
check of the departure records entered in.
(b)(2), to verify that registrants who have reported for departure registration do in fact depart. As this information is based on
passenger manifests, these queries can be and must be performed at air and sea PODs. Land PODs should confirm departure by other
(b)(7)
(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
means such as visual confirmation, information should be noted in the comments field of the registrant's_ecord. An air or
(E)
sea POD that can verify departure through
throug h other means such as visual confirmation should also make the appropriate note in the
comments field.
It is anticipated that this manual departure verification will be replaced by an automated interface between (b)(2),

(b)(7)(E)

(b) (2)
(b)(2),
~
•(b)(7)(E)
• •n the future. Until that time, manual checks of_for
•••lIIin
departure records must be conducted the same day or next morning,

but not more than 24 hours subse uent to the re istrant's re orted de arture. After that time, if a registrant's departure data cannot
(b) (2)
(b)_
(2)
be located i n
n
_
must be performed. The_departure
a query of (b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
data will not be
eparture; therefore, allow sufficient time before
available for approximately one wee su sequen 0 a regis ran s repo e
performing this query. In the event that a registrant's departure cannot be verified through these system checks, a comment must be
placed in the registrant's (b)(2), (b)(7)(E) ecord stating which systems have been checked and that the registrant's departure cannot be
confirmed through those system.
To locate a registrant's departure record in (b)(2),

' •••'.Icodes

(b)(7)(E)

(b) (2)
.n
the

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E) codes must be entered (the other possible data fields to enter are the carrier code and flight number), use (b) (2)

to

bring up the departure manifests. It may be necessary to reenter the apiio
riate carrier code and/or flight number. Locate t e
aPti0
departure carrier or flight in question and open the manifest by placing (b) (2)next to it. Once the manifest is opened, locate the
e registrant departed by air, contact the carrier within
registrant's departure record. Should the registrant's data not be found an
48 hours of departure to obtain an "onboard confirmation" for the flight in question.
In addition, PODs are required to mark all manual departure registrations using the back-up system when sent to the Biometric
Support Center (BSC) (b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
This step will assist the BSC in identifying departure records so that they can be pulled
and the data entered into (b)(2), (b)(7)(E) s soon as possible.
(13) Departure Information.
(A) Intent to Depart. Upon reporting for departure, special registrants should demonstrate that they intend to depart the United States
on the day they report. To do so, they may show onward tickets, or boarding passes, where applicable. The amount of evidence that is
provided to the inspecting officer will vary depending on where and how the departure takes place. For example, at an airport, a
boarding pass could be shown if the review takes place inside the airport security checkpoints. However, if the interview takes place
prior to airport security and prior to check-in, the alien might only provide a ticket. At any location (air, land or sea), the officer should
interview the departing registrant and examine the evidence provided (if any) and make a determination that the special registrant
intends to depart the United States. Where logistically possible and operationally feasible, the officer should witness the departure and
annotate the I/E to that effect.
(B) Annotating Departure. The inspecting officer will examine the alien's identity document(s) and Form 1-94 and record the
registrant's departure in I/E. This process is most quickly and reliably accomplished by fingerprinting the departing alien on I/E. When
the record comes back, update the registration screen with the departure date and verification. To ensure that the normal Form 1-94
process is not Infringed upon, lifting the Form 1-94 is not required of the inspecting officer. Depending upon where the departure
control POint is established it is possible that the alien's Form 1-94 was lifted by the carrier prior to departure control.

(b) (2)

In cases where~ departure control site does not have access t~t that location, the departure information must be recorded for
(b) (2)
later input into. The information collected should contain the special registrant's last name, first name, date-of-birth, FIN number,
intended departure date, carrier name, and flight number or vessel name.
(b) (2) not available at the departure site and the alien's fingerprints cannot be taken upon departure the record can be accessed, the
I_iS
record can be accessed at a later time by using the FIN shown on the Form 1-94. In those cases the inspecting officer must verify the
identity of the alien by comparing the passport photograph or other identification documents with the subject.

If the alien has lost his or her 1-94, or it was previously collected by the carrier, examine the passport and nonimmigrant visa to
determine if the FIN number has been annotated therein.
If the alien was registered using the back-up procedures contained in part (a)(II)
(a)( 11) of this SOP (which generates no FIN to be shown in
(b) (2)
the registrant's documents), the_ecord
must be retrieved by name and date of birth search. Once the record is located, enter the
FIN number on the following documents, if they are available: Form 1-94, nonimmigrant visa and/or adjacent to the admission stamp
(for the entry in question).
(b) (2)
It is imperative that the departure data be entered into.mmediately
and accurately since it will bear on the admissibilit~the
_
application for admission. All departure information must be entered intc (b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
_
.
. . .application

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

(b) (2)

_

ecords can be compared with a carrier's departure manifest to determine if the registrant actually departed.

(C) Passport Stamp. Each designated POD should have departure stamps to record the alien's departure. The inspecting officer will
place an authorized departure stamp in the registrant's passport (where a passport was required for admission). The stamp should be
placed as close to the associated admission stamp as possible. The alien should be advised to keep this evidence in order to
(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
demonstrate his or her compliance to a consular or inspecting officer upon future applications for a visa or admission.!!!!
admission.II!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!,

or.d,e,r,to• • • • •

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

(D) j:xemption from Departure Recording. Aliens who are granted waivers of the registration or departure requirements are not subject
to part (a)(13) of this SOP. See Appendix 15-10 of this field manual. Please refer to part (a)(2) of this SOP for an exemption of
departure requirements for nonimmigrant crewmen.
(E) Violations of Status or Warrants Discovered. When an inspecting officer discovers that a special registrant has violated his or her
nonimmigrant status, (b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
However, the purpose of examination for special
(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
registration purposes upon the alien's departure is not to interfere with the departure of an alien, or to discover such violations; it is
simply to input information on the registrant's departure. Therefore, the inspecting officer must communicate to Investigations the
nature of the violation and the amount of time that they have to respond before the alien's planned departure.

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
(b) CIS, Adjudications.
(1) IdemilltiillLRegistrant.
Idemif'iiillLRegistrant. Prior to arriving at CIS district or sub offices, (b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
will analyze
the data taken at the POE relating to registrants to determine whether they must be interviewed by Investigations or Adjudications.
Adjudicators will only interview registrants who have not been identified as being of interest to the (b)(2), I hese steps are to

(b)(7)
(E)

determine where the registrant should be directed.

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

(2) Adjudications Interview. The objective of the interview is to confirm the registrant's adherence to the itinerary and statement of
intentions he or she provided at the port of entry, or last interview. The first interview will take place after day thirty and before day
forty-one of the alien's stay. Aliens reporting beyond this lO-day window will be referred to ICE, Investigations; however, between the
offices of Investigations and Adjudications, prosecutorial discretion may be exercised on a case-by-case basis. Thereafter, interviews
will occur on a yearly basis within~s of the anniversary of the last admission. The officer will take a digital photo and record a
(b)(2),
_ r i n t of the index fingers i n
_ t o verify registrant's identity. This automatically brings up the applicant's file on the
(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
monitor. While
waiting for the file to load on to the screen, the officer can start the interview by inquiring about
(b)(7)
the following general information:(E)

_print
•
•
•

Purpose of trip (business, employment, vacation, school, other)
Financial support (source & amount of financial support from abroad, is the alien self-supporting, does he or she have a bank
accou nt, etc.)
Length of stay
Name of contact(s) in U.S.
Contact(s) address and telephone number(s)
Review any supporting documents brought in by the registrant as support (school identification, employment letter, housing
agreement, etc.)
Whether the alien has been arrested since entry
(b) (2)

(3) Interview Questions. Once the. screen appears, the registrant's itinerary, as given at the POE, will be available. After reviewing
this screen, the officer should con=e with the interview in order to confirm the registrant's adherence to the itinerary and statement
of intention provided at the port of entry or last interview. Officers should only ask any questions that are pertinent to establishing the
registrant's compliance with the terms of his or her admission. Depending on the registrant's class of admission, the following sample
questions may be used to determine if they remain in lawful status:
(A) Business

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

(B) Employment

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

(C) School

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

(D) Tourist

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

(4) Continuation of Interview. Only with supervisory concurrence may the interviewing officer continue the interview for additional
documentation for up to seven (7) calendar days.
(5) Unregistered Applicants. Aliens who appear to meet registration criteria but have been lawfully admitted to the United States
without having been registered at the POE should not be registered, unless they have been notified to report to the Service for
registration through publication in the Federal Register. Subsequent to such a publication, if an interviewing officer discovers an
applicant who meets the registration criteria, but has not been previously registered, the interviewing officer must determine if the
applicant arrived after the effective date of the Federal Register notice. The interviewing officer must then examine this SOP in order to
determine if the applicant is exempt from, or has been granted a waiver (see Inspection section (a)(2) from the special registration
requirements and also Appendix 15-10 of this field manual). Once the interviewing officer determines that the applicant should be
(b) (2)
registered, the interviewing officer will collect photographs, fingerprints and registration data throug~ThiS
collection of data will be
similar the collection of registration data at a POE.

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

(B) The fact that a special registrant is maintaining his or her nonimmigrant status should be entered i n(b)t(2)
. If the interviewing
officer determines that the registrant is in compliance with the stated purpose of his or her visit, the registrant should be furnished

with a packet of information to include:
Change of address, employment, school instructions
Annual registration requirements
Departure notification requirements, including authorized PODs
A national 800 number that can be contacted by the registrant if he/she wishes to provide any information concerning acts of
terrorism.
(7) Aliens Requesting Waiver. The issuance of waivers of special registration requirements should be handled in a judicious and
expeditious manner. Aliens who have been specially registered can make a request, in writing, to CBP or CIS for a waiver of all or part
of the registration requirements for a maximum period of one year. Such requests may only be entertained after registration at the
POE.
The following three categories represent a general guide that may warrant approval of a discretionary 8 CFR 264.1(f)(7) waiver. CBP
may authorize waivers in all categories, however waiver requests that seek relief for Category 2 only, will be made or forwarded to CIS
for adjudication.
!-

Category 1 (POE Registration/Departure Waiver)

This category pertains to those nonimmigrant aliens who make frequent crossings on a daily or weekly basis, do not plan to remain in
the United States longer than 29 days upon entry, and request a waiver from registration and from departure verification at the POE.
These individuals may be engaged in employment that requires them to make repeated trips to the United States or short duration.
Similarly, this would apply to individuals who are attending educational institutions who can demonstrate that they make frequent
entries to attend school. This category may also apply to nonimmigrant aliens who are acting in a diplomatic capacity, but are awaiting
the issuance of an "A" or "G" class visa. It may also apply to individuals who are entering the United States for medical treatment.
!-

Category 2 (3D-day and/or 1-year Waiver)

This category of nonimmigrant aliens may apply for a waiver from the 30-day and/or annual interview requirements. This would
generally apply to nonimmigrant aliens who are hospitalized or in extended non-ambulatory care and cannot come to the district or
sub-office to report for the interview. It may also apply to nonimmigrant aliens who are acting in a diplomatic capacity, but are
awaiting the issuance of an "A" or "G" class visa.
!-

Category 3 (Departure Waiver)

This category would apply to nonimmigrant
nonimmig rant aliens who have been registered but now request to leave the United States from a port
other than a designated port of departure. This may apply to individuals who may have previously purchased a round-trip ticket and
the return transportation does not depart from a designated port. Additionally, this may be a request from a specially registered
nonimmigrant alien who now has to depart the United States from a non-designated port of departure because of unforeseen
circumstances.
(b) (2)

When such requests are approved, the.system will be annotated to reflect that a waiver has been granted. Refer to part (a)(lO) of
this SOP for detailed waiver processing guidance. See also Appendix 15-10 of this field manual.
(8 (b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
a print from each index finger will be recorded on a
Form
Car I an i possi e a p oto s ou
eta en (digital photo is preferred). Record the responses
,lApp
App Icant Fingerprint Car,
(they must be typewritten), under oath, to the questions posed to the registrant [referring to part (b)(3)], and include the FIN number
(if available), name and date of birth of the registrant. The interviewing officer should include a statement to indicate if the registrant
is maintaining status, or has been referred to Investigations.
The information collected in this back-up procedure will be sent, by Federal Express, from the district or sub office to Biometric Support
Center (BSC) c/o US-VISIT Program, (b) (2)
Mark the envelope "Attn: Special
Registration." Immediately fax all back-up material to the BSC at (b) (2)
. Please refer to part (a)(ll)(E) for forwarding
instructions.
(9) Asylum. Asylum officers might encounter aliens who have made an asylum claim, but who have been registered under the special
registration program. In such a case, unless waived, the alien must continue to comply with the terms of his or her special registration
until the application is approved, or he or she departs the United States (in which case the alien must report to the departure control
officer at an authorized POD). These terms of registration include 3D-day and annual interviews at the district office, as applicable. An
asylum applicant who departs the United States and returns pursuant to advanced parole (Form 1-512) will not be subject to special
registration upon return. The reason for this determination is that the alien would be a parolee and not a nonimmigrant applicant for
admission upon his or her return and therefore, not subject to the terms of special registration.

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
(3) Automatic Referrals. Nonimmigrant aliens subject to special registration who remain in the United States more than 30 days are
~hose who remain formore than
required to appear for an interview at a designated CIS office betwee.n 30 and 40 days after entr,,entry~~hOSe
(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
""'111
one year are also required to appear for an annual interview at a designated CIS office.
III automatically Identify and
generate reports of special registrants subject to these provisions wh.o"fa,i,1
who fail to
ajDear between 30 and 40 days after admission or fail to
tlo.a~pear
appear for the subsequent additional interview at one year iintervals
n t e r(b)(2),
v a l (b)(7)(E)
s!.
I

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

(5) Procedur~. Nonimmigrant aliens subject to special registration requirements will fall into three categories for action: those aliens
who are in status, abiding by the terms and conditions of their admission; those aliens who are out of status, in violation of the terms
of their admission or are otherwise in violation of the Immigration and Nationality Act; and, those aliens who are subject to
prosecution under the criminal provisions of the United States Code. In some cases, an alien may fall into more than one of these
categories. In all encounters, it is the encountering officer's responsibility to reasonably verify the identity of the alien and determine
the alien's current immigration status. In general, standard established procedures for enforcement actions will be followed. However,
additional specific requirements as outlined in the paragraphs below must also be included.

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

gUidelines and procedures;
(A) Significant Incident Reports (SIR). In accordance with established
establish.uidelines
procedures, a timely SIR will be generated when
instances; field offices will also ensure that the (b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
appropriate. In such instances,
is notified in
guidelines and procedures.
accordance with established gUidelines

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

Custody; Bond and Release on Recognizance (ROR) Determinations. Unless the nonimmigrant alien subject to NSEERS registration
(C) Custody,
SO/S.l1-P; dated October 2S,
2S; 1999,
1999; Subject: Policy Guidance for Handling of
is a Special Interest Alien (see policy memo;
memo, HQOPS SO/S.ll-P,
Special Interest Cases), standard procedures apply for custody, bond or ROR determinations.
determ inations.
(8) Referral for Prosecution. Current practices and policies within each district with respect to referral to the U.S. Attorney;s
Attorney's Office for
criminal prosecution will be followed.

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

media/press inquiries must be coordinated and processed through the District and/or Regional Public
(10) rv1~Q@LPress
rv1~QiMPress Inquiries. All rnedia/press
Information Offices as appropriate.

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

(d)

~L

Border Patrol.

(1) Exemptions. At this time;
time, nonimmigrant aliens present in the United States who arrived prior to September 11;
11, 2002 are not
subject to the National Security Entry Exit Registration System (NSEERSl:
(NSEERS), or special registration requirements. Likewise;
Likewise, nonimmigrant
"G;; nonimmigrants are not subject to special registration requirements. Please refer to part (a)
aliens admitted and classified as "Ai!
"A" or "G"
(2) for more information on exemptions.

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

(3) Automatic Referrals. Nonimmigrant aliens subject to special registration who remain in the United States for 30 days or more are
reqUired to appear for an interview at a CIS district or sub office between 30 and 40 days after entry. Those who remain for more than
reqUIred

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

one year are also required to appear for an annual interview at a designated CIS office
will automatically identify and
generate reports of special registrants subject to these provisions who fail to appear between 30 and 40 days after admission or fail to
appear for the subsequent additional interview at one year intervals. (b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

(5) Procedures. Nonimmigrant aliens subject to special registration requirements will fall into three categories for action: those aliens
who are in status, abiding by the terms and conditions of their admission; those aliens who are out of status, in violation of the terms
of their admission or are otherwise in violation of the Immigration and Nationality Act; and, those aliens who are subject to
prosecution under the criminal provisions of the United States Code. In some cases, an alien may fall into more than one of these
categories. In all encounters, it is the encountering officer's responsibility to reasonably verify the identity of the alien and determine
the alien's current immigration status. In general, standard established procedures for enforcement actions will be followed. However,
additional specific requirements as outlined in the paragraphs below must also be included .

• (b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

•

process
Process for Notice to Appear (NTA). Registered aliens who are subject to removal will be processed for the issuance of a NTA

based on applicable removal charges. However, current gUidelines on Prosecutorial Discretion apply.
Custody. Bond and Release on Recognizance (ROR) Determinations. Unless the nonimmigrant alien subject to special registration
Custody,
is a Special Interest Alien (see policy memo, HQOPS 50/5.11-P, dated October 25,1999, Subject: Policy Guidance for
Handling of Special Interest Cases), standard procedures apply for custody, bond or ROR determinations.
Significant Incident Reports (SIR). In accordance with established guidelines and procedures, a timely SIR will be generated when
appropriate. In such instances, field offices will also ensure that the Headquarters (b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
is notified
in accordance with established guidelines and procedures.

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
Referral for Prosecution. Current practices and policies within each sector with respect to referral to the U.S. Attorney's Office for
criminal prosecution will be followed.

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

(6) Media/Press Inquiries. All media/press inquiries must be coordinated and processed through the CBP Public Information Offices as
appropriate

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
(1) Exemptions. At this time, nonimmigrant aliens present in the United States who arrived prior to September 11, 2002, are not
subject to the National Security Entry Exit Registration System (NSEERS), or special registration requirements. likewise, nonimmigrant
aliens admitted and classified as "A" or "G" nonimmigrants are not subject to special registration requirements. Please refer to part (a)
(2) of thiS SOP for more information on exemptions.

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
(3) Identification of Special Registrants. General criteria for special registration will be published via policy memorandum and updated

from time to time. There may also be individual circumstances bringing about a specific registration that does not clearly fall into
published criteria. Refer to part (a)(l) of this SOP for more information.

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

Officers must be alert to the possibility that an alien before them (either under a removal action, or any other circumstance) has been
registered but carries no evidence of it, or has not been registered and should have been. They must therefore be aware of the
parameters for special registration, and be certain to check the (b)(2), (b)(7)(E) database
to determine if the alien has been registered. This
(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
is most reliably accomplished by taking the alien's two index fingerprints on _ b u t it may also be done by a FIN or name search
against ENFORCE indices.
(4) Special Registration of Certain Nonimmigrant Aliens. While special registration of nonimmigrant aliens is not a usual part of the
i
will enroll those who should be specially registered at the time of admission when they are encountered
in the normal course of
only if they are subject to registration pursuant to publication of a notice in the Federal
Register, requiring the registration of certain nonimmigrants who are present in the United States after lawful admission.

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
(b)(2),
(b)(7)(E)
(B) Take Photo. Use norma •
••
•lnllethods.
(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

(C) Take Fingerprints. Follow norma_guidelines.
(D) Record FIN on Documents. Place FIN and notation "NSEERS REGISTRANT" on any alien registration and release documents. Place
the notations near the A-number.

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

RemoveQ. This assumes that the alien has exhausted appeals and is being removed. In that case,
(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
FIN'IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIi~IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII~
fingerprints to do so to assure reliable retrieval) and obtain FIN.
~~~IiiIII~~~~~~~

(B) Unregistered Candidate Encountered.
•

Alien Being Removed. An officer preparing an alien for departure may find that the alien should be registered, but is not. First, the
alien should be registered if appropriate (see sec. (e)(4) above), with any other actions following. A failure to be registered is
cause for suspicion, and the circumstances of the failure should be closely examined. If the failure appears willful, the case
should be considered under local guidelines for presentation to the U.S. Attorney for prosecution. If prosecution is declined,
(4 )(A)
then the removal should be carried out and the departure recorded in liE under the procedure set forth in paragraph (4)(A)
above.

•

Other Encounters. This may include an alien found in an institution, or one coming in to post bond for another, or any of a broad
range of encounters. The point is to see that aliens who should be specially registered are registered. If not registered, the
alien should immediately be registered as set forth in section (e)(3) above if there has been a publication in the Federal
Register requiring the registration of aliens who are present in the United States (as opposed to those who are applying for
(b) (2)
admission upon arrival). If found in an institution and it is not practicable to register the alien using _equipment, follow the
instructions for registration contained in part (a)(l1) above. Thereafter, the alien should be handled in accordance with
current policy for the circumstance.

(C) Alien out of Status. A special registrant found out of status (particularly for failure to appear for a required interview by CIS)
should be held, and the case im
mediately referred to,•
to (b)(2),
(b)(7)(E)
immediately
•••
•••••••••

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

Appendix 15-10: How to Record Departure from the United States,
After the Fact
Dear Traveler:
If you returned home with your Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) departure record Form 1-94 (white) or Form 1-94W
(green) in your passport, it means that your departure was not recorded properly. It is your responsibility to correct this record. You
must provide the INS sufficient information so we can record your timely departure from the United States. This will close out your
earlier record of arrival to this country.
If you do not validate a timely departure from the United States, or if you cannot reasonably prove otherwise when you next apply for
admission to the United States, the INS may conclude you remained in the United States beyond your authorized stay. If this happens,
the next time you apply to enter the United States, your visa may be subject to cancellation or you may be returned immediately to
your foreign point of origin.

In particular, visitors who remain beyond their permitted stay in the United States under the Visa Waiver Program cannot reenter the
United States in the future without obtaining a visa from a United States Consulate. If this occurs and you arrive at a united States
port-of-entry seeking admission under the Visa Waiver Program without a visa, united States immigration officers may order your
immediate return to a foreign point of origin.
To validate departure, the INS will consider a variety of information, including, but not limited to:

•
•

•

Original boarding passes you used to depart the United States;
Photocopies of entry or departure stamps in your passport indicating entry to another country after you
departed the United States (you should copy all passport pages that are not completely blank, and
include the biographical page containing your photograph); and
Photocopies of other supporting evidence, such as:
Dated pay slips or vouchers from your employer to indicate you worked in another country after you departed the United
States
Dated bank records shoWing transactions to indicate you were in another country after you left the United States
School records showing attendance at a school outside the United States to indicate you were in another country after
you left the United States
Dated credit card receipts, showing your name, but, the credit card number deleted, for purchases made after you left
the United States to indicate you were in another country after leaving the United States

Your statement will not be acceptable without supporting evidence such as noted above.

You must mail legible copies or original materials where possible. If you send original materials, you should retain a copy. The INS
cannot return original materials after processing. To help us understand the situation and correct your records quickly, please include
an explanation letter in English. You must send your letter and enclosed information only to the following address:
ACS - INS SBU
P.O. Box 7125
London, KY 40742-7125
USA

Do not mail your departure Form I-94 or supporting information to any United States Consulate or Embassy, to any other INS office in
the United States, or to any address other than the one above. Only at this location are we able to make the necessary corrections to
INS records to prevent inconvenience to you in the future.
(Rev. IN02-39)

Appendix 15-11: Patterns of Global Terrorism
Section 620A of the Foreign Assistance Act, Section 40 of the Arms Export Control Act, and Section 60) of the
Export Administration Act require the designation of a foreign state as one sponsoring terrorism.
Consequently, the Department of State periodically publishes a report, Patterns of Global Terrorism, updating
such designation. Current designations are:
Cuba
Iran
Iraq
Libya
North Korea
Sudan
Syria
[Added IN02-19]

Appendix 16-1 Refugee Travel Document (RTD) Endorsements and
Actions
REFUGEE TRAVEL DOCUMENT (RTD)
ENDORSEMENTS AND ACTIONS
(Revised April 16, 1999)

ALIEN'S STATUS IN THE
UNITED

ENDORSEMENT

ACTION TO BE TAKEN ON ALIEN'S

STATES

ON RTD

APPLICATION FOR READMISSION

Conditional entrant admitted under

l

CONDITIONAL

) Readmit alien as conditional entrant;
endorse

l

ENTRANT

) 1-94 with conditional entry stamp; note

law in effect prior to the Refugee
Act
of 1980 (Note: This should not be
confused with a conditional resident

) "READMITTED" in block letters immediately
)

under section 216 INA.)

) above the stamp; furnish original Form 1-94
to
) alien and forward duplicate to Central Office
) Document Handling Unit. Do not count case
) statistically.

Alien paroled into the U.S.
indefinitely as a refugee

) PAROLEE

) Parole alien indefinitely; stamp
) 1-94 in lower right block
) "REFUGEE 1-571" .

'Parole alien for one year from

Alien paroled into the U.S. for one
year as a refugee

, *PAROLEE*

'date of readmission; stamp 1-94
'in lower right block "REFUGEE

'1-571".
Alien admitted as a refugee under

, REFUGEE

'Readmit the alien as a refugee under section

section 207 INA (including
derivative

'207; stamp the admission block ofthe 1-94
as

refugees)

'indicated in IFM Chapter 16.2(a).

Alien granted asylum under section

'ASYLEE

, Admit the alien pursuant to section 208;
, stamp the admission block of the

208 INA (including derivative
asylees)

, 1-94: "Asylum Status Granted Pursuant to

, section 208 of the Immigration and
Nationality
, Act. Valid indefinitely."
Alien previous admitted as a
refugee

, LAWFUL

'Admit alien as a returning LPR, if he/she has

or granted asylum status who
status

, PERMANENT

'not abandoned his/her status

was later adjusted to LPR, but who

'RESIDENT

applied for and is being issued a
RTD
instead of a Reentry Permit.
(Appendix added IN98-14)

Appendix 16-2 Significant Public Benefit Parole Protocols
and Forms
SIGNIFICANT PUBLIC BENEFIT PAROLE
PROTOCOL FOR U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION AND
U.S. IMMIGRATION AND CUSTOMS ENFORCEMENT
FOR LAW ENFORCEMENT PURPOSES

I.

Purpose

This protocol establishes the policy for requesting, vetting, approving, supervising, and tracking
significant public benefit paroles (SPBP) for the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), U.S.
Customs and Border Protection (CBP), and U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE).
SPBP is a critical enforcement tool that enhances the ability of CBP and ICE to enforce the law and
protect the American people. It is a temporary measure used to support law enforcement efforts
by providing a legal mechanism for aliens such as informants, witnesses, criminals, and defendants
who are otherwise inadmissible to be present in the United States so they may assist with
investigations, prosecutions, or other activities necessary to secure the borders of the United States.
Types of SPBP covered by the protocol include, but are not necessarily limited to:
1. Parole of an alien into the United States as a confidential informant to obtain information pertinent
to border enforcement operations or to assist in an investigation.
2. Parole of an alien into the United States as a material witness in the prosecution of an alien
smuggler, a drug smuggler, or other criminal violator.
3.

II.

Parole of a defendant or a criminal alien into the United States for the purpose of prosecution.

Scope
A.

This protocol applies only to the DHS organizational elements of CBP and ICE.

B.
The approval of SPBP for law enforcement agencies other than CBP and ICE is covered in a separate
protocol entitled "Significant Public Benefit Parole for U.S. Law Enforcement Agencies."
III.

Authorities

This protocol is governed by numerous Public Laws and national policy, such as:
A. Section 212(d)(5) of the Immigration and Nationality Act, Title 8, United States Code, Section 1182(d)
(5). This authorizes the Attorney General to parole aliens into the United States.
B. Sections 402 and 421 of the Homeland Security Act of 2002, Public Law 107-29: This transfers
authority for immigration matters, including parole, to the Secretary of Homeland Security and the Under
Secretary, BTS.

C.
DHS Delegation Order Number 7010.1: This delegates authority for parole to the Commissioner,
CBP.
D.
DHS Delegation Order Number 7030: This delegates authority for parole to the Assistant Secretary,
ICE.
E.
Title 8, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Section 212.5: This provides regulations for the parole of
aliens and delegated authority for parole to, among others, the Assistant Commissioner, Office of Field
Operations (OFO); Directors of Field Operations (DFO); Port Directors; Special Agents in Charge (SAC);
Deputy Special Agents in Charge; Associate Special Agents in Charge; Assistant Special Agents in Charge;
Resident Agents in Charge; and Chief Patrol Agents (CPA).
F.
Memoranda of May 22, 2003 and July 20, 2004, from the CBP Assistant Commissioner, OFO: This
delegates authority for paroles to the officials in OFO designated in Authority III.E. above and to certain
other port of entry managers.
G.
ICE Delegation Number 0001 : This delegates authority to adjudicate requests for parole and to parole
applicants for admission into the United States to the officials in the Office of Investigations (ICE/OI)
designated in Authority III.E above.

IV.

Definitions
A.
"Parole": A temporary measure used to allow an alien to be present in the United States who is
otherwise inadmissible. Parole does not constitute a formal admission to the United States and confers only
temporary authorization to be present in the United States without having been admitted.
B.
"Significant Public Benefit": A reasonable expectation on behalf of the authorizing official that the
alien's presence in the United States will facilitate, or is consistent with:
1.

National security.

2.

Development of intelligence or information pertinent to the DHS mission.

3.

Law enforcement or border enforcement operations or proceedings.

4.

Cooperation in an investigation.

5.

Advantage or benefit to the United States.

C.
"Parole in Place": The granting of parole to an applicant for admission (material witness, informant,
etc.) who is already in the United States and has not been previously inspected and admitted.
D.
"Deferred Action": A discretionary measure to defer the removal of an alien from the United States.
Deferred action does not confer any legal immigration status upon an alien, and removal proceedings may
be initiated at any time. (See I-LINK (INSERTS), Detention and Deportation Officer's Field Manual, Chapter
20.8, "Deferred Action.")
E.

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

H.

"Re-Parole (Extension)": An authorized continuation of the initial parole.
(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

v.
A.

Responsibilities

CBP and ICE Field Offices

1. Authorizing officials designated in Authority III.E and F have the authority to grant, terminate, or
deny a parole directly supporting law enforcement objectives.
2.
The authorizing official or designee will submit all appropriate forms and documentation to the POE
and the ICE Parole and Humanitarian Assistance Branch (PHAB) in accordance with this protocol.
3.
The authorizing official or designee will conduct the required record checks during the parole
approval process in accordance with this protocol.
4.
SACs, CPAs, and DFOs will assign responsibility for administering the SPBP program to a Parole
Coordinator. The Parole Coordinator will ensure compliance with this protocol by maintaining files,
communicating with officials within the chain of command, communicating with the PHAB, monitoring
deadlines, and performing other duties as necessary.
5. Authorizing field offices will be responsible for coordinating the arrival of the parolee, supervising
the parolee while present in the United States, and ensuring the parolee's timely departure from the
United States in accordance with this protocol.
6.
Foreign offices will request SPBP from the corresponding domestic field office with responsibility
for the area in which the parolee will reside while in the United States. All such requests will be
coordinated with the PHAB and approved or denied in accordance with this protocol. The authorizing
domestic field office will be responsible for supervising and tracking the parolee while the parolee is in
the United States.
B.

Parole and Humanitarian Assistance Branch
1.

The PHAB will provide programmatic support to the SPBP program for both CBP and ICE.

2.
The PHAB will maintain the database in which all SPBPs will be entered and tracked. The PHAB
will enter, update, and maintain the subject records in the SPBP database until a national field
accessible SPBP case-tracking system is developed jointly by the PHAB, the Headquarters Office of
Border Patrol (HQOBP), OFO, and ICE/Ol.
3.
For vetting and deconfliction purposes, the PHAB will circulate for concurrence names of parolees
to the principal law enforcement agencies (LEAs) identified in Procedure VI.B.7.a ("Circulation and
Concurrence").
4.
The PHAB will serve as the designated entity to contact overseas offices, embassies, and
consulates for the purpose of arranging the issuance of travel documents for parolees.

VI.

Policy and Procedures
A.
1.

Policy

Approval Authority
a.
Pursuant to the authorities and delegations listed above, the Commissioner, CBP, and the
Assistant Secretary, ICE, may grant, terminate, or deny a parole at any time within their respective
organizations.
b.
The HQOBP, OFO, and ICE/OI Headquarters components have the authority to terminate or
deny a parole at any time within their respective chains of command.
c.
Authorizing officials designated in Authority III.E and Fin CBP and ICE field offices may grant,
terminate, or deny paroles directly supporting operations in their offices.
d.
The authority levels designated in 8 CFR 212.5 (Authority III. E) are at the discretion of the CBP
Assistant Commissioner/OFO; the Chief, HQOBP; and the ICE Director/Ol for their respective
offices. These officials may issue additional internal policies to restrict approval authority for some or
all aliens.

2.
Parole in Place: Authorizing officials may approve the parole of an applicant for admission already
inside the United States without requiring the alien to first depart the United States. Since the alien is
already in the United States, the authorizing official does not have to coordinate the alien's arrival with
the POE (all other procedures must be adhered to). Parole in Place applies only to aliens who are
present, but were not inspected and admitted, e.g., "entry without inspection" or "present without
inspection." Parole in Place does not apply to others who have been admitted, e.g., overstays. An alien
who is an overstay must be placed in removal proceedings or deferred action, or the overstay alien may
be granted voluntary departure, as appropriate. Once the overstay alien has departed the United States,
the alien may then be paroled pursuant to this protocol. Parole in Place does not apply to an alien that
has been placed in proceedings.
3.

Parole Term
a.
Initial paroles will generally be approved for up to 90 days; however, an initial parole may be
granted for up to 1 year, e.g., a witness who may be required to stay in the United States for an
extended period in furtherance of a prosecution. Initial paroles of over 90 days require detailed

justification on the DHS SPBP Form.
b.
4.

Re-paroles (extensions) may be approved for up to 1 year each.

Exceptions
a.
S-Visas: This protocol does not apply to SPBPs in cases in which the "s" classification has
been approved. In those cases, the policy and procedures of 8 CFR 212.14 and 214.2(t) will be
followed.
(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

c.
Removals/Transit: This protocol does not apply to paroles for Section 240 removal proceedings
if detention is not available or appropriate, parole of stowaways for removal, deferred inspections,
and similar situations.
d.
Defendants: This protocol does not apply to paroles for the types of defendants listed below.
Such criminal aliens will be processed at the time of entry and paroled into the United States for
prosecution without following the procedures set forth in VI. B below. Detainers will be placed on the
criminal aliens at the time of incarceration to ensure that they are returned to DHS custody for
appropriate processing.
(1)
Fugitive aliens who arrive in the United States without advance knowledge of DHS
agencies will be placed in the custody of law enforcement officers upon arrival. Note: If DHS
does have advance knowledge of a fugitive alien arriving in the United States, the procedures set
forth in VI. B, including coordinating the arrival of the fugitive alien with the PHAB and POE as
appropriate, will be followed. However, the fugitive alien's name will not be circulated to other
LEAs by the PHAB (see VI.B.7.a, "Circulation and Concurrence"). The fugitive will be placed in
the custody of law enforcement officers upon arrival.
(2)
Prisoner Transfers: The United States is party to two international conventions (treaties)
relating to the transfer of prisoners. Foreign governments requesting paroles must contact the
International Prisoner Transfer Unit of the U.S. Department of Justice, Criminal Division, which
will forward the requests to the PHAB for authorization in accordance with the Significant Public
Benefit Parole Protocol for Other U.S. Law Enforcement Agencies.
(3) Aliens apprehended on the high seas or in United States waters by the U.S. Coast Guard,
ICE, CBP, or other LEA marine officers and brought to the United States for proceedings.
(4) Aliens apprehended at the POEs, such as smugglers, those presenting fraudulent
documents, and cooperating and other defendants.
B. Procedures
1.

Request and Approval of SPBP
a.

Forms

(1)
DHS SPBP Form: The CBP or ICE officer will complete, sign, and submit a DHS
Significant Public Benefit Parole Authorization Form (DHS SPBP Form) to the authorizing official
for review and approval. A separate DHS SPBP Form must be completed for each alien for
whom parole is requested. The DHS SPBP Form must be signed by the requesting officer and
his or her immediate supervisor. The authorizing official will either approve or deny the parole
and sign the DHS SPBP Form. The authorizing official or representative will electronically submit
a copy of the approved or denied DHS SPBP Form (pages 1-3) to the PHAB immediately upon
approval or denial (no later than 48 hours) and will retain a copy in the local file. Page 40fthe
DHS SPBP Form, which contains sensitive investigative and personal information, will remain
with the authorizing office and will not be transmitted to the PHAB.
(2)
Form 1-512 (Authorization for Parole of an Alien Into the United States): If a parolee will
arrive in the United States at a location other than a land border POE, the PHAB will coordinate
with the foreign ICE Attache Office and/or the U.S. Embassy or Consulate to issue transportation
documents (Form 1-512 or boarding letter) to the parolee overseas. Otherwise, the requesting
officer will complete and submit a Form 1-512 to the authorizing official for signature. A
photograph of the parolee will be attached to the Form 1-512 as soon as feasible. The form may
be used to authorize single or multiple entries. The remarks section should include the length of
parole (number of days authorized) and indicate whether a single entry or multiple entries are
authorized. If the parole request is approved, the authorizing official will sign the Form 1-512 on
the line designated "Signature of Immigration Officer." The original Form 1-512 is to be retained
by the parolee. A copy of the form will be retained in the local file. Neither Form 1-131
(Application for Travel Document) nor a fee is required for issuance of the Form 1-512.
(3) Form 1-94 (ArrivallDeparture Record): The requesting officer may prepare as much
information as possible on the Form 1-94 (e.g., the parolee's biographical information) on behalf
of the CBP/OFO Officer at the POE. The CBP/OFO Officer will endorse the Form 1-94 with the
"Parole" stamp upon the parolee's arrival at the POE. The fee for the Form 1-94 issued at land
border POEs will be waived for SPBPs.
b.
Record Checks: The requesting officer must perform the following criminal history record
checks and immigration history and database queries for each parolee. The record checks include:
(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

In addition, the requesting office will check the name of the parolee through the local Joint

Terrorism Task Force to obtain additional information. If the parolee arrives 30 days after the
date of authorization, updated record checks of the parolee will be performed.
c.
Fingerprints and Photograph: The authorizing office will take fingerprints (10 prints) and
photograph(s) for each parolee, and one complete set will be retained in the local file.
d.
Alien File: The authorizing field office will assign an Alien Registration Number (e.g., A12 345
678 for the corresponding Alien File) for the parolee in accordance with existing procedures for
creation of an A-file.
2.

Review and Action by PHAB
a.
Circulation and Concurrence: Upon receiving the DHS SPBP Form, the PHAB will review the
documentation for completeness and circulate the Notice of Request for SPBP to the designated
headquarters points of contact of the principal Federal LEAs (the Drug Enforcement Administration,
the U.S. Marshals Service, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, CBP, and ICE) and the National
Security Coordination Council at the Department of Justice (for informational purposes only).
Concurrence with or objection to paroles must be submitted in writing by the deadline specified on
the Notice of Request for SPBP (normally within 5 working days) unless extended by the PHAB.
Absent exigent circumstances, the parolee's arrival in the United States will be scheduled to allow
enough time for the PHAB to complete the circulation and concurrence process and return the
results to the authorizing official. Under exigent circumstances, the authorizing official may authorize
the alien to arrive before the completion of the PHAB circulation and concurrence process, however,
the decision must be documented on the DHS SPBP Form, Part J, with a detailed explanation of the
exigent circumstances in Part I.
b.
Negative Information: If the PHAB discovers new information that negatively affects the
decision to parole an alien, it will immediately pass the information to the authorizing field office and
simultaneously to the appropriate CBP/OBP, CBP/OFO, or ICE/OI headquarters component. The
headquarters component may discuss appropriate measures with the field office, such as
implementing stricter controls over the parolee or terminating the parole.
c.
Record-Keeping: The PHAB will maintain all SPBP information in the Parole Case Tracking
System and will provide a parole case tracking number for each case.

3.
Supervision of Parolees: The authorizing field office will be responsible for supervising and
monitoring the whereabouts of the parolee while present in the United States and for ensuring his or her
timely departure from the United States in accordance with the parole authorization.
a.
Arrival: The authorizing field office will coordinate the travel and arrival of the parolee at the
designated POE through the DFO or designee. Absent exigent circumstances, the parolee's arrival
in the United States will be scheduled to allow enough time for the PHAB to complete the circulation
and concurrence process and return the results to the authorizing official (see Procedure VI.B.2.a,
"Circulation and Concurrence" for more details). The authorizing field office will also ensure delivery
of the Form 1-512 at the designated POE (unless the Form 1-512 is coordinated by the PHAB and
issued by the U.S. Embassy or Consulate to the parolee). The CBP/OFO officer will issue the
parolee a Form 1-94 upon arrival. An officer from the authorizing field office should, generally, meet
the parolee at the POE. The CBP/OFO Officer, upon the parolee's arrival at the POE, will:
(1)

Review the Form 1-512 or boarding documents for accuracy, completeness, and signature.

(2)

Conduct up-to-date record checks, if necessary.

(3)
Record and enter the parolee's biographical information (e.g., name, date of birth,
nationality, date of parole, Form 1-94 number, and name of authorizing official, etc.) into TECS or
other CBP systems.
(4)
Inform the authorizing official or the authorizing official's representative at the POE of any
issues, concerns, or additional detrimental information pertaining to the status of the parolee.
The CBP officer may elevate for resolution (as needed or appropriate through his or her chain of
command) the discovery of significant differences between what the authorizing office knows of a
parolee's serious criminal and/or terrorist background and what is discovered upon inspection at
the time of parole. Every attempt should be made to address and resolve possible differences at
the lowest level. If resolution cannot be reached between the CBP Officer and the authorizing
official's on-site representative, the issue may then be elevated to POE management for
resolution with the authorizing field office. If the matter is still not resolved, the DFO may contact
the authorizing official (either the Border Patrol Sector CPA or the ICE SAC). If necessary,
DFOs, Sector CPAs, and ICE SACs may elevate any remaining issues to their respective
headquarters.
(b)(2), (b)(7)

_
Each person paroled pursuant to these procedures must be processed into the_
(E)
(b)(2), (b)(7) case system.
(E)

(6)
Issue and stamp the Form 1-94. Process the Form 1-512 in accordance with existing
procedures for processing advance paroles.
(7)
Forward the parolee's Form 1-94 arrival portion, in accordance with the Form 1-94 mailing
instructions, to the appropriate contractor for entry into th (b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

(8) The fee for the Form 1-94 issued at land border POEs will be waived for SPBPs unless
otherwise directed.
b.
Reporting: The authorizing field offices will report to the PHAB using the DHS Parole Tracking
Form when the following occurs:
(1)

A parolee arrives at the POE (initial arrival).

(2)

A Parole in Place is granted.

(3)

A parolee fails to arrive in the United States within 30 days of the parole authorization.

(4)

An extension (re-parole) is authorized.

(5)

The parole is terminated.

(6)

A parolee departs or adjusts to an immigration status.

(7)

A parolee absconds.

(8)

There is a change in any significant information previously provided.

c.
Benefits - Employment Authorization: Persons authorized SPBP are present in the United
States at the discretion of and under conditions imposed by the authorizing office. U.S. Citizenship
and Immigration Services (CIS) has agreed to process law enforcement sensitive requests for
benefits, such as an Employment Authorization Document (EAD) related to SPBP, in a secure and
expeditious fashion through their Fraud Detection National Security (FDNS) Unit. Applications for
benefits, such as Form 1-765 (Application for Employment Authorization), should be forwarded to the
appropriate headquarters division of the organization seeking the benefit for a parolee. The
appropriate ICE or CBP headquarters division will review and endorse the benefit application then
coordinate directly with the CIS/FDNS Unit, which will adjudicate and produce the benefit document.
The ICE or CBP headquarters unit will then forward the benefit document to the requesting field
office. In accordance with the CIS memorandum entitled, "New Procedures for Issuance of
Immigration BenefitslDocuments in Law Enforcement and National Security Matters," dated
December 19, 2003, "the fee will ordinarily be waived [for the EAD] ...."
4.
Re-Parole (Extension): A request for re-parole will be submitted to the authorizing official via a new
DHS SPBP Form, a new Form 1-512 (if the alien intends to travel outside the United States), and a new
Form 1-94 before the expiration date of the parolee's authorized stay. Each new re-parole may be
granted for up to 1 year. The new Form 1-94 will be endorsed with a "Parole" stamp by the authorizing
official. 1 The departure record of the original (expiring) Form 1-94 and the arrival record of the new Form
1-94 will be forwarded together, in accordance with the Form 1-94 mailing instructions, to the appropriate
contractor for entry into NilS.
5.

Termination of Parole
a.
Decision: The authorizing official may terminate the parole at any time. The decision must be
documented in writing, and all appropriate parties, including the PHAB, must be notified.
b. Multiple Paroles: Parole terminates each time the parolee departs the United States (8 CFR
212.5(e)). The authorizing official may authorize multiple advance paroles on the Form 1-512. When
the Form 1-512 is approved for multiple advance paroles, a new Form 1-94 will be issued at the POE
to the parolee upon each arrival.
c.
Failure To Depart (Absconding): If the parole has terminated and the parolee has not departed
as required, the parolee will be treated as an absconder. The authorizing field office will immediately
perform the following:
(1)

Terminate the parole.

(2)

Initiate removal proceedings.

(3)

Attempt to locate the parolee and provide all known information to the local CBP/OBP, ICE/

01, and CBP/OFO field office to help facilitate his or her recovery.

(4)

Submit a copy of the DHS Parole Tracking Form to the PHAB.

6.
Special Situations at POEs: A parole may also be authorized in conjunction with an ongoing
enforcement operation, such as (b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

a.
Prior Parole Approval: When the authorizing official approves a parole in advance of a special
situation, the above policy and procedures will be followed, in accordance with other policies and
procedures (e.g., directives and memorandums related to (b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
etc.).
If the subject is allowed to proceed without issuance of parole documentation, at the conclusion of
the law enforcement activity, the subject must be documented and processed by the controlling
officers as soon as feasible.
b. No Prior Parole Approval: Designated CBP/OFO officials at the POEs have parole authority for
those aliens arriving at POEs without prior parole approval as a result of emerging enforcement
actions, such as (b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
In such situations, the POE
(b)(2),
(b)(7)(E)
officials and ICE agents at the POEs will coordinate efforts in advance to effect •
•
••
••
•
•
••
•
(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

2 After concurrence, the ICE agents will assume full responsibility for all aspects of the
investigative activity, including the alien, (b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

If issues
arise that prevent the granting of parole, every effort should be made to resolve possible
differences at the lowest level. If the matter cannot be resolved at the port level, it will be
elevated through the chain of command to the DFO and SAC to resolve.

7.
Parole in Place: The authorizing official, or designee, will complete a Form 1-94 and endorse it with
the "Parole" stamp. The authorizing office will forward the parolee's Form 1-94 arrival portion, in
accordance with the Form 1-94 mailing instructions, to the appropriate contractor for entry into NilS. The
authorizing official or his or her representative will electronically submit a copy of the DHS Parole
Tracking Form to the PHAB. (See Policy VI.A.2, "Parole in Place," for appropriate use of parole in
place.)
8.
Parole of Family Members: Paroles are temporary; therefore, family members should be paroled
only under extraordinary circumstances, such as legitimate physical threats to family members. The
threat must be clearly documented on the DHS SPBP Form.
9.
Fees: In general, all fees will be waived for a parole approved for significant public benefit. If the
parolee must depart and reenter the United States for personal reasons, the fees will not be waived.
Questions or Concerns Regarding the Process: Any questions or concerns regarding this protocol
C.
r by fax a (b) (2)
should be addressed to the PHAB at (b) (2)

Michael J. Garcia

5-9-05

Robert C. Bonner

9-22-05

Date Robert C. Bonner
Date
Michael J. Garcia
Assistant Secretary
Commissioner
U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement U.S. Customs and Border Protection

SIGNIFICANT PUBLIC BENEFIT PAROLE
PROTOCOL FOR U.S. LAW ENFORCEMENT AGENCIES

I.

Purpose

This protocol establishes the policy pertaining to the responsibilities of U.S. law enforcement
agencies (LEA) with regard to requesting, vetting, supervising, and tracking significant public benefit
paroles (SPBP). All requests for SPBP will be coordinated with the Parole and Humanitarian
Assistance Branch (PHAB) within the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), U.S. Immigration
and Customs Enforcement (ICE).
SPBP is a critical enforcement tool that enhances law enforcement's ability to conduct operations
and protect the American people. It is a temporary measure used to support law enforcement efforts
by providing a legal mechanism for informants, witnesses, criminals, and defendants who are
otherwise inadmissible to be present in the United States so that they may assist with
ongoing investigations, prosecutions, or other activities necessary to protect national security.
Types of SPBP covered by the protocol include, but are not necessarily limited to:
1. Parole of an alien into the United States as a confidential informant to obtain information to assist
in an investigation.
2. Parole of an alien into the United States as a material witness in the prosecution of a criminal
violator.
3.

II.

Parole of a defendant or criminal alien into the United States for the purpose of prosecution.

Scope
A.
This protocol applies only to LEAs (including Federal, state, and local LEAs and prosecutors) outside
of U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) and U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE).
B.
CBP and ICE have independent authority to approve paroles, and their procedures are covered in a
separate protocol entitled "Significant Public Benefit Parole Protocol for U.S. Customs and Border
Protection, and U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement for Law Enforcement Purposes."

III.

Authorities

This protocol is governed by numerous Public Laws and national policy, such as:
A.
Section 212(d)(5) of the Immigration and Nationality Act, Title 8, United States Code, Section 1182(d)
(5): This authorizes the Attorney General to parole aliens into the United States.
B.
Sections 402 and 421 of the Homeland Security Act of 2002, Public Law 107-29: This transfers
authority for immigration matters, including parole, to the Secretary of Homeland Security and the Under
Secretary of BTS.
C.
Title 8, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Section 212.5: This provides regulations for the parole of
aliens.

D.
Title 8, Code of Federal Regulations, Section 212.5: This provides regulations for the parole of aliens
and delegates authority for parole to, among others, the Assistant Commissioner, Office of Field Operations
(OFO); Directors of Field Operations (DFO); Port Directors; Special Agents in Charge (SAC); Deputy
Special Agents in Charge; Associate Special Agents in Charge; Assistant Special Agents in Charge;
Resident Agents in Charge; Chief Patrol Agents (CPA); and other officials as may be designated in writing.
IV.

Definitions
A.
"Parole": A temporary measure used to allow an alien to be present in the United States who is
otherwise inadmissible. Parole does not constitute a formal admission to the United States, and confers
only temporary authorization to be present in the United States without having been admitted.
B.
"Significant Public Benefit": A reasonable expectation on behalf of the authorizing official that the
alien's presence in the United States will facilitate, or is consistent with:
1.

National security.

2.

Development of intelligence or information pertinent to the mission of the requesting LEA.

3.

Law enforcement or border enforcement operations or proceedings.

4.

Cooperation in an investigation.

5.

Advantage or benefit to the United States.

"Parole in Place": The granting of parole to an applicant for admission (material witness, informant,
C.
etc.) who is already in the United States and has not been previously inspected and admitted.
D.
"Deferred Action": A discretionary measure to defer the removal of an alien from the United States.
Deferred action does not confer any legal immigration status upon an alien, and removal proceedings may
be initiated at any time.
(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

H.

"Re-Parole (Extension)": An authorized continuation of the initial parole.
(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

V.

Responsibilities

A.

Federal LEAs
1.
Federal LEAs are responsible for following the policies and procedures of this protocol and will
designate point of contacts (POCs) at their headquarters (including a telephone number, a fax number,
and an e-mail address) to ensure compliance with this protocol by maintaining records, communicating
with the PHAB, monitoring deadlines, and performing other duties as necessary.
2.
The Federal LEAs will forward all requests for SPBP through their headquarters POCs. The
headquarters POCs will certify that all forms for SPBP and supporting documents are accurate and
complete. Refer to Procedure VI.B.6 ("Emergency Paroles") for 72-hour emergency paroles.

B.

State and Local LEAs
1.

State and local LEAs are responsible for following the policies and procedures of this protocol.

2.
State and local LEAs will submit requests for SPBP to the PHAB through the appropriate ICE SAC
or the Border Patrol CPA in their jurisdiction. The requesting official will certify that all forms for SPBP
and supporting documents are accurate and complete. Refer to Procedure VI.B.6 ("Emergency
Paroles") for 72-hour emergency paroles.
C.

Parole and Humanitarian Assistance Branch
1.
The PHAB will have the authority to grant, terminate, or deny a parole directly supporting law
enforcement objectives for Federal, state, and local LEAs.
2.
The PHAB will maintain the database known as the Parole Case Tracking System. The PHAB will
enter, update, and maintain all the SPBP subject records in the database.
3.
The PHAB will query the necessary immigration and customs databases in Treasury Enforcement
Communications System (TECS) or other appropriate systems.
4.
The PHAB will circulate the parolee's name to the principal Federal LEAs for vetting and
deconfliction purposes.
5.
The PHAB will serve as the designated entity to contact overseas offices, embassies, and
consulates for the purpose of arranging the issuance of travel documents for parolees.

VI.
A.

Policy and Procedures
Policy
1.
Approval Authority: Pursuant to the authorities and delegations listed above, the PHAB may grant,
terminate, or deny a parole at any time.
2.

Parole in Place: The PHAB may authorize the parole of an applicant for admission already inside

the United States without requiring the alien to first depart the United States. Since the alien is already
in the United States, the authorizing official does not have to coordinate the alien's arrival with the POE
(all other procedures must be adhered to). Parole in Place applies only to aliens who are present but
were not inspected and admitted, e.g. "entry without inspection" or "present without inspection." This
does not apply to others who have been admitted, e.g., overstays. An alien who is an overstay must be
placed in removal proceedings or deferred action, or the overstay alien may be granted voluntary
departure, as appropriate. Once the overstay alien has departed the United States, the alien may then
be paroled pursuant to this protocol. Parole in Place does not apply to an alien that has been placed in
proceedings.
3.

Parole Term
a.
Initial paroles will generally be approved for up to 90 days; however, an initial parole may be
granted for up to 1 year, e.g., a parole for a witness who may be required to stay in the United
States for an extended period of time in furtherance of a prosecution. Requests for initial paroles of
over 90 days require detailed justification on the LEA SPBP Form.
b.

4.

Re-paroles (extensions) may be approved for up to 1 year each.

Exceptions
a.
S-Visas: This protocol does not apply to SPBPs in cases in which the "s" classification has
been approved. In those cases, the policy and procedures of 8 CFR 212.14 and 214.2(t) will be
followed.
(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

c.
Removals/Transit: This protocol does not apply to paroles for Section 240 removal proceedings
if detention is not available or appropriate, parole of stowaways for removal, deferred inspections,
and similar situations.
d.
Defendants: This protocol does not apply to paroles for the types of defendants listed below.
Such criminal aliens will be processed at the time of entry and paroled into the United States for
prosecution without following the procedures set forth in VI. B ("Procedures"). Detainers will be
placed on the criminal aliens at the time of incarceration to ensure that they are processed for
removal before they are released from detention.
(1)
Prisoner Transfers: The United States is party to two international conventions (treaties)
relating to the transfer of prisoners. Foreign governments requesting paroles must contact the
International Prisoner Transfer Unit of the U.S. Department of Justice, Criminal Division, which
will forward the requests to the PHAB for authorization in accordance with this protocol.

(2) Aliens apprehended on the high seas or in United States waters by the U.S. Coast Guard,
ICE, CBP, or other LEA marine officers and brought to the United States for proceedings.

(3) Aliens apprehended at the POEs, such as smugglers, those presenting fraudulent
documents, and cooperating and other defendants.
B.

Procedures
1.

Request and Approval of SPBP
a.

Forms
LEA SPBP Form: The requesting LEA will complete, sign, and submit a LEA Significant
(1)
Public Benefit Parole Authorization Form (LEA SPBP Form)1 to the PHAB for review and
approval. A separate LEA SPBP Form must be completed for each alien for whom parole is
requested. The LEA SPBP Form must be signed by the requesting LEA.

(a)
Federal LEAs: Federal LEA field offices will submit requests for SPBP to their
headquarters POCs, who will review and certify that each SPBP Form is accurate and
complete, then forward the package to the PHAB for review and approval, or denial.
(b)
State and Local LEAs: The highest ranking official in the state or local LEA will sign and
submit an SPBP request (including re-paroles) for review and facilitation to the nearest ICE
SAC or Border Patrol Sector CPA in whose area of responsibility the state or local LEA
resides. Upon completion of the LEA SPBP Form, the ICE SAC or Border Patrol Sector CPA
will forward the LEA SPBP Form on behalf of the state or local LEA to the PHAB for review
and approval, or denial.
(2)
DHS Parole Tracking Form~ If approved, the PHAB will send the requesting LEA a DHS
Parole Tracking Form. This is used to inform the PHAB of the parolee's status. Refer to
Procedure VI.B.3.b (Reporting) for further instructions.

(3)

Form 1-512 (Authorization for Parole of an Alien Into the United States)

(a) Arriving at a Non-Land POE: If the parole is approved and the parolee will arrive at a
location other than a land border POE, the PHAB will coordinate with the U.S. Embassy or
Consulate to issue the Form 1-512 or boarding documents to the parolee overseas. A parolee
who obtains travel documents from an overseas office must depart for the United States
within 7 days of receiving the travel documents, or the travel documents will expire.
(b) Arriving at a Land POE: If the parole is approved and the parolee will arrive at a land
border POE (in these situations, the parolee is not issued a Form 1-512), the CBP/OFO
Officer will endorse the Form 1-94 with the "Parole" stamp upon the parolee's arrival at the
POE. If it is necessary for the parolee to enter and depart the United States frequently for
operational purposes during the authorized parole period, the PHAB may authorize multiple
paroles. If the PHAB authorizes multiple paroles, the PHAB will coordinate with the local field
office for the issuance ofa Form 1-512 to the parolee (e.g., verifying identity, attaching
photograph, etc.). Neither Form 1-131 (Application for Travel Document) nor a fee is required
for issuance of the Form 1-512.
b.
Record Checks: The requesting LEA will perform queries within its own information systems
and (b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
or each parolee.

c.
Fingerprints and photograph: The LEA will fingerprint (10 prints) and photograph the parolee.
The originals will be maintained in the LEA's local file and will be made available upon request to
DHS in circumstances such as a national security emergency or a case when the parolee absconds.
2.

Review and Action by PHAB
a.
Circulation and Concurrence: Upon receiving the LEA SPBP Form, the PHAB will review the
documentation for completeness and circulate the Notice of Request for SPBP to the designated
headquarters POCs of the principal Federal LEAs (the Drug Enforcement Administration, the U.S.
Marshals Service, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, CBP, and ICE) and the National Security
Coordination Council at the Department of Justice (for informational purposes only). Concurrence
with or objection to paroles must be submitted in writing by the deadline specified on the Notice of
Request for SPBP (normally 5 working days) unless extended by the PHAB.
b.
Record Checks: The PHAB will perform the following required criminal history record checks
and immigration history and database queries for each parolee:
(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

c.
Denial: In the case of denial, the LEA may request reconsideration by presenting new and/or
additional information in support of the original SPBP request.
d.
Conditions: The PHAB reserves the right to specify any conditions it deems appropriate for
authorization of parole. In certain instances (such as controversial witnesses or defendants), DHS
may issue a Form 1-247 (Immigration Detainer - Notice of Action), which requires that the parolee
be returned to DHS custody to ensure the parolee departs the United States.
e.
Notification to CBP/OFO: Upon approval of the parolee, the PHAB will submit an authorizing
memorandum, which will provide the name of the parolee, the designated POE, and expected date
of arrival to CBP/OFO headquarters, which will then notify the designated POE.
3.
Supervision of Parolees: The LEA will be responsible for supervising and monitoring the
whereabouts of the parolee while present in the United States and for ensuring his or her timely
departure from the United States in accordance with the parole authorization.
a.
Arrival: The LEA will coordinate the travel and arrival of the parolee at the designated POE.
CBP/OFO Officers will issue the parolee a Form 1-94 upon arrival. An officer from the LEA should,
generally, meet the parolee at the POE. The CBP/OFO Officer, upon the parolee's arrival at the
POE, will:

(1)

Review the Form 1-512 or boarding documents for accuracy, completeness, and signature.

(2)

Conducl up-la-dale record checks, if necessary.

3)
Record and enter the parolee's biographical information (e.g., name, date of birth, (b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
nationality, date of parole, Form 1-94 number, and name of authorizing official, etc.) into"or
other CBP systems.
(4)
Inform the authorizing official or the authorizing official's representative at the POE of any
issues, concerns, or additional detrimental information pertaining to the status of the parolee and
may consult with the PHAB to determine whether parole is still appropriate in light of this
additional information.

(b)(2), (b)(7)
~person paroled pursuant to these procedures must be processed into t h
e"
(E)
(b)(2), (b)(7)
~ a s e system.
(E)

(6)
Issue and stamp the Form 1-94. Process the Form 1-512, if presented, in accordance with
existing procedures for processing advance paroles.
(7)
Forward the parolee's Form 1-94 arrival portion, in accordance with the Form 1-94 mailing
instructions, to the appropriate contractor for entry into the Nonimmigrant Information System
(NilS).
(8)
The fee for the Form 1-94 issued at land border POEs will be waived for SPBPs unless
otherwise directed.
b.
Reporting: The LEA will report to the PHAB using the DHS Parole Tracking Form when the
following occurs:
(1)

A parolee arrives at the POE (initial arrival).

(2)

A parolee fails to arrive in the United States within 30 days of the parole authorization.

(3)

A parolee departs.

(4) A parolee adjusts to an immigration status (a new copy of the Form 1-94 should be
forwarded to the PHAB).
(5)

A parolee absconds.

(6)

A parolee otherwise violates the parole conditions.

(7)

There is a change in any significant information previously provided.

c.
Benefits - Employment Authorization: U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (CIS) is
responsible for the adjudication and production of benefit documents, such as the Employment
Authorization Document (EAD). CIS has agreed to process law enforcement sensitive requests for
benefits, such as an EAD related to SPBP, in a secure and expeditious fashion through their Fraud
Detection National Security (FDNS) Unit. In order to receive secure and expedited handling, field
offices should forward applications for benefits, such as Form 1-765 (Application for Employment
Authorization), to their headquarters POC (for federal agencies) or to the local ICE SAC Office (for
state and local agencies). The benefits application will then be forwarded to ICE Headquarters,

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

will review and endorse the benefit application, then coordinate directly with the CIS/
(b)(2), (b)
then forward the
FCNS Unit, which will adjudicate and produce the benefit document._will
(7)(E)
benefit document to the requesting LEA. In accordance with the CIS memorandum entitled, "New
Procedures for Issuance of Immigration BenefitslDocuments in Law Enforcement and National
Security Matters," dated December 19,2003, "the fee will ordinarily be waived [for the EAD] ... "

d.
Re-Parole (Extension): A request for re-parole should be submitted to the PHAB via a new LEA
SPBP Form 10-days before the expiration date of the parolee's authorized stay (unless the initial
parole was an emergency parole authorized pursuant to Procedure VI.B.6 ("Emergency Paroles")). A
re-parole may be granted in increments of up to 1 year each. If the re-parole is authorized, the PHAB
will refer the LEA to the appropriate field office to obtain a new Form 1-94. If the alien's parole has
expired, a new request for SPBP must be submitted to the PHAB and the parolee may be required
to depart the United States.
4.

Termination of Parole
a.
Decision: The PHAB may terminate the parole at any time. The PHAB will notify the LEA and all
appropriate parties in writing.
b.
Multiple Paroles: Parole terminates each time the parolee departs the United States (8 CFR
212.5(e)). The PHAB will notify by cable or memorandum the U.S. Embassy or Consulate overseas
and OFO headquarters of approved multiple advance paroles. For multiple advance paroles, a new
Form 1-94 will be issued at the POE to the parolee upon each arrival.
c.
Failure To Depart/Absconders: If the parole has terminated and the parolee has not departed
as required, the parolee will be treated as an absconder. The LEA will immediately submit a copy of
the DHS Parole Tracking Form to the PHAB. The PHAB will immediately perform the following:
(1)

Terminate the parole.

(2)
Initiate removal proceedings with ICE. ICE will be responsible for preparing a Notice To
Appear (NTA).
(3)
Provide all known information to the appropriate CBP and ICE field offices to help facilitate
his or her recovery.
6.
Emergency Paroles: The ICE SAC, Border Patrol CPA, or DFO may authorize an emergency
parole for 72 hours for informants or witnesses under exigent circumstances when the parole is
important to an investigation, a prosecution, or other activity deemed necessary to maintain public
safety. This authority should be exercised only when the LEA could not reasonably have requested the
parole in advance through the PHAB in accordance with this protocol. During this emergency 72-hour
parole, the parolee must remain in the custody of agents from the requesting LEA. The authorizing
official will submit copies of the LEA SPBP Form to the PHAB for tracking and vetting purposes. If the
parolee will arrive at a POE, then the authorizing official must coordinate the arrival with POE officials
(DFO or Port Director) having jurisdiction over the POE where the alien will arrive. If the parolee is
required to remain in the United States as an informant or a witness beyond the initial 72-hour period,
then a re-parole (extension) must be authorized and executed by the requesting LEA from the PHAB in
accordance with Procedure VI. B.4 ("Re-Parole (Extension")).

7.
Family Members: Paroles are temporary; therefore, family members should be paroled only under
extraordinary circumstances, such as legitimate physical threats to family members. The threat must be
clearly documented on the LEA SPBP Form.
8.
Fees: In general, all fees will be waived for a parole approved for significant public benefit. If the
parolee must depart and reenter the United States for personal reasons, the fees will not be waived.
However, the PHAB will make the final determination whether to charge or waive a fee.
9. Additional LEA Request: If another LEA desires the presence of the same alien, that LEA must
submit a new LEA SPBP Form to PHAB to initiate a new parole request pursuant to this protocol.
C.
Questions or Concerns Regarding the Process: Any questions or concerns regarding this protocol
(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
or by fax at
should be addressed to the PHAB at (b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

Appendix 17-1
Office Hours for Deferred Inspections (Revised CBP
02-07 01/12/07; Revised 12/01/05; CBP 15-06; Revised 11/1/05; CBP
13-06; Revised 08/12/05; CBP 11-05; Revised 05/16/05; CBP 09-05)
LOCATION

ADDRESS

Hours

Days

Albany, NY

1086 Troy-Schenectady Road Latham,
NY12110

10:00 - 14:00

Tuesday and Thursday

Anchorage,
AK

Ted Stevens Anchorage International
Airport 4601 Postmark Drive NB 143
Anchorage, AL 99502

10:00 - 15:00

Monday - Friday

Atlanta, GA

Reporting address: 77 Forsyth S1. SW
Room 114 Atlanta, GA 30303-0253
Deferred for Judgement and Conviction:
08:00 to 14:00. Wednesday Only. Leave
30 days to allow for the LPR to obtain
certified copies of court records to show
the duty officer.

08:00 - 14:00

Tuesday - Thursday
(Closed Monday &
Friday)

Baltimore,
MD

Reporting address: BWI Airport Lower
Level, Pier E Baltimore, MD 21240
Mailing address: U.S.Customs and
Border Protection P.O. Box 28628

08:00 - 15:00

Monday - Saturday

I

Phone

Baltimore, Maryland 21240
. _..

Monday, Tuesday,
Thursday & Friday

1185 South Vinnell Way Boise, ID
83709

08:00 - 15:00

Boston, MA

Reporting address: Logan International
Airport Terminal E, Lower Level, Room
500 Boston, MA 02128 Mailing address:
Customs and Border Protection 500
Terminal E Logan International Airport
Boston, MA 02128

07:00 - 13:00

Monday - Thursday

Buffalo, NY

Peace Bridge Peace Bridge Plaza
Buffalo, NY 14213

10:00 - 14:00

Tuesday - Thursday

Champlain,
NY

Champlain Port-ot-Entry 234 West
Service Road, Interstate 87 Champlain,
NY 12919

10:00 -14:00

Tuesday - Thursday

Charlotte
Amalie, VI

Reporting address: U.S. Customs Border 08:00 -16:00
Protection Cyril E. King Airport Charlotte,
Amalie, St. Thomas, USVI 00801 Mailing
address: U.S. Customs and Border
Protection 5500 Veterans Drive Federal
Bldg. Room 248 Charlotte Amalie, St.
Thomas, USVI 00801 Attn: Deterred
lnspction

Monday - Friday

Charleston,
SC

170 Meeting Street, 5th Floor
Charleston, SC 29401

09:00 - 14:00

Wednesday only

Charlotte,
NC

Reporting address: Charlotte Douglas
International Airport International

11:00-13:00

Monday - Friday

Boise,ID

. _..

Arrivals, Lower Level Zone D Charlotte,
NC 28217 Mailing address: USCBP 1901
Cross Beam Charlotte, NC 28217
Chicago,IL

10 W. Jackson Blvd. Second Floor,
Deferred Inspections Chicago, IL 60604

08:00 -14:00

Cincinnati,
OH

4243 Olympic Blvd, Suite 210
Erlanger, KY 41018

9am- 1pm
Appointment only

Monday - Thursday
(Closed Friday)
Monday, Tuesday,
Thursday & Friday
(Closed Wednesday)

(859)
282-6308
ext. 209,
210
Fax:
(859)
282-9570

Cleveland,
OH

Reporting address: Cleveland Hopkins
International Airport Concourse A
International Arrivals 5300 Riverside
Drive Cleveland, OH 44135 Mailing
address: CBP I Inspections P.O. Box
81186 Cleveland, OH 44181 - 0186

10:00 - 14:00

Des Moines,
IA

U.S. Customs and Border Protection
6000 Fleur Drive Des Monies, IA 50321

10:00- 14:00

Dallas, TX

Reporting address: Customs and Border 08:30 - 14:00
Protection 1205 Royal Lane DFW
Airport, Texas 75261 Mailing address:
Customs and Border Protection P.O. Box
619050 DFW Airport, TX 75261

I
,I
I

Monday - Friday

.. -

Tuesday & Thursday

Monday - Friday

..-

Denver, CO

Reporting address: Denver International 11 :00 - 14:00
Airport Main Terminal - International
Arrivals 8500 Pena Blvd. Denver, CO
80249 Mailing address: Bureau of
Customs and Border Protection Deferred
Inspections 24735 E. 75th Ave., Suite
100 Denver, CO 80249

Monday - Friday

Detroit, MI

Customs Border Protection /INS
Discipline Detroit Metropolitan Airport,
Building 830, Lower Level, Int'I. Arrivals
2597 World Gateway Place Detroit, MI
48242

Monday - Friday,
except holidays

EIPaso, TX

Ysleta Port-of-Entry Customs & Border
08:00 - 16:00
Protection/INS Discipline Building A,
Information Window 797 South Zaragosa
Road EI Paso, TX 79907

Great Falls,
MT

Great Falls Airport 1600 Airport Drive
Great Falls, MT 59404-5501

08:00 - 16:00

Guam

Guam International Airport 355 Chalan
Pasajero, Route 10-A Tamuning, Guam
96911

08:00 - 13:00 18:00 21:00

Hartford

450 Main St. Room 421 Hartford, CT
06103-3060

08:00 - 15:00

Monday - Friday

Highgate
Springs, VT

Highgate Springs POE 482 Welcome
Center Rd. Swanton, VT 05488

09:00 - 16:00

Monday - Friday

08:00 - 16:00

Monday - Saturday

Monday - Friday

Monday - Saturday

Honolulu,
HW

300 Rodgers Blvd. International Arrivals
Building 2nd Floor, Ewa End Honolulu,
HW 96819

09:30 - 15:00

Monday - Friday

Houlton, ME

27 Customs Loop Houlton, ME 04730

08:00 - 16:00

Monday - Friday

Houston, TX

7141 Office City Drive Houston, TX
77087

09:00 - 17:00

Monday - Friday

Indianapolis,
IN

6801 Pierson Drive Indianapolis, IN
46241

08:30 - 15:30

Monday - Friday

Jacksonville,
FL

Reportimg and Mailing address: U.S.
08:00 - 12:00
Customs and Border Protection Deferred
Inspection Office 2831 Talleyrand
Avenue Jacksonville, FL 32206

Jacksonville, 4121 South point Blvd. Room 143
FL
Jacksonville, FL 32216

Kansas, MO

Reporting address: Kansas City
International Airport Terminal C, Gate 90
Kansas City, MO 64153 Mailing address:
U.S. Customs and Border Protection
4100 Mulberry Drive, Suite 110 Kansas
City, MO. 64116

Kona, HW

Reporting address: Kailua-Kona
International Airport Building T-2 KailuaKona, HI 97640-2644 Mailing address:
73-100 Kupipi St. Kailua-Kona, HI
97640-2644

I
I

08:00 -12:00

Call to schedule
appointment

08:00 -12:00

Monday - Friday
Individuals should be
encouraged to call to
confirm appointment.
Monday - Friday
Individuals should be
encouraged to call to
confirm appointment
By Appointment Only

7days a week. Deferred
inspections for the Big
Island of Hawaii only.

Las Vegas,
NV

Reporting address: Customs and Border 08:00 - 16:00
Protection McCarran International
Airport, Terminal 2 5757 Wayne Newton
Blvd. Las Vegas, NV 89119 Mailing
address: Customs and Border Protection
P.O Box 11049 Las Vegas, NV 891111049

Los Angeles, 300 N. Los Angeles St., Room 2067 Los
Angeles, CA 90012
CA

08:00 - 16:30

Monday - Friday

Monday, Tuesday,
Wednesday & Friday
(Closed Thursday)

Louisville,
KY

Advise applicant to
Reporting office: 601 W. Broadway
Room 601 Louisville, KY 40202 Mailing call for an
appointment. Please
address: CBP ATTN: Deferred
Inspections Room 4001 550 Main Street obtain good address
and telephone
Cincinnati, OH 45202
number for
applicant.

Wednesday

McAllen, TX

U.S. Customs and Border Protection
McAllen-Miller International Airport 2500
So. Bicentennial Street McAllen, TX
78503

08:00 -16:00

Monday - Friday

Memphis,
TN

3150 Tchulahoma, Suite 1 Memphis, TN
38118

08:00 - 15:00

Thursday

Miami, FL

7880 Biscayne Blvd. 5th floor, Deferred
Inspections Miami, FL 33138

08:00 - 15:00

Monday - Friday

502-3663388
ext. 107

(305)
5262840

I

Tuesday Wednesday

Milwaukee,
WI

310 E. Knapp Street Milwaukee. WI
53202

08:30 - 14:3008:0012:00

Newark, NJ

Newark International Airport, Terminal B
Newark, NJ 07114

08:00 - 11 :00

Monday - Friday

New Orleans, Mailing address: CBP Inspections P.O.
LA
Box 20207 Kenner, LA 70141 Reporting
address: Louis Armstrong International
Airport Ground Floor, Immigration Office
900 Airline Hwy. Kenner, LA 70062

09:00 - 11 :00

Tuesday, Wednesday
and Thursday

New York,
NY

26 Federal Plaza, Room 8-804 New
York, NY 10278

09:00 - 12:00
Schedule a specific
date! time on the
Form 1-546.

Norfolk, VA

101 East Main Street,. Norfolk. VA
23510

09:00 - 15:00

Oklahoma
City, OK

U.S. Customs and Border Protection
10:00 - 15:00
4300 Highline Blvd., Suite 250 Oklahoma
City, OK 73108

Omaha. NE

Customs and Border Protection 5229
Boeing Court Omaha, NE 68110

Orlando, FL

Reporting & mailing address: U.S.
08:00 - 12:00
Customs and Border Protection Deferred
Inspections Office 9076 Binnacle Way
Orlando, FL 32827

12:00 - 16:00

Monday - Thursday
(allow 3 weeks for
mail)

Wednesdays only. Call
for appointment
1 st and 3rd
Wednesday of each
month
Monday - Friday

Monday - Friday
Individual should be
encouraged to call to
confirm appointment.

Pembina,
NO

Pembina Port-of-Entry 10980 1-29 Suite
1 Pembina, NO 58271

08:00 - 12:00

Philadelphia, Philadelphia International Airport,
09:00 -12:00
PA
Customs and Border Protection Terminal
A West, International Arrivals
Philadelphia, PA 19153

Tuesday, Wednesday
& Thursday
Monday - Friday

Phoenix, AZ

2035 N. Central Ave. Phoenix, AZ
85004

09:30 - 15:00

Monday - Thursday
(Closed Friday)

Pittsburgh,
PA

Pittsburgh International Airport Terminal
C, International Arrivals Pittsburgh, PA
15231

09:00 - 12:00

Monday - Saturday
Individual should call
for an appointment.

Portland, ME 176 Gannett Dr. S. Portland, ME 04106

10:00 - 14:00

Monday - Friday

Portland, OR Reporting address: 511 N.W. Broadway,
Room 117 Portland, OR 97209 Mailing
address: P.O. Box 55580 Portland, OR
97238

10:00 - 12:00

Thursday only

Providence,
RI

200 Dyer St. Providence, RI 02903

08:00 - 13:00

Wednesday

Raleigh, NC

120 South center Court, Suite 500
Morrisville, NC 27560

10:00 - 12:00

Tuesday - Thursday

Reno, NV

2220 Radar Street Reno, NV 89502

09:00 - 11 :00

Tuesday Only

Salt Lake

Reporting address: Salt Lake City

08:00 - 14:30

Tuesday - Thursday

City, UT

(Closed Monday)

International Airport 3850 West Terminal
Drive Salt Lake City, Utah 84116 Mailing
address: P.O. Box 22330 Salt Lake City,
Utah 84122
12:00 - 16:00

Monday - Friday

San Juan,
PR

09:00 - 17:00
ReporUng address: U.S. Customs and
Border Protection Luis Munoz Marin
International Airport American Airlines
Terminal "C", 3rd floor Carolina, Puerto
Rico Mailing address: U.S. Customs and
Border Protection #1 La Puntilla San
Juan, PR 00901 Att: Deferred Inspection

Monday - Friday

San Diego,
CA

880 Front Street, Suite B268 San Diego,
CA 92101

08:00 - 15:30

Monday - Friday

San
Francisco,
CA

630 Sansome S1. Room 931 San
Francisco, CA 94111-2280

07:45 - 15:00

Monday - Thursday

Santa
Teresa, NM

Reporting address: Santa Teresa Portof-Entry 170 South Pete V. Domenici
Highway Santa Teresa, NM 88008
Mailing address: U.S. Customs and
Border Protection P.O. Box 1197 Santa
Teresa, NM 88008-1197

08:00 - 16:00

Monday - Friday

San Antonio, Customs Border Protectionl Legacy INS
9800 Airport Blvd, Terminal 1, Room
TX
1103 San Antonio, TX 78216 Note:
Located adjacent to baggage claim
across from lower elevator.

Seattle, WA

7277 Perimeter Road, Room 116
Seattle, Wa 98108

09:00 - 15:00

Monday - Friday
Individual should call
for appointment

Spokane,
WA

U.S. Customs and Border Protection
Airport Office Center 5709 W. Sunset
Highway Suite 204 Spokane, WA 99224

09:00 - 15:00

Tuesday, Wednesday
& Thursday. Individual
should call for
appointment.

St. Croix, VI

Reporting and Mailing address: U.S.
08:00 - 16:00
Customs and Border Protection Henry E.
Rohlsen Airport Frederiksted, St. Croix,
USVI 00840 Attn: Deferred Inspection

Monday - Friday

St. John, VI

Reporting address: U.S. Customs and
Border Protection Cyril E. King Airport
Charlotte Amalie, St. Thomas, USVI
00801 Mailing address: U.S. Customs
and Border Protection 5500 Veterans
Drive Federal Bldg. Room 248 Charlotte
Amalie, St. Thomas, USVI 00801 Attn.
Deferred Inspection

08:00 - 16:00

Monday - Friday

St. Louis,
MO

Reporting address: St. Louis
International Airport East Terminal, ET16 International Arrivals, E-1125 St.
Louis, MO 63145 Mailing address: U.S.
Customs & Border Protection P.O. Box
10406 St. Louis, MO 63145

11 :30 - 15:30

Wednesday only

St. Paul, MN

2901 Metro Drive, Room 100
Bloomington, MN 55425

07:30 - 11 :30

Monday - Thursday
(Closed Friday)

Tampa, FL

Reporting address: U.S. Customs and
Border Protection Tampa International
Airport Airside "F" 5503 Spruce Street
Tampa, FL 33607 Mailing Address:
U.S.Customs and Border Protection
ATTN: Deferred Inspection Unit, Suite
201 1624 East 7th Avenue Tampa, FL
33605

08:00 - 12:00

Tuesday, VVednesday
and Thursday only.
Individual should be
encouraged to call to
confirm date and time
of appointment.

Thousand
Islands

Thousand Islands Bridge 46735
Interstate Route 81 Alexandria Bay, NY
13607

10:00 - 14:00

Tuesday - Thursday

Tuscon, AZ

Tuscon Interational Airport 7150 S.
Tucson Boulevard International Terminal
Tucson, AZ 85706

14:00 - 16:00

Monday - Friday

VVashington,
D.C.

Reporting address: BCBP Deferred
10:00 - 14:00
Inspections Unit VVAS-Dulles
International Airport Main Terminal,
Lower Level, VVest End Chantilly, VA
20151 Mailing address: Bureau of
Customs and Border Protection Deferred
Inspection Unit VVAS-Dulles International
Airport P.O.. Box 17423 VVashington,
D.C. 20041

Monday - Thursday.
Individual should be
encouraged to call the
Deferred Inspection
Unit to confirm date
and time of
appointment.

VVest Palm
Beach, FL

1 East 11 Street, 2nd floor Rivera Beach, 10:00 - 12:00
FL 33404

Tuesday - Thursday

Appendix
Appendix
AppendIx
Appendix

Revised
Revised
Revised
Revised

CBP
CBP
CBP
CBP

05-04
07-04 (11/18/01)
09-05 (05/16/05)
11-05 (08/12/05)

Appendix Revised CBP 13-06 (11/01/05)
Appendix Revised CBP 15-06 (12/01/05)
Appendix Revised CBP 19-06 (07/21/06)

Appendix 17-2

Public Health Service Offices

u.s. Public Health Service
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
National Center for Infectious Diseases
Division of Global Migration and Quarantine
(Revised May 2003)
•

LOS ANGELES
U.S.P.H.S. Quarantine Station (Los Angeles)
Tom Bradley International Airport
380 World Way, Box N19
Los Angeles, CA 90045
Phone: 310-215-2365 (24 hours)
FAX 310-215-2285
All ports in Southern California, Arizona, Colorado, Las Vegas, Nevada, New Mexico, Texas, and the
U.S. Mexico Border.
(b) (6)
(b) (6)
(b) (6)

•

SAN FRANCISCO
U.S.P.H.S. Quarantine Station (San Francisco)
P.O. Box 280548 SFIA

San Francisco, CA 94128-0548
650-876-2872
FAX 650-876-2796
All ports in Northern California, Nevada (except Las Vegas),Utah, and Wyoming.

~e:
(b)
(6)
e
-m
m
. ,DC.GOV
l
e__
,
:
(b) a
(6)a
Cell (b) (6)
MIAMI
U.S.P.H.S. Quarantine Station (Miami)
Miami International Airport
P.O. Box 996488
Miami, FL 33299-6488
305-526-2910
FAX 305-526-2798
All ports in Florida, Puerto Rico, and the US Virgin Islands.
Officer-in-charge:
(b) (6)
e-m~.GOV
e-m~.GOV
(b) (6)
(6)l l : _
C(b)
e

HONOLULU
U.S.P.H.S. Quarantine Station (Honolulu)
Honolulu International Airport
300 Rodgers Boulevard, Terminal Box # 67
Honolulu, HI 96819-1897
808-861-8530 or 8531
FAX 808-861-8532
All ports in Hawaii, Guam, and Pacific Trust Territories.
Officer-in-charge:

(b) (6)
(b) (6)
(b) (6)

.GOV
·GOV

CHICAGO
U.S.P.H.S. Quarantine Station (Chicago)
O'Hare International Airport
P.O. Box 66012
Chicago, IL 60666-0012
773-894-2960 main
773--894-2961/2968 others
FAX 773-894-2970
All ports in Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota,
Ohio, South Dakota, and Wisconsin. Canadian pre-clearance port: Toronto.
(b) (6)
_E.dIEl
i iEii_
~

Officer-in-charTL(b) (6)

e-ma_
CDC.GOV
l
(b) (6)
Cell:
NEW YORK
U.S.P.H.S. Quarantine Station (New York City)
J. F. Kennedy International Airport
Terminal 4, Room 219.016
Jamaica, NY 11430-1081
718-553-1685,6,7
FAX 718-553-1524
All ports in New York, Connecticut, Delaware, District of Columbia, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts,
New Hampshire, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, Virginia, and West Virginia.
Canadian pre-clearance port: Montreal. Also, pre-clearance at Shannon and Dublin.
Dublin .

....

(b) (6)

.-

.- .-_.- ..

(b) (6)
e-mail: _@CDC.GOV
Cell: (b) (6)

SEATTLE
U.S.P.H.S. Quarantine Station (Seattle)
Seattle-Tacoma International Airport
Room 2067
Seattle, WA 98158-1250
206-553-4519
FAX 206-553-0855
All ports in Washington, Alaska, Idaho, Montana, and Oregon. Canadian pre-clearance ports:
Edmonton, Calgary, Vancouver, and Victoria.
Officr-in-char.e:
officr-in-charle:

(b) (6)

(b) (6)
e-mail: ~CDC.GOV
(b).
(6)• • • •
Cell •

ATLANTA
U.S.P.H.S. Quarantine Station (Atlanta)
Hartsfield Atlanta Int'l
P.O. Box 45256
Atlanta, GA 30320
404-639-1220/1221
FAX 404-639-1224
All ports in Georgia, Alabama, Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and
Tennessee.

-

(b) (6)
(b) (6)
e-ma~.GOV

(6)
C(b)
e
ll:_

DIVISION OF GLOBAL MIGRATION AND QUARANTINE HEADQUARTERS
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
National Center for Infectious Diseases

Division of Global Migration and Quarantine (E-03)
Atlanta, Georgia 30333
Main number
404-498-1600 (24 hours)
FAX 404-498-1633
Contacts:

~n
of Global Migration and Quarantine
404-498-1600

(b) (6)

(b) (6)
e-ma~.GOV

(b)
(6)llll:
c
Ce
e
:_
_
(b) (6)

J
d

Deputy Director, Division of Global Migration and Quarantine
(b) (6)
(b) (6)
(b) (6)
(b) (6)

Chief, Field Operations
Division of Global Migration and Quarantine
(b) (6)

email: _@CDC.GOV
(b) (6)
Cell (b) (6)
(b) (6)

Chief, Quarantine Section
Division of Global Migration and Quarantine
(b) (6)
(b) (6)
ema~.GOV
(b)e
(6) l l _
C

TRAVELER'S HEALTH HOTLINE
24-hour telephone hotline: 877- FYI-TRIP (394-8747)

[Rev. IN 03-41]

Appendix 17-4 Flores v. Reno Settlement

HQ 243-C

Settlement of Jenny Lisette Flores,
et aI., v. Janet Reno

Jul 18 1997
Regional Directors

Office of the

District Directors

Deputy Commissioner

Chief Patrol Agents
Regional Counsel
Director of Training
GLYNCO

A settlement has been reached in a federal class action lawsuit involving the Immigration
and Naturalization Service's (INS) policies, practices, and regulations regarding the detention
and release of minors taken into INS custody. The settlement sets forth a nationwide policy for
the detention, release, and treatment of alien minors in the custody of the INS and supersedes
all previous INS policies that are inconsistent with the terms of this agreement. A copy of the
entire stipulated settlement is being sent to you by electronic mail from headquarters Detention
and Deportation Division (HQDDP)

As part of this settlement, INS agreed to provide appropriate guidance and training for
designated INS employees regarding the terms of this agreement. The national juvenile
coordinator in HQDDP has held "train the trainer" sessions for this purpose in all three regions.
A video explaining the Flores v. Reno settlement has been distributed to all of the participants in
the regional training sessions. All immigration officers who may come in contact with detained
alien minors must receive the training and view the video by July 17. Exhibit 2 of the settlement,
"Instructions to Service Officers Re: Processing, Treatment, and Placement of Alien Minors," is
attached and should be distributed to all INS officers in your jurisdiction immediately. It
explains the requirements of the settlement. This exhibit contains changes from the original
settlement document because of the enactment of the Illegal Immigration Reform and
Immigrant Responsibility Act of
1996.
Lastly, Exhibit 4, also attached, is an agreement concerning facility visits by the plaintiffs.
All facilities in which INS houses juveniles should be given a copy of this agreement. The
agreement allows plaintiff's counsel to visit these facilities, observe conditions, and to interview
staff and alien minors. The Office of International Affairs, Humanitarian Affairs Branch, has
already notified the Headquarters of our contracted shelters.
Any questions regarding this national policy should be directed to (b) (6)
(b) (6)
Coordinator, Headquarters Detention and Deportation, at

Chris Sale
Deputy Commissioner

Attachments
cc: HQPGM
HQEXS
HQENF
HQCOU
INSTRUCTIONS TO SERVICE OFFICERS RE:

uvenile

PROCESSING, TREATMENT, AND PLACEMENT OF MINORS

These instructions are to advise Service officers of INS policy regarding the way in which minors in INS custody are processed, housed
and released. These instructions are applicable nationwide and supersede all prior inconsistent instructions regarding minors.
(a) Minors. A minor is a person under the age of eighteen years. However, individuals who have been "emancipated" by a state court
or convicted and incarcerated for a criminal offense as an adult are not considered minors. Such individuals must be treated as adults
for all purposes, including confinement and release on bond.

Similarly, if a reasonable person would conclude that an individual is an adult despite his claims to be a minor, the INS shall treat such
person as an adult for all purposes, including confinement and release on bond or recognizance. The INS may require such an
individual to submit to a medical or dental examination conducted by a medical professional or to submit to other appropriate
procedures to verify his or her age. If the INS subsequently determines that such an individual is a minor, he or she will be treated as
a minor for all purposes.
(b)
General policy. The INS treats and will continue to treat minors with dignity, respect and special concern for their particular
vulnerability. INS policy is to place each detained minor in the least restrictive setting appropriate to the minor's age and special
needs, provided that such setting is consistent with the need to ensure the minor's timely appearance and to protect the minor s wellbeing and that of others. INS officers are not required to release a minor to any person or agency whom they have reason to believe
may harm or neglect the minor or fail to present him or her before the INS or the immigration courts when requested to do so.
(c)
Processing. The INS will expeditiously process minors and will provide a Form 1-770 notice of rights, including the right to a
bond redetermination hearing, if applicable.

Following arrest, the INS will hold minors in a facility that is safe and sanitary and that is consistent with the INS's concern for the
particular vulnerability of minors. Such facilities will have access to toilets and sinks, drinking water and food as appropriate, medical
assistance if the minor is in need of emergency services, adequate temperature control and ventilation, adequate supervision to
protect minors from others, and contact with family members who were arrested with the minor. The INS will separate unaccompanied
minors from unrelated adults whenever possible. Where such segregation is not immediately possible, an unaccompanied minor will
not be detained with an unrelated adult for more than 24 hours.
If the juvenile cannot be immediately released, and no licensed program (described below) is available to care for him, he should be
placed in an INS or INS-contract facility that has separate accommodations for minors, or in a State or county juvenile detention
facility that separates minors in INS custody from delinquent offenders. The INS will make every effort to ensure the safety and wellbeing of juveniles placed in these facilities.

(d)
Release. The INS will release minors from its custody without unnecessary delay, unless detention of a juvenile is required to
secure her timely appearance or to ensure the minor's safety or that of others. Minors shall be released, in the following order of
preference, to:

(i) a parent;
(ii) a legal guardian;
(iii) an adult relative (brother, sister, aunt, uncle, or grandparent);

(iv) an adult individual or entity designated by the parent or legal guardian as capable and willing to care for the minor's
well-being in (i) a declaration signed under penalty of perjury before an immigration or consular officer, or (ii) such other
documentation that establishes to the satisfaction of the INS, in its discretion, that the individual designating the
individual or entity as the minor's custodian is in fact the minor's parent or guardian;
(v) a state-licensed juvenile shelter, group home, or foster home willing to accept legal custody (as opposed to only
physical custody); or
(vi) an adult individual or entity seeking custody, in the discretion of the INS, when it appears that there is no other likely
alternative to long term detention and family reunification does not appear to be a reasonable possibility.
(e)
Certification of custodian. Before a minor is released, the custodian must execute an Affidavit of Support (Form 1-134) and
an agreement to:
(i) provide for the minor's physical, mental, and financial well-being;
(ii) ensure the minor's presence at all future proceedings before the INS and the immigration court;
(iii) notify the INS of any change of address within five (5) days following a move;
(iv) if the custodian is not a parent or legal guardian, not transfer custody of the minor to another party without the prior
written permission of the District Director;
(v) notify the INS at least five days prior to the custodian's departure from the United States, whether the departure is
voluntary or pursuant to a grant of voluntary departure or order of removal; and
(vi) if dependency proceedings involving the minor are initiated in state court, notify the INS of the initiation of such
proceedings and the dependency court of any removal proceedings pending against the minor.
In an emergency, a custodian may transfer temporary physical custody of a minor prior to securing permission from the INS, but must
notify the INS of the transfer as soon as is practicable, and in all cases within 72 hours. Examples of an "emergency" include the
serious illness of the custodian, destruction of the home, etc. In all cases where the custodian seeks written permission for a transfer,
the District Director shall promptly respond to the request.
The INS may terminate the custody arrangements and assume legal custody of any minor whose custodian fails to comply with the
agreement. However, custody arrangements will not be terminated for minor violations of the custodian's obligation to notify the INS
of any change of address within five days following a move.
(f) Suitability assessment. An INS officer may require a positive suitability assessment prior to releasing a minor to any individual
or program. A suitability assessment may include an investigation of the living conditions in which the minor is to be placed and the
standard of care he would receive, verification of identity and employment of the individuals offering support. interviews of members of
the household, and a home visit. The assessment will also take into consideration the wishes and concerns of the minor.

(9) Family reunification. Upon taking a minor into custody, the INS, or the licensed program in which the minor is placed, will
promptly attempt to reunite the minor with his or her family to permit the release of the minor under Paragraph (d) above. Such
efforts at family reunification will continue as long as the minor is in INS or licensed program custody and will be recorded by the INS
or the licensed program in which the minor is placed.
(h) Placement in licensed programs. A "licensed program" is any program, agency or organization licensed by an appropriate state

agency to provide residential, group, or foster care services for dependent children, including a program operating group homes, foster

Flores v. Reno Settlement Ag reement describes
the standards required of licensed programs. Juveniles who remain in INS custody must
be placed in a licensed program within three calendar days if the minor was apprehended
in an INS district in which a licensed program is located and has space available, or within
five calendar days in all other cases, except when:
homes, or facilities for special needs minors. Exhibit 1 of the

(i) the minor falls under Paragraph (i), "Secure and supervised detention," below;
(ii) the INS reasonably believes the alien is an adult and is conducting medical or dental examinations to determine age;
(iii) a court decree or court-approved settlement requires otherwise;
(Iv) an emergency (such as a natural disaster, fire, civil disturbance, or medical emergency) or influx of minors into the
United States (meaning the INS has more than 130 minors in custody) prevents compliance, in which case all minors should
be placed in licensed programs as expeditiously as possible; or
(v) the minor must be transported from remote areas for processing or speaks an unusual language such that a special
interpreter is required to process the minor, in which case the minor must be placed in a licensed program within five
business days.
(i) Secure and supervised detention. A minor may be held in or transferred to a State or county juvenile detention facility or in a
secure INS facility or INS-contracted facility having separate accommodations for minors, whenever the District Director or Chief Patrol
Agent determines that the minor _

(i) has been charged with, is chargeable, or has been convicted of a crime, or is the subject of delinquency proceedings, has
been adjudicated delinquent, or is chargeable with a delinquent act, unless the minor's offense is
(a) an isolated offense not within a pattern of criminal activity which did not involve violence against a person or the
use or carrying of a weapon (Examples: breaking and entering, vandalism, DUI. etc.); or
(b) a petty offense, which is not considered grounds for stricter means of detention in any case (Examples:
shoplifting, joy riding, disturbing the peace, etc.);
(ii) has committed, or has made credible threats to commit, a violent or malicious act (whether directed at himself or others)
while in INS legal custody or while in the presence of an INS officer;
(iii) has engaged, while in a licensed program, in conduct that has proven to be unacceptably disruptive of the normal
functioning of the licensed program in which he or she has been placed and removal is necessary to ensure the welfare of the
minor or others, as determined by the staff of the licensed program (Examples: drug or alcohol abuse, stealing, fighting,
intimidation of others, etc.);
(iv)

IS

an escape-risk; or

(v) must be held in a secure facility for his or her own safety, such as when the INS has reason to believe that a smuggler
would abduct or coerce a particular minor to secure payment of smuggling fees.

"Chargeable" means that the INS has probable cause to believe that the individual has committed a specified offense.

The term "escape-risk" means that there is a serious risk that the minor will attempt to escape from custody. Factors to consider when
determining whether a minor is an escape-risk or not include, but are not limited to, whether:
(a)

the minor is currently under a final order of removal;

(b) the minor's immigration history includes: a prior breach of a bond; a failure to appear before the
INS or the immigration court; evidence that the minor is indebted to organized smugglers for his
transport; or a voluntary departure or a previous removal from the United States pursuant to a final
order of removal;
(c)

the minor has previously absconded or attempted to abscond from INS custody.

The INS will not place a minor in a State or county juvenile detention facility, secure INS detention facility, or
secure INS-contracted facility if less restrictive alternatives are available and appropriate in the
circumstances, such as transfer to another licensed program or transfer to a medium security facility. A
"medium security facility"may have a secure perimeter but cannot have major internal restraining construction,
such as locked cells. A medium security facility must otherwise meet all the standards of a licensed program
and provide intensive staff supervision and counseling services.
All determinations to place a minor in a secure facility will be reviewed and approved by the regional Juvenile
Coordinator. INS officers must also provide any minor not placed in a licensed program with a written notice of
the reasons for housing the minor in a secure or medium security facility.
(j) Notice of right to bond redetermination and judicial review of placement. A minor in removal
proceedings shall be afforded a bond redetermination hearing before an immigration jUdge in every case,
unless the minor indicates on the Notice of Custody Determination form that he or she refuses such a hearing.
A juvenile who is not released or placed in a licensed program shall be provided (1) a written explanation of
the right of judicial review (copy attached) and (2) the list of free legal services providers compiled pursuant to
INS regulations (unless previously given to the minor).
(k) Transportation and transfer. Unaccompanied minors should not be transported in vehicles with detained
adults except when being transported from the place of arrest or apprehension to an INS office or where
separate transportation would be otherwise impractical, in which case minors shall be separated from adults.
INS officers shall take all necessary precautions for the protection of minors during transportation with adults.
When a minor is to be released, the INS will assist him or her in making transportation arrangements to the
INS office nearest the location of the person or facility to whom a minor is to be released. The INS may, in its

discretion, provide transportation to such minors.
Whenever a minor is transferred from one placement to another, she shall be transferred with all of her
possessions and legal papers; provided, however, that if the minor's possessions exceed the amount
permitted normally by the carrier in use, the possessions must be shipped to the minor in a timely manner. No
minor who is represented by counsel should be transferred without advance notice to counsel, except in
unusual and compelling circumstances such as where the safety of the minor or others is threatened or the
minor has been determined to be an escape-risk, or where counsel has waived notice, in which cases notice
must be provided to counsel within 24 hours following transfer.
(I) Periodic reporting. Statistical information on minors placed in proceedings who remain in INS custody for longer than 72 hours
must be reported to the Juvenile Coordinator by all INS district offices and Border Patrol stations. Information will include: (a)
biographical information, including the minor's name, date of birth, and country of birth, (b) date placed in INS custody, (c) each date
placed, removed or released, (d) to whom and where placed, transferred, removed or released, (e) immigration status, and (f) hearing
dates. INS officers should also inform the Juvenile Coordinator of the reasons for placing a minor in a medium-security facility or
detention facility as described in paragraph (i).
(m) Attorney-client visits by Plaintiffs' counsel. The INS will permit the lawyers for the Flores v. Reno plaintiff class to visit
minors, even though they may not have the names of minors who are housed at a particular location. A list of Plaintiffs' counsel
entitled to make attorney-client visits with minors is available from the district Juvenile Coordinator. Attorney-client visits may also be
conducted by any staff attorney employed by the Center for Human Rights & Constitutional Law of Los Angeles, California, or the
National Center for Youth Law of San Francisco, California, provided that such attorney presents credentials establishing his or her
employment prior to any visit.
Visits must occur in accordance with generally applicable policies and procedures relating to attorney-client visits at the facility in
question. Upon Plaintiffs' counsel's arrival at a facility for attorney-client visits, the facility staff must provide Plaintiffs' counsel with a
list of names and alien registration numbers for the minors housed at that facility. In all instances, in order to memorialize any visit to
a minor by Plaintiffs' counsel, Plaintiffs' counsel must file a notice of appearance with the INS prior to any attorney-client meeting.

in connection with his placement
or treatment during INS custody. Plaintiffs' counsel must submit a copy of the notice of
appearance by hand or by mail to the local INS juvenile coordinator and a copy by hand
to the staff of the facility.
Plaintiffs' counsel may limit the notice of appearance to representation of the minor

A minor may refuse to meet with Plaintiffs' counsel. Further, the minor's parent or legal guardian may deny Plaintiffs' counsel
permission to meet with the minor.
(n) Visits to licensed facilities. In addition to the attorney-client visits, Plaintiffs' counsel may request access to a licensed
program's facility (described in paragraph (h)) or to a medium-security facility or detention facility (described in paragraph (i)) in
which a minor has been placed. The district juvenile coordinator will convey the request to the facility's staff and coordinate the visit.
The rules and procedures to be followed in connection with such visits are set out in Exhibit 4 of the

Flores v. Reno

Settlement Agreement, unless Plaintiffs' counsel and the facility's staff agree otherwise.
In all visits to any facility, Plaintiffs' counsel and their associated experts must treat
minors and staff with courtesy and dignity and must not disrupt the normal functioning of

the facility.
EXHIBIT 4

AGREEMENT CONCERNING FACILITY VISITS UNDER PARAGRAPH

33

The purpose of facility visits under paragraph 33 is to interview class members and staff and to observe conditions at the
facility. Visits under paragraph 33 shall be conducted in accordance with the generally applicable policies and procedures of the facility
to the extent that those policies and procedures are consistent with this Exhibit.
Visits authorized under paragraph 33 shall be scheduled no less than seven (7) business days in advance. The names,
positions, credentials, and professional association (e.g., Center for Human Rights and Constitutional Law) of the visitors will be
provided at that time.
All visits with class members shall take place during normal business hours.
No video recording equipment or cameras of any type shall be permitted. Audio recording equipment shall be limited to handheld tape recorders.
The number of visitors will not exceed six (6) or, in the case of a family foster home, four (4), including interpreters, in any
instance. Up to two (2) of the visitors may be non-attorney experts in juvenile justice and/or child welfare.
No visit will extend beyond three (3) hours per day in length. Visits shall minimize disruption to the routine that minors and
staff follow.

NOTICE OF RIGHT TO JUDICIAL REVIEW

The INS usually houses persons under the age of 18 in an open setting, such as a foster or group home, and not in detention facilities.
If you believe that you have not been properly placed or that you have been treated improperly, you may ask a federal judge to review
your case. You may call a lawyer to help you do this. If you cannot afford a lawyer, you may call one from the list of free legal services
given to you with this form.

Appendix 17-5
Table of Terrorist Organizations Designated by
the Secretary of State (Added IN98-04)
Table of Terrorist Organizations Designated by the Secretary of State
(October, 1997)

Table of names, abbreviations, and acronyms of terrorist organizations 1 designated by the Secretary of
State 2

Name / Acronym

Cross Reference

17 November

see Revolutionary

Active in Country or
Region

Description of Group

·ANO

Headquarters in Libya; has

International terrorist
organization

Arab Revolutionary

members in Bekaa Valley,
Lebanon

led by Sabri al-Banna. Split
from the

Brigades

plus overseas support

PLO in 1974. Made up of

Organization 17
November
A.I.C. Comprehensive

see Aum Shinrikyo

Research Institute
A.I.C. Sogo Kenkyusho

see Aum Shinrikyo

Abu Ghunaym Squad of

see Palestine Islamic

the Hizballah Bayt AI-

Jihad-Shaqaqi Faction

Maqdis
Abu Nidal Organization

structure; has

various

Arab Revolutionary Council

presence in Sudan; in
thepast,

functional committees,
including

Black September

received aid from Iraq and
Syria.

political, military and
financial.

Fatah Revolutionary Council
Revolutionary Organization
of Socialist Muslims
Abu Sayyaf Group

·AI Harakat AI Islamiyya

Islamic extremist group in the

Led by Abdurajik
Abubakar

southern Philippines.

Janjalani. Split from the
Moro
National Liberation Front
in 1991;
using bombing,
assassination and
kidnappings, seeks to
promote an
Iranian style Islamic state
in
Mindanao, Philippines.

AIG

·see Armed Islamic Group

AIIB

·see Japanese Red Army

AI Harakat AI Islamiyya

·see Abu Sayyaf Group

al-Faran

see Harakat ul-Ansar

al-Gama'at

·see Gama'a al-Islamiyya

al-Hadid

·see Harakat ul-Ansar

al-Hadith

·see Harakat ul-Ansar

al-Jama'ah al-Islamiyah

·see Armed Islamic Group

al-Musallah
ai-Jihad

Egyptian ai-Jihad

Egyptian Islamic extremist
group;

Organized into two apparent
factions:

Egyptian Islamic Jihad

appears to have members
or

the original Jihad led by Abbud
al-

New Jihad

supporters in Afghanistan,
Pakistan

Zumar, imprisoned in Egypt;
and the

Talai'i al-Fatah

and Sudan.

Vanguards of Conquest led by

Dr.

Tala'ah al-Fatah

Ayman al-Zawahiri,
whereabouts

Tala'al al-Fateh

unknown. Preeminent spiritual

Tala' al-Fateh

leader is Shaykh Umar Abd al-

Talaah al-Fatah

Rahman. Specializes in armed

Tala'al-Fateh

attack against officials of the
secular

Vanguards of Conquest

Egyptian government (i.e.

Vanguards of Victory

assassination of President
Anwar
Sadat in 1981).

ANO

·see Abu Nidal
Organization

Ansar Allah

·see Hizballah

Anti-Imperialist

·see Japanese Red Army

International Brigade
Anti-War Democratic

·see Japanese Red Army

Front
Arab Revolutionary

·see Abu Nidal

Brigades

Organization

Arab Revolutionary

·see Abu Nidal

Council

Organization

Armed Islamic Group

·AIG

Islamic extremist group in
Algeria;

GIA aims to overthrow the
secular

AI-Jama'ah al-Islamiyah al-

has support among
expatriates in

Algerian government and
replace it

Musallah

Western Europe; may
receive

with an Islamic state. GIA
uses

GIA

support from Iran and
Sudan.

assassinations, bombings, and

Groupement Islamique

kidnappings in which the
throats of

Arme

victims are often slit.

ASG

see Abu Sayyaf Group

Aum Shinrikyo

A.I.C. Comprehensive

Japanese cult.

Founded by Shoko Asahara;

aims to
Research Institute

take over Japan and then the
world

A.I.e. Sogo Kenkyusho

with an organizational
structure
mimicking a nation-state, with

Aum Supreme Truth

"ministries" and a "popesecretariat. "
Its religious status was
revoked by
Japanese law following a
poison gas
attack on the Japanese public
in the
Tokyo subway.

Aum Supreme Truth

see Aum Shinrikyo

Basque Fatherland and

see Euzkadi Ta

Liberty

Askatasuna

Black September

see Abu Nidal

Organization
Committee for the Safety

see Kach

of the Roads
Communist Party of Peru

see Shining Path

on the Shining Path of
Jose Carlos Mariategui

Democratic Front for the

see Democratic Front for

Liberation of Palestine

the Liberation of Palestine
- Hawatmeh Faction

Democratic Front for the

Democratic Front for the

Palestine Authority and
Israeli-

Marxist group that split from
the

Liberation of Palestine -

Liberation of Palestine

occupied territories; has a
presence

PFLP; hard-line faction is
headed by

Hawatmeh Faction

DFLP

in Syria and Lebanon.

Nayif Hawatmeh; opposes the
Israel-

Red Star Battalions

PLO peace process; engages
in

Red Star Forces

cross-border terrorist raids
into
Israel.

De" Sol

see Revolutionary
People's Liberation Party
/ Front

De" Sol Armed

see Revolutionary

Re"olutionary Units

People's Liberation Party
/ Front

De" Sol SOB

see Revolutionary
People's Liberation Party
/ Front

De" Sol Silahli Devrimci

see Revolutionary

Birlikleri

People's Liberation Party
/ Front

Devrimci Halk Kurtulus

see Revolutionary

Partisi-Cephesi

People's Liberation Party

Devrimci Sol

see Revolutionary

/ Front

People's Liberation Party
/ Front
DFLP

see Democratic Front for
the Liberation of Palestine
- Hawatmeh Faction

DHKP / C

see Revolutionary
People's Liberation Party
/ Front

Dikuy Bogdim

see Kach

DOV

see Kach

EGP

see Shining Path

Egyptian al-Gama'at al-

see Gama'a al-Islamiyya

Islamiyya
Egyptian aI-Jihad

see ai-Jihad

Egyptian Islamic Jihad

see ai-Jihad

Ejercito de Liberacion

see National Liberation

Nacional

Army

Ejercito Guerrillero

see Shining Path

Popular
Ejercito Popular de

see Shining Path

Liberacion
ELA

see Revolutionary
People's Struggle

Ellalan Force

see Liberation Tigers of
Tamil Elam

ELN

see National Liberation
Army

Epanastatiki Organosi 17

see Revolutionary

Noemvri

Organization 17
November

Epanastatikos Laikos

see Revolutionary

Agonas

People's Struggle

EPL

see Shining Path

ETA

see Euzkadi Ta
Askatasuna

Euzkadi Ta Askatasuna

Basque Fatherland and

Basque region of Spain and in

Seeks an independent
homeland in

Liberty

southwestern France.

Spain's autonomous
Basque region;

ETA

has engaged in
kidnapping, robbery
and extortion; has also
targeted
French interests in
response to
French operations against
the group.

FARC

see Revolutionary Armed
Forces of Colombia

Fatah Revolutionary

see Abu Nidal

Council

Organization

Followers of the Prophet

see Hizballah

Muhammad (or
"Mohammed")
FPMR

see Manuel Rodriguez
Patriotic Front Dissidents

FPMR/A

see Manuel Rodriguez
Patriotic Front Dissidents

FPMR/D

see Manuel Rodriguez
Patriotic Front Dissidents

Frente Patriotico Manuel

see Manuel Rodriguez

Rodriguez

Patriotic Front Dissidents

Frente Patriotico Manuel

see Manuel Rodriguez

Rodriguez-Autonomos

Patriotic Front Dissidents

Fuerzas Armadas

see Revolutionary Armed

Revolucionarias de

Forces of Colombia

Colombia
Gama'a al-Islamiyya

al-Gama'at

Indigenous Egyptian Islamic

Loosely organized; no single
head,

Egyptian al-Gama'at al-

extremist group.

though the preeminent
spiritual

Islamiyya

leader is Shaykh Umar Abd
al-

IG

Rahman (the "blind sheik").
Seeks

Islamic Gama'at

to overthrow the secular
Egyptian

Islamic Group

government with an Islamic
state;
has used armed attacks
against the
government, tourists, and
Coptic
Christians among others, to
accomplish its goals.

GIA

see Armed Islamic Group

Groupement Islamique

see Armed Islamic Group

Arme
Halhul Gang

see Popular Front for the
Liberation of Palestine

Halhul Squad

see Popular Front for the
Liberation of Palestine

HAMAS

Harakat al-Muqawama al-

The occupied territories of
Israel,

HAMAS uses both political
and

Islamiya

land under control of the
Palestinian

violent means to accomplish
its goal

Islamic Resistance

Authority; has members and
support

of replacing Israel with an
Islamic

Movement

in Jordan; receives funding
from

Palestinian state. It is
loosely

Izz ai-Din al-Qassim (or

Iran, from Palestinian
expatriates

structured, and is an
outgrowth of

"Qassam") Battalions

and from benefactors in Saudi the Palestinian branch of the
Muslim
Arabia

Izz ai-Din al-Qassim

and other Arab states.

Brotherhood.

al-Faran

Kashmir region of India; has

A militant Islamic group
seeking

al-Hadid

members and supporters in

Kashmir's accession to
Pakistan;

al-Hadith

Muzaffarabad, Pakistan and
the

formed of the two former
groups,

Harakat ul-Jihad al-Islami

Doda area of India.

Harakat ul-Jihad al-Islami
and

Brigades
Izz ai-Din al-Qassim Forces
Students of Ayyash
Students of the Engineer
Yahya Ayyash Units
Harakat al-Muqawama al-

see HAMAS

Islamiya
Harakat ul-Ansar

Harakat ul-Mujahedin

Harakat ul-Mujahedin. Uses

machine guns, explosives,
mortars,

HUA

and other weaponry in its
attacks.
Has been involved in
guerrilla
warfare in Tajikistan, the
Arakan
mountains of Burma, and
Bosnia.
Harakat ul-Jihad al-Islami

see Harakat ul-Ansar

Harakat ul-Mujahedin

see Harakat ul-Ansar

Hizballah (or

Ansar Allah

Radical Shiite Muslim group
formed

D Violently anti-Western and
anti-

"Hezbollah")

Followers of the Prophet

in Lebanon; allied with, and
often

Israeli group, known or
suspected to

Muhammad (or

(but not always) directed by
Iran.

have engaged in numerous
anti-U.S.

"Mohammed")

Has established cells in
Europe,

attacks such as the U.S.
Embassy

Islamic Jihad

Africa, North and South
America.

and Marine Barracks in
Beirut,

Islamic Jihad for the
Liberation of Palestine
Islamic Jihad Organization
Organization of the
Oppressed on Earth
Organization of Right
Against Wrong
Party of God
Revolutionary Justice
Organization
Holy War Brigade

see Japanese Red Army

HUA

see Harakat ul-Ansar

IG

see Gama'a al-Islamiyya

Islamic Gama'at

see Gama'a al-Islamiyya

Lebanon.

Islamic Group

see Gama'a al-Islamiyya

Islamic Jihad

see Hizballah

Islamic Jihad for the

see Hizballah

Liberation of Palestine
Islamic Jihad in (or "of")

see Palestine Islamic

Palestine

Jihad-Shaqaqi Faction

Islamic Jihad Organization

see Hizballah

Islamic Resistance

see HAM AS

Movement
Izz ai-Din al-Qassim (or

see HAMAS

"Qassam") Battalions
Izz ai-Din al-Qassim (or

see HAMAS

"Qassam") Brigades
Izz ai-Din al-Qassim (or

see HAMAS

"Qassam") Forces
Japanese Red Army

AIIB

Japan; believed to have cells
in

International terrorist group
that

Anti- Imperialist

Manila, Philippines, as well as

broke from the Japanese
Communist

International Brigade

Singapore and Kuala Lumpur;
also

League - Red Army Faction.
Leader

Anti-War Democratic Front

known to have close ties to

Fusako Shigenobu is
believed to be

Holy War Brigade

Palestinian terrorist groups.

in the Bekaa Valley,
Lebanon.

JRA

Group has engaged in air
hijackings,

Nihon Sekigun

and the massacre at Lad
Airport,

Nippon Sekigun

Israel. Suspected of bombing

a usa
facility in Naples, Italy that
killed five.
Jihad Group

see ai-Jihad

JRA

see Japanese Red Army

Judea Police

see Kach

Judean Voice

see Kahane Chai

Kach

Committee for the Safety of

Israel and Israeli-occupied
territories.

Founded by Rabbi Meir
Kahane;

the Roads

avowed goal is the
restoration of the

Dikuy Bogdim

biblical state of Israel.
(Kahane Chai

DOV

is an offshoot of Kach.) Has

Judea Police

threatened and claimed
credit for

Repression of Traitors

attacks on Palestinians,
Arabs and

State of Judea

Israeli government officials.

Sword of David
Kahane Chai

Kahane Lives

Israel and Israeli-occupied
territories.

Founded by the son of Rabbi
Meir

Judean Voice

Kahane after his
assassination;

Kfar Tapuah Fund

avowed goal is the
restoration of the
biblical state of Israel.
(Kahane Chai
is an offshoot of Kach.) Like
Kach,
Kahane Chai ("Kahane
Lives") has
threatened and claimed
credit for
attacks on Palestinians,
Arabs and
Israeli government officials.

Kahane Lives

see Kahane Chai

Kfar Tapuah Fund

see Kahane Chai

Khmer Rouge

National Army of

Cambodia.

Communist insurgency that,
under

Democratic Kampuchea

the leadership of Pol Pot,
engaged in

Party of Democratic

the genocide of more than

one
million people in Cambodia;
though

Kampuchea

most victims are Cambodian
villagers, Khmer Rouge has
been
known to target tourists and
other
foreigners in Cambodia.
Kurdistan Workers' Party

Partiya Karkeran Kurdistan

Southeastern Turkey; has
supporters

Marxist-Leninist insurgent
group

PKK

in Europe and Asia; receives
support

primarily composed of
Turkish

from Syria, Iran, Iraq.

Kurds, seeking to create an
independent Kurdish state in
southeast Turkey. Has
engaged in
attacks on TurkiSh diplomatic
and
commercial targets in Europe
and
elsewhere.

Liberation Tigers of

Ellalan Force

Sri Lanka; has operated in
southern India

Founded to establish an

Tamil Elam

LTTE

(Tamil Nadu State).

independent Tamil state in
Sri

Tamil Tigers

Lanka; uses an integrated
military
and terror strategy to
accomplish this
goal. Uses political
assassination
(for instance, Indian Prime
Minister
Rajiv Gandhi in 1991) to
achieve this
goal.

lTTE

see liberation Tigers of

Tamil Elam
Manuel Rodriguez

see Manuel Rodriguez

Patriotic Front

Patriotic Front Dissidents

Manuel Rodriguez

FPMR

Patriotic Front

FPMRjA

the Chilean Communist
Party;

Dissidents

FPMRjD

named for the hero of
Chilean

Frente Patriotico Manuel

independence from
Spain. Has

Rodriguez

attacked and bombed
civilians and

Chile.

(table continued on next page)

Initially began as the
armed wing of

(table continued from previous page)

Frente Patriotlco Manuel

international targets in Chile.

Rodriguez-Autonomos
Manuel Rodriguez Patriotic
Front
MEK

see Mujahedin-e Khalq
Organization

MKO

see Mujahedin-e Khalq
Organization

Movimiwnto

see Tupac Amaru

Revolucionario Tupac

Revolutionary Movement

Amaru
MRTA

see Tupac Amaru
Revolutionary Movement

Mujahedin-e Khalq

see Mujahedin-e Khalq
Organization

Mujahedin-e Khalq

MEK

Dissidents who oppose the
regime in

The group was initially formed
by

Organization

MKO

Iran, operating from Iraq;
uses front

college educated students to
oppose

MUjahedin-e Khalq

organizations such as the
Muslim

the westernization of Iran
under the

National Liberation Army of

Iranian Students' Society in
other

Shah; now opposes the
Islamic

Iran

countries to solicit funds and

regime and uses a worldwide

Organization of the

support. Has a residual
support

campaign of propaganda and

People's Holy Warriors of

network in France.

violence to do so. Philosophy

mixes
Iran

Marxism with Islam. Several

People's Mujahedin

thousand fighters are based
in Iraq.

Organization of Iran
PMOI
Sazeman-e Mujahedin-e
Khalq-e Iran
Muslim Iranian Student's

see Mujahedin-e Khalq

Society

Organization

National Army of

see Khmer Rouge

Democratic Kampuchea
National Council of

see Mujahedin-e Khalq

Resistance

Organization

National Liberation

Ejercito de Liberacion

Army 3

Nacional

Marxist-Leninist guerrilla
group

ELN

opposed to the Colombian

Colombia.

Rural-based, anti-U.S.,
Maoist-

government.
National Liberation Army

see Mujahedin-e Khalq

of Iran

Organization

New Jihad

see ai-Jihad

Nihon Sekigun

see Japanese Red Army

Nippon Sekigun

see Japanese Red Army

Organization of Right
Against Wrongsee
Hizballah
Organization of the

see Hizballah

Oppressed on Earth
Organization of the

see Mujahedin-e Khalq

People's Holy Warriors of

Organization

Iran
Palestine Islamic Jihad-

Islamic Jihad in (or "of")

Land under control of the

Loosely affiliated factions of

Palestinian

militant

Shaqaq i FaetionAbu

Palestine

Authority and Israel/occupied

Palestinians that arose in the
Gaza

Ghunaym Squad of

PIJ

territories.

Strip. Dedicated to the
destruction

the Hizballah Bayt AI-

PIJ-Shaqaqi Faction

of Israel and creation of an
Islamic
Palestinian state. The group
sees

Maqdis

the U.S. as an enemy
because of its
support of Israel; also
opposes
moderate
states.
Palestine Liberation Front

I

secular Arab

see Palestine Liberation
Front - Abu Abbas Faction

Palestine Liberation

Palestine Liberation Front

Israeli-occupied territories;
receives

Terrorist group that split from
PFlP-

Front - Abu Abbas

PlF

safe haven in Iraq; obtains
logistic

GC, and split once again into
pro-

Faction

PlF-Abu Abbas

and military support from the
PlO,

PlO, pro-Syrian and proLibyan

Libya and Iraq.

factions. This (pro-PlO)
faction is
led by Muhammad Abbas,
a.k.a. Abu
Abbas. It has carried out
attacks in
Israel, but also against
others, such
as the cruise vessel Achille
Lauro in
which U.S. citizen Leon
KUnghoffer
was murdered.

Partido Comunista del
Peru en el Sendero
Lummoso de Jose Carlos

see Shining Path

Mariategui
Partiya Karkeran

see Kurdistan Workers'

Kurdistan

Party

Party of Democratic

see Khmer Rouge

Kampuchea
Party of God

see Hizballah

PCP

see Shining Path

People's Aid of Peru

see Shining Path

People's Guerrilla Army

see Shining Path

People's Liberation Army

see Shining Path

People's Mujahedin

see Mujahedin-e Khalq

Organization of Iran

Organization

PFLP

see Popular Front for the
Liberation of Palestine

PFLP-GC

see Popular Front for the
Liberation of Palestine General Command

PIJ

see Palestine Islamic
Jihad-Shaqaqi Faction

PIJ-Shaqaqi Faction

see Palestine Islamic
Jihad-Shaqaqi Faction

PKK

see Kurdistan Workers'
Party

PLF

see Palestine Liberation

PLF-Abu Abbas

see Palestine Liberation

Front - Abu Abbas Faction

Front - Abu Abbas Faction
PMOI

see Mujahedin-e Khalq
Organization

Popular Front for the

Halhul Gang

Israel, the Israeli-occupied
territories,

Marxist-Leninist group
founded by

Liberation of Palestine

Halhul Squad

and Lebanon; receives
assistance

George Habash; advocates a
Pan-

PFLP

from Syria, Libya.

Arab revolution and opposes

the
Red Eagle Gang

Israeli-Arab peace accords.
Has

Red Eagle Group

carried out numerous attacks
against

Red Eagles

Israelis and moderate Arabs.
Israeli-occu pied territories;
receives

Split from the PFLP in late
1960s in

Liberation of Palestine -

support and probably
direction from

order to focus on fighting,
not

General Command

Syria. Believed to have bases
in

politics. Violently opposed to
the

Lebanon and cells in Europe.

PLO under Vasser Arafat. Led
by

Popular Front for the

PFLP-GC

former Syrian Army Captain
Ahmad
Jibril. Carries out crossborder
attacks into Israel.
Popular Revolutionary

see Revolutionary

Struggle

People's Struggle

Red Eagle Gang

see Popular Front for the
Liberation of Palestine

Red Eagle Group

see Popular Front for the
Liberation of Palestine

Red Eagles

see Popular Front for the
Liberation of Palestine

Red Star Battalions

see Democratic Front for
the Liberation of Palestine
- Hawatmeh Faction

Red Star Forces

see Democratic Front for
the Liberation of Palestine
- Hawatmeh Faction

Repression of Traitors

see Kach

Revolutionary Armed

FARC

Colombia; has occasionally

Largest, best-trained and
equipped

Forces of Colombia

Fuerzas Armadas

conducted operations in
Venezuela,

guerrilla organization in
Colombia.

Revolucionarias de Colombia

Panama and Ecuador.

Goal is to overthrow present
government and ruling class;
engages in attacks on the
military
and police. Many members
engage
in for-profit crimes (e.g., bank
robbery, extortion, narcotics
trafficking).

Revolutionary Justice

see Hizballah

Organization
Revolutionary Left

see Revolutionary
People's Liberation Party
/ Front

Revolutionary

17 November

Organization 17

Epanastatiki Organosi 17

leftist group opposed to Greek

November

Noemvri

establishment, neighboring
Turkey;

Greece.

Obscure, and probably small
radical

also anti-NATO, anti-U.S. Has
assassinated Greek and U.S.
citizens, and attacked facilities
in
Europe.
Revolutionary

see Abu Nidal

Organization of Socialist

Organization

Muslims
Revolutionary People's

Dev Sol

Greece; also carries out
attacks in

A splinter of the Turkish
People's

Liberation Party / Front

Dev Sol Armed

Turkey. Raises funds in
Europe, but

Liberation Party / Front.
Virulently

Revolutionary Units

also engages in robbery
and

anti-U.S., anti-NATO and pro-

Dev Sol SDB

extortion in Greece to do so. Marxist. Uses rockets in its

May

attacks

Dev Sol Silahli Devrimci

have received training from
radical

on facilities (i.e., U.S.
Consulate).

Birlikleri

Palestinians.

Also engages in assassination
of

Devrimci Halk Kurtulus

U.S. and Turkish military and
civilian

Partisi-Cephesi

personnel.

Devrimci Sol
DHKP / C

Revolutionary Left
Revolutionary People's

ELA

Greece; no known outside
sponsors

Extreme leftist group, selfdescribed

Struggle

Epanastatikos Laikos

or supporters.

as revolutionary, anticapitalist / anti-

Agonas

imperialist. Cooperates with
the

Popular Revolutionary

groups "lMay" and
"Revol utiona ry

Struggle

Solidarity." Might have ties
with

Revolutionary Popular

"Revolutionary Organization
17

Struggle

November" group. Has carried
out
bombings against Greek and
U.S.
government, economic and
business
facilities.

Revolutionary Popular

see Revolutionary

Struggle

People's Struggle

Sazeman-e Mu]ahedin-e

see MUjahedin-e Khalq

Khalq-e Iran

Organization

Sendero Luminoso

see Shining Path

Shining Path

Communist Party of Peru

Peru, primarily in rural
regions.

The larger of Peru's two
insurgent

(on the Shining Path of Jose

movements; one of the most

Carlos Mariategui)

ruth less guerrilla / terrOrist

EGP

organizations. Stated goal is
to

Ejercito Guerrillero Popular

destroy Peruvian institutions
and

Ejercito Popular de

replace them with a
revolutionary

Liberacion

peasant regime.
Indiscriminately

EPL

uses bombs, as well as
selective

Partido Comunista del Peru

assassinations. Is involved in
narco-

(en el Sendero Luminoso de

trafficking in the region.

Jose Carlos Mariategui)
PCP
People's Aid of Peru
People's Guerrilla Army
People's Liberation Army
Sendero Luminoso
SL
Socorro Popular del Peru
SPP

SL

see Shining Path

Socorro Popular del Peru

see Shining Path

SPP

see Shining Path

State of Judea

see Kach

Students of Ayyash

see HAMAS

Students of the Engineer

see HAMAS

Sword of David

see Kach

Tala'ah al-Fatah

see ai-Jihad

Tala'al al-Fateh

see ai-Jihad

Tala'al-Fateh

see ai-Jihad

Tala'al-Fateh

see ai-Jihad

Talaah al-Fatah

see ai-Jihad

Talai'i al-Fath

see ai-Jihad

Tamil Tigers

see Liberation Tigers of
Tamil Elam

Tupac Amaru

Movimiento Revolucionario

Revolutionary Movement

Tupac Amaru

revolutionary movement;
greatly

·MRTA

diminished in recent
years. Engages

Peru.

Traditional MarxistLeninist

in bombings, kidnappings
and
assassination. Notable
recent act:
takeover of Japanese
Ambassador's
residence in December,
1996 during
reception at which
hundreds of
hostages were taken.
Vanguards of Conquest

see ai-Jihad

Vanguards of Victory

see ai-Jihad

Yahya Ayyash Units

see HAMAS

Footnotes for Appendix 17-5

1/

The information about these organizations that is contained in the columns, "Active in Country or Region" and "Description of
Group" was derived and excerpted from the April 1997 Department of State document entitled, Patterns of Global Terrorism
1996. It is not intended to fully duplicate that document, which should be obtained and read in full for more exhaustive
information. Note that not all of the organizations contained in that document have been designated by the Secretary of
State. This Table is limited strictly to the designated organizations

2/

These organizations were designated by the Secretary of State pursuant to Section 219 of the Immigration and Nationality Act,
by publication in the Federal Register on October 8, 1997 (see 62 FR 52650-01). They do not constitute a comprehensive
listing of organizations known or believed by the United States to have engaged in terrorism. However, the specific
designation of these particular grops under this provision of law renders their "representatives" and current "members"
subject to removal from the United States under immigration laws, whether or not they have engaged in specific terrorist
acts. The removal provisions became effective immediately upon publication of the list on October 8th ..

3/

There is also a National Liberation ("ELN") operating in Bolivia, otherwise known as the Netor Paz Zamora Commission ("CNPZ").
It is not at this time a Secretary of State - designated terrorist organization.

Appendix 17-7 H-1B Fraud Refusal Notification Report (Added
INOl-14)

H-1B Fraud Refusal Notification Report
PORT OF ENTRY:

OFFICER:

PHONE:

FAX NUMBER:

PETITION #:

NAME OF ALIEN:
NOTIFICATION SENT TO:
Nebraska Service Center
ATTN: (b) (6)

__

n

(b) (6)

(b) (6)

U
u

Fa x
F_a_x_:_(_4_02_)_3_2_3_-_2_4_51
_ _ _:_(4_0_2_)_3_2_3_-_24_5_1

-"'I=",,1~
I==I

F_a_x_:_(2_1_4_)_7_6_7_-7_4_1_2
F_a_x_:_(_2_14_)_7_6_7_-_74_1_2

California Service Center

Vermont Service Center

ATTN:•
•••
ATTN (b) (6)

ATTN (b) (6)

Fax (949) 389-3402

Fax (802) 527-4877

:lIIiIililllllllillil

Additional Comments:
Pages to Follow:

__

Attachment: 1-275

__

Appendix 17-8 Detention logs
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY
Bureau of Customs and Border Protection
PERSONAL DETENTION LOG SHEET
Directive 3340-030A
Port Code/Name.

_

Date of Date/
Birth
Time In

Name of Person

Race

Gender

Reason Detained

Officer
Badge #

Officer
Badge #

Date/
Time Out

IOILlSAS #
(b) (2)

Observations - Physical and Mental Conditions

11

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

32

33

34

35

36

(b) (2)

CBP Form 3501 (03/04)

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY
Bureau of Customs and Border Protection
MASTER DETENTION LOG SHEET

Directive 3340-030A
Port Code/Name,

Name of Person

_

Date Date/
of
Time In
Birth

I
I

Officer
Badge #

I
I

Date/
Time Out

Officer
Badge #

(b) (2)

-

-

-

-- -

-

-

-

-

---

-

-

-

--

-

-

CBP Form 3502 (03/04)

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY
Bureau of Customs and Border Protection

CAUTION SHEET ON DETAINED INDIVIDUAL

CD 3440-030A

I

~S_U_b_j_e_c_t_N_a_m_e_:
DaB:

.loate:

Check appropriate box( es):

Medical Condition:

Remarks:

Requires Medication Type/Frequency:

Remarks:

Hostile or Uncooperative:

Remarks:
Depressed or Suicidal:

Remarks:
Suspected or Known Communicable Disease:

Remarks:

ITime:

~

=:J

Political Assyluum:

Remarks:
Juvenile:

Remarks:
Other:

Remarks:

Instructions/Observations/Disposition:

CBP Form 3503 (03/04)

INS#m450-appendix-32-17-8

Page 1 of5

INSERTS PLUS/Inspectors Field Manual!Appendix 17-8 Detention Logs

Appendix 17-8 Detention logs
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY
Bureau of Customs and Border Protection
PERSONAL DETENTION LOG SHEET
Directive 3340-030A
Port Code/Name.

_

Date of Date/
Birth
Time In

Name of Person

Race

Gender

Reason Detained

Observations - Physical and Mental Conditions

Officer
Badge #

Officer
Badge #

Date/
Time Out

IOILlSAS #
15 Minute Checks - Time and
Officers Initials
1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

http://onlineplus.uscis.dhs.gov/lpbinplus/lpext.dll/infobase/m450/m450-13156?f=templates&fn=document-frame.htm

1/2912008

INS#m450-appendix-32-17-8

Page 20f5

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

32

33

34

35

36

This log sheet will be used when a person is left unattended in a secure area. Observation entries will be made every 15 minutes to ensure
the safety of the person. If the person is removed from the secure area and taken to a different location within the CBP facility, (i.e.,
fingerprint room, interview room, etc.), it shall be annotated on the sheet. After the person is released or transferred to another agency or
facility, the Personal Detention Log Sheet will be retained on file locally, in chronological order, for two years and three months from the
date of detention. Local reproduction of this form is authorized.

CBP Form 3501 (03/04)

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY
Bureau of Customs and Border Protection
MASTER DETENTION LOG SHEET

Directive 3340-030A
Port Code/Name

Name of Person

_

Date Date/
of
Time In
Birth

I
I

Officer
Badge #

Date/
Time Out

Officer
Badge #

I
I

http://onlineplus.uscis.dhs.gov/lpbinplus/lpext.dll/infobase/m450/m450-13156?f=templates&fn=document-frame.htm

1/29/2008

INS#m450-appendix-32-17-8

Page 3 of 5

The Master Detention Log Sheet will be used to record all persons detained and left unattended in a secure area. Entries will include name,
date of birth, date/time when the person is left unattended, date/time and officers badge number, and when the person is released or
transferred to another agency or facility. The Master Detention Log Sheet will be maintained at the detention location and retained on file
locally, in chronological order, for two years and three months from the date of detention. Local reproduction of this form is authorized
CBP Form 3502 (03/04)

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY
Bureau of Customs and Border Protection

http://onlineplus.uscis.dhs.gov/lpbinplus/lpext.dlllinfobase/m450/m450-13156?f=templates&fn=document-frame.htm

1/29/2008

INS#m450-appendix-32-17-8

Page 40f5

CAUTION SHEET ON DETAINED INDIVIDUAL

CD 3440-030A

I

~S_U_b_j_e_c_t_N_a_m_e_:
DaB:

.loate:

ITime:

~

=:J

Check appropriate box( es):

Medical Condition:

Remarks:

Requires Medication Type/Frequency:

Remarks:

Hostile or Uncooperative:

Remarks:
Depressed or Suicidal:

Remarks:
Suspected or Known Communicable Disease:

Remarks:

http://onlineplus.uscis.dhs.gov/lpbinplus/lpext.dll/infobase/m450/m450-13156?f=templates&fn=document-frame.htm

1129/2008

INS#m450-appendix-32-17-8

Page 5 of 5

Political Assyluum:

Remarks:
Juvenile:

Remarks:
Other:

Remarks:

Instructions/Observations/Disposition:

CBP Form 3503 (03/04)

http://onlineplus.uscis.dhs.gov/lpbinplus/lpext.dlllinfobase/m450/m450-13156?f=templates&fn=document-frame.htm

112912008

Appendix 22-1
Memorandum of Understanding Between U. S.
Customs Service and Immigration and Naturalization
Service
MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING
BETWEEN
U.S. CUSTOMS SERVICE
AND
IMMIGRATION AND NATURALIZATION SERVICE
The United States Customs Service of the Department of the Treasury and the Immigration and Naturalization
Service of the Department of Justice hereby enter into the following Memorandum of Understanding (MOU).
A.

PURPOSE OF AGREEMENT
To promote mutual respect and support for the mission of each agency in the international air
passenger environment.

B.

AGREEMENT
The U.S. Customs Service (Customs) and the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) agree that
mutual cooperation in both policy and operational matters enhances both the facilitation and
enforcement objectives of each agency.
In order to encourage and ensure the continuation of the cooperative spirit and efforts of both
agencies, Customs and INS hereby agree that:

I. FACILITY PLANNING

The Federallnspeetion
Federal Inspection Services (FIS) agencies, which include Customs and INS, each have
clearly defined requirements for the design of airport facilities. However, in today's environment,
the operations of each agency are no longer as physically separate as they once were and it has
become necessary to approve designs of facilities in a cooperative manner. In light of this, it is
agreed that:
A national interagency group will be established to deal with the appropriate airport entity in a
unified manner regarding the planning, design, and construction of facilities.
facilities will only be approved which, through physical design, enable INS to control passengers
from their primary area to their secondary area, while at the same time, giving Customs ready
access to and view of the INS primary area.

Both Customs and INS must have ready access to the coordination center.
In single level facilities the coordination center must be located so that personnel have an
unobstructed view and ready access to the INS primary area without affecting either agency's
facility requirements. In two level facilities other means for coordination center access and
viewing capabilities between the two agencies must be established.

2. COORDINATION CENTER
The coordination center is a joint-use facility available to personnel from Customs and INS, as
well as other FIS agencies. The center serves as a central location point for the coordination of
the enforcement activities which link the agencies.

Customs and INS will staff the coordination center with a supervisor or lead inspector. It is
agreed that other issues regarding staffing and operation of the coordination center will remain
with each agency's local management.
3.

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

UERY

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

will routinely evaluate the method of
implementation of this responsibility based on facility, location, and operational considerations as

well as introduction of technical and automated changes.
(b)(2), (b)(7)

4. U. S. CUSTOMS SERVICE_
(E)
Customs has developed an inspectional strategy which incorporates selectivity methods,_
(b)(2), (b)
behavioral analysis and targeting techniques. This strategy is implemented by the use of (7)(E)
(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

5. CARRIAGE OF WEAPONS
It is agreed that the carriage of weapons by either Customs or INS personnel is a matter of each
agency's policy.
U. S. Customs and INS personnel retain the right to carry weapons throughout the airport
complex to the extent allowed by law and by regional and headquarters policy.

6. (b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
In order for each agency to fully exert its jurisdiction and authority
WI ou Jeopar IZlng
e en orcement processes of the other agency, we have agreed to the
following cooperative effort.
(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
(b)(2),h
(b)(7)(E)
_
i t s fall within the jurisdiction of INS. In these instances, INS will ensure that Customs
processing is also completed through procedures developed locally.

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

7. PREINSPECTION
ection at forei n sites of embarkation will continue.

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

it becomes necessary to ensure the information is

transmitted to Customs in the U. S.
It is agreed that, where possible, INS will provide Customs, at the port of arrival, in advance of
arrival, with the information relating to the queries performed at the preinspection site. In addition,
INS will provide USCS with positive identification of all subject hits.

8. (b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

YSTEM

_s

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

System _
The (b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
provides both Customs and INS with
capabilities for enhanced enforcement and facilitation.

It is agreed that in instances in which
received from either a carrier or a foreign
government,
government. the agencies will work cooperatively to develop facilitative processing of the APIS
arrivals.

It Is agreed that INS and Customs will cooperate to promote participation in
the airlines and foreign government

(b) (2)
th~rogram

by

9. MACHINE READABLE PASSPORTS AND VISAS

It is agreed that INS and Customs will engage in a joint effort to promote the development and
use of machine readable passports and visas.

10. SPECIAL REQUESTS
It is agreed that any special requests for inspection services that involve the FIS agencies will be
decided in joint consultation.
C.
C.

OTHER TERMS OF AGREEMENT

DATE:

1.

This agreement will be effective from the date of signature and will continue indefinitely until
terminated in writing by mutual agreement.

2.

Revisions, amendments and modifications to this agreement may be made upon the written
approval of both agencies and shall become effective upon the date of approval.

3.

This document is an internal government agreement and is not intended to confer any right
or benefit on any private person or party.

October 17, 1990

APPROVED:
APPROVED:

Carol Hallett Gary McNary
Commissioner Commissioner
U.S. Customs Service U.S. Immigration and
Naturalization Service

Appendix 22-2 lATA International Airline Codes (May, 1996)
A

AA

American Airlines

AB

Falcon Airlines

AD

Lone Star Airlines

AE

Mandarin Airlines

AF

Air France

AG

Provincial Airways (pax)

AG

Air Bridge Carriers (ego)

AH

Air Algerie

AI

Air India

AJ

Air Belgium

AK

Island Air

AL

Alsair

AM

Aeromexico

AN

Ansett Australia

AO

Aviaco

AP

Aliadriatica

AR

AerolineasArgentinas

AS

Alaska Airlines

AT

Royal Air Maroc

AU

Austral

AV

Avianca

AW

Aeroquetzal

AX

Air Aurora

AY

Finnair

AZ

Alitalia

B

BA

British Airways

BB

Sansa

BC

Brymon Airways

BD

British Midland A.

BE

Braniff International

BF

Markair

BG

Biman Bangladesh

BH

Augusta Airways

BI

Royal Brunei Airlines

BJ

Eliambassador

BK

Paradise Island A.

BM

ATI-Aero Transporti Italiani (pax)

BM

Belize Air International (ego)

BN

Tropical Sea Airlines

BO

Bouraq Indonesia A.

BP

Air Botswana

BQ

Aeromar (ego)

BR

Eva Airways

BS

Gamair (pax)

BS

Air Exchange (ego)

BU

Braathens S.A.F.E.

BV

Bopair

BW

BWIA International Trinidad and Tobago
Airways Corp.

BX
BY

Coast Air
Brittania

BZ

Keystone Air Service

C

CA

Air China

CB

Suckling Airways

CD

Trans Provincial A.

CE

Aircity

CF

Compania De Aviacion Faucett

CG

Caicos Caribbean Airways (ego)

CH

Bemidji Airlines

CI

China Airlines

CJ

China Northern A.

CK

Gambia Airways

CM

COPA

CO

Continental Airlines

CO

Air Micronesia

CP

Canadian Airlines International

CQ

Air Alpha

CS

Florida Air

CT

C.A.V.E.

CU

Cubana

CV

Cargolux Airlines

CW

Air Marshall Islands

CX

Cathay Pacific A.

CY

Cyprus Airways

CZ

China Southern A.

D

DA

Dan-Air Services

DB

Brit Air (pax)

DB

Air Niagara (ego)

DC

Golden Air Commuter

DE

Condor Flugdienst

DF

Indian Ocean Airlines

Dr

Deutsche BA

DJ

NorthCross Airways

DK

Kampuchea Airlines

DL

Delta Air Lines

DM

Maersk Air

DN

Corporate Air

DO

Dominicana de Aviacion

DP

Eastland Air

DQ

Coastal Air Transport

DS

Air Senegal

DT

TAAG-Angola Airlines

DU

Hemus Air (pax)

DU

Aerial Transit Co. (cargo)

DV

Nantucket Airlines

DX

Danair

DY

Alyemda-Democratic Yemen Airlines

E

EB

Emery Worldwide (cargo)

ED

CC Air (pax)

ED

Andes Airlines (ego)

EF

Far Eastern Air Transport

EG

Japan-Asia Airways

EH

SAETA

EI

Aer Lingus

EJ

New England Airlines

EK

Emirates

EL

Nippon

EM

Empire Airlines

EN

Air Dolomiti

EO

Air Nordic Sweden

EP

Blackhawk Airways

EQ

TAME

ER

DHL Airways

ET

Ethiopian Airlines

EU

Equatoria na

EV

Atlantic Southeast Airlines

EW

Eastwest Airlines

EX

A/S Norving

EY

Europe Aero-Service

EZ

Sun-Air

F

FA

Finnaviation (pax)

FA

Safair Freighters (ego)

FB

Promair Australia

FC

Berliner Spezial Flug

FD

CityFlyer Express

FF

Tower Air

FG

Ariana Afghan Airlines

FI

Icelanair

FJ

Air Pacific

FK

Flamenco Airways

FL

Coast to Coast AIrlines

FM

Federal Express (ego)

FN

Niue Airlines

FO

Western New South Wales Airlines

FQ

Air Aruba

FR

Ryanair

FS

Missionary Aviation Fellowship

FU

Air Littoral

FV

Viva Air

FW

Isles of Scilly Skybus

FY

Metroflight Airlines

G

GA

Garuda Indonesia

GB

Great Barrier Airlines (pax)

GB

Airborne Express (ego)

GC

Una Congo

GD

TAESA

GE

Trans Asia Airways

GF

Gulf Air

GH

Ghana Airways

GI

Air Guinee

GJ

Equatorial- International Airlines of Sao
Tome

GL

Gronlandsfly

GM

Flitestar

GN

Air Gabon

GO

Air Stord

GP

China General Aviation

GQ

Big Sky Airlines

GT

GB Airways

GU

AVIATECA

GV

Talair

GW

Central American A.

GX

Goll Aviation (pax)

GX

Air Ontario (ego)

GY

Guyana Airwys Corp.

GZ

Air Rarotonga

H

HA

Hawaiian Airlines

HB

Mali Tinbouctou Air Service

HC

Naske Air

HD

New York Helicopters

HF

Hageland Aviation

HG

Harbor Airlines, Inc.

HI

Papillon Airways

HJ

Holmstroem Air (pax)

HJ

Air Haiti (ego)

HK

Time Air Sweden

HM

Air Seychelles

HN

KLM City Hopper

HO

Airways International

HP

America West Airlines

HQ

Business Express

HR

Southern Pacific

HS

Air North International

HU

Slov-Air (pax)

HU

Northern Air Cargo (ego)

HV

Transavia

HW

North Wright AIr

HX

Hamburg Airlines

HY

Uzbekistan Airways

HZ

Euroflight Sweden

I

IB

Iberia

IC

Indian Airlines

IE

Solomon Airlines

IF

Great China Airlines

IH

Loken Aviation (pax)

IH

Falcon Aviation (ego)

II

Business Air

IJ

T.A.T. European A.

IK

Roadair Lines

IL

Istanbul Airlines

1M

Australia Asia Airlines

IN

IPEe Aviation (ego)

10

T.A. T. Export European Airlines (pax)

IO

LL.P.O. Aruba Cargo (ego)

IP

Airlines of Tasmania

IQ

Interot Airways

IR

Iranair

IS

Island Airlines

IT

Air Inter

IU

Helitrans Air Service

IV

Air Gambia

IW

AOM Minerve

IX

Flandre Air

IY

Yemenia Yemen Airways

IZ

Arkia Israeli Airlines

J
JA

Norway Airlines (pax)

JA

Bankair (ego)

JB

Helijet Airways

JC

Rocky Mountain Airways

JD

Japan Air System

JE

Manx Airlines

JF

LAB. Flying Service

JH

Nordeste (pax)

JH

Amerijet International (ego)

JI

Midway Airlines

JJ

Brasil Central

JK

Link Airways (Austr.)

JL

Japan Airlines

JM

Air Jamaica

IN

Japan Air Commuter

JO

LMT

JP

Adria Airways

JQ

Trans Jamaica Airlines

JR

Aero California

JS

Chosonminhang Korean Airways DPR of
Korea

JU

JAT

JV

Bearskin Lake Air Service

JW

Arrow Air (ego)

JX

JES Air Service

JY

Jersey European Airways

JZ

Avia

K

KA

Dragonair

KB

Druk-Air

KD

Kendall Airlines

KE

Korean AIr

KF

Air Botnia

KG

King Island Airlines

KH

Kyrnair

KI

Air Atlantique

KJ

Sultan Air

KK

Transportes Aereos Regionais

KL

KLM

KM
KQ

Air Malta
Kenya Airways

KR

Karair (pax)

KR

Kitty Hawk Air Cargo (ego)

KS

Peninsula Airways

KT

Turtle Airways Ltd.

KU

Kuwait Airways

KV

Transkei Airways

KW

Carnival Air Lines

KX

Carman Airways

KZ

Nippon Cargo Airlines

L

LA

Lan Chile

LB

LAB (Lloyd Air Boliviana)

LC

Loganair Ltd. (pax)

LD

LADE (pax)

LD

AHK Air Hong Kong (ego)

LE

Airlink

LF

Linjeflyg

LG

Luxair

LH

Lufthansa

LI

LIAT

U

Sierra National Airlines

LK

Goldfields Air Services (pax)

LK

Link America (ego)

LL

Bell Air

LM

ALM

LN

Jamahiriya Libyan Arab Airlines

LO

LOT -Polish AIrlines

LP

Nyge-Aero

LR

LACSA

LS

Iliamna Air Taxi (pax)

LS

Channel Express (ego)

LT

LTU

LU

Theron Airways

LV

Aeropostal

LW

Air Nevada

LX
LY

Crossair

LZ

Balkan

EI-AI Israel Airlines

M

MA

Malev

ME>

Western Airlines

MD

AIr Madagascar

ME

MEA

MF

Xiamen

MG

MGM Grand Air

MH

Malaysia Airlines

MI

Silk Air (pax)

MI

Four Star Air Cargo (ego)

MJ

tAPA

MK

Air Mauritius

ML

Aero Costa Rica Acari

MM

SAM

MN

Commercial Airways

MO

Calm Air International

MP

Martinair Holland

MR

Air Mauritanie

MS

Egyptair

MT

Melbourne Regional A.

MU

China Eastern Airlines

MV

Ansett W.A.

MW

Maya Airlines

MX

Mexicana

MY

Helifrance

MZ

Merpati Nusantara Airlines

N

NA

National Airlines

NB

Sterling Airways

NC

Norskair

ND

Inter-Canadien

NF

Air Vanuatu

NG

Lauda Air

NH

All Nippon Airways Co., Ltd.

NI

Portugalia

NJ

Namakwaland Ludgiens

NL

Atlantic Air Transport

NM

Mount Cook AIriines

NN

Air Martinique

NO

Aus-Air (pax)

NO

NPA (ego)

NR

Norontair

NS

NFD

NT

Norcanair

NU

Southwest Airlines (Japan)

NV

Northwest Territorial Airways

NW

Northwest AIrlines

NX

Nationair Canada

NZ

Air New Zeland

0

OA

Olympic Airways

OB

Monarch AIr

OC

Sunshine Air

OD

Zuliana de Aviacion

OE

Westair Commuter A.

OG

Air Guadeloupe

OH

Comair

or

Hel i-Tra nsport

OJ

Air St. Barthelemy

OK

Czechoslovak Ai rli nes

OL

OLT-Ostfriesische Luftransport (pax)

OL

Aeronorte Internacional (ego)

OM

Air Mongol-MIAT

ON

Air Nauru

00

Skywest Airlines

OP

Chalks International A.

OQ

Arizona Pacific Airways

OR

Air Comores

OS

Austrian Airlines

OT

Evergreen Helicopters

OU

Coati a Airlines

OV

Estonia Air

OW

Metavia Airlines

OX

Air Hudik

OY

Sunaire

OZ

Asiana Airliens

p

PB

Air Burundi

PC

Fiji Air

PD

Pem-Air

PF

Vayudoot (pax)

PF

Mid Pacific Air (ego)

PG

Bangkok Air

PH

Polynesian Air

PI

Sunflower Air

PJ

Air St. Pierre

PK

Pakistani International Airlines

PL

Aeroperu

PN

Societe Nouvelle Air Martinique

PO

Aeropelican Air Services

PQ

Pacific Coast Airlines

PR

Philippine Airlines

PU

PLUNA

PX

Air Niugini

PY

Surinam AIrways

PZ

LAP

Q
QA

Aerocaribe

QC

Air Zaire

QD

Grand Airways

QF

Quantas Airways

QG

Dynamic Air

QH

Qwestar

QI

Cimber Air

QJ

Jet Airways

QK

Air Nova

QL

Lesotho Airways

QM

Air Malawi

QP

Airkenya Aviation

QQ

Reno Air

QR

Air Satelite

QS

Tatra Air

QT

S.A.R. Avions Taxis (pax)

QT

Tampa Airlines (ego)

QU

Uganda Airlines

QV

Lao Aviation

QW

Turks and Caicos National Airline

QX

Horizon Air

QZ

Zambia Airways

R
RA

Royal Nepal Airlines

RB

Syrian Arab Airlines

RC

Atlantic Airways, Faroe Islands

RD

Avionova

RE

Aer Aranf1 Teo

RF

Emirates Air Services

RG

VARIG

RH

Meridiana Air

RI

P.T. Mandala Airlines (pax)

RI

Airpac Airlines (ego)

RJ

Royal Jordanian

RK

Air Afrique

RN

Euralair

RO

TAROM

RP

Precision Airlines

RQ

Air Engiadina

RR

Royal Air Force

RS

Intercontinental de Aviacion

RT

Lincoln Airlines

RV

Reeve Aleutian A.

RW

Rhineland AAirt Services (pax)

RW

Alas de Transportes Internacionales
(ego)

RY

Air rwanda

RZ

Trans World Express

S

SA

South African Airways

S6

Air Caledonie Internacional

SC

Cruzeiro

SD

Sudan Airways

SE

Wings of Alaska (pax)

SE

Dairo Air Services (ego)

SF

Shanghai Airlines

SG

Sempati Air

SH

SAHSA

SI

Friesenflug

SJ

Southern Air

SK

SAS

SL

Rio-Sui Servicios Aereos Regionais

SM

Aberdeen Airways

SN

Sa ben a Belgian World Airlines

SO

Austrian Air Services

SP

SATA AIr Acores

SQ

Singapore Airlines

SR

Swissair

SS

Carnival Airlines

ST

Yanda Airlines

SU

Aeroflot

SV

Saudia

SW

Air Namibia

SX

Christman Air System

SZ

China Southwest

T

TA

Taca International A.

TC

Air Tanzania Corp.

TD

TNT Sava

TE

Lithuanian Airlines

TF

Air Transport Pyrenees

TG

Thai Airways International

TH

LAR Transregional

TI

Baltic International Airlines

TJ

Tikal Jets (ego)

TK

Turkish AIrlines

TL

Skyport (pax)

TM

LAM-Linhas Aereas de Moeambique

TN

Australian Airlines

TO

Alkan Air

TP

TAP Air Portugal

TQ

Transwede Airways

TR

Transbrasil

TS

Samoa Aviation

TU

Tunis Air

TV

Haiti Trans Air

TW

TWA

TY

Air Caladonie (pax)

TY

Trans-Air Link (ego)

TZ

American Trans Air

U

UA

United Airlines

UB

Myanma Airways

UC

Ladeeo

UD

Hexair (pax)

UD

Fast Air Carrier (ego)

UE

Air L.A.

UF

Saro AIr

UG

Tuninter

UH

Transport Air Centre

UI

Norlandair

UJ

Air Sedona

UK

Air UK

UL

Air Lanka

UM

Air Zimbabwe

UO

Direct Air Inc.

UP

Bahamasair

UQ

O'Connor Airlines

UR

British International Helicopters

US

USAIR

UT

UTA

UU

Air Austral

UV

Air Kangaroo Island

UW

Perimeter Airlines

UY

Cameroon Airlines

UZ

Regional Air

V

VA

VIASA

VB

Birmingham European Airways

VC

Servivensa

VD

Air Liberte

VE

AVENSA

VG

RFG-Regionalflug

VH

Air Burkina

VI

Vieques Air Link

VK

Air Tungaru Corp. (pax)

VK

Zantop International Airlines (ego)

VM

Regional Airlines

VN
va

Vietnam Airlines
Viking International (Eagle)

VP

VASP

VQ

Oxley Airlines

VR

Transportes Aereos de Cabo Verde

VS

Virgin Atlantic Airways

VT

Air Tahiti

VU

Air Ivoire

VV

Flexair

VW

Transportes Aeromar

VX

ACES

VZ

Aquatic Airways

w
WA

Newair

WB

SAN

WC

Islena Airlines

WE

Rheintalflug Seewald (pax)

WE

Challenge Air Cargo (ego)

WF

Wide roe's Flyveselskap

WG

Taiwan Airways

WI

Rottnest Airbus(pax)

WI

Tradewinds International (ego)

WJ

Labrador Airways

WL

Aeroperlas

WM

Windward Islands Airways International

WN

Southwest AIrlines

WO

Polarwing

WP

Aloha Islander

WQ

Service Aerien Francais

WR

Royal Tongan Airlines

WS

Westates Airlines

WT

Nigeria Airways

WV

Southern Airlines

WX

Ansett Express

wv

Oman Aviation Services

WZ

B.A.S.E. Business A.

x
XC

Air Caribbean

XE

South Central Air

XF

Sky Bus Express

XG

Alsavia

XJ

Mesaba Airlines

XK

Compagnie Aerienne Corse Mediterranee

XL

Country Connection A.

XO

Xinjiang Airlines

XQ

Action Airlines

XT

Air Exel Netherlands

XU

Aerovias S.A.

XW

Walkers International

XX

Aeronaves del Peru

XV

Ryan Air (Alaska)

XZ

Eastair (Iceland)

y

VC

Flight West Airlines

YE

Grand Canyon A.

YI

Air Sunshine

VJ

National Airlines

VK

Cyprus Turkish A.

YL

Long Island A.

YN

Air Creebec

YO

Heli Air Monaco

YQ

Helikopterservice AB

YR

Scenic Airlines

YS

Proteus

YT

Skywest AIrlines

YU

Dominair

YV

Mesa Airlines

YW

States west Airlines

YX

Midwest Express A.

YZ

Transportes Aereos da Guine Bissau

z
ZA

Zas Airlines

ZB

Monarch Airlines

ZC

Royal Swazi Nabonal A

ZD

Ross AViation

ZE

Arcus Air Logistic

ZF

Airborne of Sweden

ZG

Sabair Airlines

ZH

Turk Hava Tasimaciligi

ZI

Aigle Azur

ZJ

Teddy Air
(table continued on next page)

(table continued from previous page)
ZL

Hazelton Air Services (pax)

ZL

Affretair (pvt.)(cgo)

ZM

Sci be-Airlift

ZN

Key AIrlines

ZO

Mohawk Airlines

ZP

Virgin Air

ZQ

Ansett New Zealand

ZR

Muk Air

ZS

Hispaniola Airways

ZT

SATENA

ZU

Freedom Air(pax)

ZU

Aerovias Colombianas (ego)

ZV

Air Midwest

ZW

Air Wisconsin

ZX

Air B.C.

ZY

Ada Air

2

2D

Southeast Airlines

2E

Markair Express

2F

Frontier Flying Service

2J

Majestic AIrlines

2K

Kitty Hawk Airways

2L

Alberni Airways

2P

Prairie Flying Service

2Q

Letaba Airways

2S

Island Express

2U

Air Caraibes (Dominica)

2V

Northeast Express

2W

Wairarapa Airlines

2Y

Koyukon Air

2Z

Servicios Aereos Litoral

3
3A

Alliance Airliens

3B

Borinqueen Air

3C

Camai Air

3E

Northwestern Air Lease

3G

Virgin Island Seaplane Shuttle

3J

Air Alliance

3K

tatonduk Flying Service

3L

West Isle AIr

3M

GulfstreamInternational

3N

Airvantage

3P

Equator Airlines

3R

Macair

3S

Shuswap Flight Center

3T

Contact Air

3V

Waglisla Air

4

46

Olson Air Service

4C

AIRES

40

Air Sinai

4E

Tanana Air Service

4F

Frontier Air Service

4H

Hanna's Air Saltspring

4K

Kenn Borek Air

4L

Air Alma

4M

Island Air

4N

Air North

4Q

Trans North Aviation

4U

Dorado Air

4V

Voyageur Airways

4W

Warbelow's Air Ventures

4Y

Yute Air Alaska

5

SA

Alpine Aivation

5B

Bellair

5C

Conquest AIrlines

5E

Sky One Express

SF

Arctic Circle Air

5K

Kenmore AIr

5N

Connectair Charters

5P

Ptargmigan Airways

55

Airspeed Aviation

5T

Aviacion del Noroeste

5U

Skagway Air Service

5W

Air San Juan Chartair

5X

United Parcel Service

6

6A

AVIACSA

6B

Baxter Aviation

6C

Cape Smythe AIr Service

6D

Alaska island AIr

6E

Malmo/City Air

6G

Las Vegas AIrlines

6H

Trans AIr Cambodia

6J

Southeast European A.

6L

Aktak Air Ltd.

6M

40-Mile Air

6P

Aero Puma

6Q

Barrow Air

6S

Ketchikan Air Service

6T

Tyee Airways

6V

Air Vegas

6W

Wilderness Airline

7

7A

Haines Airways

7B

Simpson Air

7C

Columbia Pacific Air

7D

Air Molokai

7E

Nepal Airways

7F

First Air

7H

ERA Aviation

7J

LAP.SA

7K

Larry's Flying Service

7L

Lake Union Air Service

7M

Aeromonterrey

7N

Air Manitoba

7P

APA International Air

7R

Redwing Airways

7S

Region Air

7T

Translift

7V

Alpha Air

7W

Air Sask Aviation

7Y

Albanian AIrliens

8

8B

Baker Aviation Inc

8E

Bering Air

8G

GP Express Airlines

8H

Harbor Air Service

8J

Jetall

8K

Air Vitkovice

8L

Servicio Aereo Leo Lopez

8M

Skymaster

8N

Flagship AIrlines

8P

Pacific Coastal Airlines

8R

WRA, Inc.

8S

Salair

8T

Travelair

8V

Wright Air Service

8W

Burlington Air Express

8Y

Ecuato Guineana de AViacion

9

9A

Air Atlantic

9B

Intourtrans

9E

Express Airlines

9F

Skycraft Air TYransport

9K

Cape Air

9L

Colgan Air

9M

Central Mountain Air

9N

Trans States Airlines

9P

Pelangi Air

9Q

Taquan Air Service

9S

Sabourin Lake Airways

9T

Athabaska Airways

9V

Air Schefferville

9W

Northwinds Northern

9X

Ontario Express

9Y

Yutana Airlines

Appendix 24-1

Bilateral Agreement (Added INS - TM2)

The "Agreement Between the Government of the United States of America and the Government of Canada on
Air Transport Preclearance" states:
The Government of the United States of America, and the Government of Canada,
Considering that preclearance facilitates air travel between the two countries and that it should be continued
(and established) for eligible flights at various locations in Canada and the United States, where the facilities
and other conditions are adequate to enable the United States and Canadian inspection agencies to carry out
their missions, in respect to the inspection of passengers and their possessions, aircraft crew, baggage and
aircraft stores entering the United States and Canada,
Agree as follows:
ARTICLE I
(a) "Preclearance" refers to the procedure of conducting in the territory of one of the Parties, inspections
required for entry/admission into the territory of the other Party.
(b) Flights eligible for preclearance are common carriage flights of large aircraft (as defined in Part 298 of the
U.S. Civil Aeronautics Board Economic Regulations, or the maximum authorized take-off weight on wheels of
35,000 pounds or more, or 30 seats or more) scheduled or charter, including ferry flights. Air taxi-type
operations, private flights, or state aircraft flights are not included.
(c) "Law enforcement officer" may include local peace officers as well as the Royal Canadian Mounted Police
and law enforcement officers of federal agencies in the United States.
ARTICLE"

(a) The Parties agree that preclearance shall be continued at Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg, and Vancouver,
and instituted at locations specified in Annex A to this Agreement in accordance with the following paragraph.
The preclearance program shall be extended to provide service in multiterminal complexes at such locations.
(b) The Parties further agree that preclearance will be instituted by Canada into cities in the United States or
by the United States into additional cities in Canada upon the concurrence of both Parties to that effect
expressed in writing.

ARTICLE III
Where preclearance exists in the territory of a Party, that Party shall:
(a) permit inspection agencies of the other Party to carry out preclearance of passengers and their
possessions, aircraft, crew, baggage and aircraft stores destined to the territory of the inspecting Party and, in
this context, permit such inspection agencies to determine the procedures under which the inspections will be
carried out and the utilization of manpower;
(b) provide at each preclearance location facilities acceptable to the other Party's inspection agencies as
defined in Annexes B or C, as appropriate, to this Agreement;
(c) permit the installation and operation by the other Party of such communications and other modern
inspection aids as it requires;
(d) provide appropriate law enforcement assistance to the other Party's inspectors including inter alia, upon
request of the other Party's inspection officer:
(i) search by a law enforcement officer of the territory where inspection takes place of any person and his
effects which are subject to preclearance in accordance with the Agreement if, under the law of the
country in which preclearance takes place, that law enforcement officer has authority and sufficient
grounds to believe that the person to be searched is seeking to carry into the other country
merchandise or other articles the possession of which constitutes an offense under the law of the
country in which preclearance takes place;
(ii) search by a law enforcement officer of any accomplice or abettor of a person searched for reasons and
under the conditions specified in paragraph (i) above;
(iii) if a search, conducted pursuant to paragraph (d)(i) and (ii) above, discloses merchandise or other
articles the possession of which constitutes an offense under the law of the territory in which
preclearance takes place, take whatever steps would have ordinarily been taken if the articles or
merchandise would have been found under circumstances unrelated to preclearance;

(e) wherever possible, conduct searches under Article III paragraph (d) in the presence of the other Party's
inspection officer. When a person refuses to submit to search, such person shall not be permitted to board a
precleared flight.
ARTICLE IV
The Party conducting preclearance shall:
(a) provide a sufficient number of inspectors to carry out with reasonable speed and efficiency preclearance of
passengers and their possessions, crew, baggage and aircraft stores on eligible flights of carriers to which
preclearance has been extended in accordance with Article VI;
(b) have its inspection agencies consult with the airport manager, the appropriate authorities of the other Party
and with the air carriers concerned in the implementation of this Agreement;
(c) have the prerogative to require post-clearance as it deems necessary of any aircraft, passenger or
passengers and their possessions on any flight that has been precleared. Any flight that is diverted or
required to be post-cleared shall be given preferential treatment for the purpose of post-clearance inspection;
(d) in any case where required under its law and in particular where there is likely to be commingling of
cleared and uncleared passengers or baggage, have the right to deny preclearance.
ARTICLE V
Each Party agrees to take all appropriate steps to protect:
(a) the facilities and premises used by the other Party in preclearance against any intrusion or damage and to
prevent any disturbance of the peace on the premises; and,
(b) the official archives and documents maintained by the inspection agencies.
ARTICLE VI
Preclearance being a facilitation procedure, the Parties agree that each air carrier should have the option to
use either preclearance or post-clearance subject to the following conditions:
(a) If an air carrier applies for preclearance, it shall use the procedures for all of its flights on a given route.
Ordinarily, three months notice to the appropriate inspectional agencies will be sufficient at locations where
other routes or carriers are being pre cleared; however, the inspection agencies may require an additional
reasonable delay before compliance in order to obtain or reduce personnel or facilities required by the

anticipated change in service.
(b) An air carrier desiring to withdraw entirely from preclearance at any location must give twelve months
notice to both Parties, but if neither Party objects, it may withdraw sooner. To withdraw from preclearance
only in respect to one or more eligible routes, the inspection agencies may require reasonable notice.
(c) Inspection agencies may decline to conduct pre-clearance on any carrier until that carrier has filed tariffs
acceptable to the appropriate government regulatory agency permitting the carrier to deny carriage to anyone
failing to submit to a preclearance inspection and to anyone who, having submitted to such inspection, is
found ineligible by inspection agencies to board a precleared flight.
ARTICLE VII

Except as may be agreed by the Parties and included in Annex A, the cost of preclearance shall be allocated
in accordance with the following principles:
(a) Neither the Party in whose territory inspection is conducted nor the airport authorities shall be responsible
for additional cost attributable to preclearance facilities and either or both as appropriate shall be
compensated for space used for preclearance;
(b) The inspecting Party shall be responsible for the normal cost of its inspection personnel;
(c) Any charges upon air carriers related to preclearance shall be based on participation at a particular airport
location and shall be assessed in an equitable and non-discriminatory manner.
ARTICLE VIII

The inspecting Party may extend the application of any of its customs, immigration, agriculture and public
health laws and regulations to aircraft, passengers, aircraft crew, baggage, cargo and aircraft stores in the
territory of the other Party which are subject to preclearance to the extent consistent with the law of the
country in which the inspection takes place.
ARTICLE IX

Either Party may at any time request in writing consultations concerning the interpretation, application and
modification of this Agreement and of its Annexes. Such consultations shall begin within 60 days from the
date on which such request is received by the other Party.
ARTICLE X

This Agreement together with its Annexes shall into force on the date of signature. Thereafter it shall continue

to be in force unless terminated by either Party giving one year's notice in writing to the other Party.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF the undersigned, duly authorized by their respective Governments, have signed the
present Agreement.
DONE in duplicate at Ottawa in the English and French languages, both versions being equally authentic, this
8th day of May, 1974.
William J. Porter (ss)
For the Government of the
United States of America

J. Marchand (ss)

For the Government of
Canada
***********************

ANNEX A

PRECLEARANCE LOCATIONS

1. In the United States

Boston

Los Angeles

Chicago

Miami

Cleveland

Newark

Dallas/Ft. Worth

New York

Denver

San Francisco

Honolulu

Tampa

Houston

2. In Canada

Calgary

Quebec

Edmonton

Toronto

Halifax

Vancouver

*
*

London

Montreal

Victoria

*

Winnipeg

*

Ottawa

3. Those points at which preclearance exists are indicated by an asterisk. Facilities meeting the standards
of Annex D will be placed into operation at Montreal no later than the opening of Mirabel Airport for
international traffic. Except as waived by the inspection agencies concerned, facilities meeting standards of
Annex C will be introduced at all other eXisting points in accordance with schedules to be agreed upon by the
Parties.
4. In accordance with Article lI(b) at such time as traffic justifies it and acceptable facilities are available,
preclearance will be introduced at other points at the request of either Party. Such agreement shall contain
specific provision for cost of construction of facilities. The inspecting Party will make available necessary
personnel within 18 months.

ANNEX B

CANADIAN INSPECTION AGENCIES GUIDELINES FOR A
PRECLEARANCE FACILITY

Preclearance facilities shall meet the following standards:
1. Reasonable passenger sterility from inspection control points to aircraft;
2. Reasonable baggage sterility from inspection control point to turn over to airlines with prerogative to spot
check baggage in the sterile area;
3. Office space for officers in charge of inspection agencies which conform to the inspecting Government's
standards;
4. Common room with locker facilities for inspection agency staff which conform to the inspecting
Government's standards;
5. Search room facilities to provide inspection agencies with an area in which a more detailed examination
can be carried out;
6. Sufficient examination space to ensure privacy to the traveller at check in positions, and to provide
adequate service to the travelling pUblic;
7. Locked drawers provided in working area to store documents, stamps, etc, as well as cash collections; if
sufficient volume of collections, space for a centrally located cashier;
8, Adequate wash room and communications facilities;

9. Parking facilities for staff.

ANNEX C

UNITED STATES INSPECTION AGENCIES GUIDELINES
FOR A PRECLEARANCE FACILITY

INTRODUCTION
When planning a preclearance facility, sufficient space must be provided to allow the Federallnspectional
Agencies (FIA) to conduct their examinations effectively, and ensure the sterility of the precleared passenger
to be preserved from the point of examination until boarding the aircraft. Airport planners are urged to work
closely with the FIA during all stages of planning and development to ensure maximum utilization of all areas
of the facility.
Below are general descriptions of the FIA space and equipment requirements for a preclearance
operation.
(1) INSPECTION AREA
The inspection area must have sufficient space for the number of inspection counters required to process
passengers in an orderly and expeditious manner. In determining this space, the following dimensions should
be kept in mine:
Immigration inspection booths are usually 25 feet square with a 3 foot outside aisle. Customs baggage
inspection counters are approximately 25 feet long and 2 feet 8 inches wide. Counters are paired, and form a
rectangle with the inspector's work station (Which houses the CRT equipment) at one end and the
communications printer at the other. There should be 5 foot aisles on both sides of the counters.
Specifications and technical drawings for the inspector work station and the baggage inspection counters are
available from the inspectional agencies upon request.
To minimize confusion and congestion in the inspection area, it is recommended that a 40 foot queue
space be provided for the Immigration inspection booths and that a 30 foot queue be provided between
Immigration inspection booths and Customs baggage counters. (A schematic drawing is attached.)

Under normal conditions, the Immigration Service can process approximately 50 passengers per hour per
booth and Customs can process approximately 100- 120 passengers per hour through each set of inspection
counters.
(2) STERILE AREA
A sterile area large enough to accommodate the anticipated per-hour passenger load must be provided
contiguous to the FIA passenger processing area. A minimum of 10 square feet per passenger is
recommended.
Public toilet facilities should be provided in the sterile hold room area and must be constructed to maintain
the sterility by precluding contact with noncleared passengers and the general public.
(3) BAGGAGE
A very important part of the preclearance operations is the baggage handling following the inspection.
Provisions must be made for passengers' "hold baggage" to proceed under sterile conditions from the
baggage inspection area directly to a sterile baggage make-up area. A sterile hold area of sufficient size to
accommodate the preexamined baggage must also be provided. With adequate planning, most problems with
the baggage handling requirements can be overcome.
(4) INSPECTOR WORK STATIONS
Two inspector work stations must be provided for each set of baggage inspection counters. The forward
work station must be constructed to house a CRT unit, and the rear work station must accommodate a small
ADP printer. The CRT unit and ADP printer are inspectional aids used to expedite the processing of
passengers. Specifications and detailed drawings for these stations are available from the United States
Customs Service upon request.
(5) SEARCH ROOMS
As a part of the inspection process, it is sometimes necessary to require passengers to submit to a more
thorough examination than is given the average traveller. Therefore, search rooms are required in or
immediately adjacent to the inspectional area. A minimum of two search rooms is necessary, and locations
with heavy passenger traffic may require additional search rooms. Search rooms should contain at least 80
square feet of space and should have a corner bench and a shelf, with coat hooks, permanently affixed to the
structure.
(6) CASHIER'S OFFICE

The need for a cashier's office at a particular preclearance facility will depend upon the number of dutiable
declarations filed at the location. When a cashier's office is required, it should have at least 80 square feet and
should be constructed of a material that will deter unlawful entry.
(7) OFFICE SPACE
The FIA will require adequate office space for supervisory and clerical support personnel as follows. The
officers-in-charge of the Customs, the Immigration and the Agriculture Services will each require offices of
350 square feet, which will also accommodate their clerical support staffs. In addition, the Customs floor
supervisory officer on duty requires an office of 120-150 feet located in the inspection area, where he will
provide direct supervision of the operation. At least three Immigration interview rooms, approximately 120
square feet each, located in the immediate vicinity of the inspection area are required and the Agriculture
Service will require a work office of approximately 150 square feet for laboratory and scientific study and
analysis.
(8) FEDERAL INSPECTIONAL AGENCY EMPLOYEE FACILITIES
Each preclearance facility must include, as a minimum, the following employee amenities:
a. separate toilet facilities for male and female inspeetional personnel. Each toilet facility should have an
adjacent locker room whose size and number of showers will depend on the number of inspectional personnel
assigned;
b. a combination employee lounge and lunch room large enough to accommodate the FIA personnel
assigned to duty at that location;
c. parking facilities for staff.
(9) GENERAL
Each preclearance facility should provide for passenger convenience such items as: (a) central climatic
control devices for heating and air conditioning; (b) adequate seating to accommodate the precleared
passenger; and (c)maintenance and janitorial services in the preclearance area to ensure public acceptance.
******

ANNEX D

SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS FOR DORVAL

In redeveloping the Montreal International Airport (DORVAL), when the international air carriers have been
relocated in MIRABEL, the following requirements will be included in a revised U.S. Federal Inspection
Agencies (FIA) area.
1. A one-stop FIA centralized processing area with preservation of the respective airline independent
checkin.
2. Provision of mechanized baggage transfer of tagged baggage from airline counters to the vicinity of the
FIA location; claim and transfer to the inspection position to be done by the passenger. Processed baggage
shall then be transferred secure from sorting and makeup.
3. Accommodation in the FIA centralized area will be to U.S. Government standards including: customs
inspection counters, queuing space, search rooms, supervisory offices, cashier accomodations, immigration
inspection booths, public toilets.
4. The accommodation shall be such as to permit the secure use of electronic aids with appropriate
provision for any necessary equipment rooms.
5. Processed passengers will be afforded the necessary convenience in accomodations so as to protect
the sterility requirements and preclude the need for secondary examination prior to boarding.
6. Associated facilities shall be provided including clerical support accommodation, lunch room, locker
rooms, vehicle parking, staff toilets and lounges.

Appendix 24-2
NOTE BY THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE, Pursuant to
Public Law 89-497 (Added INS - TM2)
Pursuant to Public Law 89-497, approved July 8, 1966 (80 Stat. 271; 1
U.S.C. 118) -the Treaties and Other International Acts Series issued under the
authority of the Secretary of State shall be competent evidence ..
. of the treaties, international agreements other than treaties, and
proclamations by the President of such treaties and international
agreements other than treaties, as the case may be, therein
contained, in all the courts of law and equity and of maritime
jurisdiction, and in all the tribunals and public offices of the United
States, and of the several States, without any further proof or
authentication thereof."

BERMUDA
Aviation: Preclearance for Entry into the United States
Agreement signed at Hamilton January 15, 1974;.
Entered into force January 15, 1974
AGREEMENT BETWEEN THE GOVERNMENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA AND THE
GOVERNMENT OF BERMUDA ON PRECLEARANCE

The Government of the United States of America and the Government of Bermuda;

Considering that preclearance, the procedure of conducting in Bermuda inspection by United States
inspection agencies required for entry into the United States of passengers destined nonstop to the United
States on flights of aircraft, facilitates travel between the two countries; and
Considering that the laws of the two countries in respect to merchandise or articles the entry of which is
prohibited are sufficiently similar to enable U.S. inspection agencies to carry out their missions, subject to
provision of facilities adequate to enable them to use their manpower efficiently and to insure proper security
safeguards for passengers, aircraft, crew, baggage and aircraft stores entering the United States;
Agree as follows:
Article I

The Government of Bermuda shall:
(a) Permit United States inspectors to carry out preclearance of passengers, aircraft, crew, baggage and
aircraft stores destined non-stop to the United States.
(b) Provide the following facilities as set forth in the Annex to this Agreement in accordance with the
indicated time schedule:
(i) by August 1, 1974 the interim facility; and
(ii) by February 28, 1977 the permanent facility.
(c) Permit the installation and operation of such communications and other modern inspection aids as
required by the United States inspection agencies.
(d) Furnish appropriate law enforcement assistance to the United States inspectors, including, upon
request of a United States inspector, search by a Bermudan law enforcement officer in the presence of a
United States inspection officer of any person subject to preclearance in accordance with this Agreement to
determine if such person is seeking to carry into the United States:
(i) anything the possession of which is prohibited under the law of Bermuda; or
(ii) documents relevant to his immigration status which are fraudulent or misused.
Further, the Bermudan law enforcement officer, if so requested by a United States inspector, shall prevent
such person from boarding an aircraft destined for the United States. If it appears that there is at the airport an
accomplice who is assisting such a person, and that he may have in his possession something falling in the
categories described in (i) or (ii) above, such accomplice shall also be sUbject to search if such search is

requested by the United States inspector.
(e) Upon the request of a United States inspection agency:
(i) seize and confiscate articles or merchandise if such articles or merchandise are falsely declared or
not declared at the time of time preclearance and if the possession or exportation of such articles or
merchandise is prohibited under the laws of Bermuda; or
(ii) if possession or exportation of such articles or merchandise falsely declared or not declared is not
prohibited under the laws of Bermuda, submit to prosecution within its Constitutional authority the allege
offender for knowingly making a false declaration.
(f) In coordination and cooperation with the United States Government, seek to add to the articles
prohibited for possession or exportation as may be deemed necessary and, if required by the exigencies of
the then applicable situation, seek such other legal sanctions as may be deemed desirable.
(g) Grant to all United States citizen employees of the Government of the United States of America
assigned to duties in Bermuda in connection with the Agreement, and their families, the same privileges and
immunities as are accorded to administrative and technical personnel of a diplomatic mission or the families of
such personnel, respectively, under the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations of 1961, as given effect in
the Consular Relations Act, 1977, of the Government of Bermuda.
(h) Permit the United States inspection agencies to determine procedures for carrying out inspections and
utilization of their manpower.
Article II

The Government of the United States shall:
(a) Provide sufficient inspectors to carry out preclearance of all passengers, crew, baggage and aircraft
stores on flights of aircraft (scheduled or charter) in air transportation as defined in the United States Federal
Aviation Act of 1958, as amended, destined nonstop to the United States with reasonable speed and
efficiency and with care to avoid undue inconvenience to travelers from Bermuda to the United States.
(b) Conduct preclearance under this procedure unless the officers in charge of the United States federal
inspection agencies after consultation with the Bermudan authorities and the air carriers concerned determine
that adequate manpower is not available or that the accumulation of passengers will overtax the facilities. It is
anticipated that the facilities will accommodate up to 700 passengers per hour under normal circumstances. If,
after such consultation, it is necessary for United States inspection agencies to require post-clearance on

arrival in the United States instead of, or in addition to, preclearance in Bermuda, the United States inspection
agencies will select flights for such post- clearance on a reasonable and non-discriminatory basis.
Article III

It is understood that the United States may extend the application of any of its customs, immigration,
agriculture, and public health laws and regulations to aircraft, passengers, aircraft crew, baggage, cargo and
aircraft stores in Bermuda which are subject to preclearance, for the purpose of establishing and enforcing
penalties for violations of these laws and regulations upon arrival in the United States.
Article IV

Any person wishing to defer United States Customs inspection until his arrival in the United States may do
so either (a) by traveling on any post-cleared flight or (b) by sending his luggage as unaccompanied baggage
to any port of entry in the United States where there are full customs facilities, and submitting his person and
carried on items to preclearance procedures.
Article V

Either Government may at any time request consultations concerning the interpretation, application, or
amendment of this Agreement, including the Facilities Annex attached thereto. Such consultations shall begin
within 60 days from the date the other Government receives the request.
Article VI

This agreement shall enter into force upon signature. It shall remain in force for eight years and shall
continue in force thereafter until terminated as provided herein. Either party may, by giving one year's written
notice, terminate this Agreement at the end of the initial eight year period or at any time thereafter.
Done in duplicate at Hamilton, Bermuda this 15th day of January 1974.
DB McCue

F John Barritt

Donald B. McCue
F. J. Barritt
United States Consul General
Minister for Marine and Air Services
For the Government of the
For the Government of Bermuda

United States of America
E T Richards
Sir Edward T. Richards
Premier. Government of Bermuda

Facilities Annex to the Agreement Between the Government of the United States and the Government
of Bermuda on Preclearance

I. Interim facilities shall include the installation of "H" system inspection counters in accordance with U.S.
Customs standards and additional facilities as described in III below.
II. Permanent facilities shall include sterility of passengers and baggage from initial inspection through
boarding of aircraft with additional facilities as described in III below.
III. The following additional facilities will be provided:
(a) Provide for such passenger comforts as a central climatic control device that includes air
conditioning.
(b) Provide suitable seating accommodations in the sterile hold area that will be conducive to passenger
comforts.
(c) Provide for adequate janitorial services in the preclearance area, as well as perform any necessary
repairs or maintenance.
(d) Construct two search rooms that provide approximately 80 square feet per room.
(e) Construct a cashier's booth of sufficient size to accommodate two teller/cashiers, if requested.
(f) Provide hooded baggage conveyor systems that will insure adequate security as directed by the
United States Secretary of the Treasury for the transport of the precleared baggage to a segregated baggage
make-up area.
(g) Provide baggage make-up areas that will be secured by mutually acceptable fences. The gates used
to secure these enclosures shall be equipped with adequate locking mechanisms.

(h) Provide office space to house adequately the Customs Officer-in-Charge, a Supervisor of Customs,
a Supervisor of Immigration and Agriculture Officer as well as interview rooms and clerical support staff; and
toilet facilities in the sterile area, which shall be constructed in such a manner as to preclude contact with nonprecleared passengers and the general public.
(i) Provide that precleared air passengers are not allowed to commingle with other arriving or departing
passengers.
DBM

FJB

Appendix 26-1
Memorandum of Understanding (On Advance
Passenger Information Entry Facilitation Trials)
(Added INS - TM2)
MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING

(On Advance Passenger Information Entry
Facilitation Trials)
BETWEEN

THE COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA
acting through the Department of Immigration,
Local Government and Ethnic Affairs (DILGEA)
AND

THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA IMMIGRATION
AND NATURALIZATION SERVICE (INS)
A.

OBJECTIVES OF THIS MEMORANDUM
1,1

B.

The objective of Advance Passenger Information (API) is to reduce on-arrival formalities for
passengers by collecting immigration clearance data at the point of departure, rather
than the point of entry. Upon arrival, API flights will face reduced clearance times, all the
necessary checking against law enforcement indices having already been completed.

THE UNDERSTANDING

1.2

DLIGEA and INS agree to conduct joint trials of API in two phases. Phase 1 will test systems to
facilitate the entry processing of passengers on selected United States-bound flights.
Phase 2 will test systems to facilitate the entry of passengers on direct Los AngelesSydney flights, operated by Qantas Airways.

1.3

DILGEA will be responsible for liaising with all Australian agencies with an interest in the trials (for
example, the Australian Customs SeNice and Federal Airports Corporation): likewise,
INS will be responsible for liaising with appropriate United States agencies.

PHASE 1 - UNITED STATES-BOUND FLIGHTS

2.1

At Australian ports of departure, as passengers pass through immigration control, their personal
particulars (name, date of birth, citizenship and travel document number) will be
collected and recorded on DILGEA databases. Stickers will be placed on passengers'
travel documents to help U.S. authorities identify them as API passengers.

2.2

Data on cleared flights will be extracted from the DILGEA TRIPS system - after the flights have
closed - and transmitted to the United States to be recorded on the Interagency Border
Inspection System (IBIS). Under normal circumstances, transmission will take place
within one hour of the flight's departure. To the extent that this data relates to United
States citizens and lawful permanent residents, INS will ensure that it is maintained in
compliance with the Privacy Act, 5 United States Code 552(a). The system of records of
which the data will be part is an inter-agency system maintained by the United States
Customs SeNice.

2.3

The data transmitted from Australia will be used by INS and other U.S. inspection agencies to
complete appropriate data analysis before designated flights arrive. INS will facilitate
inspection of API flights by processing passengers through INS "Blue Lane"
arrangements.

PHASE 2 - AUSTRALIA-BOUND FLIGHTS

3.1

Passengers will present their passports and visas for processing by Australian Consulate-General
staff at one of three points - the Qantas First Class Lounge, Business Class Lounge, or
the departure gate. Their travel documents will be read by a passporUvisa reader and
the data checked against Australian warning lists.

3.2

Passengers cleared for entry will have their passports stamped in accordance with the pre-clearance

provisions of the Migration Act of 1958 as amended (the Act) and then board the flight.
3.3

The data on such passengers will then be transmitted to DILGEA databases in Canberra, within an
hour of the flight's departure. The flight may be declared a pre-cleared flight for the
purposes of Sections 17 and 19 of the Act.

3.4

The data received from the United States will be checked, again, against warning lists and the visa
file by DILGEA and made available to other agencies to facilitate Customs, health,
quarantine and security clearance.

3.5

No immigration processing will be necessary when the cleared flight arrives in Australia, and
passengers will be free to proceed directly to baggage claim for streamlined Customs,
health, quarantine and security processing.

TERMS OF IMPLEMENTATION

4.1

Formal transmission of Advance Passenger Information under Phase 1 will commence from
signature of this Memorandum and following Ministerial approval and publication of
arrangements in the Commonwealth Gazette as required by Migration Regulation 148A.
Phase 2 will commence in a subsequent stage on a subsequent date agreed upon
between DILGEA and INS.

PERIOD OF THE UNDERSTANDING

5.1

The understanding contained in this document will be operative in respect of both Phase 1 and
Phase 2 for a period agreed upon between the participants.

EVALUATION OF TRIALS AND FUTURE ARRANGEMENTS

6.1

At the conclusion of both phases of the trials,
jointly, the effectiveness of API.
effectiveness of entry facilitation,
involvement of other agencies, and

DILGEA and INS will evaluate, independently and
The evaluation process will have regard to the
administrative performance, systems performance,
resource implications.

6.2

If, following the evaluation process, both participants agree that API should continue, the terms of an
ongoing arrangement will be negotiated between them. Consideration will be given to
the feasibility of INS officers acting as DILGEA's agents for southbound clearance and
to DILGEA officers acting as INS' agents for northbound clearance.

USE
USE AND
AND SAFEGUARD
SAFEGUARD OF
OF INFORMATION
INFORMATION

7.1
7.1

Advance
Advance passenger
passenger information
information transmitted
transmitted by DILGEA to IBIS is for entry facilitation purposes only
and
will
not
be
used
under the
the
and will not be used for other purposes.
purposes. The information provided is collected under
authority
of
authority of the
the Act and
and Migration
Migration Regulations and with regard to the requirements of
Australian
to take
take
Australian laws
laws applying
applying to the privacy of personal information. INS undertakes to
all
and
all reasonable
reasonable action
action to prevent unauthorized access to, or use of, the information, and
to
restrictions.
to comply
comply with
with all
all reasonable
reasonable privacy requirements and restrictions.

DISCLAIMER
DISCLAIMER

8.1
8.1

Notwithstanding
the rights
rights to
to
Notwithstanding the
the terms
terms of this
this Memorandum,
Memorandum, both
both DILGEA and the INS reserve the
subject
appear
subject any
any person
person traveling on
on an API flight to on-arrival processing, should itit appear
desirable
the same
same
desirable to
to the
the respective
respective participant in
in the country of the flight's arrival. In the
way,
entry visa
visa of,
of,
way, both
both participants
participants also
also reserve
reserve the right to deny entry to, or cancel the entry
any
any person
person traveling
traveling on
on an
an API
API flight.
flight.

CONTACT OFFICERS
OFFICERS
CONTACT

C.
C.

9.1
9.1

DILGEA nominates
nominates (b) (6)
, Director,
Director, Entry Systems and
Tourism Support Section as
an~tion
DILGEA
as its
its
contact officer for the
the API
API trials.
trials. INS
INS nominates (b) (6)
,, Assistant
contact
Assistant
Commissioner, Office
Office of Inspections,
Inspections, as its contact officer.
Commissioner,

9.2
9.2

either participant
participant is
is concerned
concerned that the aims and objectives of the Memorandum have not
IfIf either
not been
been
complied with
with to
to its
its reasonable
reasonable satisfaction, it will notify the other participant
complied
participant in
in writing.
writing.
Resolution of any disagreement will be through normal liaison channels and
Resolution
and
procedures.
procedures.

OTHER TERMS
TERMS OF
OF THE
THE MEMORANDUM
MEMORANDUM
OTHER

40,l
10.1

This Memorandum
Memorandum may
may be
be varied
varied by
by way of a further Memorandum of Understanding in
This
in writing
writing
which is
is signed
signed by
by both
both participants.
which

10.2
10.2

The operation
operation of
of this
this Memorandum
Memorandum will be
be reviewed by representatives
representatives of the participants
participants when
when one
one
The
of the
the participants
participants so
so requests the other in
in writing.
of

10.3

This Memorandum may be terminated by either participant at any time during the term of this
document by notice in writing.

10.4

Notwithstanding anything expressed or implied to the contrary in this Memorandum, it is the shared
intention of the participants that any agreements or understandings contained in this
document will not be enforceable at law or in equity.

10.5

Any attachment annexed by a participant to this document with the consent of the other participant
will form part of this Memorandum.

SIGNED on behalf of the

SIGNED on behalf of the

COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

acting through the Department

Immigration and

of Immigration, Local Government

Naturalization Service by:

and Ethnic Affairs by:

Mark Sullivan

Michael T. Lempres

First Assistant Secretary

Executive Commissioner

Temporary Entry, Compliance

U.S. Immigration and

& Systems

Naturalization Service

Department of Immigration,
Local Government and Ethnic
Affairs

June 12, 1991

June 12,1991

Appendix 26-2
Advance Passenger Information System,
Memorandum of Understanding (Added INS - TM2)
ADVANCE PASSENGER INFORMATION SYSTEM
Memorandum of Understanding
This Advance Passenger Information System (APIS) Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) is made
voluntarily between (hereafter referred to as "the Provider") and the United States Government Border
Inspection Agencies, consisting of the United States Customs Service (USCS), the United States Immigration
and Naturalization Service (INS), and the United States Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS)
(hereafter referred to collectively as "the Government").
It is understood and agreed by the partjes that this MOU is not intended to be legally enforceable by either
party. No claims, liabilities, or rights shall arise from or with respect to this MOU except as provided for by
Federal statute or the Code of Federal Regulations. All terms of this MOU are subject to applicable local
laws.
Both the Provider and the Government agree to work toward the mutual goal of enhancing the APIS program.
The Provider will accomplish this through the provision of accurate, timely, and complete data. The Provider
and Government are committed to work in a cooperative and coordinated spirit, with the ultimate goal being
that, while maintaining effective enforcement, statutory and regulatory operations, in the normal course of
actions, for all APIS flights complying with the provisions of this MOU, all passengers requiring only primary
inspection will be processed and cleared through the Government inspection facility exit within 30 minutes of
entry of the first passenger into the FIS arrivals area. The Government and Provider further agree that in order
to meet processing goal times, appropriate staffing levels must be maintained at the airport of arrival.
This MOU will be effective upon signature of an appropriate representative of the Provider and one
Government representative, on behalf of all three inspection agencies. This MOU will remain in effect for a
period of three (3) years unless terminated or extended by mutual agreement of the Provider and the

Government.
********************************

FOR THE PROVIDER:

(Signature)

FOR THE GOVERNMENT:

(Signature)

Michael D. Cronin
(Printed Name)
Assistant Commissioner,
Inspections
(Title)
U.S. Immigration and
Naturalization Service
(Company)

(Date)

(Date)

ADVANCE PASSENGER INFORMATION SYSTEM
Memorandum of Understanding
1.

PROVIDER DATA RESPONSIBILITIES:

1.1

As of April 1, 1998, the Provider agrees to provide the following data elements for APIS flights: Airline
lATA code, flight number, passenger last name(s), passenger first name(s), passenger date-of-birth,
departure location lATA code, U.S. arrivallocation(s} lATA code(s}, and date of flight arrival. (This will
be known as Level 1.)

1.2

Not later than January 1, 1999, the Provider agrees to provide the following data elements for APIS
flights: All data from Level 1, passenger travel document nationality (or passenger nationality when the
passenger is exempt from documentary requirements for travel). and passenger travel document

number (except when passenger is exempt from documentary requirements for travel). (This will be known as
Level 2.)
1.3

Not later than October 1 J 1999, the Provider agrees to provide the following data elements for APIS
flights: All data from Level 2 and passenger gender. (This will be known as Level 3.)

1.4

As of April 1, 1998, the Provider agrees to collect and transmit Level 1 data with a minimum sufficiency
rate of 60%, per APIS flight.

1.5

Not later than January 1 J 1999, the Provider agrees to collect and transmit Level 2 data with a
minimum sufficiency rate of 75%, per APIS flight.

1.6

Not later than October 1 J 1999, the Provider agrees to collect and transmit Level 3 data with a
minimum sufficiency rate of 80%, per APIS flight.

1.7

Not later than April 1, 2000, the Provider agrees to collect and transmit Level 3 data with a minimum
sufficiency rate of 90%, per APIS flight.

2.

PROVIDER OPERATIONAL RESPONSIBILITIES:

2.1

In the Provider's judgment, where it is operationally feasible, the Provider agrees to utilize a machine
reader as the input device for APIS data, when a valid machine readable travel document (MRTD),
conforming to ICAO and ISO standards, is presented by the passenger.

2.2

When more than one valid MRTD is presented, the Provider agrees to scan only one document, using
the following order of preference: a U.S. Alien Registration Card, a U.S. Border Crossing Card, a U.S.
non-immigrant visa, a U.S. Refugee Travel Document or Re-Entry Permit, a U.S. Passport, a non-U.S.
passport.

2.3

The Provider agrees to compare the information collected with the travel document itself, to insure that
the correct information was collected, that the document appears to be valid for travel to the U.S., and
that the passenger is the person to whom it was issued.

2.4

The Provider agrees to work with the Government and the airport authority at the airport of arrival to
erect appropriate signage, make appropriate announcements and verify that sufficient and appropriate
personnel are available to segregate passengers into the correct primary inspection lanes, monitor
those lanes and otherwise assist in the primary inspection process, to include the provision of
appropriate interpreters.

2.5

Not later than April 1,2000, the Provider agrees to transmit APIS data for all non- precleared U.S.
bound flights.

2.6

Not later than April 1, 2001, the provider agrees to provide APIS data on all crew members, and to
designate them as "crewmember" during the data transmission.

3.

GOVERNMENT RESPONSIBILITIES:

3.1

The Government agrees to process only passengers on Blue Lane eligible APIS flights through
appropriate Blue Lanes at the primary inspection area. All APIS flights meeting the requirements of
paragraphs 1.1 - 1.7 and 2.1 - 2.6 on the required dates will be designated as Blue Lane eligible
flights.

3.2

As of April 1, 1998, the Government agrees to eliminate the requirement that APIS passengers be in
possession of Blue Lane stickers on their travel documents.

3.3

The Government agrees, as a goal, in the normal course of actions, while maintaining effective
enforcement and regulatory operations, to complete ALL clearance of properly manifested
passengers* requiring not more than a primary inspection, within the following processing times:
Beginning Not Later Than:

Processing Goal Times Will Be:

January 1, 1999

40 Minutes

October 1, 1999

35 Minutes

April 1, 2000

30 Minutes

*Provided that the passengers arrive on a flight that is designated as Blue Lane eligible.
The normal course of actions means that API has been collected at the last foreign port of embarkation,
transmitted, processed and posted to the airport of arrival in advance of the flight; that all passengers
deplane and proceed to the inspection area in a continuous fashion; and that checked baggage is
delivered in a timely manner to the facility.
Processing cycle time will begin with first passenger entry into the FIS arrivals area and will end
with last passenger, requiring only primary inspection, through the facility exit.
The Government agrees that in order to meet processing goal times, appropriate staffing levels must be
maintained at the airports of arrival.

304

The Government will develop operational plans to improve primary lane segregation and queuing in

order to further the facilitation of Blue Lane eligible flights.
3.5

The Government will further develop systems for electronic, automated primary inspection (INSPASS),
incorporating APIS data, MRTD's, and biometrics, for use by pre-enrolled passengers.

3.6

The Government will develop operational plans to further improve the primary inspection process
through the consolidation or elimination of certain tasks that do not diminish the integrity of the
inspections process.

3.7

The Government agrees to work with the local airport authority to provide preferential baggage carousel
assignments to APIS Blue Lane eligible flights, whenever operationally feasible. Preferential carousels
are determined by the Provider's local representative.

3.8

The Government agrees that greater resources for flight clearance will be provided to APIS Blue Lane
eligible flights over non-APIS Blue Lane eligible flights, but will continue to insure that all passengers
arriving on non-APIS Blue Lane eligible flights are processed within Congressionally mandated times.

3.9

The Government agrees to work toward increasing the use of APIS data to begin the inspection and
clearance process in-advance of the arrival of the flight, through a system of advance name checks,
targeting analysis, and risk assessment.

3.10

The Government agrees to provide necessary MRTD readers on a no-fee loan basis, that allows for
efficient APIS data collection. The Government will use the current procurement regulations to select a
vendor(s) that will provide a high quality reader, with the capability for technology upgrades. The
Government will explore funding and procurement mechanisms in an effort to proVide additional
equipment to the Provider, on a no-fee loan basis, that will further assist with the use of the MRTD
readers on airline and common use check-in systems, as well as with APIS data collection.

3.11

The Government will develop and test processes, based upon the provision of accurate and complete
APIS data, that permit the direct transfer of checked baggage that is in-transit through the United
States on a low-risk Blue Lane eligible flight to a non-U.S. port. If testing is successful, implementation
of "in- transit baggage bypass" will take place.

3.12

The Government will develop and test systems, based upon the provision of accurate and complete
APIS data, to make certain paper forms available via electronic means. If testing is successful,
implementation of "electronic forms" will take place.

3,13

The Government will develop and test, based upon the provision of accurate and complete APIS data,
an electronic, "self-declaration" secondary, that will allow low-risk APIS passengers to complete
routine baggage related clearance requirements using an automated system. If testing is successful,

implementation
implementation of "self-declaration" secondary will take place.
3.14
3.14

4.
4.

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

The Government will develop and test specialized technology, such as
ystems to
screen baggage, that will fulfill its enforcement requirements and provide expeditious and non-intrusive
inspections.

DATA ACCURACY:

4.1
4.1

A deficiency will be defined as: Any passenger data element that prevents the system from performing
a valid query or causes an inspector to modify any data element that does not match the data
recorded on the passenger's travel document (if required), or any passenger for whom no API record
has been transmitted, or any API record(s), other than duplicate records, transmitted in excess of the
total number of travelers disembarking at the U.S. destination POE.

4.2
4.2

The deficiency rate is: The total number of deficiencies, divided by the total number of passengers,
times one hundred (100), expressed as a percentage.
DEFICIENCIES + TOTAL PASSENGERS x 100

4.3
4.3

=DEFICIENCY RATE (%)

The sufficiency rate is: 100% minus the deficiency rate
100% - DEFICIENCY RATE

=SUFFICIENCY RATE

4.4
4.4

A deficiency will be charged only once per record.

4.5
4.5

Deficiencies will not be assigned to records that can be automatically corrected (modified) by the APIS
mainframe software prior to performing a name check.

4.6

Deficiencies will not be assigned to duplicate records, provided that a valid query can be conducted with
one record.

4.7
4.7

Sufficiency rates will be calculated on a flight-by-flight basis, using a weekly average (7 days data).

4.8
4.8

The Government will make available to the Provider, upon request, a comprehensive carrier
performance report showing, for each APIS flight, the percentage of passengers with APIS data and
the data accuracy level. This performance report for all APIS flights arriving at U.S. gateways will be
available to the Provider at any local airport on a daily (not sooner than two (2) hours after block time),
weekly, or monthly basis. The Government will work toward improving reporting mechanisms through
the exploration of an on-line data sufficiency report accessible by air carrier representatives.

5.

ADMINISTRATION:

5.1

The Provider will designate a national APIS coordinator, in writing, within thirty (30) days of signing this
MOU. As a minimum, the name, title, address, telephone number, facsimile number, and SITA address
will be provided.

5.2

The INS Assistant Commissioner, Inspections, is the official Government administrator of this MOU.
However, the Government (by agency) will designate national APIS coordinators for day-to-day
administration of the MOU, as well as field APIS coordinators responsible for resolution of local day-today compliance.

5.3

The Government port directors will jointly administer the provisions of this MOU at the local level using
eXisting joint management mechanisms such as port quality improvement committees.

5.4

The Provider will designate a local APIS coordinator for each airport served, in writing, within thirty (30)
days of signing this MOU. Notice will be given to the local agency port directors, and will contain the
name, title, telephone number, and facsimile number of the coordinator.

5.5

The Government will designate local APIS coordinators for each agency. Where no designation is
specified, the local port director will be the coordinator.

5.6

The Provider will give 30 days advance notice, where possible, for the addition or deletion of a flight in
the APIS program. Such notification will be made through the local APIS coordinators to the local INS
port director who will then coordinate the request.

6.

PERFORMANCE:

6.1

For flights that fail to meet the performance levels stated in paragraphs 1.1 - 1.7 and 2.1 - 2.6, Providers
will be given written notice by the INS port director, which will include examples (data accuracy
reports) of deficient performance.

602

The Government will work with Providers, when necessary, to correct deficiencies.

6.3

Sixty (60) days after the written notice, any flight that has not improved to the minimum current
performance levels in paragraphs 1.1 - 1.7 and 2.1 - 2.6, will be removed from Blue Lane eligible
status.

6.4 Reinstatement of non-performing flights can be accomplished after the Provider gives written notice to
the local INS port director. The written notice will outline the problem and measures taken to correct the
problem. Reinstatement is contingent upon the flight meeting minimum current performance levels in
paragraphs 1.1 - 1.7 and 2.1 - 2.6.

The Provider or Government can terminate the MOU with sixty (60) days written notice to/from the
Assistant Commissioner, Inspections, INS Headquarters.

Appendix 26-3
Notice of Deficient Advance Passenger
Information and Notice of Revocation of Blue Lane
Eligibility (Added INS - TM2)

U.S. Department of Justice
Immigration and Naturalization Service

(Date)

To: (Carrier AP/S Coordinator)
From: Port Director
(POE)

Re:

NOTICE OF DEFICIENT ADVANCE PASSENGER INFORMATION

For the seven day reporting period ending (date), the following flight(s) failed to meet the minimum APIS
sUfficiency rate required for Blue Lane processing:
(Flights)

A copy of the APIS carrier performance report for these flights is attached.

Please be advised that any of these flights which do not improve to the minimum current APIS sufficiency rate
within the next 60 days will be removed from Blue Lane eligible status and will NOT be processed through
Blue Lanes at this port-of-entry.
Sincerely,

(Name)

U.S. Department of Justice
Immigration and Naturalization Service

(Date)

To: (Carrier AP/S Coordinator)
From: Port Director
(POE)
Re:

NOTICE OF REVOCATION OF BLUE LANE ELIGIBILITY

As you are aware, the following flight(s) have been in a Blue Lane probationary status for the past eight
weeks. In addition, these flights have also failed to meet the minimum APIS sufficiency rate required for Blue
Lane processing for at least the last four consecutive weeks of this period:
(Flights)

A copy of the APIS carrier performance report for these flights is attached.
Effective immediately, these flights have been removed from Blue Lane eligible status and WILL NOT be
processed through APIS Blue Lanes at this port-of-entry. These flights will continue to be denied Blue Lane
processing benefits until such time that you request, in writing, that the flights be reinstated.

Any written requests for reinstatement of a flight must be directed to this office and must explain the
problems that caused the poor performance. The request must also outline the measures taken to correct
those problems.
Upon receipt of your written request, we will review the current flight performance reports and, if the flight is
meeting current minimum standards, reinstate the flight at that time.
Sincerely,

(Name)

Appendix 31-1

lookout Work Sheet (Added INS - TM2)

Legal name (LAST, First, Middle):
Alias:

_

-----------------------

Date of birth (mmddyy): _ / _ / _
A-file number: A- - FBI/State/ other record number: - - - - - - - Country of citizenship:

_

Passport number/passport issuing country:

_

Armed and dangerous? Y / N
Case codes/flag:
Sex/race: - - - - - - - -

_

Description: (Hair color/ eye color/ height! weight): _ _/_ _,/_----.:/_ _
Scars/ marks/ tatoos:

_

(continued on next page)

Requester's name:

Requesting agency:
Requester's (area code) and phone number: (_ _)

_

_
_

INS POE office code: - - - Comments: (Briefly explain, in plain language the place, date of event, source of information, documentary
evidence, brief summary of grounds of inadmissibility, INS action taken, and action to be taken if subject is
intercepted in the future.)
_

Appendix 31-2

SAMPLE LETTERS (Added INS - TM2)

SAMPLE LETTER 1

EXM 70/20.9
Name
Address
Dear Mr./Ms. - - - - This is in reference to your letter of DATE OF LETTER in which you request that the Immigration and
Naturalization Service (INS) review the inclusion of Mr./Ms.
in the lookout system.
The lookout database is considered a law enforcement system of records of which the INS is not the sole
proprietor. The records to which INS officers have access during the inspection process may include entries
made by law enforcement and government agencies other than the INS. As a practice, the INS neither
confirms nor denies an individual's presence in these records, as so doing could interfere with or allow
circumvention of enforcement activities. The INS will acknowledge, however, if a file exists that contains
evidence that a person is prima facie excludable from the United States.
Each applicant for admission is subject to a complete inspection upon each arrival in the United States,
notwithstanding his/her presence or absence in any lookout system maintained by the INS or any other
agency. No one is permitted to enter the United States until the examining immigration officer is satisfied that
the individual is either a citizen of the United States or an alien who is admissible to the United States. The
applicant bears the burden of proof of establishing admissibility.
The information that you have provided has been taken under consideration. Any changes to the database
deemed necessary by and within the control of the INS have been made. Since the lookout system is

generated from a multi-agency database, the INS may take the liberty of forwarding your inquiry to another
agency for further review, if appropriate. Thank you for bringing this matter to our attention.
Sincerely,
District Director
CC: A

(FCO-_)

SAMPLE LETTER 2
EXM 70/20.9
Mr.lMs.
Address
Dear Mr.lMs.:
This is in reference to your letter of DATE OF LETTER in which you request that the Immigration and
Naturalization Service (INS) review the inclusion of Mr.lMs.
in the lookout system.
The lookout database is considered a law enforcement system of records of which the INS is not the sole
proprietor. The records to which INS officers have access during the inspection process may include entries
made by law enforcement and government agencies other than the INS. As a practice, the INS neither
confirms nor denies an individual's presence in these records, as so doing could interfere with or allow
circumvention of enforcement activities. The INS will acknowledge, however, if a file exists that contains
evidence that a person is prima facie inadmissible from the United States.
In the present case, our records indicate that Mr.lMs.
is amenable to removal under Section 212(a)
_ _ _ _ of the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) in that STATE BASIS FOR INADMISSIBILITY.
Mr.lMs.
may apply for a waiver of these inadmissibility grounds at the American Consulate in
XXXXX, pursuant to INA Section 212(d)(3). Alternatively, Mr.lMs.
may contest the basis for
inadmissibility before an Immigration Judge by requesting a hearing at the time of application for admission to
the United States. At that time he/she will be placed in removal proceedings.
Thank you for bringing this matter to our attention.

Sincerely,
District Director
CC: A

(FCO - _ _)

SAMPLE LETTER 3
EXM 70/20.9
Mr.lMs.
Address
Dear Mr.lMs.

_

This is in reply to your letter of DATE OF LETTER, regarding your request to remove your client's name from
the lookout system of the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS).
The lookout system which we maintain is considered a law enforcement system of records. As a practice, we
neither confirm nor deny any individual's presence on the list as so doing could interfere with, or circumvent
enforcement procedures. However, Section 601 (c) of the Immigration Act of 1990 (Public Law 101-649)
allows us to disclose the pertinent content of a record that indicates that grounds already exist to support
removal proceedings against your client. Found was a historical record of this removal from the United States
for attempted entry by fraud or misrepresentation. Based on the documentation you provided, that Mr.
_____was granted a waiver of this ground for inadmissibility, the record has been removed.
Every applicant-for-admission is subject to a complete inspection on each arrival in the United States,
notwithstanding his/her presence or absence on any watch list maintained by the INS or any other agency. No
one may enter the United States until he/she has satisfied the examining Immigration Officer that he/she is
either a citizen of the United States or an alien who has overcome all grounds for inadmissibility. The
applicant bears the burden of proof of establishing admissibility.
Rest assured that we have carefully considered the information that you have provided and we have made
any changes to our database deemed necessary. Thank you for bringing this matter to our attention.

Sincerely,
District Director
CC: DOS, ATTN: AMCONGEN, Location of Consular Post. FYI.
CC: A
(FCO-_)

SAMPLE LETTER 4

EXM 70/20.9
Mr.lMs.
Address
Dear Mr.lMs. - - This is in reference to your letter of DATE OF LETTER, concerning your request to remove your name from
the lookout system of the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS).
The lookout system that we maintain is considered a law enforcement system of records. As a practice, we
neither confirm nor deny any individual's presence on the list as so doing could interfere with or allow
circumvention of enforcement procedures. However, Section 601 (c) of the Immigration Act of 1990 (Public
Law 101-649) allows us to disclose the pertinent content of a record that grounds already exist to support
removal proceedings. [ACKNOWLEDGE ANY GROUNDS HERE]
Each applicant for admission is subject to a complete inspection on each arrival in the United States,
notwithstanding his/her presence or absence on any watchlist maintained by the Immigration Service or any
other agency. No one is allowed to enter the United States until they have satisfied the examining immigration
officer that he/she is either a citizen of the United States or an alien who has overcome all grounds for
inadmissibility. The applicant bears the burden of proof of admissibility.
Rest assured that the information that you have provided has been taken under consideration and any
changes to the database deemed necessary were made.
Thank you for bringing this matter to our attention.

Sincerely,
District Director
(FCO-_ _

CC: A

SAMPLE LETTER 5
EXM 70/20.9
M.
Address

, Esquire

Dear Mr. - - This is in reply to your letter of DATE OF LETTER, regarding your client, MR./MS. NAME OF PERSON. Your
letter requests an inquiry into MR./MS. NAME's difficulties during inspection procedures upon arrival to the
United States.
Each applicant for admission is subject to a complete inspection on each arrival in the United States,
notwithstanding his/her presence or absence on any watchlist maintained by the Immigration and
Naturalization Service or any other agency.
Rest assured that the information that you have provided has been taken under consideration and any
changes to the database deemed necessary have been made.
We have taken the liberty of forwarding your letter to the State Department for whatever action it may deem
appropriate.
Thank you for bringing the matter to our attention.
Sincerely,

District Director
Director
District

cc: D
DOJ/OS~,
is the
the subject
subject of
of aa State
State Department
Department CLASS
CLASS lookout
lookout as
as "Possibly
"Possibly
CC:
OJ/OS_,is
(b)(2),
(b)(7)(E)
Inadmissible~ve
have
no
record,
Please
advise
us
and
DOS.
Inadmissible~.e have no record, Please advise us and DOS.
(b) (6)
CC: DOS
DOS CAlVO,
CAlVO, ATT~Mr,
ATT~Mr,
CC:
P
).
Plea~r.
__'
P
). Plea~r. __'

is the
the subject
subject of
of aa CLASS
CLASS record
record (IBIS
(IBIS Record
Record
is

Appendix 31-3
Text of letter from Department of State to
Persons listed in their lookout System
TEXT OF LETTER FROM DEPARTMENT OF STATE TO PERSONS LISTED IN THEIR LOOKOUT
SYSTEM
United States Department of State
Washington, D.C. 20520

[SEAL]

9/27/00

Dear Sir/Madam:
Regarding: Consular Lookout and Support System, information and instructions

The Department of State maintains a computerized lookout system, the Consular Lookout and Support System (CLASS). As part of
our efforts to assist in the administration of U.S. law, selected portions of the databases are shared with other government agencies
for the use of port of entry inspection personnel. Every effort is made to ensure that the information in this database is accurate.
However, some individual entries are no longer applicable. Please review below the steps you may take to remove such entries that
relate to you.
If you are now either a United States citizen or a lawful permanent resident alien (LPR) and you believe your name is included in
the visa lookout database because you were once refused a visa or were potentially ineligible to receive a visa, please proceed as
follows:
Submit proof of your citizenship or legal permanent residency to the Chief, Systems Liaison and Procedures Division,
Visa Office, U.S. Department of State, Washington, D.C. 20522-0113. If available, please provide a copy of one of the
following documents as proof of citizenship or LPR status: U.S. passport, Certificate of Naturalization, Alien Registration
Card (Form 1-551), and Re-Entry Permits (Form 1-132). Other forms of proof may be acceptable if they clearly establish
that you are a U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident alien.
Include with your submission a brief note providing a daytime telephone number for use in the event that we have
questions. As a U.S. citizen or a lawful permanent resident, you are not reqUired to justify the removal of your name
from the visa lookout database.

If you are neither a United States citizen nor lawful permanent resident but are concerned about a lookout, you should contact the
U.S. Foreign Service post where your visa was issued or the nearest U.S. Foreign Service post to your residence for further advice
regarding your case.

Sincerely yours,

Division Chief
Systems and Interagency Liaison
for Visa Services

Appendix 42-1
TWOV Contract Carriers -- Signatory to Form 1426 Agreement (Amended 10/1/97; IN97-07)
(Amended 8/5/98; IN98-20) (Amended 8/11/98;
IN98-18) (Revised 12/21/98; IN99-0S)(Revised
November 23, 1999) (Revised July 21, 2000)
ACES Airlines
Achille Lauro Armatore (Lauro Lines)
Aero California, S.A. de C.V.
Aero Continente
Aero Continente Chile
Aero Costa Rica, S.A.
Aerolineas Argentinas
Aerolineas Centrales de Colombia, S.A.
Aerolineas Dominicanas S.A.- Dominair
Aerolineas INI & Cia., S.A.
Aerolineas Nicaraguense, S.A.
Aeromar Airlines
Aeromexico Airlines
Aeroposta
Aeropostal Alas de Venezuela, C.A.
Aerotours Dominicano Airlines/Dominair/Dominican A
Aerovias Brasil
Aerovias Condor de Colombia, Ltd.
Aerovlas de Mexico, S.A. de C.v.

Aerovias Guest, S.A.
Aerovias lnter-Americanas de Panama, 8.S.
Aerovias Nacionales de Colombia
Aerovias Panama Airvvays
Aerovias Venezolanas, S.A.
AIH
Air 2000 Airlines Limited
Air ArUba, NV.
Air B. C., Limited
Air B.V.I., Ltd.
Air Belgium
Air Belgium Int'l., S.A.
Air Caribbean Ltd.
Air Club International, Inc
Air Columbus
Air Espana, S. A.
Air Europa
Air Europe Italy
Air Europe, 8. p. A.
Air Florida Airlines
Air France
Air Gambia, Ltd.
Air Guadeloupe
Air India, Limited
Air Jamaica Limited
Air Japan Co., Ltd.

Air Liberte, S.A.
Air Manila, Inc.
Air Martinique
Air Micronesia, Inc.
Air Nauru
Air Outre Mer
Air Pacific Limited
Air Pacific, Inc
Air Panama International
Air Paraguay/LAPSA
Air Plus Argentina

Air Siam Air Company, Ltd.
Air Specialties Corp.
Air Tahiti
Air Transat
Air Transat A.T., Inc.
Air Tungaru Coroporation
Air Tungaru Corporation
Air Ukraine
Air West, Inc
AirBC Limited
AirClub International
Airline of the British Virgin Islands
Airours Int'l. Airways, Ltd.
Airtours International Airways, Ltd.
Alaska Airlines Inc.
Alcoa Steamship Company, Inc
ALIA-The Royal Jordanian Airlines
Alitalia
Alitalia-Linee Aeree Italiane
All Islands Air Taxi, Inc.
All Nippon Airways Co., Ltd.
Alliance Air, Inc.
ALM 1997 Airline N.V.
America West Airlines, Inc.
American Airlines, Inc.
American Eagle, Inc.
American Banner Lines, Inc.
American Export Lines, Inc.
American International Airways, Inc.
American President Lines, Ltd.
American Trans Air
American Trans Air, Inc.
American-Israeli Shipping Co., Inc.
ANA
Antilliaannse Luchtvaart Maatschappij
Antone Sylvester Tug Services, Inc.
AOM French Airlines

APA International Air, S.A.
Argonaut Trading Agency, Inc.
Arosa Line (Canada) Ltd.
Arosa Line, Inc. "Panama"
Asiana Airlines, Inc.
Atlantic Air, BVI, Ltd
Atlantic Coast Jet, Inc.
Atlantic Gulf Airlines
Atlantis Airways, Ltd
Austrian Airlines
Austrian Airlines AUA
Avensa
Aviacion y Comercio, S.A.
Aviaco Airlines
Avianca Airlines/Pan American World Airways System
Aviateca S.A.
Bahamasair
Bahamasair Holdings, Ltd
Balair A G
Balkan-Bulgarian Airlines
Blue Star Line, Inc.
BMA
BOAC
Bradley Services, Ltd.

Braniff Airways, Inc.
Braniff International Airways
Brazilian International Airlines
Britannia Airways, Ltd.
British Midland Airways Ltd.
British Overseas Airways Corporation
British United Airlines Ltd./Caledonian Airways (P
Business Express Airlines, Inc.
BWllnt'UTrinidad & Tobago (BWIA Int'/.) Airways
BWIA International Airways Ltd.
CAL
Caledonian Airways Limited

Canada 3000 Airlines, Ltd.
Canadian Airlines International, ltd.
Canadian National Railway Co.
Canadian Pacific Airlines/ Pacific Western Airline
Canadian Partner
Cape Air
CaribAirCaribbean Atlantic Airlines, Inc.lCaribbea
Caribbean Airlines Co., Ltd.
Caribbean Express, Inc.
Catamaran Cruiselines
Cathay Pacific Airways, Ltd.
Cayman Airways, Ltd.
Challenge International Airlines
Chicago & Southern Air Lines, Inc./Delta-C&S Air L
China Airlines, Ltd.
China Eastern Airlines
Cinta Airlines/Chilean Airlines
City Bird
Compagnie Francaire (Air France)
Compagnie Generale Transatlantique
Companhia Colonial de Navegacao
Companhia Nacional de Navegacao, S.A.R.L.
Compania Mexicana de Aviacion, S.A. de C.V.
Compania Nacional de Turismo Aero, Ltd.
Compania Panamena de Aviacion, S.A.
Compania Trasatlantica Espanola, S.A.
Condor
Condor Flugdienst GmbH
Consorcio Aviaxsa S.A de C.v.
Continental Air Micronesia
Continental Airlines
Continental Micronesia
COPA
Corse-Air International, S.A.
CTA Ltd.lc/o SWISSAIR
Cunard Line Limited
Czech Airlines

Czechoslovak Airlines/Ceskoslovenske Aerolinie
d.b.a. LanChile Airlines
Daido Kaiun Kaisha, Ltd.
Daido Line
Dan-Air Services, Ltd.
Delaware and HUdson Railroad Corp.
Delta Air Lines, Inc.
Ditley-Simonsen Lines
Dominion Far East Line (Hong Kong), Ltd.
Donaldson International Airways
Donaldson Line (Air Services), Ltd.
Dorado Wings, Inc.
Eagle Airlines
East African Airways
Eastern & Australian Steamship Co, Ltd. (The)
Ecuatoriana de Aviacion, S.A.
Egyptair
EI AI Israel Airlines Ltd.
Empresa Ecuatoriana de Aviacion/Ecuatoriana Airlin
Era Aviation, Inc.
Ethiopian Airlines
Eurofly S.p.A.
Eva Air
EVA Airways Corporation
Excalibur Airways, Ltd.
Executive Air Charter
Falcon Air Express, Inc.
Finnair
Finnair Oyj
Five Star Airlines
Florida Air, Inc.
Flugfelag Islands/Icelandic Airways/Iceland Airway
Flying Colours Airlines Ltd.
Fred Olsen Line, Ltd.
French Line

Furness, Withy & Co., Ltd.
General Airvvays, Inc.
General Steamship Corporation, Ltd.
Glaessel Shipping Corporation
Global Chartering & Brokerage Co., Inc.
Gray Coach Lines, Ltd.
Greyhound Lines-East
Grimaldi Siosa Lines
Guam Marianas Air
Guest Airvvays Mexico/Guest Aerovias Mexico, S.A.
Gulf Air Company
Guy-America Airvvays, Inc.
Guyana Airvvays Corporation
Haiti Air
Halisa Air
Hamburg-American Line
Hamburg-Atlantik Linie, GmbH & Co.
Hapag-L1oyd A.G.lNorth German Lloyd Passenger
Hapag-L1oyd Kreuzfahrten GmbH
Harbor Airlines
Hawaiian Airlines, Inc.
Haytian Aviation Line, SA
Holland America Line Westours Inc.
Home Lines Agency Inc. (Agent)
Home Lines Inc.
Hugo Stinnes Transozean Schiffahrts, GmbH
Iberia Airlines
Iberia Airlines of Spain
Iberia Lineas Aereas de Espana
Ibervvorld Airlines, S.A.
Icelandair
lncres Steamship Company, Ltd.
lnexadria Airvvays
Intair, Inc.
Iran Air

Iran National Airlines Corporation
Island Aviation Incorporated
Island Flying Service
Italian Line
J. D. Valenciana Airline
Jadrolinija Steamship Co.
JAL
JALways Co., Ltd.
Japan Airlines Co., Ltd.
JAT
Jim Pattison Industries, Ltd.
Jugolinija
Jugoslavenska Linijska Plovidba
Kamabara Kisen Co., Ltd.
KIWI International Air Lines, Inc.
KIWI International Holdings
KLM-Royal Dutch Airlines
Kloster Cruise Limited (See Norwegian Cruise Line)
Koninklijke Luchtvaart Maatschappij N.V./Northwest
Koninklijke Nederlandsche Stoomboot-Maatschapi
Korea Shipping Corporation, Ltd.
Korean Air Lines
La Caribeenne des Transportes Aeriens

LACSA Airlines
Ladeco, Ladeco Airlines
Laker Airways
Laker Airways Incorporated
Lan Chile
Lan Peru, S.A.
LAPSA
Lauda Air S.p.A.
Lauda Air, LDI
Lauro Lines
Leisure International Airways Ltd.
Linea Aerea Del Cobre, S.A.

Linea Aerea Nacional-Chile, S.A.
Lineas Aereas Costarricenses, S. A.
Lineas Aereas Paraguayas, S.A.
Lineas Aereas Privadas Argentinas, S.A.
Lloyd International Airways Limited
LOT-Polish Airlines
LTU International Airways
Lufthansa German Airlines
Luftverkehrsunternehmen Atlantis G.m.b.H.
Mackey International, Inc.
Magadan (Mavial) Airlines
Malaysian Airline System Berhad
Malev-Hungarian Airlines Public Limited
Mamenic Line
Marina Mercante Nicaraguense, S.A.
Martinair Holland, N.Y.
Maui Airlines, Inc.
Mesaba AViation, Inc.
Mexicana
Mexicana de Aviacion/Mexicana Airlines
Miami Air International, Inc.
Middle East Airlines
Monarch Airlines Ltd.
Montana Flugbetrieb
Mulheim-Ruhr, Germany
Murray Hill Limousine Service, Ltd.
Nationair Canada
National Hellenic American Line, S.A.
Nauru Pacific Line Agency
Naviera Aznar, S.A.
Nederland Line

Nevis Express Ltd
New York Central Railroad
NICA/Aeronica
Nippon Cargo Airlines Co., Ltd.

Nippon Yusen Kaisha (NYK)/Crystal Cruises/NYK Line
Nolisair International Inc.
North American Airlines, Inc.
North Central Airlines
Northwest Airlink
Norwegian Cruise Lines
NYK Cruises Co., Ltd.
Omni Air International, Inc.
Ontario Express, Ltd.
Orient Overseas Line
Orient Steam Navigation Co., Ltd.
Orion Shipping & Trading Co., Inc.
Out Island Airways Ltd.
Overseas National Airways
P. R. Express International Airline
Pacific Far East Line. Inc.
Pacific Island Aviation, Inc.
Pacific Islands Transport Linel Caribbean Atlantic
Pacific Micronesia Line, Inc.
Pacific Shipowners Limited
Pakistan International Airlines
Pan Am Express
Pan American World Airways, Inc.
Panagra Airways, Inc.
Peninsular & Occidental Steamship Company (The)
Penn Central Company (The)
Philippine Airlines
Piedmont Airlines, Inc.
Pilgrim Airlines
Pilgrim Aviation & Airlines, Inc.
pka Northern Consolidated Airlines, Inc.
Polynesian Airlines (Holdings) Limited
Pomair NV.
Ports of Call Air
Presidential Airways, Inc.

PRINAIR
Pro Air, Services.
Puerto Rico International Airlines, Inc.
Qantas Airways, Ltd.
Qantas Empire Airways, Ltd./British Commonwealth P
Real S/A-Transportes Aereos
Red Star Line/Holland-America Line
Rederiaktiebolaget Transatlantic
Republic Airlines, Inc.
Resort Commuter, Inc.
Resorts
Riddle Airlines, Inc.
Royal Air Maroc
Royal Hawaiian Air Service
Royal Hawaiian Airways, Inc.
Royal Jordanian
Royal Mail Lines, Ltd.
Royal Netherlands Steamship Co.

SM
SAETA S.A./Saeta Airlines
Samoa Aviation, Inc.
Samoa Inc./Samoa Airlines
San Juan Airlines
Saudi Arabian Airlines
Sea Enterprises Corp.
Servicios Avensa, S.A.
Servivensa
Shawnee Airlines, Inc.
Sicula Oceanica, S.A.
Singapore Airlines, Ltd.
Siosa Lines
Sitmar Line
Sky Trek International Airlines, Inc.
Sky World Airlines
Skylink Airlines Ltd.

Skystar International, Inc.
SkyWorld Airlines
Sobelair N.v./S.A.
Sociedad Ecuatoriana de Transportes Aereos Ltd.
Societa Italiana Trasporti Marittimi of Genoa
Societa' per Azioni di Navigazione, Genoa
Societe Nouvelle Air Guadeloupe
Societe Nouvelle Air Martinique
South African AirNays
Southern AirNays, Inc.
Spanair. S.A.
Spantax Airlines
Sterling AirNays
Sterling European Airlines NS
Suckling AirNays
Sun Land Airlines, Inc.
Surinam AirNays Ltd.
Swiss Air Transport Co. Ltd.
Swiss World AirNays, S.A.
Swissair
Sylvester Marine, Inc.
TAM Airlines
Tampa Airlines
TAP - Air Portugal
TEA France
Texas International Airlines, Inc.
Thai AirNays International, Ltd.
The Blue Star Line, Inc.
The China NaVigation Co., Ltd.

The Cunard Steam-Ship Co., Ltd.
The Sun Lane to Europe
Total Air
Tower Air, Inc.
Tower Airlines, Inc.
Toyo Yusen Co., Ltd.
Trans European Airways France, S.A
Trans World Airlines, Inc.
Trans World Express
TransAero Airlines
Transair Limited
Transamerica Airlines
Transatlantic Steamship Co., Ltd.lJohnson Line
Transavia Airlines C.v.
Transbrasil Airlines, Inc.
Transbrasil S/A Linhas Aereas
Translift Airways Ltd.
Transporte Aereo NAO Regular, S.A
Transportes Aereos Mercantiles Panamericanos, S.A
Transportes Aereos Meridionaise
Transportes Aereos Portugueses S.AR.L. (TAP)
Triton Shipping, Inc.
Turk Hava Yollari AO.
Turkish Airlines, Inc.
Turks and Calcos Airways, Ltd
TWA
Ukrainian State Airline
United Air Lines, Inc.

United Airlines, Inc.
United States Lines Co.
Universal Airlines, Inc.
US Airways, Inc.
USAfrica Airways, Inc.
USAir Express
USAir Express/US Air
Uzbekistan Airways
Varig
VASP Brazilian Air Lines
Venezolana Internacional de Aviacion, S.A.
Via Rail Canada, Inc.
Viacao Aerea Rio-GrandenseNarig Airlines
Viacao Aerea Sao Paulo, S.A. (VASP)
VIASA
Viking International Airlines, Inc.
Virgin Atlantic Airways Ltd.
Wardair Canda (1975) Ltd.
West Coast Airlines, Inc.
Wien Consolidated Airlines, Inc.
Win Air, Inc.
Winair, Inc.
Windward Island Airways
Windward Island Airways International NV.
Y Guahan Airways, Inc.
Yugoslav Airlines
Zambia Airways Corporation Limited
Zim Israel Navigation Co., Ltd.

Appendix 42-2
Visa Waiver Program (VWP) Carriers (Revised
6/20/01, IN01-04); (Revised 10/31/97; IN98-01) (Revised
3/31/98; IN98-11) (Revised 6/24/98; IN98-14) (Revised
12/21/98; IN99-0S) (Revised November 23, 1999) (Revised
July 21,2000)
AfS Conair
ACES Airlines
ACI
ACL
Admiral Cruise Lines
Admiral Cruises, Inc
Aer Lingus P.L.C.
Aer Turas Teoranta
Aero California, S.A. de C. V.
Aero Coach Airlines
Aero Coach Aviation Int'l, Inc.
Aero Coach Aviation International, Inc.
Aero Continente Chile

Aero Peru
Aeropostal Alas de Venezuela, C.A
Aeroflot Russian International Airlines
Aerolineas Argentinas
Aerolineas Centrales de Colombia, S.A.
Aerolineas Dominicanas S.A.- Dominair
Aerolineas Nicaraguense, S.A.

Aeromar Airlines
AEROMAR/AERO MAR
Aeromexico Airlines
Aeronautica de Cancun, S.A. de C,v.
Aeroperu
Aeroposta
Aeropostal Airlines/Linea Aeropostal Venezolana
Aeropostal Alas de Venezuela, C. A.
Aerotours Dominicano Airlines/Dominair/Dominican A
Aerovias de Mexico, S.A. de C.V.
Aerovias Nacionales de Colombia
Aerovias Venezolanas, S.A.
Agent Chrysses Demitriades & Co.
Agent Transocean Tour
Agent Ulysses Cruises, Inc.
AIH
Air 2000 Airlines Limited
Air Afrique
Air America
Air Anguilla Inc.
Air Aruba, N'v.
Air Atlanta Icelandic
Air Atonabee, Ltd.
Air B. C., Limited
Air B.V.I., Ltd.
Air Belgium
Air Belgium Int'L, S.A.
Air Borinquen, Inc.
Air Canada
Air Canada's Connector
Air Caraibes Exploitations
Air Caribbean Ltd.

Air
Air
Air
Air
Air

Caribe International, Inc.
Center Helicopters, Inc.
Charter, Inc.
China
Club International/Lignes Aeriennes Globe Azur

Air Columbus
Air Comet
Air Continente
Air Culebra
Air Espana, S. A.
Air Europa
Air Europe Italy
Air Europe, Ltd.
Air Europe, S. p. A.
Air Evasion
Air Florida
Air France
Air Gambia, Ltd.
Air Georgian Ltd.
Air Guadeloupe
Air India, Limited
Air Jamaica Limited
Air Japan Co./ Ltd.

Air L. A., Inc.
Air Liberte, S.A.
Air Malta
Air Mango, Ltd.
Air Marshall Islands, Inc.
Air Martinique
Air Micronesia, Inc.
Air Nauru
Air New Zealand Limited
Air Niagara Express, Inc.
Air North Canada
Air North Charter & Training
Air Nova, Inc
Air Ontario
Air Operations of Europe AS
Air Outre Mer
Air Pacific Limited
Air Paraguay/LAPSA
Air Plus Argentina

Air Plus Comet
Air St. Barthelemy
Air St. Martin
Air Sunshine Inc.
Air Sweden
Air Tahiti
Air Tahiti Nui
Air Toronto
Air Transat
Air Transat AT., Inc.
Air Transport Int'I. , LLC
Air Tungaru Corporation
Air Ukraine
AirBC Limited
AirFlite, Inc
Airline of the British Virgin Islands
Airmark Aviation, Inc.
Airours Int'l. Airways, Ltd.
Airtours International Airways, Ltd.
Airways International
Airways International, Inc.
Alaska Airlines Inc.
ALIA-The Royal Jordanian Airlines
Alitalia
Alitalia-Linee Aeree Italjane
All Nippon Airways Co., Ltd.
ALM 1997 Airline N.V.
Aloha Airlines, Inc.
America West Airlines, Inc.
American Airlines, Inc.
American Eagle
American International Airways, Inc.
American Trans Air
American Trans Air, Inc.
American Viking Cruise Line
American Viking Lines Limited Company
Amerijet International Inc.

ANA
Antilliaannse Luchtvaart Maatschappij
AOM French Airlines
APA International Air, S.A.
Apelearir
Arrow Air Inc.
Asiana Airlines, Inc.
Astral AViation, Inc.
Athabaska Airways Ltd.
ATI
Atlantic Air, BVI, Ltd
Atlantic Coast Jet, Inc.

Atlantic Container Line
Austrian Airlines
Austrian Airlines AUA
Av Atlantic
Avensa
Avianca Airlines/Pan American World Airways System
Aviateca S.A.
Aviation Services, Ltd.
B. S. L. Cruises, Inc.
Bahamasair
Bahamasair Holdings, Ltd
Balair A G
Balkan-Bulgarian Airlines
Bermuda Star Line
Bering Air, Inc.
Biman Bangladesh Airlines
Bimini Island Air, Inc.
Black Sea Shipping Co.
Blackbeard's Cruises
Bluewater Adventures Ltd.
Bohlke International Airways, Inc.
Bradley Services Limited
Britannia Airways A.B.
Britannia Airways GMBH

Britannia Airways, ltd.
Britannia GMBH
British Air
British Airways Pic
British Midland Airways, Ltd.

British United Airlines ltd.lCaledonian Airways (P
Business Express Airline, Inc.
BWI Int'l./Trinidad & Tobago (BWIA Int'l.) Airways
BWIA International Airways ltd.
CAAC
CAL
Caledonian Airways Limited
Canada 3000 Airlines, ltd.
Canadian Airlines International, ltd.
Canadian Pacific Airlines/ Pacific Western Airline
Canadian Partner
CanAir Cargo Ltd.
CanAir Cargo/CanAr/Nolinor
Canberra Cruises
Cape Air
Cape Canaveral Cruise Line
Cargolux Airlines International, S.A.
CaribAirCaribbean Atlantic Airlines, Inc./Caribbea
Caribbean Air Carrier, Inc.
Caribbean Airlines Co., Ltd.
Carnival Cruise Lines, Inc.
Cathay Pacific Airways, ltd.
Cayman Airways, ltd.
Celebrity Cruises
Central Mountain Air, ltd.
Chalk's International Airlines
Chandris Fantasy Cruises
Chandris, Inc.
Chicago & Southern Air Lines, Inc./Delta-C&S Air L
China Airlines, ltd.
China Eastern Airlines

China Southern Airlines
City Bird
City Express
City Wings, Inc.
Civil Aviation Administration of China
Clair Aero, Inc.
Clint Aero, Inc.
Clinton Aviation Services
Clipper
Clipper Adventure Cruises
Clipper Cruise Line
Coastal Air Transport
Comair, Inc.
Commodore Cruise Line, Ltd.
Compagnie des lies du Ponant
Compagnie Francaire (Air France)
Compagnie Francaise de Croisieres
Compagnie Francaise de Transports Aeriens
Compania Mexicana de Aviacion, S.A. de C.V.
Compania Panamena de Aviacion, S.A.
Conair of Scandinavia
Condor
Condor Flugdienst GmbH
Conifair Aviation/Royal Airlines
Consorcio Aviaxsa S.A. de C.V.
Containership Agency, Inc
Continental Air Micronesia
Continental Airlines
Continental Micronesia
COPA
Corporacion Ferries del Caribe
Corse-Air International, S.A.
Costa Crodere S.P.A.
Costa Cruises, Inc.
Crown Cruise Line
CrownAir
Crystal Cruises, Inc.

CTA Ltd.lc/o SWISSAIR
CTC Cruise Lines
Cunard Line Limited
Czech Airlines
Czechoslovak Airlines/Ceskoslovenske Aerolinie
d.b.a. LanChile Airlines
Daimler Chrysler Avaition GmbH
Delta Air Lines, Inc.
Delta Connections
Deutsche Seereederie Rostock GmbH
Deutsche Seetouristik GmbH
Diamond International Airlines, Inc.
Discovery Cruise Line, Inc
Disney
Disney Cruise Line (dba)
Division of Soundair Corporation
Dolphin Cruise Lines
Dolphin Maritime Ltd.
Domtrave Airways
DSR Lines
Eagle Airlines
Eastern Airlines, Inc
Eastern Metro Express/Aviation Associates, Inc.
Ecuatoriana de Aviacion, S.A.
Egyptair
EI AI Israel Airlines Ltd.
Empire Airlines
Empresa Ecuatoriana de Aviacion/Ecuatoriana Airlin
Empressa de Transporte Aereo del Peru
Epirotiki Lines, Inc.
Era Aviation, Inc.
Ethiopian Airlines
Euro City Line
Eurofly S.p.A.
Eva Air

EVA Airways Corporation
Excalibur Airways, Ltd.
Express One International, Inc.
Falcon Air Express, Inc.
Faucett Airlines
Festival Cruises, Inc.
Festival Shipping & Tourist Enterprises, Ltd.
Finnair
Finnair Oyj
First Air
Flugfelag Islands/lcelandic Airways/lceland Airway
Flying Colours Airlines Ltd.
formerly CalAir International
Francis & Lane Inter-Island Transport Services, Lt

Fred Olsen Line, Ltd.
Freedom Air
Frontier Cruises Ltd.
Garuda Indonesia
Ghana Airways
Glacier Wings Flying Services Ltd.
Globe Azur Airline, Inc.

Golden Airlines, Inc.
Gorda Aero Services, Inc.
Great American Airways, Inc

Great Lakes Cruises, Inc.
Grupo Taca
Guam Marianas Air
Gulf Air Company
Gulf Air Transport/Gulf Air
Gulfstream International Airlines, Inc.
Guyana Airways Corporation
H.e.L Aviation, Inc.
Haiti Trans Air
Halisa Air

Hanseatic Cruises, GmbH
Hapag Lloyd Fluggesellschaft MBH
Hapag-L1oyd A.G./North German lloyd Passenger
Hapag-lloyd Kreuzfahrten GmbH
Happy Days Shipping Limited
Harbour Air Ltd.
Harlequin Air Corporation
Hawaiian Airlines, Inc.
Haytian Aviation Line, SA
Helijet Airways, Inc.
Holland America Line Westours Inc.
Horizon Air/Horizon Air Industries, Inc./Manha
Horizon Airlines
Iberia Airlines
Iberia Airlines of Spain
Iberia Lineas Aereas de Espana
Icelandair
Imperial Airlines, Ltd.
IMS Health Transportation Services Corporation
Independent Air, Inc.
Inland Air Charters, Ltd.
Intair, Inc.
Inter-Island Boart Services
ious dba Eastern Metro Express
Isla Nena Air Service, Inc.
Ivaran Lines
J. D. Valenciana Airline
JAL
JALways Co., Ltd.
Japan Air Charter Co., Ltd.
Japan Air System Co., Ltd.
Japan Airlines Co., Ltd.
Japan Asia Airways Co. Ltd.
Japan Cruise Line Inc.
Japan Universal System Transport Co., Ltd.

JAT
Jet Center, Inc.
Jim Pattison Industries, Ltd.
JMC Airlines Limited
Kenmore Air Harbor, Inc.
Key Air, Inc.
Key Airlines
KIWI International Air Lines, Inc.
KIWI International Holdings
KLM-Royal Dutch Airlines
Kloster Cruise Limited
Kloster Cruise Limited (See Norwegian Cruise Line)
Koninklijke Luchtvaart Maatschappij NV.lNorthwest
Korean Air Lines
Kuwait Airways Corporation
La Caribeenne des Transportes Aeriens

LAB Airlines
LACSA Airlines
Ladeco, Ladeco Airlines
Lady Lou Shipping Co., Ltd.
Laker Airways
Laker Airways Incorporated
Lan Chile
Lan Peru, S.A.
LAPSA
Lauda Air S.p.A.
Lauda Air. LDI
Leeward Island Air Transport Services (LIAT)
Leisure Air
Leisure International Airways Ltd.
lIAT
Liat (1974) Ltd.
Lignes Aeriennes Globe Azur
Linea Aerea Del Cobre, S.A.
Linea Aerea Nacional-Chile, S.A.
Lineas Aereas Allegro, S.A. de C.v.

Lineas Aereas Costarricenses, S. A.
Lineas Aereas Paraguayas, S.A.
Lineas Aereas Privadas Argentinas S.A.
Lloyd Aereo Boliviano, S.A.
Lone Star Airlines
LOT-Polish Airlines
Louis Cruise Lines
LTU International Airways
Lufthansa German Airlines
Luxair
Luxembourg Shipping Services
M & N Aviation, Inc.
Magadan (Mavial) Airlines
Magical Cruise Company, Limited
Majesty Cruise Lines
Malaysian Airline System Berhad
Malev-Hungarian Airlines Public Limited
Mar Line Universal Shipping Co.
Martinair Holland, N.V.
Maxim Gorkiy Shipping Co., Ltd.
Mediterranean Transportation Inc.
Mesaba Aviation, Inc.
Mexicana
Mexicana de Aviacion/Mexicana Airlines
MGM Grand Air
Miami Air International, Inc.
Midwest Express Airlines, Inc
Midwest Express Airlines, Inc.lMidway Express Hold
Midwest Express Holdings, Inc.
Minerva Airlines
Minerve

Misty Fjords Air & Outfitting
Mitsui O.S.K. Lines, (Passenger) Ltd.
Monarch Airlines Ltd.
MS Berlin
MS Deutschland
MSC Mediterranean Shipping Co., S.A.
Nationair Canada
National Air Charters, Inc.
Native Son, Inc.
Nevis Express Ltd.
New York Central Railroad
New World Ship Management Company, LLC
NICA/Aeronica
Nigeria Airways Ltd.
Nippon Cargo Airlines Co., Ltd.
Nippon Yusen Kaisha (NYK)/Crystal Cruises/NYK Line
Nishinihon Kisen Co., Ltd.
Nolisair International Inc.
North American Airlines, Inc.
Northwest Airlines, Inc.
Northwest Airlink
Northwest Orient Airlines
Norwegian Cruise Lines
Novair International Airways, Ltd.
NSB
NSB Niederelbe Schiffahrt Gesellschraft MBH & Co.
NYK Cruises Co., Ltd.

Oasis International Airlines
Ocean Quest International
Odessa America Cruise Co.
Odessa Cruise German Shipmanagement Ltd.
Odyssey Aviation Limited
Olympic Airways, S.A.
Omni Air International, Inc.
Ontario Express, Ltd.
Orion Air
Orion Lift Service, Inc.
P & 0 Cruises, Ltd.
Pace Airlines

Pacific Island Aviation, Inc.
Pakistan International Airlines
Pan Am Express
Pan American World Airways, Inc.
Paradise Island Airlines, Inc.
Passat Ship Management Company Ltd.
Penn Central Company (The)
Peter Island Resort & Yacht Harbor
Petrol Air, S.A.
Philippine Airlines, Inc.
Phoenix Air
Phoenix Air Group, Inc.
Piedmont Airlines, Inc.
Planet Airways, Inc.

Poetto Shipping Co., Ltd.
Points of Call Airlines, Ltd.
Polynesian Airlines (Holdings) Limited
Ponant, Compagnie des Isles du
Premiair A/S
Premier Aviation, Inc.
Premier Cruise Lines
Prince of Fundy Cruises Limited

Princess Cruises
PrivatAir S.A.
Promech Air, Inc.

Qantas Airways, Ltd.
Qantas Empire Airways, Ltd./British Commonwealth P
Quassar de Mexico, S.A.
Radisson Seven Seas Cruises

Red Lion Charter/Spirit of America/
Red Star Line/Holland-America Line
Reeve Aleutian Airways, Inc.
Regency Cruises, Inc.
Regional Air Charters, Inc.
Renaissance Cruises, Inc.
Reno Air, Inc.
Rich International Airways, Inc.
Royal Air Maroc
Royal Aviation, Inc.
Royal Caribbean Cruise Line
Royal Jordanian
Royal Viking Line
Ryan International Airlines
Sabena Belgian World Airlines
Sabena, S.A.
SAETA S.A./Saeta Airlines
San Juan Jet Charters, Inc.
SAS
Saudi Arabian Airlines
Scanair
Scandinavian Airlines System
Schiffahrtsgellschaft MS Berlin Kreuzfahrten mbH &
Schiffahrtsgesellschaft MS Deutschland GMBH & Co.
Schiffahrtsgesellschat MS Berlin GmbH & Co.
Sea Delphin Shipping, Ltd.
Seaborne Aviation, Inc.
Seabourn Cruise Line
SeaEscape, Ltd.
Service et Transports Cruise Lines, S.A. (STCLS)
Servicios Aereos Litoral, S.A. de C.V.

Servicios Aereos Profesionales, Inc.
Servicios Avensa, S.A.
Servicios E Transportes Aereos, S.A.
Servivensa
Seven Seas Cruise Line Ltd.
Showa Line, Ltd.
Silversea Cruises
Singapore Airlines, Ltd.
Sky Trek International Airlines, Inc.
Skyservice F.B.a., Inc.
Smith's Ferry Services, ltd.
Sobelair N.V./S.A.
Sociedad Ecuatoriana de Transportes Aereos Ltd.
Societe Caribbeenne de Transport Aerien
Societe Nouvelle Air Guadeloupe
Societe Nouvelle Air Martinique
South African Airways
Spanair, S.A.
S1. Lawrence Cruise Lines Inc.
Star Clippers, Inc.
STCL-Services et Transports Cruise Lines, S.A.)
Sterling Airways
Sterling European Airlines AJS
Suckling Airways
Summit Air Charters
Sun Country Airlines
Sunair Express
Sunworld International Airlines, Inc.
Surinam Airways Ltd.
Swiss Air Transport Co. Ltd.
Swiss World Airways, S.A.
Swissair
TACA
Taca International Airlines, S.A.
TAESA Airlines
Tall Ship Adventures, Inc.

TAM Airlines
Tampa Airlines
TAN (Transportes Aereos Nacionales, S.A.)
Tan Airlines or Tan Sahsa
TAP - Air Portugal
Taquan Air Service Inc.
TAROM - Romanian Air Transport
TEA France
Thai Airways International, Ltd.
The China Navigation Co., Ltd.
The Cunard Steam-Ship Co., Ltd.
The Delta Connection
Time Air Sweden AS
Topaz International Shipping, Inc.
Tower Air, Inc.
Tower Airlines, Inc.
Tradewinds Airlines, Inc.
Trans Continental Airlines, Inc.
Trans European Airways France, S.A.
Trans International Airlines
Trans Meridian Airlines
Trans World Airlines, Inc.
Trans-Caribbean Air Export-Import, Inc.
Trans-Provincial Airlines Ltd.
TransAero Airlines
Transavia Airlines C.V.
Transbrasil Airlines, Inc.
Transbrasil S/A Linhas Aereas
Translift Airways Ltd.
TransMeridian Airlines
TransOcean Airways
Transporte Aereo Dominicano, S.A.
Transporte Aereo NAO Regular, S.A.
Transportes Aereos Ejecutivos, S.A. de C.V.
Transportes Aereos Mercantiles Panamericanos, S.A.
Transportes Aereos Meridionaise
Transportes Aereos Nacionales, S.A.

Transportes Aereos Portugueses S.AR.L. (TAP)
Transportes Aeromar, S.A de C.V.
Transwede Airways AB
Transwede Leisure AB
Trump Shuttle, Inc.
Turk Hava Yollari AO.
Turkish Airlines, Inc.
Turks and Caicos Airways, Ltd
Turquoise Airways Ltd.
TWA
Twin Air
Twin Town Leasing Co., Inc.
Ukrainian State Airline
Ulysses Cruises Inc.
United Air Lines, Inc.
United Airlines, Inc.
United Parcel Service Co.
UPS
US Airways, Inc.
USAfrica Airways, Inc.
USAir Express
USAir Express/US Air
Uzbekistan Airways
Vacationair Inc.
Varig
VASP Brazilian Air Lines
Venezolana Internacional de AViacion, S.A
Viacao Aerea Rio-GrandenseNarig Airlines
Viacao Aerea Sao Paulo, S.A. (VASP)
VIASA
Viking International Airlines, Inc.
Virgin Air Inc.
Virgin Atlantic Airways Ltd.
Virgin Gorda, Transport Ltd.
Viscount Air Service, Inc.
Vista mar Canarias, S. L.

WAC
Waglisla Air Inc.
Walker's Aviation Services, Inc.
Walker's International
West Jet Airlines Limited
Western Air Services
WestJet Airlines Ltd.
Win Air, Inc.
Windstar Sail Cruises
Windward Island Airways
Windward Island Airways International NV.
World Air Network Co., Ltd.
World Airways, Inc.
World Explorer Cruises I SS Universe Explorer
Worldways Canada Ltd.
Worldwide Airline Services, Inc.
WRA, Inc.
WRAlCaribbean
Y Guahan Airways, Inc.
Yugoslav Airlines
Zuliana de Aviacion C.A.

Appendix 42-3
In-Transit lounges (ITls) (Revised 4/9/97)
(Amended 11/17/98; IN98-19)
* Denotes ITL contract maintained at HQINS

EASTERN REGION
Atlanta District:
Atlanta:
Aerovias de Mexico, S.A. de
Aero Costa Rica
Air Jamaica (07/20/98)*
Cayman Airways
Delta (07/20/98)*
Japan (07/20/98)*
Lufthansa
Sabena
Varig (07/20/98)*

c.v.

Raleigh-Durham:
American
Miami District:
Daytona:
LTU International (11/08/95)*

Miami:

(Five ITLs in five Terminals (A, B, 0, E, & F))

Aero Costa Rica (06/20/94)*
Aeroflot (03/27/92)*
Aerolineas Argentinas (05/92)*
Aeromexico
Aeroperu (05/12/97)* Expires 05/12/98
Aeroposta (07/22/93)*
Air Belgium (10/30/92)*
Air Canada (01/29/92)*
Air France
Air Jamaica
Alitalia-Linee Aeree Italiane, S.P.A. (12/05/91)*
ALM
American (05/17/89)*
Bahamas Air
British
Cayman
Continental (11/16/87 - copy at MIA)
Delta Airlines (12/05/91)*
Ecuatoriana
Falcon Air Express*
Iberia (03/27/92)*
Japan
Ladeco (03/13/92)*
Lan Chile
LTU (05/11/92)*
Lufthansa
Martinair Holland (11/02/92)*
Mexicana
Miami Air (12/17/92)*
Northwest
Saeta (03/13/92)*
TransBrasil (10/15/90)*
United (01/29/92)*
VARIG Brazilian

VASP-Brazilian (04/28/93)*
Virgin Atlantic (09/10/86)
Progressive Clearance at Miami:
VARIG Brazilian (11/05/96)* (two flights combine in MIA for progressive clearance to Orlando Expires April
30, 1997)
Special International-to-International (ITI) Transit Agreement for the Directing and Escorting of ITI
passengers at MIAP and ITL Use
Alitalia (10/01/98)* expires 09/30/99
Special Progressive Clearance
VARIG Brazilian (05/04/98)* (two flights combine in Miami for progressive clearance to Orlando; Expires April
30,1999)
Orlando-Sanford:
Britannia (09/11/98)* Expires 09/11/99
Leisure (10/01/98)* Expires 09/30/99
Orlando:
Aeroflot Russian International (05/20/94)*
Brittania (04/30/93)*
KLM
Lauda Air S.p.A (03/28/96)*
Leisure (06/15/93)*
LTU International (11/25/96)*
Sobelair N.V./S.A. (10/31/96)*
Tampa 9 (I & II):
Condor (11/06/92)*
LTU
New York District:

JFK Airport:
lAB:
Aerolineas Argentinas
Air France
Air India (05/07/93)*
ALIA Royal Jordanian (see KLM)
Alitalia
Avianca
Egypt Air
EIAI
KLM Royal Dutch; ALIA Royal Jordanian; Martinair. (One ITL Agreement for the three carriers) (07/07/81)*
Lan Chile
LTU
Lufthansa
Olympic (03/27/91)*
Martinair (see KLM)
Pakistan International (03/29/88)*
Royal Air Maroc
SAS
Saudia Airlines
Swissair
TACA Airlines
Tra nsAm eri ca
VARIG Airlines
VASP Brazilian (05/06/96)* Expires 05/06/99

British Airways Terminal:
British (06/25/92)* (Not used per OIC/JFK 11/08/93 )

Delta Airlines Terminal:
Delta Airlines (Not used per JFK 01/12/96)

Trans World Airlines Terminal:
None (ITL proposed by TWA)

Philadelphia District:
Philadelphia:

British (03/23/94)* Expired 03/23/95
USAir (03/22/94)* Expired 03/22/95
Lufthansa (04/19/94)* Expired 04/19/95
Portland, ME District:
Bangor:

Air 2000 (02/26/96)*
Air Belgium
Air Espana (dba Air Europa)(02/26/96)*
Air Europe
Air Europe, S.P.A.
Air Europe Italy
Air Holland
Airtours International (11/25/96)*
Britannia Airways Ltd. (03/19/96)*
Caledonian Airways (06/17/96)*
Finair (10/27/98)* Expires 10/27/01
Flying Colours (01/23/97)*
Monarch Airlines (02/26/96)*
Sterling Airways
San Juan District:
San Juan:

ACES (09/01/98)* Expires 08/31/99
Air Aruba (09/11/98)* Expires 08/31/99
Air Canada (11/24/97)* Expires 08/31/98
Air Transat A.T. Inc.* Expires 08/31/98
American (09/01/98)* Expires 08/31/99
American Eagle (09/01/98)* Expires 08/31/99

ALM 1997 Airline NV. (12/15/97)* Expires 08/31/98
British West Indies Airways* (09/11/98)* Expires 08/31/99
Canada 3000 Airlines Limited* (10/09/98) Expires 08/31/99
Condor Flugdienst GmbH* (12/16/97)* Expires 08/31/99
Iberia* Expires 08/31/99
KLM Dutch Airlines* Expires 08/31/98
Lineas Aereas Costarricenses, S.A. d/b/a
LACSA Airlines* Expires 08/31/98
Martinair Holland, NV. (09/11/98) * Expires 08/31/99

Washington District:
Dulles:
Pakistan (Midfield Terminal) (10/01/97) (Expires 10/01/98)
United* (10/27/92)
United (Midfield Terminal) (10/01/97) (Expires 10/01/98)
CENTRAL REGION

Dallas District:
Dallas:
American* (08/25/95) [Expires 08/25/98]
Lufthansa

Chicago District:
Chicago:
No ITL Agreement sent to HQ as of November 4, 1998, though Korean Air using ITL

Houston District:
Houston:
Aerovias de Mexico* (10/06/93)

Air Canada* (04/28/93)
British Airways* (08/15/90)
Cayman Airways* (03/12/91)
Compagnie Nationale Air France* (06/15/93)
Continenta/* (07/02/92)
KLM Royal Dutch Airlines* (02/15/91 )
TACA International Airlines* (07/15/91)
TAN SAHSA* (07/26/90)
Viasa* (10/24/90)
WESTERN REGION
Anchorage District:
Anchorage:

Asiana (11/24/92)*
Cathay Pacific Airways Ltd. (03/28/96)* [Expires 03/28/99]
BritiSh Airways
Eva Airways (08/08/96)* Expires 08/08/99
Iberia
Japan (03/18/96)* [Expires 03/18/99]
KLM Royal Dutch
Scandinavian (SAS)
Swiss Air
Allin-Transit Lounge passengers must de-plane in ANC and go to an In-Transit Lounge though they are not
signatory to any agreement.
Honolulu District:
Agana:

Unavailable.
Honolulu:

Air Canada (01/22/98)* Expires 01/22/01
Air New Zealand (07/31/98)* Expires 07/31/01

Air Pacific Limited (08/26/97)* Expires 08/26/00
Canadian Airlines International (07/24/97)* Expires 07/24/00
Canada 3000 Airlines Ltd (05/12/97)* Expires 05112/00
Qantas (12/22/97)* Expired 12/22/00

Los Angeles District:
Los Angeles: (Two (2) Lounges in 2 Terminals)
Thomas Bradley International Terminal (TBIl):
Aeromexico (02/28/94)*
Air France
AOM French Airlines (07/03/95)*
British Airways (01/19/95)*
Corse-Air (07/03/95)*
Eva Airways (11/20/95)*
Japan
Korean
LTU International (08/17/94)*
Mexicana (10/18/94)*
Qantas (02/14/95)*
United (08/14/92)*
UTA
Varig

Joint ITL Agreements at TBIT:
British Airways/Qantas ITL Agreement (02/09/95)*
Japan/Aeromexico Airlines Agreement (01/10/95)*
LTU International/Mexicana Agreement (10/21/94)*
Qantas/British Airways ITL Agreement (02/14/95)*

Satellite 2:
Air Canada (03/28/96)*
Air New Zealand (10/04/94)*
Air New Zealand/Air Canada ITL (03/24/96)*

Terminal 6 & 7:

United (04/02/97)* Expires 04/02/00
San Francisco District:
Oakland:

Corse-Air International (04/17/96)* [Expires 04/17/99]
San Francisco:

Air France (12/09/91)* Expired 12/09/92
United
Seattle District:
Seattle-Tacoma:

Japan Air Line
Thai Airways

Appendix 42-4
Preinspection Agreements--Signatory to Form 1425 Agreement (Amended 10/1/97; IN97-07a);
2/12/98; IN98-08) (Amended 7/9/98; IN98-17);
(Revised 1/29/99; IN99-12) (Revised November 23,
1999) (Revised July 21, 2000)
ARUBA
Aeropostal Alas de Venezuela, C. A.
Air Aruba, N'v.
Airmark Aviation, Inc.
American Airlines, Inc.
American International Airways, Inc.
American Trans Air, Inc.
Antilliaannse Luchtvaart Maatschappij
Av Atlantic
Carnival Air Lines
Continential Airlines
Express One International, Inc.
Falcon Air Express, Inc.
Jet Fleet Corporation
KIWI International Air Lines, Inc.
Laker Airways Incorporated
Lineas Aereas Allegro, S.A. de C,v.
Martinair Holland

Mexicana Airlines

Miami Air International, Inc.
North American Airlines, Inc.
Omni Air International
Planet Airways, Inc.

Pan American Airways Corp.
Rich International Airways, Inc.
Ryan International Airlines
Servicios Avensa, S.A.
Sky Trek International Airlines, Inc.
Sky West Airlines, Inc
Sun Country Airlines
Sun Pacific International, Inc.
Sunworld International Airlines, Inc.
Tradewinds Airlines, Inc.
Trans World Airlines, Inc.
TransMeridian Airlines
Transportes Aereos Ejecutivos
United Airlines, Inc.

United Parcel Service Co.
us Airways, Inc.
Viking International Airlines, Inc.
World Airways, Inc.
Worldwide Airline Services, Inc.
CALGARY
Air Canada
Air Niagra Express, Inc.
Air Transat A.T., Inc.
America West Airlines, Inc.
American Airlines, Inc.
American Trans Air, Inc.
Azur Airline, Inc.
Big Sky Airlines
Canadian Airlines International, ltd.
Cascade Airways, Inc.
ContinentiaI Airlines
Delta Air Lines, Inc.

Express One International, Inc.
Hughes Air Corp.
Miami Air International, Inc.
Northwest Airlines, Inc.
Pace Airlines

Royal Aviation, Inc.
Sky King, Inc.
Sky Trek International Airlines. Inc.
TEM Enterprises
Time Air, Inc
United Airlines, Inc.
Wardair Canda (1975) Ltd.
Western Pacific Airlines, Inc.
WestJet Airlines Ltd.
DUBLIN

Aer Lingus P.L.C.
American Trans Air, Inc.
Britannia Airways, Ltd.
Delta Air Lines, Inc.
Express One International, Inc.
Tower Air, Inc.
EDMONTON

Air Canada
Air Transat A.T.. Inc.
American Trans Air, Inc.
Azur Airline, Inc.
Canadian Airlines International, ltd.
Continental Airlines
Delta Air Lines, Inc.
Express One International, Inc.
Laker Airways Incorporated
Miami Air International, Inc.
Northwest Airlines, Inc.
Pace Airlines, Inc.

Republic Airlines, Inc.
Royal Aviation, Inc.
Sky King, Inc.
Wardair Canda (1975) Ltd.
Western Airlines
WestJet Airlines Ltd.
Winair, Inc.
FREEPORT
Aero Coach Aviation International, Inc.
Aerostar Airlines, Inc.
Aerovias Nacionales de Colombia
Air Florida Airlines
AirTran Airways, Inc.
Airways International, Inc.
American Eagle, Inc.
Bahamasair Holdings, Ltd
British Airways
Caribbean Express, Inc.
Comair, Inc.
Continental Airlines
Delta Air Lines, Inc.
Evergreen International Airlines, Inc.
Express One International, Inc.
Falcon Air Express, Inc.
Gulf Air Company
Gull Air, Inc.
Key Airlines
Lineas Aereas Allegro, S.A. de COY.
LYNX Air International
Mackey International, Inc.
Miami Air International, Inc.
Midway Airlines
North Central Airlines
Northeastern International Airways, Inc.
Planet Airways, Inc.

Regal Bahamas International Airlines

Renown Aviation, Inc.
Rich International Airways, Inc.
Sky Trek International Airlines, Inc.
Sun Country Airlines
Trans World Airlines
TransOcean Airways
Trinity Air Bahamas
United Airlines, Inc.
United Parcel Service Co.
US Airways, Inc.
HAMILTON

Aerovias Guest, S.A.
Air Florida Airlines
Air Venturers of Houston, Inc.
AirTran Airways, Inc.
American Airlines, Inc.
American Eagle, Inc.
American Flyers Airline Corp.
Av Atlantic
Braniff Airways, Inc.
Capitol Airways, Inc.
Continental Airlines
Delta Air Lines, Inc.
Express One International, Inc.
Flying Tiger Line
Furness, Withy & Co., Ltd.
Miami Air International, Inc.
Nomads, Inc.
Northeast Airlines, Inc.
Northeastern International Airways, Inc.
Northwest Airlines, Inc.
Pace Airlines

Piedmont Airlines, Inc.
Pilgrim Aviation & Airlines, Inc.
Planet Airways, Inc.

Saturn Airways

Standard Air Ways, Inc.
Swedish American Line Agency, Inc.
Trans International Airlines
Trans World Airlines, Inc.
United Airlines, Inc.
US Airways, Inc.
Wardair Canda (1975) Ltd.
World Airways, Inc.

MONTREAL
Air Alliance, Inc.
Air Canada
Air Florida Airlines
Air France
Air Georgian Ltd.
Air Liberte, S.A.
Air Niagara Express, Inc.
Air Ontario
Air Transat A.T., Inc.
American Airlines, Inc.
American Flyers Airline Corp.
American Trans Air, Inc.
Atlantic Coast Jet, Inc.

Braniff Airways, Inc.
British Airways
Canadian Airlines International, ltd.
Capitol Airways, Inc.
Comair, Inc.
Continental Airlines
Delta Air Lines, Inc.
Eagle Airways (Bermuda) Ltd.
Eastern Provincial Airways (1963) Limited
Express One International, Inc.
Intair, Inc.
Lufthansa German Airlines
McCulloch International Airlines, Inc.
Mesaba Aviation, Inc.

Miami Air International, Inc.
Nordair Ltd.
Northeast Airlines, Inc.
Northwest Airlines, Inc.
Odyssey Aviation Limited
Ozark Air Lines, Inc.
Pace Airlines

Piedmont Airlines, Inc.
Pilgrim Aviation & Airlines, Inc.
Planet Airways, Inc.

Quebecair
Royal Aviation, Inc.
Saturn Airways
Trans Florida Airlines, Inc.
Trans World Airlines, Inc.
Transair Limited
United Airlines, Inc.
US Airways, Inc.
Wardair Canda (1975) Ltd.
Wesstates Airlines, Inc.
Western Skyways, Inc.
World Airways, Inc.
Worldway Airlines Ltd.
Worldwide Airline Services, Inc.
Wright Air lines, Inc.
NASSAU

Aerostar Airlines, Inc.
Air Canada
Air Venturers of Houston, Inc.
AirTran Airways, Inc.
American Eagle, Inc.
American Flyers Airline Corp.
American International Airnays, Inc.American Trans Air, Inc.
Bahamas Airways, Ltd.
Bahamasair Holdings, Ltd
Best Airlines, Inc.

British Airways
CanAir Leisure Ltd.
Capitol Airways, Inc.
Challenge International Airlines
Continental Airlines
Delta Air Lines, Inc.
Eagle Airways (Bermuda) ltd.
Executive Jet Aviation, Inc.
Express One International, Inc.
Falcon Air Express, Inc.
Florida Air, Inc.
Flying Tiger Line
Great Lakes Aviation, Ltd.
International Air Bahama, Ltd.
Key Airlines
Lineas Aereas Allegro, S.A. de C.v.
Mackey International, Inc.
McCormick Shipping Corp.
Mexicana Airlines
Miami Air International, Inc.
Midway Airlines
Modern Air Transport
National Airlines, Inc.
Northeastern International Airways, Inc.
Omni Air International
Pace Airlines

Pan Am Express
Paradise Island Airlines, Inc.
Piedmont Airlines, Inc.
Planet Airways, Inc.

Pro Air, Services.
Regal Bahamas International Airlines
Renown Aviation, Inc.
Rich International Airways, Inc.
Sky Trek International Airlines, Inc.
Southern Airways, Inc.
Sun Country Airlines
TEM Enterprises

Texas International Airlines, Inc.
Trans Caribbean Airways, Inc.
Trans World Airlines, Inc.
TransMeridian Airlines
Trinity Air Bahamas
United Airlines, Inc.
United Parcel Service, Co.
US Airways, Inc.
World Airways, Inc.
OTTAWA

Air Canada
Air Nova
Air Nova, Inc
American Airlines, Inc.
American Eagle, Inc.
Atlantic Southeast Airlines

Business Express Airline, Inc.
Canadian Regional Airlines (1998) Ltd.
Chautauqua Airlines, Inc.
Comair, Inc.
Continetial Airlines
Mesaba Aviation, Inc.
Mesa Airlines
Miami Air International, Inc.
Northwest Airlines, Inc.
Pace Airlines
Piedmont Airlines, Inc.

Orca Bay Aviation
Royal Aviation, Inc.
United Parcel Service Co.
US Airways, Inc.
PARADISE ISLAND

Express One International, Inc.
Paradise Island Airlines, Inc.

SHANNON
Aer Lingus P.L.C.
Aeroflot Russian International Airlines
Air Malta

American Airlines, Inc.
American Trans Air, Inc.
Britannia Airways, Ltd.
Caledonian Airways Limited
Canadian Airlines International, ltd.
Condor Flugdienst GmbH
Continetial Airlines
Delta Air Lines, Inc.
Gulf Air Company
Laker Airways Incorporated
Northwest Airlines, Inc.
Royal Jordanian
Tower Air, Inc.
Transamerica Airlines
Translift Airways Ltd.
TransOcean Airways
TORONTO
Air Canada
Air Florida Airlines
Air France
Air Georgian, Ltd.
Air Niagara Express, Inc.
Air Ontario
Air Transat A.T., Inc.
Alaska Airlines Inc.
America West Airlines, Inc.

American Airlines, Inc.
American Eagle, Inc.
American Flyers Airline Corp.
American Trans Air, Inc.
Astral Aviation, Inc.

Atlantic Coast Airlines
Braniff Airways, Inc.
BWIA International Airways Ltd.
Caledonian Airways Limited
Canada 3000 Airlines, Ltd.
Canadian Airlines International, ltd.
CanAir Leisure ltd.
Capitol Airways, Inc.
Chautauqua Airlines, Inc.
Comair, Inc.
Dan-Air Services, Ltd.
Eastern Provincial Airways (1963) Limited
Express One International, Inc.
Fun Air, Inc.
McCulloch International Airlines, Inc.
Miami Air International, Inc.
Midway Airlines
Nationair Canada
Nordair ltd.
North Central Airlines
Pace Airlies
Planet Airways, Inc.

Odyssey Aviation Limited
Orca Bay Aviation
Ozark Air Lines, Inc.
Piedmont Airlines, Inc.
Pilgrim Aviation & Airlines, Inc.
Quebecair
Royal Aviation, Inc.
Saturn Airways
Sky Trek International Airlines, Inc.
Skyservice F.B.a., Inc.
Standard Air Ways, Inc.
Tempus Air Limited
Tower Air, Inc.
Trans World Airlines, Inc.
Transair Limited

United Airlines, Inc.
US Airways, Inc.
Vacationair Inc.
Wardair Canda (1975) Ltd.
World Airways, Inc.
Worldways Canada Ltd.
Wright Air Lines, Inc.
Yugoslav Airlines

VANCOUVER
Admiral Cruises, Inc
Air B. C., Limited
Air Canada
Air Niagara Express, Inc.
Air Transat A.T., Inc.
AirCal, Inc.
Alaska Airlines Inc.
America West Airlines, Inc.
American Airlines, Inc.
American Flyers Airline Corp.
American Trans Air, Inc.
Amtrack
British Airways
Canadian 3000 Airlines, Ltd.
Canadian Airlines International, ltd.
Champion Air
Continental Airlines
Costa Cruises, Inc.
Crystal Cruises, Inc.
Delta Air Lines, Inc.

Empire Airlines
EVA Airways, Corporation
Express One International, Inc.
Fun Air, Inc.
Great American Airways, Inc
Great Northern Airways, Ltd.
Harbor Airlines
Harrison Airways, Ltd.
Holland America Line Westours, Inc.
International Jet Air, Ltd.
London Air Services Limited

Miami Air International, Inc.
Monarch Cruise Lines, Inc.
Nomads, Inc.
North American Airlines, Inc.

Northwest Airlines, Inc.
Nouvelle Compagnie de Paquebrots
Orca Bay Aviation
Pace Airlines

Pacific Interstate Airlines
Premier Aircraft Management, Inc.
Princess Cruises
Radisson Seven Seas Cruises
Royal Aviation, Inc.
Royal Caribbean Cruise Line
Royal Cruise Line
Ryan International Airlines

San Juan Airlines
Sky King, Inc.

Sky West Airlines, Inc
Skylink Airlines Ltd.
Skyservice F.B.O., Inc.
Skywest Airlines
South Pacific Island Airways
Standard Air Ways, Inc.
Sundance Cruises, Inc.
TEM Enterprises
Trans World Airlines, Inc.
United Airlines, Inc.
Universal Airlines, Inc.
VCHC Enterprises, Limited
Wardair Canda (1975) Ltd.
Western Airlines
WestJet Airlines Ltd.
World Airways, Inc.
World Explorer Cruises

VICTORIA
Airwest Canada
B.C. Stena Line, Ltd.
Black Ball Transport, Inc.
British Columbia Steamship
Canadian Airlines International, ltd.
Canadian Pacific Railway Co.
Clipper Navigation, Inc.
Frontier Airlines, Inc.
Island Jetfoil Corporation
Miami Air International, Inc.
Northwest Hydrofoil Corporation
Princess Cruises
Royal Cruise Line
Victoria Rapid Transit
Washington States Ferries
Yarmouth Cruises, Inc.

WINNIPEG

Aero Trades (Western) Ltd.
Air Canada
Air Niagara Express, Inc.
American Trans Air, Inc.
Azur Airline, Inc.
Canadian Airlines International, ltd.
CPAir
Express One International, Inc.
Holiday Air of America
Kelowna Flightcraft Air Charter
Mesaba Aviation, Inc.
Miami Air International, Inc.
Nordair Ltd.
North Central Airlines
Northwest Airlines, Inc.
Royal Aviation, Inc.
TEM Enterprises
Trans Air
Trans World Airlines, Inc.
VCHC Enterprises, Limited
Wardair Canda (1975) Ltd.
WestJet Airlines Ltd.
(Revised INOl-16)

Appendix 42-5
Guam Visa Waiver Program Signatory Carriers
(Added INS - TM2) (Revised 12/21/98; IN99-05) (Revised
August 20, 1999)
Air Japan Co., Inc
Air Micronesia, Inc.
Air Nauru
All Nippon Airways Co" Ltd.
Alliance Air, Inc.
ANA
Asiana Airlines, Inc.
Chicago & Southern Air Lines, Inc.lDelta-C&S Air L
China Airlines, Ltd.
China Navigation Co. Ltd.
Club Med 2
Continental Air Micronesia
Continental Micronesia
Delta Air Lines, Inc.
Eva Air
EVA Airways Corporation
Far Eastern Air Transport Corp.
Freedom Air
Frontier Cruises Ltd.
Guam Marianas Air
JAL
Japan Airlines Co., Ltd.
Japan Asia Airways Co. Ltd.

Korean Air Lines
Mitsui O.S.K. Lines, (Passenger) Ltd.
Nippon Yusen Kaisha (NYK)/Crystal Cruises/NYK Line
Nishinhon Kisen Co., Ltd.
Nishinihon Kisen Co., Ltd
Northwest Airlines, Inc.
Northwest Airlink
Northwest Orient Airlines
NYK Cruises Co., Ltd.
Pacific Island Aviation, Inc.
PT Airfast Indonesia
Services & Transports Cruise Lines 2
Services et Transports
Showa Line, Ltd.
WAC
World Air Network Co., Ltd.

(Revised INOl-16)

Appendix 42-6

Section 273(e) MOU Signatory Carriers

ACES Airlines
Aeroflot Russian International Airlines
Aerolineas Argentinas
Aerolineas Nicaraguense, S.A.

Aeropostal Alas de Venezuela, C.A.
Air Aruba, N.V.
Air China
Air Espana, S. A.
Air France
Air India, Limited
Air Jamaica Limited
Air New Zealand Limited
Airours Int'1. Airways, Ltd.
All Nippon Airways Co., Ltd.
American Airlines, Inc.
American Eagle, Inc.
American Trans Air, Inc.
Antilliaannse Luchtvaart Maatschappij Asiana Airlines, Inc.
Austrian Airlines
Aviateca S.A.
Bahamasair Holdings, Ltd
Balair A G
Britannia Airways, Ltd.
British Airways
British Midland Airways, Ltd.
BWIA International Airways Ltd.
Carnival Cruise Lines, Inc.
Cathay Pacific Airways, Ltd.
Cayman Airways, Ltd.
China Airlines, Ltd.
China Eastern Airlines
Continental Airlines
Continental Micronesia
Czech Airlines

Delta Air Lines, Inc.
Ecuatoriana de Aviacion, S.A.
Egyptair
EI AI Israel Airlines Ltd.
Executive Airlines, Inc.
Finnair Oyj
Gulfstream International Airlines, Inc.
Icelandair
Japan Airlines Co., Ltd.
KLM-Royal Dutch Airlines
Korean Air Lines
Liat (1974) Ltd.
Linea Aerea Nacional-Chile, S.A.
Lineas Aereas Costarricenses, S .A.
Lloyd Aereo Boliviano, S.A.
LTU International Airways
Lufthansa German Airlines
Malaysian Airline System Berhad
Malev-Hungarian Airlines Public Limited
Martinair Holland, N.V.
North American Airlines, Inc.
Northwest Airlines, Inc.
Premier Cruise Lines
Princess Cruises
Qantas Airways, Ltd.
Royal Air Maroc
Royal Jordanian
Saudi Arabian Airlines
Servicios Avensa, S.A.
Singapore Airlines, Ltd.
Smith's Ferry Services, Ltd.
South African Airways
Spanair, S.A.
Swiss Air Transport Co., Ltd.
Taca International Airlines, S.A.
TAP - Air Portugal
TAROM - Romanian Air Transport
Thai Airways International, Ltd.
Tower Air, Inc.
Trans World Airlines, Inc.
Turkish Airlines, Inc.
Ukrainian State Airline
US Airways, Inc.
United Airlines, Inc.
Uzbekistan Airways
Vang
Viacao Aerea Sao Paulo, S.A. (VASP)

Windward Island Airways International N.V.
(Revised INOl-16)

Appendix 42-7

Section 273(e) Sample MOU

United States Immigration and Naturalization Service
Section 273(E) Memorandum of Understanding
United States Immigration and Naturalization Service
Section 273(e) Memorandum of Understanding

This voluntary Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) is made between
(hereafter referred to as the
"Carrier") and the United States Immigration and Naturalization Service (hereafter referred to as the "INS"). The purpose of this MOU
is to identify the responsibilities of each party to improve the performance of the Carrier with respect to its duty under section 273 of
the Immigration and Nationality Act (the Act) to prevent the transport of improperly documented aliens to the United States. Based on
the Carrier's Performance Level (PL) in comparison to the Acceptable Performance Level (APL) or Second APL (APL2) set by the INS,
and based upon compliance with the other stipulations outlined in the MOU, the INS may refund, reduce, or waive a part of the
Carrier's section 273 of the Act administrative penalties. The MOU cannot, by law, exempt the Carrier from liability for civil penalties.
Although taking the steps set forth below will not relieve the Carrier of liability from penalties, the extent to which the Carrier has
complied with this MOU will be considered as a factor in cases where the INS may reduce, refund, or waive a fine. It is understood and
agreed by the parties that this MOU is not intended to be legally enforceable by either party. No claims, liabilities, or rights shall arise
from or with respect to this MOU except as provided for in the Act or the Code of Federal Regulations. Nothing in this MOU relieves the
Carrier of any responsibilities with respect to United States laws, the Act, or the Code of Federal Regulations. This document, once
jointly endorsed, will serve as a working agreement to be utilized for all fines cases relating to section 273 of the Act, and reflects the
mutual understanding of the Carrier and the INS. This MOU shall take effect immediately upon its approval by the Assistant
Commissioner for Inspections and shall be a valid working document and shall expire on September 30, 2001. The Carrier's
compliance with the MOU shall be evaluated periodically. The Carrier shall be notified in writing of its PL and the overall APL for each
rating period. Accordingly, the Carrier agrees to begin prompt and complete implementation of all of the terms listed in this MOU. With
30 days written notice, either party may terminate this MOU, for any reason, to include the INS' termination of this MOU for the
Carrier's failure to abide by its terms. Any subsequent fines will be imposed for the full penalty amount.
Memorandum of Understanding
L Introduction

1.1
1.2
1.3

The ASSistant Commissioner for Inspections shall exercise oversight regarding the Carrier's compliance with this MOU.
The Carrier agrees to begin implementation of the provisions set forth below immediately upon signing and receipt of the MOU
signed by the Assistant Commissioner for Inspections.
The Carrier agrees to permit the INS to monitor its compliance with the terms of this MOU. The Carrier shall permit the INS to
conduct an inspection of the Carrier's document screening procedures at ports of embarkation before arrival in the United

States, to determine compliance with the procedures listed in this MOU, to the extent permitted by competent local authorities
responSible for port access and security. If necessary, the carrier agrees to use its good offices to obtain this permission.
1.4
The Carrier agrees to designate a coordinator to be the contact point for all issues arising from the implementation of this MOU.
The Carrier shall provide the INS with the coordinator's name, title, address, telephone number, and facsimile number.
1.5
The Carrier shall require that all of its employees, including its representatives, follow the provisions of this MOU, and comply
with all requirements of the Act. The Carrier further agrees to cooperate with the INS in an open two-way exchange of pertinent
information.
2. Prompt Payment

2.1

2.2

2.3
2.4

The INS agrees to authorize a reduction in fine penalties based on compliance with this MOU only if the Carrier has paid all
administrative fines, liquidated damages, and user fees. This includes interest and penalties that have been imposed by either a
formal order or final decision, except cases on appeal.
The Carrier agrees to promptly pay all administrative fines, liquidated damages, and user fees. This includes interest and
penalties that are imposed by a formal order or a final decision during the time this MOU is in effect, except cases on appeal.
Prompt payment for the purposes of this MOU means payments made within 30 days from the date of billing.
The INS shall periodically review the Carrier's record of prompt payment for administrative fines, liquidated damages, and user
fees including interest and penalties. Failure to make prompt payment will result in the loss of benefits of the MOU.
The Carrier agrees to select a person from its organization as a contact point in the INS Office of Finance for the resolution of
payment issues. The Carrier shall provide the INS with the contact person's name, title, address, telephone number, and
facsimile number,

3. Carrier Agreement

3.1
3.2

3.3

3.4

3.5
3.6

3.7

3.8

3.9

The Carrier shall refuse to knowingly carry any improperly documented passenger.
The Carrier agrees to verify that trained personnel examine and screen passengers' travel documents to confirm, to the best of
their ability, that the passport, visa (if one is required), or other travel documents presented are valid and unexpired, and that
the passenger, and any accompanying passenger named in the passport, is the apparent rightful holder of the document.
The Carrier agrees to conduct addiflonal document checks when deemed appropriate, to verify that all passengers, including
transit passengers, are in possession of their own, and proper, travel documents as they board the aircraft, and to identify any
fraudulent documents.
The Carrier agrees to permit INS and State Department Consular officials to screen passengers' travel documents before or after
the Carrier has screened those passengers for boarding, to the extent permitted by the competent local authorities responsible
for port access and security. If necessary, the carrier agrees to use its good offices to obtain this permission.
In cases involving suspected fraud, the Carrier shall assess the adequacy of the documents presented by questioning indiViduals
or by taking other appropriate steps to corroborate the identity of the passengers, such as requesting secondary identification.
Following notification by the INS, or its representative, about a particular passenger or passengers, the carrier shall refuse to
knowingly transport any such individual determined by an INS official not to be in possession of proper documentation to enter
or pass through the United States. Transporting any improperly documented passenger so identified may result in a civil penalty.
At locations where there is no INS presence, carriers may request State Department Consular officials to examine and advise on
authenticity of passenger documentation. State Department Consular officials will act in an advisory capacity only.
Where the Carrier has refused to board a passenger based on a suspicion of fraud or other lack of proper documentation, the
Carrier agrees to make every effort to notify other carriers at that port of embarkation about that passenger, to the extent
permitted by competent local authorities responsible for port access and security. If necessary, the carrier agrees to use its good
offices to obtain this permission.
The Carner shall maintain a reasonable level of security designed to prevent passengers from circumventing any Carrier
document checks. The Carrier shall also maintain an adequate level of security designed to prevent stowaways from boarding
the Carrier's aircraft or vessel.
The Carrier agrees to participate in INS training programs and utilize INS Information Guides and other information provided by

the INS to assist the Carrier in determining documentary requirements and detecting fraud.
3.10
The Carrier agrees to make the INS Information Guides and other information provided by the INS readily available for use by
Carrier personnel, at every port of embarkation.
3.11
The Carrier agrees to make appropriate use of technological aids in screening documents including ultra violet lights,
magnification devices, or other equipment identified by the INS to screen documents.
3.12
The Carrier agrees to expeditiously respond to written requests from the appropriate INS official(s) for information pertaining
to the identity, itinerary, and seating arrangements of individual passengers. The Carrier also agrees to provide manifests and
other information, required to identify passengers, information and evidence regarding the identity and method of concealment
of a stowaway, and information regarding any organized alien smuggling activity.
3.13
Upon arrival at a Port-of-Entry (POE) and prior to inspection, the Carrier agrees to notify INS personnel at the POE of any
unusual circumstances, incidents, or problems at the port of embarkation involving the transportation of improperly documented
aliens to the United States.
3.14
The Carrier agrees to notify the Assistant Commissioner of Inspections, in writing, if it is unable to comply with any section of
the MOU because of local law or local competent authority. The Carrier shall list the specific section of the MOU with which it is
unable to comply and, to be in compliance with the MOU, shall notify the Service within ten (10) days after becoming cognizant
of this prohibition to comply. Further, in such instances the Carrier shall propose alternative means for meeting the objective
sought by the paragraph in question. For instance, where review of foreign boarding procedures cannot be performed by INS
personnel, the Carrier could provide that an audit of its operation be performed by local authorities or by private auditors.
4. INS Agreement

4.1
4.2

4.3

4.4
4.5

4.6

4.7

4.8

The Director of the National Fines Office will serve as a coordinator for all issues arising from the implementation of this MOU.
The INS shall provide the carrier with the coordinator's name, address, telephone number, and facsimile number.
The INS agrees to develop an Information Guide to be used by Carrier personnel at all ports of embarkation prior to boarding
passengers destined to the United States. The Information Guide will function as a resource to assist Carrier personnel in
determining proper documentary requirements and detecting fraud.
The INS agrees to develop a formal, continuing training program to assist carriers in their screening of passengers. Carriers may
provide input to the INS concerning specific training needs that they have identified. Initial and annual refresher training will be
conducted by the INS or Carrier representatives trained by the INS.
To the extent possible, INS and State Department Consular officials will consult, support, and assist the Carrier's efforts to
screen passengers prior to boarding.
The INS shall determine each Carrier's Performance Level (PL) based on statistical analysis of the Carrier's performance, as a
means of evaluation whether the Carrier has successfully screened all of its passengers in accordance with 8 CFR 273.3 and
this MOU. The PL is determined by taking the number of each Carrier's violations of section 273 of the Act for a fiscal year 1 and
dividing this by the number of documented nonimmigrants (i.e., those nonimmigrants that submit an Arrival/Departure Record,
Form 1-94, I-94T, or I-94W) transported by the Carrier and multiplying the result by 1,000.
The INS shall establish an Acceptable Performance Level (APL), based on statistical analysis of the performance of all carriers,
as a means of evaluating whether the Carrier has successfully screened all of its passengers in accordance with 8 CFR 273.3
and this MOU. The APL shall be determined by taking the total number of all carrier violations of section 273 of the Act for a
fiscal year 1 and dividing this by the total number of documented nonimmigrants (i.e., those nonimmigrants that submit an
Arrival/Departure Record, Form 1-94, I-94T, or I-94W) transported by all carriers for a fiscal year and multiplying the result by
1,000.
The INS shall establish a Second Acceptable Performance Level (APL2), based on statistical analysis of the performance of all
carriers at or better than the APL, as a means of further evaluating carrier success in screening its passengers in accordance
with 8 CFR 273.3 and this MOU. Using carrier statistics for only those carriers which are at or better than the APL, the APL2
shall be determined by taking the total number of these carrier violations of section 273 of the Act for a fiscal year 1 and
dividing by the total number of documented nonimmigrants (i.e., those nonimmigrants that submit an Arrival/Departure Record,
Form 1-94, I-94T, or I-94W) transported by these carriers and mUltiplying the result by 1,000.
The PL, APL, and APL2 may be recalculated periodically as deemed necessary, based on Carrier performance during the previous
period(s).

4.9

Carriers whose PL is at or better than the APL are eligible to receive an automatic 25 percent reduction, if signatory to and in
compliance with this MOU, on fines imposed under section 273 of the Act for periods determined by the INS.
4.10
Carriers whose PL is at or better than the APL2 are eligible to receive an automatic 50 percent reduction, if signatory to and in
compliance with this MOU, on fines imposed under section 273 of the Act for periods determined by the INS.
4.11
If the Carrier's PL is not at or better than the APL, the Carrier may receive an automatic 25 percent reduction in fines, if it
meets certain conditions, including being signatory to and in compliance with the MOU, and the carrier submits evidence that it
has taken extensive measures to prevent the transport of improperly documented passengers to the United States. This
evidence shall be submitted to the Assistant Commissioner for Inspections for consideration. Evidence may include, but is not
limited to, the following: (1) Information regarding the Carrier's training program, including participation of the Carrier's
personnel in any INS, Department of State (DOS), or other training programs and the number of employees trained: (2)
information regarding the date and number of improperly documented aliens intercepted by the Carrier at the port(s) of
embarkation, including, but not limited to, the aliens' name, date of birth, passport nationality, passport number or other travel
document information, and reason boarding was refused, if otherwise permitted under local law; and, (3) other evidence,
including screening procedure enhancements, technological or otherwise, to demonstrate the Carrier's good faith efforts to
properly screen passengers destined to the United States.
4.12
The Carrier may defend against imposition or seek further reduction of an administrative fine if the case is timely defended
pursuant to 8 CFR part 280, in response to the Form 1-79, Notice of Intent to Find, and the Carrier establishes that mitigating
or extenuating circumstances existed at the time of the violation.
4.13
Nothing in this MOU precludes a carrier from seeking fine reduction, refund, or waiver under 8 CFR 273.4.

Dated:

_

(Representative's Signature)

(Title)

(Carrier Name)
Dated:
Assistant Commissioner, Office of Inspection,
United States Immigration and Naturalization Service.

_

Appendix 43-1 Administrative Fines & Liquidated Damages Under
the INA(Added INS - TM2)
ADMINISTRATIVE FINES & LIQUIDATED DAMAGES UNDER THE INA
INA SEC

CIRCUMSTANCE

PENALTY

MITIGATION

231 (a)
231 (b)

No 1-94 or wrong type of 1-94 upon arrival.
Non-submission or improper completion of 1-94 at departure.

$330
$330

NO
NO

234

No advance notice of aircraft arrival or aircraft landing at
unauthorized place.

$2,200

YES

233

Breach of Transit Without Visa (TWOV) Agreement (liquidated
Damages).

$500

NO

243(c)

Failure to remove passenger as ordered [ref. 241 (d)(3)].
Failure to pay passenger removal expenses as ordered [ref. 241
(e)].

$2,000
$2,000

NO
NO

$2,000

NO

$2,000

NO

$2,000

NO

$5,000

NO

Failure to receive back passenger as ordered [ref. 241 (d)(1 )].

Failure to detain stowaway until inspected [ref. 241 (d)(2)].

Failure to pay for stowaway removal as ordered [ref. 241 (e)].

Failure to remove stowaway as ordered [ref. 241 (d)(2)(C)].

Failure to provide complete list of alien crew upon arrival.
Failure to report illegally-landed alien crew.

$220
$220

NO
NO

Failure to provide complete list of alien crew upon departure.

$220

NO

Performance of unauthorized longshore work by alien crew [ref.
258].

$5,500

NO

254(a)(1 )
254(a)(2)

Failure to detain alien crewman prior to inspection.
Failure to detain alien crewman as ordered.

$3,300
$3,300

YES
YES

254(a)(3)

Failure to remove alien crewman as ordered.

$3,300

YES

255

Employment on passenger vessels of crewmen with certain
afflictions.

$1,100

YES

256

Improper discharge of alien crewman.

$3,300

YES

257

Bringing alien to the U.S. as crewman with intent to evade INS
laws.

$11,000

YES

271

Failure to prevent unauthorized landing of aliens

$3,300

YES

272

Bringing an alien subject to refusal on a health-related ground.

$3,300

NO

273(a)(1 )
273(a)(2)

Bringing an alien without a valid unexpired entry document.
$3,300
Taking a fee, deposit or consideration in attempt to avoid 273(a)(1) $3,300
liability.

YES
NO

251

Appendix 43-2 Precedent Decisions Relating to Fines (Added INS TM2) (Revised July 21, 2000)
Section 231. Lists of alien and citizen passengers arriving or departing the U.S.
Incorrectly prepared forms - liability. Matter of Plane N-1 02-A, 6 I&N Dec. 628 (BIA 1955)
History of errors and warnings - liability. Matter of Pawa Plane No. 715, 8 I&N Dec. 694 (BIA 1960)
No knowledge of stowaway's presence - no liability. Matter of SS Lionne, 81&N Dec. 19 (BIA 1958)
Delay presenting departure manifest due to loss in mails - liability. No mitigation or remission. Matter of SS
Castel Felice, 11 I&N Dec. 831 (BIA 1966);
Failure to present arrival - departure card per alien - liability. Matter of Aeromexico Flight #142, 151&N
Dec. 392 (BIA 1975);
Section 234. Control of aircraft. (Section 239 prior to April 1, 1997.)
Section 239 provisions are inapplicable to section 273 fines. Matter of Plane Cut -- 480, 5 I&N Dec. 226
(BIA 1953)
The maximum penalty imposed is per aircraft, not per violation / The number of violations bears upon
mitigation or remission. Matter of Howard Aircraft N-813, 7 I&N Dec. 584 (BIA 1957)
Unintentional violation - possible mitigation. Matter of Aircraft No. N- 2476ZU, 11 I&N Dec. 73 (BIA 1965)
Owner was not pilot - no defense to liability. Matter of Aircraft N-3281-Z, 13 I&N Dec. 409 (BIA 1969)
INS denies pilot's request for personal interview - collection proceeding canceled. Matter of Beechcraft B-9,

171&N Dec. 147 (BIA 1979)
Section 243. Removal of Stowaways (Section 273(d) prior to April 1, 1997)
All measures taken to prevent an alien's escape and master's prompt action led to alien's capture liability. Matter of MN Spencer,S I&N Dec. 563 (BIA 1953).
Section 251. Lists of alien crewmen; reports of illegal landings; performance of unauthorized longshore work.
Master of U.S. -owned vessel fails to provide list of names and nationalities of alien crewmen liability. Matter of SS American Eagle, 7 I&N Dec. 235 (BIA 1956)
Clerical errors in manifest; no opportunity for correction; repeated warning - liability. Matter of Pawa Plane
No 774,7 I&N Dec. 403 (BIA 1957);.
No remission permitted if fail to report desertion within 24 hours. Matter of MN Trinity Mariner,16 I&N Dec.
508 (BIA 1978).
Section 254. Control of alien crewmen.
Failure to detain after notice to do so - agents liable. Matter of SS Lake Minnew Anka, 5 I&N Dec 296 (BIA
1953);.
Alien crewman lacking nonimmigrant visa and not on visaed crew list is not detained - liability. Matter of
SS. Greystoke Castle and MN Western Queen. 6 I&N 112 (BIA 1954)
Section 254 inapplicable to alien crewman where U.S.-owned vessel never stops at foreign port. Matter of
SS. American Eagle, 7 I&N Dec. 235 (BIA 1956)
a) Separate notice to detain never issued, alien crewman deserts - liability; b) Agents for charterers may be
liable. Matter of SS. Marilena, 7 I&N Dec. 453 (BIA 1957)
Notice to detain not required for liability. Matter of MN Arnfinn Stange, 8 I&N Dec. 639 (BIA 1960)
Alien crewman drowns while escaping - no liability. Matter of SS Bellina, 9 I&N Dec. 62 (BIA 1960)
The maximum penalty applies per crewman per trip, not per violation. Matter of MN Signeborg, 9 I&N Dec.
6 (BfA 1960)
Alien crewman returned to ship by INS after being taken ashore for fingerprinting then deserts - liability.
Matter of MIS Tenna Dan, 9 I&N Dec. 564 (BfA 1962)

Prerequisite to fine liability: No notice of Intention to Fine and Notice to Detain must be served. Matter of
MN Hellenic Leader, 10 I&N Dec. 737 (BIA 1964)
Alien crewman denied landing privileges yet taken ashore for medical treatment - escapes- liability. Matter
of MIS Panaghia Throskepasti, 10 I&N Dec. 360 (BIA 1963)
Alien crewman, during course of duties, stands on pier to assist debarking passengers - no liability. Matter
of MIS Berlin, 10 I&N Dec. 607 (BIA 1964)
Extent of mitigation is determined by reasonableness, not effectiveness, or precautions exercised. Matter
of MN Clydefield, 10 I&N Dec. 165 (BIA 1963)
Failure to present crewman for inspection - no liability, absent proof of alien's departure. Matter of MN
Pacific Ocean, 11 I&N Dec. 475 (BIA 1966)
No evidence submitted by carrier that illegal landing did not occur - liability. Matter of MIT Dona Maria, 11
I&N Dec. 596 (BIA 1966)
Mitigation warranted where master, officers or vessel cooperate with INS regs. Matter of MN Tung An, 11
I&N Dec. 700 (BIA 1966)
Alien escapes from medical installation under government supervision - no liability. Matter of MN
Zarathrusta, 11 I&N Dec. 245 (BIA 1965)
Alien crewmen apprehended swimming ashore - no liability. Matter of SIS Captain Demosthenes, 13 I&N
Dec. 345 (BIA 1969)
Despite lack of notice, where record shows regulations were fully adhered to - liability. Matter of MN
Oceanic Amity, 131&N Dec. 418 (BIA 1969)
Alien crewman escapes via lifeboat after vessel has left U.S. port -liability. Matter of MN Halcyon Wave,
13 I&N Dec. 92 (BIA 1968)
Evidence shows alien crewman deserted before inspection -liability. Matter of MN Oceanic Peace, 14 I&N
Dec. 51 (BIA 1972)
Crewman admitted in TWOV status deserts after joining vessel -liability. Matter of MN Ferrol, 14 I&N Dec.
18 (BIA 1972)
Crewman admitted in TWOV status; vessel not then and not expected to be in U.S. - no liability. Matter of

MIT Dona Rita, 15 I&N Dec. 718 (BIA 1976)
Single fine accrues for one or multiple violations by same crewman. Matter of MN Trinity Mariner, 16 I&N
Dec. 508 (BIA 1978);.
INS may not impose two fines for same misfeasance. Matter of SIT Grand Zenith, 16 I&N Dec. 460 (BIA
1977).
Section 256. Failure to payoff I discharge alien crewman.
Master acts without agent's knowledge - agent liable. Matter of SS. Captain K. Papzoglou, 5 I&N Dec. 567
(BIA 1953)
Fine provisions inapplicable to public vessels. Matter of U.S. Naval Ship General Mason M. Patrick,S I&N
Dec. 572 (BIA 1953)
Direct evidence of violation not required. Matter of SS. Republic, 5 I&N Dec. 663 (BIA 1954)
Crewman discharged but not paid off - liability. Matter of SS Ciudad de Barquisimeto, 6 I&N Dec. 311 (BIA
1954)
Master discharged self; agent had nothing to do with his replacement - agent liable. Matter of SS. Kamma
Dan, 6 I&N Dec. 518 (BIA 1955)
Crewman stricken at sea, paid off and discharged, transferred to another vessel - liability - exceptions.
Matter of SS. Loch Avon, 7 I&N Dec. 215 (BIA 1956)
Deserting crewman paid off while in INS constructive control - no liability. Matter of SS. Evimar, 7 I&N Dec.
350 (BIA 1956);
Payoff and discharge merely transferred employee relationship to new owner - no liability. Matter of SS.
Federal Commerce, 8 I&N Dec. 366 (BIA 1959);
Alien crewman paid off and discharged leaves U.S. temporarily and is uncontrollably delayed in rejoining
vessel - no liability. Matter of Yacht Caribbean Star, 9 I&N Dec. 272 (BIA 1961)
a) Separate fine per crewman, not per vessel; b) Vessel's operations or purposes are irrelevant to liability.
Matter of HMS Bounty, 10 I&N Dec. 391 (BIA 1963)
No evidence of payoff and discharge - no liability. Matter of MIS Valiant Trader, 14 I&N Dec. 688 (BIA
1974)

Alien lawfully admitted to U.S. for permanent residence -liability exception. Matter of MN Bergen Juno, 16
I&N Dec. 102 (BIA 1977)
Crewman paid off and discharged without Attorney General's consent - liability. Matter of SIT Grand Zenith,
16 I&N Dec. 460 (BIA 1977)
Section 271. Prevention of unauthorized landing of aliens in the United States.
Alien fails to appear for additional required examination - liability. Matter of Plane NC SJD 004, 5 I&N Dec.
482 (BIA 1953)
Due diligence by carrier permits mitigation - but remains liable. Matter of Plane N-8224-H, 6 I&N Dec. 594
(BIA 1955)
Alien crewman employed on U.S.-owned vessel- section 271 inapplicable. Matter of SS. American Eagle,
7 I&N Dec. 235 (BIA 1956).
Ship's officer assisted and concealed alien stowaways on board - no liability. Matter of 0- - -, 8 I&N Dec.
323 (BIA 1959)
Failure to present alien passenger for deferred inspection - liability. Matter of TACA International Airlines
Plane Flight 110, 13 I&N Dec. 390 (BIA 1969)
No evidence carrier made earnest effort to locate alien who absconded - minimal mitigation. Matter of
Northwest Airlines Aircraft, Flight Number 4, 13 I&N Dec. 840 (BIA 1971)
Alien crewman admitted in TWOV status to join vessel - no liability. Matter of MN Trinity Mariner, 16 I&N
Dec. 508 (BIA 1978)
Inability to fine is absolute; lack of knowledge is irrelevant. Matter of Southern Pacific Railroad Bridge, 16
I&N Dec. 209 (BIA 1977)
After "landing" properly, alien effects an illegal entry without leaVing the U.S. - no liability. Matter of
Lewiston-Queenston Bridge, 17 I&N Dec. 410 (BIA 1980)
Section 272. Bringing in aliens subject to exclusion on a health-related ground.
Neither carrier nor physician had reason to suspect mental problems from alien's appearance and behavior
- no liability. Matter of SS. United States, 6 I&N Dec. 467 (BIA 1954)

In-transit agreement or documentary waiver - still liable. Matter of Plane CF- CUR, 7 I&N Dec. 209 (BIA
1956)
Section 273. Unlawful bringing of aliens into the United States (lack of a valid passport or visa (See Outcome
of Deferred Inspections & TWOVs Not Presented this chapter); or failure to deport a stowaway.
Reduction, waiver or refund permitted for violations occurring on or after December 29, 1994.
Individual waiver of nonimmigrant documents - no defense to liability. Matter of SS Florida, 6 I&N Dec. 85
(BIA 1954)
Where visa is not required - no liability. Matter of Plane CCA CUT 532. 6 I&N Dec. 262 (BIA 1954)
Alien without visa does not intend to leave vessel - liability. Matter of MIS Amagisan Maru, 6 I&N Dec. 362
(BIA 1954)
No evidence that a particular alien comes within an agreement to allow certain aliens to enter in TWOV
status - liability. Matter of Plane N - - 90674. 6 I&N Dec. 570 (BIA 1955)
Waiver of documents granted to returning resident alien -liability. Matter of PM Flight 204. 6 I&N Dec. 810
(BfA 1955)
Alien crewmen without visas - section 273 inapplicable. Matter of SS. Greystoke Castle and MN Western
Queen, 6 I&N Dec. 112 (BIA 1954)
Diplomatic officer and household lack visas - liability. Matter of SS. Liberte, 6 I&N Dec. 204 (BIA 1954)
Government has contracted obligation to reimburse carrier for payment of any penalty - carrier liable.
Matter of Plane N - - 6104 - -C, 6 I&N Dec 819 (BIA 1955)
Prerequisite to liability: Notice to Detain and Notice of Intention to Fine must be served on same party.
Matter of SS. Morning Light, 7 I&N Dec. 280 (BIA 1956)
Carrier did not ensure Canadian citizens with U.S. residence possess reentry documents - liability. Matter
of CPA Plane Flight 301, 7 I&N Dec. 329 (BIA 1956)
Alien falls under standing waiver published in regulations - no liability. Matter of Plane CUT - - 604, 7 I&N
Dec. 701 (BIA 1958)
Subsequently published regulation relieves carrier of liability -liability. Matter of KLM Plane PH-LKA, 7 I&N
Dec. 704 (BfA 1958)

Carrier signatory to Overseas Agreement - no liability. Matter of Canadian Pacific Airlines, 8 I&N Dec. 8
(BIA 1957)
Passenger in TWOV status without passport or other entry document - liability. Matter of PM Plane Flight
896/10. 8 I&N Dec. 498 (BIA 1959)
Waiver of documents or parole is no defense of liability. Matter of Plane F- BHSO, 9 I&N Dec. 595 (BIA
1062)
Alien paroled into U.S. and subsequently granted waiver of visa requirement - no liability. Matter of Flight
SR-4, 10 I&N Dec. 197 (BIA 1963)
Carrier may offer evidence on the question of due diligence. Matter of SS. Ryndam, 10 I&N Dec. 240 (BIA
1963)
Passenger without visa, presented as nonimmigrant visitor for business - liability. Matter of Aircraft VT-DJK,
12 I&N Dec. 267 (BIA 1967)
Visa forms not sealed - no defense to liability. Matter of MN Guadalupe, 13 I&N Dec. 67 (BIA 1968)
Suspension of TWOV regulations is exempt from notice and comment regulations. Matter of Swissair Flight
SR 164, 151&N Dec. 291 (BIA 1974)
INS records establish liability absent carrier's contradictory evidence. Matter of Swissair Flight SR 168, 15
I&N Dec. 372 (BIA 1975)
Family of ship's officers are not "crewmen". Matter of MIT Rajendra Prasad, 16 I&N Dec. 705 (BIA 1979)
A listing of persons to be detained is not alone sufficient notice. Matter of MN Rio CalchaillJl, 16 I&N 323
(BIA 1977)
Carrier ensures all passengers have met visa requirements. Matter of MN Runaway, 18 I&N Dec. 127 (BIA
1981 )
Evidence of "affirmative misconduct". Matter of MN Solemn Judge, 18 I&N Dec. 186 (BIA 1982)
Presumption that owner of vessel participated in bringing undocumented aliens to U.S. may be rebutted.
Matter of MN Coral Springs. 18 I&N Dec. 229 (BIA 1982)
Presumption that owner of vessel participated in bringing undocumented aliens to U.S. may be rebutted.
Matter of MN Snail's Pace, 18 I&N Dec. 233 (BIA 1982)

The carrier's intent does not affect liability; reasonable diligence is decided on a case-by-case basis. Matter of M/V "Emma",
18 I&N Dec. 40 (BIA 1981).
A Service decision must state specific reasons for determination. Matter of Air India "Flight No. 101",1. D. 3315 (BIA 1997).
Carrier is subject to fine where alien is granted parole instead of waiver. Matter of United Airlines "Flight UA 802", 1. D. 3396
(BIA 1997).
Granting a waiver to an undocumented LPR does not relieve the carrier of fine liability. Matter of Air India "Flight No. 101",1.
D. 3388 (BIA 1999).
Liability is not incurred where carrier demonstrates, by a preponderance of evidence, that it could not have ascertained that
the individual transported was an alien and that a valid passport and visa was required. Matter of Varig Brazilian Airlines
"Flight No. 830", I. D. 3304 (BIA 1996 and 1997).

Page 1 of2

INS

INSERTS PLUS/Inspectors Field Manual/Appendix 43-3 Personal Interview Guidelines (Added INS - TM2)

Appendix 43-3 Personal Interview Guidelines (Added INS - TM2)

Important Notice
Personal Interview Guidelines

A personal interview is authorized under 8 CFR 280.12. Procedures for conducting a personal appearance
are contained in 8 CFR 280.13. The National Fines Office (NFO) has established specific procedures for a
request for a personal interview.
In order for a personal interview to be conducted, the request must be made in conjunction with the written
defense and submitted within 30 days of service of the Notice of Intent to Fine, Form 1-79 (8 CFR 280.12).
The immigration officer assigned to conduct the personal interview shall contact the representative of the
carrier to set a date and time for the personal interview at the NFO, or a telephonic interview in lieu of a
personal interview at the NFO.
If additional evidence is to be presented by the representative during a personal interview, the evidence must
be submitted at the time of the personal interview. If a telephonic interview is to be conducted and additional
will be presented, the representative must submit the documentation at least 24 hours before the start of the
telephonic interview for consideration and inclusion in the file.
Once a date and time for the personal or telephonic interview have been established, the representative is
obliged to appear in person for the personal interview or telephonically contact the NFO for the telephonic
interview on the scheduled date and time.
If the representative cannot appear for the personal interview or cannot call for the telephonic interview on the
scheduled date and time, the representative must call the NFO at least 24 hours in advance to reschedule the
interview. The immigration officer will reschedule one additional date on which the personal or telephonic
interview is to be held. The rescheduled interview date will be set within thirty (30) days of the original

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INS

interview date and must be conducted and completed within that time frame.
If the representative fails to appear or telephonically contact the NFO on the date and time that has been
rescheduled by the immigration officer, the representative will have forfeited his or her opportunity to discuss
or present information regarding those determined cases. The immigration officer will make a decision on the
case based upon the existing record.
The immigration officer assigned to conduct the personal interview may limit the discussion of a particular
case to a reasonable time period at his or her discretion. The immigration officer may also limit the total time
period allotted in a day for the scheduled personal or telephonic interview.
In the discretion of the immigration officer assigned to conduct the personal interview, the representative may
also discuss another case assigned for personal interview to the same officer, provided that the written
defense and any additional evidence relevant to that other case has been filed. The representative may not
discuss any case for which no request for a personal interview has been made, nor any case assigned to
another immigration officer.
The immigration officer will prepare a report of the personal or telephonic interview, summarizing the evidence
and containing his or her findings and recommendation, and present it to the Director of the NFO. (8 CFR
280.13).
A case decision will be mailed to the representative after the case is reviewed by the Director. Official
notification will be made in the form of a Formal Order and a Bill, or a Notice of Termination of Proceedings.
The Service does not have jurisdiction of a case once it is pending before the Board of Immigration Appeals
(BIA). Any request for oral argument must then be made according to the BlA's rules of procedure.
GQJo. tl}~NextPClg~ :>.. :>.. >

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Appendix 46-1

INS Fee Collection Procedures
TABLE OF CONTENTS

I. DEFINITIONS AND FORMS
A. Definitions
B. Forms and Illustrations
II. OVERVIEW
A. Getting Started
B. Equipment
C. Management Oversight
D. Principle of liability for Public Funds
III. CASH REGISTERS: MANAGEMENT OVERVIEW
A. General Guidelines
B. Procedures Where Three or More INS Staff Members Are Present
C. Staff Responsibilities Where Two INS Staff Members Are Present
D. Procedures Where Only One INS Staff Member Is Present
E. Maintenance / Supplies
IV. CASH REGISTER PROCEDURES
A. General
B. Programming the Cash Register
C. Cash Register Reports
D. Supervisor's Responsibilities
E. Immigration Inspector's Responsibilities
F. Cashier's Responsibilities
G. Cashier's Procedures
H. Accounting for Applications Processed during Each Shift
I. Accounting for Fees Collected during Each Shift
J. Securing the Journal Tape
K. Accounting for Fees Collected Each Day
L. liability During the Fee Collection, Reconciliation and Reporting Stages
V. CASH REGISTER FEE DEPOSITS

A. Policy
B. Procedures for Checks and Cash Received
C. Preparing the SF-215, Deposit Ticket
D. Safeguarding the Deposit
E. Forwarding the Deposit to the Depositary (Bank) or FRB
F. Using a Courier Service to Transfer Deposits
G. Disposition of Confirmed Copies
H. Adjustments to Deposits
I. Submission of Records of Deposits to the Debt Management Center
J. File Documents to be Retained by POEs
VI. MANUAL FEE COLLECTIONS: MANAGEMENT OVERVIEW
A. General Guidelines
B. Procedures Where Three or More INS Staff Members Are Present
C. Staff Responsibilities Where Two INS Staff Members Are Present
D. Procedures Where Only One INS Staff Member Is Present
E. Maintenance / Supplies
VII. MANUAL FEE COLLECTION PROCEDURES
A. General
B. Supervisor's Responsibilities
C. Immigration Inspector's Responsibilities
D. Cashier's Responsibilities
E. Cashier's Procedures
F. Accounting for Applications Processed During Each Shift
G. Accounting for Fees Collected During Each Shift
H. Liability During the Fee Collection, Reconciliation and Reporting Stages
I. Safeguarding Supplies of Receipts

VIII. MANUAL FEE DEPOSITS
A. Policy
B. Procedures for Checks and Cash Received
C. Preparing the SF-215, Deposit Ticket
D. Safeguarding the Deposit
E. Forwarding the Deposit to the Depositary (Bank) or FRB
F. Using a Courier Service to Transfer Deposits
G. Disposition of Confirmed Copies
H. Adjustments to Deposits
I. Submission of Records of Deposits to the Debt Management Center
J. File Documents to be Retained by POEs
IX. FORMS OF PAYMENT
A. Amount of Checks or Money Orders
B. Counterfeit Money
C. Review of Checks, Money Orders, Etc.

D. Inscription of Checks
E. Required Identification
F. Recording the Information
G. Endorsement
X. CHANGE FUNDS
A. Policy
B. Establishing Change Funds
C. Authorized Use of Change Funds
D. Increasing Authorized Amount
E. Reducing or Closing the Change Fund
F. Accountability for Transfer of the Change Fund Between Cashiers
G. Safekeeping Facilities for Change Funds
H. Verification of Funds
I. Verification of Change Funds $200 or Less in POEs in Remote Locations
J. Personal Liability for Change Funds
XI. REFUNDS
A. Policy
XII. SAFEGUARDING COLLECTIONS AND SUPPORTING DOCUMENTS
A. Personnel
B. Segregation of Duties
C. Drop Safes
D. Safe Combinations
E. Passwords and PINs
F. Courier Service Contracts
G. Cash Register Inventory
H. Cashier Room Construction Recommendations
XIII. Fee Collection Quality Assurance
A. Checklist
B. Worksheet A - Reconciliation of End-of-Shift
C. Worksheet B -Tracking Applications / Cash Counts
D. Worksheet C - Deposit Activities
E. Worksheet D - Journal Tapes
F. Worksheet E - Manual Receipts
G. Instructions for Completing Checklist Questions

I. DEFINITIONS AND FORMS
A. DEFINITIONS
Accountable Officer - Any government employee who by reason of his or her employment is responsible for or has custody of
government funds.

Agency Location Code (ALC) - A numeric
accounting reports prepared by or for INS. (b)(2),

to agencies used to identify deposits, documents, and

(b)(7)(E)

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
Cashier - INS employee authorized to collect fees. This may be an Immigration Aide or Immigration Inspector.
Change Fund - A fund established in accordance with applicable principles and standards of the Department of the Treasury and the
INS for an amount not to exceed $500. Change Funds are used to make change for fees paid in cash in U. S. currency only.
CIN - CASH-LINK Identification Number. This number is

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

rovided b the INS Debt Mana ement Center.

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

Checks - As used in this manual, the term includes checks drawn on Treasury and postal money orders, as well as other checks,
drafts, and money orders.
Cutoff Time - A time predesignated by a bank beyond which deposits or other transactions will be deferred to the next banking day.
Debt Management Center (DMC) - Immigration and Naturalization Service Finance Office located in Vermont to which all deposit
forms, records, and data are sent for reconciliation with Treasury's CA$H-LINK system and for long-term record retention.
Deposit (same day) - A deposit made before the cutoff time on the day the funds were received by the agency. For example, if the
agency receives funds for deposit at 10 a.m. on Monday and makes the deposit to the bank by the cutoff time of 2 p.m. on Monday,
the depositary's cutoff time reqUirements
requirements are met.
Depositary - A bank into which a deposit is made for the credit of the U.S. Treasury. These include Federal Reserve Banks as well as
commercial banks that have been specifically authorized by the Department of the Treasury for that purpose.
Drop Safe - A safe that enables individuals to safeguard funds in stages without having to open the safe.
End-of-shift tape - A cash register tape prepared at the end of the Cashier's shift, sometimes called a Z tape.
FMS - Acronym used to denote the Department of the Treasury/Financial Management Service, the part of the Department having
jurisdiction over deposits into the U.S. Treasury.
FRB - Federal Reserve Bank or one of its branches.
Journal tape - The cash register tape that provides
activity. Journal tapes,
prOVides complete and chronological records of all cash register actiVity.
sometimes called detail tapes, are official accounting records.
OCR - Optical Character Recognition.
Manual Receipt Tracking Number - A unique control number placed on each application taken, check received, and receipt given
under manual fee collection processes. This number enables INS to document payment and to tie these pieces of information
together.
Principal Officer - Person designated by the Port Director to have primary responsibility to ensure that the security of and
accountability for funds received by INS employees are maintained.

Quality Assurance - Internal control tool adopted by INS to monitor and measure compliance with procedures, to mitigate adverse
aspects of operations, and to assure program processes are performed with integrity and in compliance with applicable law.
Remittance - A fee payment, including cash, check, cashier's check, certified bank check, or money order.
Remitter - Person paying a fee to INS.
Segregation of duties - At POEs, segregation of duties means the same person should not accept payment and adjudicate. It is an
internal control mechanism. By separating functions or duties, no one person has complete control over the collection process.
Segregation of duties makes it difficult to take fees or alter records without detection.
Subtotal tape - A cash register tape used to take an interim total, as when a cashier is temporarily transferring responsibility, e.g.,
during a break. This is sometimes called an X tape.
B. FORMS AND ILLUSTRATIONS
Form

G-221,

Schedule of Valuables Shipped - A record of the shipment of remittances to an FRB or other depositary. (To view a

filled-in illustration of this form, click on "sample
Form

G-266,

G-221 ").

Request for Refund of Fee - Form used when a determination is made to refund an application fee. (To view a filled-

in illustration of this form, click on "sample

G-266").

Form G-277, Report of Imprest Fund Verification - Form prepared when there is a transfer of Change Fund accountability, such
as a change of Cashiers.
Form

G-711,

Individual Fee Register Receipt - A three-part, pre-numbered form used to record all application fees received and

accepted over-the-counter during a business day. (To view a filled-in illustration of this form, click on "sample
Form

G-712,

Summary of Fees - Multi-copy form to be sent by field offices including ports of entry (POEs) in the deposit back-up

package to the INS Debt Management Center. (To view a filled-in illustration of this form, click on "sample
Form

G-714,

1-2958,

G-712").

Receipt for Funds and Valuables Transferred - Form used to acknowledge the transfer of fees collected from one

employee to another. (To view a filled-in illustration of this form, click on "sample
Form
fees.

G-711 ").

G-714").

Designation of Cashier - Form used by a supervisor to designate the responsibility to collect, handle, and safeguard

Form OF-211, Request for Change or Establishment of Imprest Fund - Form used to request the establishment of a Change
Fund, to Increase or decrease the amount of the fund, or to close it.

SF-215, Deposit Ticket - Document used for preparing deposits credited to the account of the U.S. Treasury (to view a filledin illustration of this form, click on "sample SF -215").

Form

Form SF-116S, Interim Receipt for Cash - Form used to account for advances to alternate cashiers.

Fee Reconciliation Worksheet -

A standard reconciliation work sheet to be used by a Cashier to account for fees collected
prior to securing them. This worksheet requires the printed names and the signatures of two persons to be properly completed. It
must also include date and time of reconciliation.
Cash Register

Tapes

(examples)

Overage/Shortage Memo

Cover Sheet with

Employee Overage/Shortage

Instructions and the completed Overage/Shortage Memo

Memo

Location Discrepancy

Tracking Log

with Instructions

Location Discrepancy

Tracking Log

(completed)

Internal

Tracking Log

Cash Register Breakdown
Endorsement

Stamp

Manual Receipt

Cover Sheet

Example (blank)

Worksheet

Examples

Example (Forms SF-21S, G-711)

Cash Register Receipt

Example (Forms SF-21S, G-712, Cash register tapes)

II. OVERVIEW
This manual documents the Immigration and Naturalization Service's (INS) procedures to be followed in the collection and
safeguarding of fees at ports of entry. INS' objective is to ensure the integrity of the fee collection program by establishing controls
to:
Collect fees properly;
Reconcile fees collected with the cash register tape (or manual receipts) and applications adjudicated;
Establish sufficient segregation of duties to prevent fraud, theft, or the misuse of funds; and
Establish procedures for supervisory responsibility and accountability of functions.

A. GETTING STARTED
To begin fee collection, the Port Director must:

•

Appoint a person to serve as Principal Officer over all Port locations. The Principal Officer shall be designated in writing.
The Principal Officer will have primary responsibility to oversee the fee collection process, to train and manage the
staff engaged in fee collection, and to ensure the security and accountability of funds received by INS employees are
maintained. A single Principal Officer will be the norm unless the Port Director justifies, and the number of subports
requires, the appointment of additional Principal Officers at other sites.
Identify employees to serve as Cashiers. Cashiers shall be designated in writing using Form 1-2958, Designation of
Cashier. In large POEs, these will often be Immigration Aides. In smaller POEs, it may be more practical for
Immigration Inspectors to serve as Cashiers. One person may not both adjudicate applications and accept fees. For
very limited exceptions, such as when there is only one INS employee assigned at a POE, see section III-D for POE
using cash registers or section VI-D for POEs using manual fee collection procedures.

•

Obtain necessary equipment to safeguard collected fees and applications, and all materials necessary to backup
deposits.
Identify an authorized bank into which deposits will be made. This must be a Federal Reserve Bank or a commercial bank
specifically authorized by the Department of the Treasury to maintain a demand account, entitled "Treasury's
General Account," for the purpose of accepting deposits to the Treasury. The INS Debt Management Center can
assist in obtaining or replacing a financial institution. Note: Deposits shall not be mailed to the INS Debt
Management Center.

B. EQUIPMENT

The equipment needed will vary with the size of the POE and the volume of fees collected. At a minimum, every POE should have

a:
•

Lockable cash box;

•

Locked box with a slot for inserting applications collected. The lockbox shall be fastened to, or incorporated into, an
immobile object.

•

File cabinet with a bar and combination lock if the total fees awaiting deposit and the Cash Fund are not expected to
exceed $50, or a relatively non-removable safe, preferably a drop safe, with a three position dial combination feature
for larger amounts. There should also be a log to record entry and closure attached to or accompanying each
container or cabinet holding fee collections when more than one person has access to the safe.

•

Rubber stamp so that the Cashier can place the restrictive endorsement on checks, money orders, etc. immediately upon
receipt; (first endorsement required by internal control)
A rubber stamp so that the deposit preparer can properly endorse cash instruments for deposit to the financial
institution; (second endorsement required by Treasury).
A supply of nondenominational money straps for use in preparing deposits.

Larger POEs will also require:
•

Cash registers, preferably programmable models, with a maintenance contract in place;

A safe in lieu of a file cabinet with bar and combination lock. A drop safe is preferable, because Cashiers can deposit their
fee collections at the end of their shifts without concern for safeguarding collections already in the safe;
Cash counting machines;
Credit card readers, if credit cards are accepted;
Locking bags for transporting cash between locations and/or to the depositary (bank); and
A contract with a courier service to make daily bank deposits.
Two additional actions may be taken:

1.

A Change Fund may also be established, to assist Cashiers in making change, if the Port Director deems it necessary.
Procedures for establishing and maintaining Change Funds are described in section X.

2.

Counterfeit detection pens may be purchased.

C. MANAGEMENT OVERSIGHT
Management oversight by the Port Director, the Principal Officer, and subordinate supervisors is the key component in the
successful collection and handling of fees at POEs. With effective management oversight, Government funds can be better protected
and personal liabilities for losses reduced. Without it, the likelihood of losses and liability increases. Management oversight will be
greatly increased by ensuring that particular areas of vulnerability are addressed, proper procedures are followed, and accountability is
monitored through periodic spot checks or reviews in these areas. The most important of these areas are:

1.

Prompt reconciliation of fees and transactions;

2.

Segregation of duties in all locations where three or more staff members are present, and to the extent feasible where
fewer than three staff members are present;

3.

Safeguarding of all supporting documentation in addition to safeguarding cash register tapes and manual receipts;

4.

Where cash registers are used, ensuring that each register is programmed and used to its capacity and that the
programming reflects the current structure for INS fees;

5.

Ensuring specific passwords for each Cashier using cash registers and changing these passwords when Cashiers change
or when passwords are revealed and accountability is threatened;

6.

Establishing and following strict rules of accountability for Cashiers and other INS employees handling Government
funds.

7.

Establishing proper supervisory oversight of the fee collection process, to include certification of the accuracy of the cash
collected at the end of each shift, immediate review and concurrence of cashier errors, and performance of
unannounced cash counts on cashiers. The performance and the results of unannounced cash counts need to be
documented in writing.

8.

Providing unique cashier numbers to each person working as a Cashier.

D. PRINCIPLE OF LIABILITY FOR PUBLIC FUNDS

Government employees who are responsible for or have custody of public funds are accountable for the safeguarding of these
funds. These employees are accountable officers.
In the General Accounting Office's Principles of Federal Appropriations Law, Chapter 9, Liability and Relief of Accountable Officers,
two important points are made. First, the standard for accountable officers is one of strict liability. The accountable officer is, in effect,
an "insurer" of the funds in his or her charge. Second, the liability is automatic and arises by operation of law at the moment the
physical loss occurs or an erroneous payment (such as giving too much change) is made. Employees performing collection duties are
responsible for maintaining appropriate accounting practices and controls of the assets for which they are responsible. Responsibility
continues from the time the fees are collected until proper and acceptable accounting is made and the fees collected are deposited or
officially turned over to another individual.
The first and major part of safeguarding funds comes through the Principal Officer and supervisors who must establish
accountability for these employees. This will be accomplished by providing clear procedures for the employees to follow to determine
the accountability for fees collected at any given time of the day/shift. The second part, which is equally important, is for supervisors
to establish strict terms of liability for employees. That is, employees who handle and are accountable for public funds must be liable
for any shortages or discrepancies found in these funds.
Reconciliation of fees collected is to be done at the end of each shift and cumulatively on a daily basis, so as to detect any
shortages or overages and account for them in a timely manner. Cashiers or other employees held liable for shortages are to restore
the funds promptly, i.e., no later than the next morning at a time established by the Principal Officer. Overages are the property of the
U.S. Government and may not be kept by employees under any circumstances. Overages are deposited to Miscellaneous Receipt
Account 151060, "Forfeitures of Unclaimed Money and Property."
In the case of a shortage or an overage, the employee will submit a memorandum to the Port Director acknowledging the
discrepancy and explaining the circumstances that caused the discrepancy, if known. This will be done whether or not the employee
replaces a loss. Shortages shall not be made up from the Change Fund. Overages from one day or shift may not be used to replace
shortages occurring on another day or shift.
Unless the employee can prove he/she was without fault or negligence, the employee will assume liability for the loss. To prove
lack of fault or negligence, it must appear with a reasonable degree of certainty from all proof and circumstances that the employee
entrusted with public money did not cause the shortage. In such a case, the employee should be exonerated from the obligation to
restore funds. Reasons for the shortage that are not specific, such as "I don't know what happened/' or "I must have given the wrong
change," are inadequate and may not be used to circumvent liability. The Principal Officer will review the employee's memorandum
and will indicate a recommendation as to whether a loss must be replaced before the memorandum is forwarded to the Port Director
for a final decision. The final decision must be documented on the Overage/Shortage Memo Cover Sheet, attached to the original
employee memo and forwarded to the INS Debt Management Center with the deposit documentation. The Overage/Shortage Memo
Cover Sheet must include the Port Director's rationale as to why the employee did not have to replace the funds. Decisions regarding
overages and shortages must be made qUickly in order to ensure that the correct documentation is forwarded the day of the deposit to
the Debt Management Center. A copy of the employee memo and the Overage/Shortage Memo Cover Sheet must be sent to the
Deputy District Director at the same time the original package is sent to the DMC.
Unless the employee can prove that he/she did not cause the loss, it is expected that the liable employee will replace the funds. An
employee found to have repeated discrepancies overages/shortages) may be subject to disciplinary action, to include reassignment to

non-cash handling duties.
The Port Director must establish a "Location Discrepancy Tracking Log." An example is found in section LB. (Forms and
Illustrations). Each overage or shortage memo prepared by the location should be assigned a unique tracking number. For example,
the first discrepancy at location XXX for FY 2001 would be identified as XXX-Ol-000l. This number should be written on the original
memo and the Overage/Shortage Memo Cover Sheet. A completed example is located in section LB. (Forms and Illustrations).
III. CASH REGISTERS: MANAGEMENT OVERVIEW

These procedures are designed for general use. At POEs where only one INS employee is assigned, it may be necessary to make
some modifications because of staffing limitations. These procedures apply only to POEs with programmable cash registers. If the POE
does not have such a cash register or the cash register is temporarily out of service, the procedures in the sections on manual
processing must be applied. For further information on manual processing, see section VII.

A. GENERAL GUIDELINES
Fees collected must be counted, reconciled with cash register tapes, and totals of applications collected after each shift and
cumulatively at the end of each business day. Two principles apply at every stage of the process:

1.

Fee collections and applications are never counted alone, with the exception of situations at POEs where there is only
one INS staff member on duty.

2.

At every point in which fee collections are transferred from the custody of one individual to another, the transfer is
recorded on Form G-714, Receipt for Funds and Valuables Transferred.

The consistent application of these principles safeguards fees, but just as important, protects employees who must handle the
fees.
At the end of each shift, in the presence of a supervisor or a person designated by the supervisor, the Cashier must perform a
prompt and thorough reconciliation of fees collected. This reconciliation is a three-sided balancing of:
•
•
•

Fees collected,
Totals from the end-of-shift cash register tape, and
Applications processed.

This reconciliation must be documented on the Fee Reconciliation Worksheet. The documentation will be accomplished by
having the names, titles and signatures of those signing (cashier and supervisor) along with a statement certifying the
accuracy of the cash count.

B. PROCEDURES WHERE THREE OR MORE INS STAFF MEMBERS ARE PRESENT
The following procedures and methods to ensure segregation of duties will be applied in locations where three or more INS staff are
present: an Immigration Inspector, a Cashier (often an Immigration Aide), and a supervisor. U.S. Customs Service staff or INS
contractors are not by definition INS staff. Modifications allowable in situations where fewer than three staff members cannot be
present are discussed in section III-C and section III-D.

The Principal Officer must:
1.

Establish a Cashier's Register Log and ensure that all Cashiers log in, filling in all appropriate information, such as
Cashier number, date and time for periods that Cashier duties were performed, and total amounts collected at the
end of the shift for each Cashier.

2

Establish logs to track the folloWing: SF-215 (local deposit number), unique cash register receipt tracking number and G712 (Summary of Fees).

3.

Ensure that Cashiers are trained in their responsibilities, including procedures for using the make and model of the cash
register(s) in use.

4.

Ensure that each Cashier has a distinct Cashier number, along with a password or personal identification number (PIN).

5.

Ensure that supervisors retain custody of the cash register keys at all times.

6.

Ensure that all accountable officers safeguard both funds and all pertinent supporting documentation (manual receipts,
cash register tapes, applications, etc.) needed to perform reconciliation by requiring two distinct steps. First, I-94s
and copies of other applications must be inserted into the slot of a locked box in the custody of the Inspector.
Second, fees collected must be kept in a cash register in the custody of the Cashier. The cash register must be
locked when it is not in the direct and continuous view of the Cashier.

7.

Ensure that Cashiers and supervisors (or the supervisor's designee) together perform a prompt and thorough
reconciliation of fees collected, cash register tapes, and applications processed at the end of each shift. This includes
ensuring that all applications are removed from the lockbox and accounted for at the end of each shift.

8.

Ensure that neither fees collected nor applications processed are counted by one person alone. The Cashier should not
count applications and money together. Instead, assign a different person to count I-94s and other applications. The
Cashier may then verify the count of applications, and the second person may verify the count of fees collected.

9.

Ensure that total fees collected are recorded on Form G-714, Receipt of Funds and Valuables Transferred, and that the
fees and supporting documents are then placed in a safe (or file cabinet with a bar and combination lock or locked
cash box, as applicable) until a deposit is prepared.

10.

Where there is a shortage or an overage, review the Cashier's memorandum of explanation, making a recommendation
for appropriate action to the Port Director. See section II-D, Principle of Liability for Public Funds, for further
information.

11.

When shortages or overages occur, especially repeated instances involving the same accountable officer, initiate an
investigation or take corrective action as the situation warrants.

12.

Establish procedures and safeguard facilities for Change Funds, if established, and ensure that all staff having access to
Change Funds at any time are properly trained.

13.

Secure cash registers not in use and restrict access to unused registers to supervisory staff.

14.

Ensure proper supervisory oversight of the fee collection process, to include certification of the accuracy of the cash
collected at the end of each shift, immediate review and concurrence of cashier errors, and performance of
unannounced cash counts on Cashiers. The performance and the results of unannounced cash counts need to be

documented in writing.
15)

Establish and maintain a log or file to record and track the results of each unannounced cash count.

16)

Where there are any gaps in journal tape transaction numbers, determine the cause and establish and maintain a log
or file to record and track the results of each review of transaction number gaps.

17)

Ensure that all deposit documentation and forms are prepared according to established gUidelines.

C. STAFF RESPONSIBILITIES WHERE TWO INS STAFF MEMBERS ARE PRESENT

Procedures where two INS staff members are present:
•

If only two staff members are present, one shall serve as Immigration Inspector to receive and handle the application

and one as Cashier to receive and account for the cash.
I-94s and copies of other applications must be inserted into the slot of a locked box in the custody of the Inspector.
•

Fees collected must be kept in a cash register in the custody of the Cashier. The cash register must be kept locked when
it is not in the direct and continuous view of the Cashier.

•

At the end of the shift, fees must be reconciled with applications and the cash register tape.
In any cash collection function, where only two persons are present, the possibility of fraud through collusion is greater
than in situations where a supervisor is present and other employees are involved in the reconciliation process. The
Principal Officer should keep this in mind and employ the following additional techniques to monitor the process:
Perform occasional inspections where an unannounced reconciliation is performed,

•

Rotate staff members and supervisors if feasible,

•

Monitor fee collection statistics to identify and investigate unusual and suspicious fluctuations, and
Ensure that journal tapes and end-of-shift tapes are closely monitored so that all transaction numbers and end-of-shift
tape numbers are accounted for.

D. PROCEDURES WHERE ONLY ONE INS STAFF MEMBER IS PRESENT

I-94s and copies of other applications must be inserted into the slot of a locked box to be opened only at the end of the shift. Fees
collected must be kept in a cash register in the custody of the Cashier. The cash register must be locked when it is not in the direct
and continuous view of the Cashier. The Cashier must safeguard keys to both boxes. The use of a locked box for applications and a
cash register makes it possible for the Principal Officer or supervisor to perform occasional inspections where an unannounced
reconCiliation can be performed.
At the end of the shift, fees must be reconciled using procedures applicable in other situations except only one person will count
cash and applications.

In addition to unannounced inspections, the Principal Officer should employ the following techniques to monitor the process:
•

Rotate staff members and supervisors if feasible,

•

Monitor fee collection statistics to identify and investigate unusual and suspicious fluctuations, and

•

Ensure that journal tapes and end-of-shift tapes are closely monitored so that all transaction numbers and end-of-shift
tape numbers are accounted for.

E. MAINTENANCE / SUPPLIES

The Principal Officer is responsible for:
•

Ensuring that the cash registers are in working order, register tapes are legible, and that an adequate supply of ribbons
and tapes is maintained so that the cash registers are operational at all times;

•

Ensuring that each register is programmed and used to its capacity and that the programming reflects the current
structure for INS fees;

•

Ensuring specific passwords for each Cashier using the register and changing those passwords when Cashiers change or
when passwords are revealed and accountability is threatened;

•

Maintaining maintenance contracts on the cash registers. Officers at ports should look to their superiors in districts or
sectors for assistance in grouping locations with like equipment in order to obtain the most cost-effective
maintenance contracts;

•

If needed, developing specific instructions for the operation of each make and model of cash register in use; and

•

Ensuring that each Cashier at a cash register has a unique Cashier number.
IV. CASH REGISTER PROCEDURES

A.GENERAL

The acceptance of fees at a service location shall be an assignment that, ideally, is specifically designated to an individual who will
act as Cashier for a specified period of time. Depending on the volume of fee applications, it may be necessary to designate more than
one Cashier. Controls will be established by assigning Cashier codes and separate cash register drawers to individuals assigned to
accept fee payments. When it is necessary for one Cashier to relieve another Cashier and work from the same cash drawer, whether
on a day or a shift, strict procedures must be followed. In the presence of a supervisor, the two Cashiers must reconcile the cash
collected to a subtotal tape (sometimes called an X tape) and sign on and off the register. In larger ports, this means that the Principal
Officer may need to delegate this responsibility to another person(s). This delegated person will then be responsible for ensuring that
all CashIers under his/her jurisdiction properly reconcile the funds and sign on and off the cash registers.

B. PROGRAMMING THE CASH REGISTER

When available, programmable cash registers with compatible slip-printers shall be used. Each POE should have a maintenance
agreement with the vendor to maintain and provide technical assistance for each type of cash register in use.
Cash registers shall be programmed with:

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

Once the date is set on the cash register, there should be no need to reset it. However, it is a good practice to review the date
printed on the first receipt each day to verify that the date is correct.

C. CASH REGISTER REPORTS
Each cash register should be programmed to produce two reports (tapes):

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

In addition, cash registers contain a journal tape that reports a cumulative record of all cash register activity and is
considered an official accounting record. The journal tape portion representing the day's transactions is torn off and secured
at the end of each day by inserting into the drop safe.

D. SUPERVISOR'S RESPONSIBILITIES

The
The supervisor's
supervisor's responsibilities will include the following:
••

Control of the cash register keys;
Review and concurrence of cashier errors through immediate initialing of cash register journal tapes;

••

Conducting unannounced cash counts and documenting results;

••

Certification of the accuracy of cash collected at the end of each shift;

••

Certification of the completeness and accuracy of the deposit amount and deposit documentation;
Ensuring that cash registers do not run out of tape, ribbons or ink, and that all used tapes, or portions thereof, are
accounted for; and
which
Signing, dating, and providing on the application a clear explanation for any fee waived. Note: Any application for which
a fee is reqUired and subsequently waived also requires an explanation annotated on the application as well as
supervisory concurrence and dated signature.

E. IMMIGRATION
IMMIGRATION INSPECTOR'S RESPONSIBILITIES
E.
The Immigration
Immigration Inspector will perform the functions outlined below. If adjudicating applications, the Inspector must not accept
The
payments or
or perform Cashier duties, except when only one INS employee is assigned.
payments
Issuance of
of Permits (1-94, etc.)
Issuance
The Inspector
Inspector must:
The
1.
1.

Review the application presented for acceptability.

2.
2.

If acceptable and the application is an 1-94, separate the Arrival/Departure portion and place the Arrival portion through
through
the slot of a locked box.

3.
3.

If acceptable and the application is other than an 1-94, place the copy, or photocopy, through the slot of the locked box.
box.

4.
4.

Pas

5.
5.

Instruct the visitor to go to the Cashier to pay the applicable fee.

6.
6.

Keep all Arrival portions, copies, or photocopies of other applications in the locked box until the end of the day/shift.
These documents will form a transaction record independent from the Cashier and will be counted to establish the
the
proper amount of fees collected that should be produced by the Cashier.

•

•

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

••

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

F. CASHIER'S RESPONSIBILITIES
The Cashier must:

1.

Safeguard fees collected, any funds from the Change Fund, and all supporting documentation that can be used in
reconciliation, including cash register tapes.

2.

Safeguard his/her password/PIN.

3.

Account at all times for the accuracy of the cash in the cash register or cash drawer. Repayment of any shortage is
required unless the Cashier can prove that he/she did not cause the loss.

4.

Never count money in cash register drawers or cash boxes during the shift unless the supervisor is performing an
unannounced count or reconciliation.

5.

Ensure that the cash register does not run out of cash register tape.

G. CASHIER'S PROCEDURES
The Cashier must:

1.

Sign in on the cashier's log.

2.

Open the cash register using a unique Cashier number with a password or PIN.

3.

Record all breaks taken on a single drawer cash register on the cashier's log and on a subtotal tape.

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
IIIIIIII
tape.11111111!!

4.

Receipt each fee collected individually. For example, a TN application =
=: one receipt for $50 and one receipt for $6. In
another example, a family of four purchasing four 1-94s =
=: 4 separate $6 receipts.

5.

Verify that all checks, money orders, or bank drafts are acceptable in accordance with the standards found in Forms of
Payment (section IX).

6.

Endorse each check, bank check, and money order immediately using the rubber stamp. This endorsement reads
reads""For
For
Deposit Only, U.S. Immigration & Naturalization Service.

7

For I-94s, issue the Departure portion validated by the cash register slip-print. For other applications, issue a photocopy
that is validated by a cash register slip-print.

8.

If necessary to issue manual receipts, retain copies of all receipts issued for purposes of reconciliation and keep them in
the cash register or a locked box. For detailed information on manual receipts, refer to the instructions in section
VII.

9.

If a fee is entered erroneously into the cash register and must be voided, call the supervisor immediately to initial the
journal tape next to the VOID entry.

H. ACCOUNTING FOR APPLICATIONS PROCESSED DURING EACH SHIFT

The applications collected are totaled separately from fees at the end of each shift. At that time, the supervisor, or person
designated by the supervisor, will open the locked box of applications processed, tally the applications by type, and calculate the fees
that should have been collected. This tally must be conducted in the presence of a second person, usually the Cashier. The supervisor
should then ensure that all applications are provided to the employees assigned responsibility for determining POE statistical counts
and for forwarding to appropriate offices for processing.
1. ACCOUNTING FOR FEES COLLECTED DURING EACH SHIFT

At the end of the shift, the Cashier must:

1.

In the presence of a supervisor or person designated by the supervisor, close out the cash register by producing an endof-shift tape (Z tape).

2.

In the presence of a person designated by the supervisor, reconcile the fees collected with the end-of-shift tape and the
count of applications from the locked box and document this reconciliation on the Fee Reconciliation Worksheet.

3.

Log the amount collected on the cashier's log.

4.

In the case of a shortage or an overage, the employee will submit a memorandum to the Port Director explaining the
circumstances that caused the discrepancy. This will be done whether or not the employee replaces a loss. Unless the
employee can prove he/she was without fault or negligence, the employee will assume liability for the loss and repay
the funds. Detailed procedures may be found in section II -D.

5.

Sort the fees by type (cash, check, money order, credit card), and bundle each type together. The bills should be
grouped by denomination with all bills facing upright and in the same direction.

6.

Seal the end-of-shift tape and the fees in an envelope or in another secure manner as determined by the Port Director.
Document the reconciliation on the Fee Reconciliation Worksheet as required in section III-A, General Guidelines.

7.

Initial across the flap of the sealed envelope as a deterrent to opening by an unauthorized person. Taping across the
initials is recommended as a further deterrent.

8.

Drop or place the sealed envelope in the safe in the presence of the supervisor. Record the action on Form G-714,
Receipt for Funds and Valuables Transferred.

J. SECURING THE JOURNAL TAPE
At the end of the last shift of the calendar day, for each cash register in use, the supervisor must:
L

Tear off the portion of the journal tape representing the day's activity from each cash register after the last Cashier has
closed out and the fees collected from the last shift have been removed.

2.

Circle or write in the date (MM-DD-YV) and location (e.g. Columbia Bridge, Laredo) on the journal tape, and initial it. The
journal tape will be rolled and secured with a rubber band.

3.

Place the journal tape in the safe unless the end-of-day reconciliation is to be done immediately.

4.

After initially securing the journal tape in the safe overnight, this tape is to be turned over to the Principal Officer who
will secure all journal tapes both for short-term storage (available for review and audit) and for long-term retention.

5.

While these journal tapes remain at the port in the custody of the Principal Officer, they are to be secured in the same
manner as deposits, Le., in a locked cash box, a file cabinet with a bar lock, a safe, or in a secure room as volume
requires. The Principal Officer will be responsible also for keeping these tapes stored in an orderly manner so that
they may be available for review and audit.

6.

In addition to the short-term storage, the Principal Officer is also responsible for securing the journal tapes for long-term
retention. Federal law requires retention for a period of six years and three months.

K. ACCOUNTING FOR FEES COLLECTED EACH DAY
Daily accounting for fees must be done promptly each day that fees are collected. If the volume of fees collected at a port calls for
a daily deposit, this accounting for fees becomes part of the Verification and Final Preparation of Deposit process, see section V-B. If
the volume does not require a daily deposit, this accounting for fees becomes a separate activity distinct from the deposit preparation
process.
The supervisor will assign two employees to perform the fee reconciliation. These should not include a Cashier whose fee collections
are included, unless it is necessary in the judgment of the Port Director.
In the presence of the supervisor, the two employees will open the safe and remove the sealed envelopes containing the deposits
for each shift.
The two employees will:
1.

Open the sealed envelopes and again verify the fees collected for each shift by counting the fees and comparing them to
the end-of-shift tapes. This is necessary because if there is a shortage or overage in the total fees collected, it is
important to be able to identify the source.

2.

Total all fees collected and compare this total to the cumulative totals for the day indicated on the end-of-shift tapes.
POEs should use the Fee Reconciliation Worksheet for this purpose.

3.

For each cash register, compare the end-of-shift tape (Z tape) control numbers to ensure the continuity of end-of-shift
tapes. Also, review the journal tape and compare the beginning transaction number with the ending transaction
number from the previous day's journal to ensure that transactions are continuously accounted for.

4.

Notify the Principal Officer immediately of any shortages/overages, or if there are any "gaps" in the transaction
numbers, so that the Principal Officer can begin an inquiry into the discrepancy.

5.

Record totals for each end-of-shift tape for each cash register on a Form G-712, Summary of Fees Recorded. A single G-

712 can be used to record end-of-shift control numbers from multiple registers providing all control numbers are listed on the
G-712 in box 10. The total of these individual amounts should be placed in box 5. For complete instructions, see the
example linked in Forms and Illustrations, section B. On the G-712, list the local deposit number, the G-712
summary number, the total from the register tapes, and the end-of-shift tape control number(s) to ensure that all
end-of-shift tapes are consecutive, and there are no gaps in control numbers. The two signatures on each of the G712s certify that the deposited amount agrees with amounts reconciled at the end of each shift. The total of fees
reported for the deposit on the G-712(s) and any overage/shortage memos should match the SF-215(s) deposit
totals. The Principal Officer must establish a log to track the G-712 Summary numbers.
6.

Secure the deposit. If the deposit is to be prepared by another employee, place the tapes, fees, and all other related
documents in a single sealed, identified package or locked bag, such as a bank bag, to be transported to the
administrative office that will prepare the deposit. If the deposit is to be prepared at a later time, return the deposit
immediately to the safe. Instructions on safeguarding deposits are found in section V-D. Record each change of
custody on Form G-714, Receipt for Funds and Valuables Transferred.

Detailed instructions for preparing the deposit are contained in the next chapter, section V.
L. Liability During the Fee Collection, Reconciliation and Reporting Stages

All employees who collect fees or take part in reconciliations and preparing deposits are considered accountable officers. Any
discrepancies occurring during the reconciliation and reporting stages must be reported through a memorandum in the same manner
-D.
as shortages or overages by a Cashier. Further information is found in section II
II-D.

V. CASH REGISTER FEE DEPOSITS
A. POLICY
In general, large POEs will make daily deposits. Small POEs may need to make a deposit only once a week. The Department of the
Treasury (Treasury Financial Manual 6-8000, Section 8030.20) requires that:
•

Deposit sites shall deposit receipts totaling $5,000 or more on the same day received prior to the depositary cutoff time.

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

(b)(2), (b)
(7)(E)

In accordance with a deposit waiver granted by Treasury for extremely remote POEs with little collection activity, receipts
of less than $500 can be deposited monthly providing it has been approved by the Debt Management Center. For
proper oversight and tracking, the DMC should be aware of which POEs are granted the Treasury waiver as well as
the Principal Officers accountable for proper internal controls at remote POEs.

late

Deposits shall be made as late as possible prior to the specified cutoff time to maximize daily deposit amounts. Funds received too
In the day to meet the deposit cutoff time must be deposited the following business day.

B. PROCEDURES FOR CHECKS AND CASH RECEIVED
Checks Received

Payee Verification: Verify that each check, money order, etc. is properly made out to the Immigration and Naturalization Service.
Refer to Inscription of Checks in section IX-D.
Deposits to Commercial Bank (General Depositary)
Checks and cash delivered to commercial banks for deposit must be accompanied by an adding machine tape or other listing of the
individual check amounts, totals of the currency, coins and the grand total of the deposit that matches the total of the Deposit Ticket,
Form SF-215.
Deposits to Federal Reserve Banks (FRBs)
Only checks or money orders can be deposited at FRBs. Cash is not accepted at FRBs. Deposits must be submitted to the FRB by
mail or via courier. Deposits cannot be hand-carried to an FRB teller. Please note that if cash is collected at a location, it cannot be
deposited at an FRB unless it is converted to a money order or bank check. This bank check or money order is then included with the
check deposit. The purchase cost of the money order or bank check cannot be deducted from the deposit or any fee collections. The
purchase cost must be paid from an imprest fund or by other means. Contact the INS Debt Management Center for information on
obtaining an alternate depositary.
Check Deposits
Depositing locations must do the following:
Separate checks into bundles not to exceed 400 items per bundle.
Attach to each bundle of checks an adding machine tape or other listing that details all items in the bundle, the bundle
total, and the Agency Location Code.
Provide the totals of each listing and the listing's item count on SF-215.
Enclose checks with the SF-215 in a sealed package.
Mail all deposits to the FRB location or deliver them by courier to the loading dock at the FRB within designated delivery
hours.
To ensure that the maximum amount of funds are deposited daily, the depositor will establish a schedule allowing the deposits to
reach the FRB before the daily cutoff for Government agency deposits. For further information on the FRB's cutoff and availability for
agency deposits, the depositor may contact the FRS (Check Processing Department) where the checks are deposited.

The mailing of deposits to FRBs may be done only when specifically authorized by Treasury, FMS. If a POE wishes to mail deposits,
the Principal Officer should contact the INS Debt Management Center to make arrangements.
It is recommended that locations mail deposits to FRBs by registered mail. Registered mail is tracked and kept under lock and key
by the Post Office from time of receipt until it is delivered at its final destination. It is important that the depositing location maintain
enough information regarding the checks in the deposit in order to obtain replacement checks if the deposit is lost or destroyed in
transit.
Verification and Final Preparation of Deposit
Note: The daily accounting for fees needs to be a separate activity distinct from the deposit preparation process only if deposits are
not made on a daily basis.

Before final preparation of a deposit for delivery to a depositary, remittances are counted and verified against supporting documents
by two employees assigned by the supervisor, one of which is the employee who prepared the deposit. The two signatures on each of
the G-712s certify that the amount for deposit agrees with amounts reconciled at the end of each shift. After verifying the remittances,
the two employees prepare them for delivery in the following manner:

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

The transfer of remittances from one individual to another is acknowledged on a Receipt for Funds and Valuables Transferred, Form
G-714.

C. PREPARING THE SF-21S, DEPOSIT TICKET
The Form SF-215, Deposit Ticket, is a five-part form used to deposit funds in a bank. It must be prepared in accordance with the

following standards:

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

Block 1: Deposit Number

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

.• -,..• -.-.
-

...

. ••• '-1'
,-..

...1- (b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

Block 2: Date Presented or Mailed to Bank
The date the document was mailed or presented for deposit (not prepared) is typed in Block 2 in 2-digit groups in month, day, and
year order, separated by hyphens, and using zeroes for single-digit dates. For example, October 2,
2002, would be typed 10-02-02.
2,2002,
Note: If you mail the deposit, the correct date for the SF-215 is the date mailed (not the date prepared, in the event there is a
difference). If you walk into a bank lobby to make the deposit at a teller window, the correct date for the SF-215 is the date presented
(again, not the date you prepared the deposit should there be a difference).
Block 3: Agency Location Code (ALC)
This code is provided to each POE by the INS Debt Management Center.
Block 4: Deposit Amount
Report the total deposit amount (including cents) in Block 4. Use appropriate commas and decimal points, but omit dollar and cent
signs.
Example;

9,999,999.99

Block 5: Date Confirmed by Bank (appears on Memorandum Copy only)
Leave blank.
Block 6: Agency Use

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
Block 6 shall also be used to list the Federal accounts symbol, appropriation codes (which correspond to a specific application type),
and amounts collected for each application type.
Exampl~:

Fed. Acct. Symbol Appropriation Code
15X5088.1
(##)
$ x.OO
15X5088.1
(##)
$xx.OO

Amount

Identifying collections by appropriation code will provide tracking capabilities by POE and the types of application processed. The
totals of the amounts listed by appropriation code must equal the total amount of the deposit (Block 4).
Block 7: Name and Address of Depositary
Place the full name and address of the depositary (bank) in this block.
Block 8: Certification
Leave blank. This block is for use by the depositary (bank).
Bloc::_I5~_Depositor's
Bloc::_I<:~_Depositor'sTitle,

Department or Agency and Address

Enter:
USINS Debt Management Center
P.O. Box 5000
Williston, VT 05495-5000
05495·5000
Proper Endorsement

Each check must be endorsed with the correct financial endorsement prior to depositing at the banking
institution. This endorsement stamp should include the following:
US Immigration - XXX (XXX is the location code, for example, MIA);
Agency Location Code (obtained from the Debt Management Center);
The words "for credit to the US Treasury"; and
Date of endorsement (this needs to be a changeable date).
The date of endorsement must match the date of the SF-215 Deposit Ticket. The financial institution may
return the entire deposit to the depositing field office if the dates on the endorsement and the SF-215 do not
match. Endorsement for the financial institution must be within the payee endorsement area located 1 1/2

inches from the beginning of the trailing edge of the check. An example is found in Section 1.8. Forms and
III ustrations.
Illustrations.
Distribution of SF-215
SF-21S

The office within the POE prepari
preparing
ng the deposit shall:
•

Make a photocopy of the Original for POE records;

•

Send the Original (top white), Depositary Copy (blue carbon) and Confirmed Copy (green carbon) to the depositary
(bank) with the deposit; and

•

Mail the Agency Copy (yellow carbon) and Memorandum Copy with applicable supporting documents attached to the INS
Debt Management Center (see Submission of Records of Deposits to the Debt Management Center, section V- I) on a
daily basis, or each time a deposit is made.

Note: If the deposit is made over the counter at commercial banks, the "Agency Copy" should be taken to the depositary, and marked
"Received" by the depositary prior to the POE photocopying and sending it to the INS Debt Management Center, along with the
supporting documentation. When deposits are made by courier, the Port-of-Entry should request from the bank a copy of the deposit
ticket marked "received" and dated.

D. SAFEGUARDING THE DEPOSIT

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

E. FORWARDING THE DEPOSIT TO THE DEPOSITARY (BANK) OR FRB
Items to be forwarded:
The POE will forward the following
folloWing documents to the depositary:

•
•

SF-215
SF-21S (Original, Depositary, and Confirmed copies),
Cash instruments (checks, money orders, cash), and
Adding machine tapes.

Record of Shipment
A record of the shipment of remittances to a depositary, FRB, or by courier is maintained on Form G-221, Schedule of Valuables
SF-215 (not the internal deposit number) must be included.
Shipped. On the Form G-221, the deposit number from Block 1 of the SF-21S

Manner
fv1anner of Shipment

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

Deposits may be mailed to FRBs, but not to commercial depositaries. Itis recommended that locations send deposits by registered
mail.

F. USING A COURIER SERVICE TO TRANSFER DEPOSITS
It is essential that the depositary's cutoff times be known prior to designating the time of day that pick-ups will be made by the
courier service. The deposit pick-up time designated for the courier should be as late as possible to maximize daily deposit amounts
and still ensure that the courier will deliver the deposit the same day before the depositary's cutoff time.
Courier service contracts shall include acceptable pickup timeframes to ensure deposits reach depositaries in accordance with
Treasury requirements and include contractual provisions with appropriate liquidated damages for failing to deliver deposits to the
designated financial institution by the cutoff time specified.

G. DISPOSITION OF CONFIRMED COPIES
The depositary shall send the Confirmed Copy of the Form SF-215 to the office shown in Block g
9 (INS Debt Management Center). If
the depositary returns the Confirmed Copy to the POE, it shall be sent immediately to the Debt Management Center.

H. ADJUSTMENTS TO DEPOSITS
The Form SF-21S cannot be recalled, corrected, nor may it be resubmitted even if an error is discovered after it has been released
to a depositary. When errors are detected, the POE must contact the INS Debt Management Center for further instruction.

1. SUBMISSION OF RECORDS OF DEPOSITS TO THE DEBT MANAGEMENT CENTER
The following documents must be forwarded by first class US mail to the INS Debt Management Center, as applicable:
•
•

Agency and Memorandum copies of the SF-21S, Deposit Ticket;
Form G-712(s), Summary of Fees, Original only;
End-of-shift cash register tapes (including zero "0" tapes);
Form G-711s, Individual Fee Register Receipts (if a manual process is used to record any fees); and
The original employee discrepancy memo and the Overage/Shortage Memo Cover Sheet. (Note: This must be sent
whether or not repayment has been made.)

The packet must be mailed on the day of deposit to:
USINS Debt Management Center

P.O. Box 5000
Williston, VT 05495-5000
J. FILE DOCUMENTS TO BE RETAINED BY POEs

POEs should retain:
A photocopy of SF-215;
Form G-712 (green carbon);
Originals of G-714, Receipt for Valuables Transferred, and G-221, Schedule of Valuables Shipped;
Any Fee Reconciliation Worksheets used in preparation of deposits;
•

Journal tapes;
Copies of all memoranda related to overages/shortages;

•

Copies of end-of-shift tapes;
Copies of deposit ticket marked "received" and date stamped (when the deposit is made at a commercial bank); and
Copies of G-711s, Individual Fee Register Receipts (if a manual process is used to record any fees).

These should be retained for one year, except for the journal tapes which must be retained for six years and three months.

VI. MANUAL FEE COLLECTIONS: MANAGEMENT OVERVIEW

The procedures for manual fee collection using a cash box are designed for general use. At POEs where only one INS employee is
assigned, it may be necessary to make some modifications because of staffing limitations.
A. GENERAL GUIDELINES

Fees collected must be counted, reconciled with manually prepared Forms G-711, Individual Fee Register Receipts, and totals of
applications collected after each shift and cumulatively at the end of each business day. Two principles apply at every stage of the
process:
1.

Fee collections and applications are never counted alone, with the exception of situations at POEs where there is only
one INS staff member on duty.

2.

At every point in which fee collections are transferred from the custody of one individual to another, the transfer is
recorded on Form G-714, Receipt for Funds and Valuables Transferred.

The consistent application of these principles safeguards fees, but just as important, protects employees who must handle the
fees.

At the end of each shift, in the presence of a supervisor or a person designated by the supervisor, the Cashier must perform a
prompt and thorough reconciliation of fees collected. This reconciliation is a three-sided balancing of:
Fees collected,
•

Individual manual receipts (only the prenumbered or serialized G-711 may now be used), and

•

Applications processed.

This reconciliation must be documented on the Fee Reconciliation Worksheet. The documentation will be accomplished by having the
names, titles and signatures of those signing (cashier and supervisor) along with a statement certifying to the accuracy of the cash
count.

B. PROCEDURES WHERE THREE OR MORE INS STAFF MEMBERS ARE PRESENT

The following procedures and methods to ensure segregation of duties will be applied in locations where three or more INS staff are
present: an Immigration Inspector, a Cashier (often an Immigration Aide), and a supervisor. U.S. Customs Service staff or INS
contractors are not by definition INS staff. Modifications allowable in situations where fewer than three staff members cannot be
present are discussed in section VI-C.
The Principal Officer must:
1.

Establish a Cashier's Log and ensure that all Cashiers log in, filling in all appropriate information, such as Cashier name,
date and time for periods that Cashier duties were performed, and total amounts collected at the end of the shift for
each Cashier.

2.

Establish logs to track the following: G-712, Summary of Fees; the G-711, Individual Fee Register Receipt, and SF-215
(local deposit number). Any administrative logs may also be established as deemed necessary by the Port Director.
Forms G-211 and G-253 are no longer valid forms and should be destroyed.

3.

Ensure that Cashiers are trained in their responsibilities.

4.

Ensure that supervisors retain the custody of cash box keys at all times.

5.

Ensure that all accountable officers safeguard both funds and all pertinent supporting documentation (manual receipts,
applications, etc.) needed to perform reconciliation by requiring two distinct steps. First, I -94s and copies of other
applications must be inserted into the slot of a locked box in the custody of the Inspector. Second, fees collected
must be kept in a cash box in the custody of the Cashier. The cash box must be locked and secured when the
Cashier is not using it.

6.

Ensure that each Cashier is provided with their own pack of sequential Forms G-711 and that a log is maintained
showing the sequential numbers assigned to each Cashier. The Principal Officer is to notify the Debt Management
Center of the range of sequentially numbered receipts assigned to Cashiers.

7.

Ensure that Cashiers and supervisors together perform a prompt and thorough reconciliation of fees collected, logs,
manual receipts, and applications processed at the end of each shift.

8.

Ensure that neither money nor applications processed are counted by one person alone.

9.

The Cashier should not count applications and fees collected together. Instead, assign a different person to count I-94s
and other applications. The Cashier may then verify the count of applications, and the second person may verify the
count of fees collected.

10.

Ensure that total fees collected are recorded on the Form G-714, Receipt of Funds and Valuables Transferred, and that
the fees and supporting documents are then placed in a safe (or file cabinet with a bar and combination lock or
locked cash box, as applicable) until a deposit is prepared.

11.

Where there is a shortage or an overage, review the Cashier's memorandum of explanation, making a recommendation
for appropriate action to the Port Director. See section II-D for further information.

12.

When shortages or overages occur, especially repeated instances involving the same accountable officer, initiate an
investigation or take corrective action as the situation warrants.

13.

Establish procedures and safeguard facilities for Change Funds, if established, and ensure that all staff having access to
Change Funds at any time are properly trained.

14.

Secure cash boxes not in use and restrict access to unused receipt forms to supervisory staff.

15.

Ensure proper supervisory oversight of the fee collection process, to include certification of the accuracy of the cash
collected at the end of each shift, immediate review and concurrence of cashier errors, and performance of
unannounced cash counts on Cashiers. The performance and the results of unannounced cash counts need to be
documented in writing.

16.

Establish and maintain a log or file to record and track the results of each unannounced cash count.

17.

Where there are any gaps in manually entered transaction numbers, determine the cause and establish and maintain a
log or file to record and track the results of each review of transaction number gap.

18.

Ensure that all deposit documentation and forms are prepared according to established gUidelines.

c. Staff Responsibilities Where Two INS Staff Members Are Present
Procedures where two INS staff members are present:
If only two staff members are present, one shall serve as Immigration Inspector to receive and handle the application
and one as Cashier to receive and account for the cash.
I-94s and copies of other applications must be inserted into the slot of a locked box in the custody of the Inspector.
~

Fees collected must be kept in a cash box. The cash box must be locked and secured when it is not being used by the
Cashier.
The key to each box must be kept in the custody of the responsible employee.
At the end of the shift, fees must be reconciled with applications and manual receipts, using the procedures applicable in

other situations.
In any cash collection function, where only two persons are present, the possibility of fraud through collusion is greater than in
situations where a supervisor is present and other employees are involved in the reconciliation process. The Principal Officer should
keep this in mind and employ the following additional techniques to monitor the process:
Perform occasional inspections where an unannounced reconciliation is performed,
•

Rotate staff members and supervisors if feasible,
Monitor fee collection statistics to identify and investigate unusual and suspicious fluctuations, and

•

Ensure that all manual receipts are closely monitored to provide that all transactions are accounted for.

D. PROCEDURES WHERE ONLY ONE INS STAFF MEMBER IS PRESENT

I-94s and copies of other applications must be inserted into the slot of a locked box to be opened only at the end of the shift. Fees
collected must be kept in a cash box in the custody of the Cashier. The cash box must be locked when it is not in the direct and
continuous view of the Cashier. The Cashier must safeguard the keys to both boxes. The use of two boxes makes it possible for the
Principal Officer or supervisor to perform occasional inspections where an unannounced reconciliation can be performed.
At the end of the shift, fees must be reconciled using procedures applicable in other situations except only one person will count
cash and applications.
In addition to unannounced inspections, the Principal Officer should employ the following techniques to monitor the process:
•

Rotate staff members and supervisors if feasible,

•

Monitor fee collection statistics to identify and investigate unusual and suspicious fluctuations, and
Ensure that all manual receipts are closely monitored to provide that all transactions are accounted for.

E. MAINTENANCE / SUPPLIES

The Principal Officer is responsible for ensuring that lockable cash boxes, locked boxes with slots for the collection of applications,
required applications, and serialized G-711 receipts, are available.
VII. MANUAL FEE COLLECTION PROCEDURES
A.GENERAL

Fees collected must be stored in a locked cash box or placed immediately in a safe. Records of daily transactions and receipts shall
be manually prepared and transferred to or placed in a locked container as soon as possible.
Application fees collected by each employee are to be maintained in separate receipt facilities, i.e., a separate cash box. At the end
of each shift, employees shall balance the fees collected with the file copies of the Individual Fee Register Receipt, Form G-711 and the

applications taken. The collections and supporting documents shall be deposited in a drop safe or transferred to another employee who
will immediately safeguard them.
Depending on the volume of fee applications, it may be necessary to designate more than one employee to accept fees. When it is
necessary for more than one employee to accept and record application fees, each should be provided with their own pack of
sequential Forms G-711. The Principal Officer should record on a log the beginning and ending numbers on G-711s transferred to the
custody of individual Cashiers. This will help to Identify the individual that handles each transaction and will establish and maintain
accountability by the employee. The Principal Officer is to provide information regarding the range of G-711 numbers assigned at the
location to the DMC.
When it is necessary to transfer custody of fees collected, such as transfer to the safe at the end of a shift, the action must be
recorded on Form G-714, Receipt for Funds and Valuables Transferred.
Personal liability, shortages, and overages are addressed in the section on the Principle of Liability for Public Funds, in section II-D.

B. SUPERVISOR'S RESPONSIBILITIES
The supervisor's responsibilities will include the following:
•

Review and concurrence of Cashier errors through immediate initialing of G-711s and other forms as necessary;

•

Conducting unannounced cash counts and documenting results;
Certification of the accuracy of cash collected at the end of each shift;

•

Certification of the completeness and accuracy of the deposit amount and deposit documentation;

•

Ensuring that POEs do not run out of manual receipts, that only serialized or prenumbered G-711 receipts are used, and
that all receipts are properly accounted for; and
Signing, dating, and providing on the application a clear explanation for any fee waived. Note: Any application for which
a fee is required and subsequently waived also requires an explanation annotated on the application as well as
supervisory concurrence and dated signature.

C. IMMIGRATION INSPECTOR'S RESPONSIBILITIES
The Immigration Inspector will perform the functions outlined below. If adjudicating applications, the Inspector must not accept
payments or perform Cashier duties, except when only one INS employee is assigned.
Issuance of Permits (1-94, etc.)
The Inspector must:
L

Review the application presented for acceptability.

2.

If acceptable and the application is an 1-94, separate the Arrival/Departure portion and place the Arrival portion through
the slot of a locked box.

3.

If acceptable and the application is other than an 1-94, place the copy or photocopy through the slot of the locked box.

4.

Pass the Departure portion of the 1-94 or other application to the Cashier.

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

5.

Instruct the visitor to go to the Cashier to pay the applicable fee.

6.

Keep all Arrival portions, copies, or photocopies of other applications in the locked box until the end of the day/shift.
These documents will form a transaction record independent from the Cashier and will be counted to establish the
proper amount of fees collected that should be produced by the Cashier.

D. CASHIER'S RESPONSIBILITIES
The Cashier must:

1.

Safeguard fees collected, any funds from the Change Fund, and all supporting documentation that can be used in
reconciliation, including G-711s, Individual Fee Register Receipts.

2.

Account at all times for the accuracy of the cash in the cash box, and safeguard keys if issued. Repayment is required
unless the Cashier can prove he/she did not cause the loss.

3.

Never count money in the cash box during the shift unless the supervisor is performing an unannounced count or
reconciliation.

E. CASHIER'S PROCEDURES
The Cashier must:

1.

Sign in on the Cashier's log.

2.

Record all breaks taken on a cashier's log. Note: This step is required in all cases, but it is critical if a secondary or relief
cashier collects fees using the same cash box during that time. When one Cashier relieves another Cashier for a
break, the Cashier being relieved should count the cash on hand. The cash is then counted by both the Cashier and
relief Cashier and noted on the Cashier's log. When the Cashier returns from the break, another count is made and
noted on the Cashier's log.

3,

Receipt each fee collected individualiy.
individually. For example, a TN application = one receipt for $50 and one receipt for $6. In
another example, a family of four purchasing four I-94s
I -94s = four separate $6 receipts.

4.

Verify that all checks, money orders, or bank drafts are acceptable in accordance with the standards found in Forms of
Payment, section IX.

5.

Endorse each check, money order, and bank draft immediately, using the rubber stamp bearing the phrase "For Deposit
Only, U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service."

6.

Issue a manual receipt using a serialized Form G-711.

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

7.

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

8.

For purposes of reconciliation, retain copies of all receipts issued in the locked box.

9.

If a G-711 receipt must be voided, call the supervisor immediately to initial the VOID. Note: The voided G-711 must be
submitted to the Debt Management Center with the deposit.

F. ACCOUNTING FOR APPLICATIONS PROCESSED DURING EACH SHIFT
The applications collected are totaled separately from fees at the end of each shift. At that time, the superVisor,
supervisor, or person
designated by the supervisor, will open the locked box of applications processed, tally the applications by type, and calculate the fees
that should have been collected. This tally must be conducted in the presence of a second person, usually the Cashier. The supervisor
should then ensure that all applications are provided to the employees assigned responsibility for determining POE statistical counts
and for forwarding to the appropriate offices for processing.

G. ACCOUNTING FOR FEES COLLECTED DURING EACH SHIFT
At the end of the shift, the Cashier must:
1.

In the presence of a supervisor or person designated by the superVisor,
supervisor, count the fees collected from the locked box.

2.

In the presence of a second person designated by the supervisor, reconcile the fees collected with the G-711s
G-71ls and the
count of applications from the locked box and document this reconciliation on the Fee Reconciliation Worksheet.

3.

Log the amount collected on the Cashier's Log.

4.

In the case of a shortage or an overage, the employee will submit a memorandum to the Port Director explaining the
circumstances that caused the discrepancy. This will be done whether or not the employee replaces a loss. Unless the
employee can prove he/she was without fault or negligence, the employee will assume liability for the loss and repay
the funds. Detailed procedures may be found in section II-D.

5.

Sort the fees by type (cash, check, money order, credit card), and bundle each type together. The bills should be
grouped by denomination with all bills facing upright and in the same direction.

6.

Document the reconciliation on the Fee Reconciliation Worksheet. Seal the fees, G-711 receipts, and the completed Fee

Reconciliation Worksheet in an envelope or in another secure manner as determined by the Port Director.
7.

Initial across the flap of the sealed envelope as a deterrent to opening by an unauthorized person. Taping across the
initials is a further deterrent.

8.

Drop or place the sealed envelope in the safe in the presence of the supervisor. Record the action on Form G-714,
Receipt for Funds and Valuables Transferred.

H. LIABILITY DURING THE FEE COLLECTION, RECONCILIATION AND REPORTING STAGES
All employees who collect fees or take part in reconciliations and preparing deposits are considered accountable officers. Any
discrepancies occuring during the reconciliation and reporting stages must be reported through a memorandum in the same manner as
shortages or overages by a Cashier. Further information is found in section II -D.
I. SAFEGUARDING SUPPLIES OF RECEIPTS

It is the responsibility of the Principal Officer to safeguard supplies of blank receipts and to ensure that books of receipts are used
consecutively in order to preserve accountability. It is also the responsibility of the Principal Officer to retrieve and destroy all
remaining unused unnumbered manual receipts. It is the responsibility of the Cashier to safeguard the book of receipts in use and to
issue receipts in numbered order. If a receipt is inadvertently destroyed or damaged and cannot be issued, the Cashier must explain
the situation to the Principal Officer or supervisor who must void and initial the unissued receipt. Voided receipts shall be retained, not
destroyed, and must be submitted to the Debt Management Center along with other receipts. Reviewing voided receipts during the
reconciliation process will provide insight on the validity of the voided receipts.

VIII. MANUAL FEE DEPOSITS
A. POLICY
In general, large POEs will make daily deposits. Small POEs will make weekly or monthly deposits based upon the criteria listed
below. The Department of the Treasury (Treasury Financial Manual 6-8000, Section 8030.20) requires that:

late

•

Deposit sites shall deposit receipts totaling $5,000 or more on the same day received prior to depositary cutoff time.

•

Col

•

In accordance with a deposit waiver granted by Treasury for extremely remote POEs with little collection activity, receipts
of less than $500 can be deposited monthly, provided it has been approved by the Debt Management Center. For
proper oversight and tracking, the DMC should be aware of which POEs are granted the Treasury waiver as well as
the Principal Officers accountable for proper internal controls at remote POEs.

.

•

•

~

••

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

• I'·

• ••

II.

.....

•

.... • • • . . . . .

"':&' .• ... •. -.. - '. ••• (b)(2),
(b)(7)(E)

Deposits shall be made as late as possible prior to the specified cutoff time to maximize daily deposit amounts. Funds received too
In the day to meet the deposit cutoff time must be deposited the following business day.

B. PROCEDURES FOR CHECKS AND CASH RECEIVED

Checks Received
Payee Verification: Verify that each check, money order, etc, is properly made out to the Immigration and Naturalization Service.
Refer to Inscription of Checks in Section IX-D.
Deposits to Commercial Bank (General Depositary)
Checks and cash delivered to commercial banks for deposit must be accompanied by an adding machine tape or other listing of the
individual check amounts, totals of the currency, coins and the grand total of the deposit that matches the total of the Deposit Ticket,
Form SF-215.
Deposits to Federal Reserve Banks (FRBs)
Only checks or money orders can be deposited at FRBs. Cash is not accepted at FRBs. Deposits must be submitted to the FRB by
mail or via courier. Deposits cannot be hand-carried to an FRB teller. Please note that if cash is collected at a location, it cannot be
deposited at an FRB unless it is converted to a money order or bank check. This bank check or money order is then included with the
check deposit. The purchase cost of the money order or bank check cannot be deducted from the deposit or any fee collections. The
purchase cost must be paid from an imprest fund or by other means. Contact the INS Debt Management Center for information on
obtaining an alternate depositary.
Check Deposits
Depositing locations must do the follOWing:
•
•

Separate checks into bundles not to exceed 400 items per bundle.
Attach to each bundle of checks an adding machine tape or other listing that details all items in the bundle, the bundle
total, and the Agency Location Code.

•

Provide the totals of each listing and the listing's item count on SF-215.

•

Enclose checks with the SF-215 in a sealed package.

•

Mail all deposits to the FRB location or deliver them by courier to the loading dock at the FRB within designated delivery
hours.

To ensure that the maximum amount of funds are deposited daily, the depositor will establish a schedule allowing the deposits to
reach the FRB before the daily cutoff for Government agency deposits. For further information on the FRB's cutoff and availability for
agency deposits, the depositor may contact the FRB (Check Processing Department) where the checks are deposited.
The mailing of deposits to FRBs may be done only when specifically authorized by Treasury, FMS. If a POE wishes to mail deposits,
the Principal Officer should contact the INS Debt Management Center to make arrangements.
It is recommended that locations mail deposits to FRBs by registered mail. Registered mail is tracked and kept under lock and key
by the Post Office from time of receipt until it is delivered at its final destination. It is important that the depositing location maintain
enough information regarding the checks in the deposit in order to obtain replacement checks if the deposit is lost or destroyed in
transit.

Reconciliation in Preparation of Deposit
The supervisor will assign two employees to make the fee reconciliation in preparation for deposit. These should not include a
Cashier, whose fee collections are included, unless it is necessary in the judgment of the Port Director.
In the presence of the supervisor, the two employees will open the safe and remove the sealed envelopes containing the deposits
for each shift. They will remove the contents of the envelopes to:
Use G-711s, Individual Fee Register Receipts and adding machine tapes to confirm that the total of fees collected equals
the sum of all Forms.
Confirm that consecutive numbers have been used for any Forms G-71l.
G-711.
Prepare blocks 1 through 5 on Form G-712, Summary of Fees. (Instructions for completing this form are provided in LB.,
Forms and Illustrations.)
Secure the deposit. If the deposit is to be prepared by another employee, place the fees, and all other related documents
in a single sealed, identified package of locked bag to be transported to the administrative office that will prepare the
deposit. If the deposit is to be prepared at a later time, return the deposit immediately to the safe. Record each
change of custody on Form G-714, Receipt for Funds and Valuables Transferred.
Detailed instructions for preparing the SF-215 Deposit Ticket are contained in section VIII-C.
Verification and Final Preparation of Deposit
Before final preparation of a deposit for delivery to a depositary, all remittances are counted and verified against supporting
documents by two employees assigned by the supervisor, one of whom is the employee who prepared the deposit. These employees
reconciied for all shifts. After verifying the remittances
will sign the G-712 certifying that the amount for deposit agrees with amounts reconciled
and preparing the deposit ticket, the two employees prepare them for delivery in the following manner:

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

The transfer of remittances from one individual to another is acknowledged on a Receipt for Funds and Valuables Transferred,
Form G-714.

C, PREPARING THE SF-21S, DEPOSIT TICKET

The Form SF-21S, Deposit Ticket, is a five-part form used to deposit funds in a bank. It must be prepared in accordance with the
following standards:

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

Block 1: Deposit Number

• •

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

••

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

Block 2: Date Presented or Mailed to Bank
The date the document was mailed or presented for deposit (not prepared) is typed in Block 2 in 2-digit groups in month, day, and
year order, separated by hyphens, and using zeroes for single-digit dates. For example, October 2, 2002, would be typed 10-02-02.
Note: If you mail the deposit, the correct date for the SF-21S
SF-215 is the date mailed (not the date prepared, in the event there is a
difference). If you walk into a bank lobby to make the deposit at a teller window, the correct date for the SF-21S is the date presented
(again, not the date you prepared the deposit should there be a difference).
Block 3: Agency Location Code (ALC)
This code is provided to each POE by the INS Debt Management Center.
Block LQ5illosit Amount
Report the total deposit amount (including cents) in Block 4. Use appropriate commas and decimal points, but omit dollar and cent
signs.
Example:

9,999,999.99

Block S:
5: Date Confirmed by Bank (appears on Memorandum Copy only)
Leave blank.

Block 6: Agency Use

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
Block 6 shall also be used to list the Federal accounts symbol, appropriation codes (which correspond to a specific application type),
and amounts collected for each application type.
Example:

Fed. Acct. Symbol Appropriation Code
15X5088.1
(##)
$ x.OO
(##)
15X5088.1
$xx.OO

Amount

Identifying collections by appropriation code will prOVide
provide tracking capabilities by POE and the types of application processed. The
totals of the amounts listed by appropriation code must equal the total amount of the deposit (Block 4).
Block 7: Name and Address of Depositary
Place the full name and address of the depositary (bank) in this block.
Block 8: Certification
Leave blank. This block is for use by the depositary (bank).
Block 9: Depositor's Title, Department or Agency and Address
Enter:

USINS Debt Management Center
P.O. Box 5000
Williston, VT 05495-5000

Proper Endorsement

Each check must be endorsed with the correct financial endorsement prior to depositing at the banking
institution. This endorsement stamp should include the following:

•

US Immigration - XXX (XXX is the location code, for example, MIA);

•

Agency Location Code (obtained from the Debt Management Center);
The words "for credit to the US Treasury"; and

•

Date of endorsement (this needs to be a changeable date).

The date of endorsement must match the date of the SF-215 Deposit Ticket. The financial institution may
return the entire deposit to the depositing field office if the dates on the endorsement and the SF-215 do not

match. Endorsement for the financial institution must be within the payee endorsement area located 1 1/2
inches from the beginning of the trailing edge of the check. An example is found in Section LB. Forms and
Illustrations.
Distribution of SF-215
The office within the POE preparing the deposit shall:

Make a photocopy of the original for POE records;
Send the Original (top white), Depositary Copy (blue carbon) and Confirmed Copy (green carbon) to the depositary
(bank) with the deposit; and
Mail the Agency Copy (yellow carbon) and Memorandum Copy with applicable supporting documents attached to the INS
Debt Management Center (see Submission of Records of Deposits to the Debt Management Center, section VIII-I) on
a daily basis, or each time a deposit is made.

Note: If the deposit is made over the counter at commercial banks, the "Agency Copy" should be taken to the depositary, and marked
"Received" by the depositary, prior to the POE photocopying and sending it to the INS Debt Management Center, along with the
supporting documentation. When deposits are made by courier, the Port-of-Entry should request from the bank a copy of the deposit
ticket marked "received" and dated.
D. SAFEGUARDING THE DEPOSIT

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

E. FORWARDING THE DEPOSIT TO THE DEPOSITARY (BANK) OR FRB
Items to be forwarded:
The POE will forward the following documents to the depositary:

•

SF-215 (Original, Depositary, and Confirmed copies),
Cash instruments (checks, money orders, cash), and
Adding machine tapes.

Record of Shipment
A record of the shipment of remittances to a depositary, FRB, or by courier is maintained on Form G-221, Schedule of Valuables
Shipped. On the G-221, the deposit number from Block 1 of the SF-215 (not the internal deposit number) must be included.
tvlanner of Shipment
fvlanner

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

Deposits may be mailed to FRBs, but not to commercial depositaries. It is recommended that locations send deposits by registered
mail.
F. USING A COURIER SERVICE TO TRANSFER DEPOSITS

It is essential that the depositary's cutoff times be known prior to designating the time of day that pick-ups will be made by
courier should be as late as possible to maximize daily deposit amounts and still
couriers. The deposit pick-up time designated for the couder
ensure that the courier will deliver the deposit the same day before the depositary's cutoff time.
Courier service contracts shall include acceptable pickup timeframes to ensure deposits reach depositaries in accordance with
Treasury requirements and include contractual provisions with appropriate liquidated damages for failing to deliver deposits to the
designated financial institution by the cutoff time specified.
G. DISPOSITION OF CONFIRMED COPIES

SF-21S to the office shown in Block 9. If the depositary returns the Confirmed
The depositary shall send the Confirmed Copy of the SF-215
Copy of the SF-215
SF-21S to the POE, it shall be sent immediately to the INS Debt Management Center.
H. ADJUSTMENTS TO DEPOSITS

SF-21S cannot be recalled, corrected, nor may it be resubmitted even if an error is discovered after it has been released to a
The SF-215
depositary. When errors are detected, the POE must contact the INS Debt Management Center for further instruction.
I. SUBMISSION OF RECORDS OF DEPOSITS TO THE DEBT MANAGEMENT CENTER

The following requirements apply to records of manually collected fees only.
The following documents must be forwarded by first-class US mail to the INS Debt Management Center, as applicable:
•

Agency and Memorandum copies of the SF-21S,
SF-215, Deposit Ticket;

•

G-711s, Individual Fee Register Receipts (Deposit Copy);

•

Form G-712, Summary of Fees; and

•

The original employee discrepancy memo and the Overage/Shortage Memo Cover Sheet. (Note: This must be sent
whether or not repayment has been made.)

The packet must be mailed on the day of deposit to:
USINS Debt Management Center
P.O. Box 5000

Williston, VT 05495-5000

J. FILE DOCUMENTS TO BE RETAINED BY POEs
POEs should retain:
•

A photocopy of the original of the SF-215, Deposit Ticket;

•

A copy of the G-712 and preferably copies of G-71ls (File Copies);
Originals of G-714, Receipt for Valuables Transferred, and G-221, Schedule of Valuables Shipped;

•

Any Fee Reconciliation Worksheets used in preparation of deposits;
Copies of the deposit ticket marked "received" and date stamped (when the deposit is made at a commercial bank); and

•

Copies of all memoranda related to overages/shortages.

These file documents should be retained for one year.

IX. FORMS OF PAYMENT
Payments for fees must be drawn on an institution located in the U.S. and payable in U.S. currency. Acceptable forms of payment
include the following:
•

Cash,
Personal Check,

•

Cashier's check,

•

Certified bank check,

•

Money order or
Credit Card, where accepted

Unacceptable forms of payment include the folloWing:
~

Foreign currency,
Postage stamps,

•

Food stamps,
Coupons,

Third party personal checks,
Employee personal checks,
Mutilated paper U.S. currency, and
Damaged coins.
A. AMOUNT OF CHECKS OR MONEY ORDERS

Ordinarily, only fees in the correct amount will be acceptable. However, when POEs are situated great distances from banks, stores,
etc. where other means of payment may be obtained, the following exceptions may be made:
U.S. Government checks (endorsed by the payee to the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service), domestic travelers checks, or
money orders must not exceed the amount of the fee by more than $50.

B. COUNTERFEIT MONEY

The Cashier must look closely at the money when accepting a fee payment. Paying attention to the quality of printing, security
threads, microprinting, and paper characteristics of the money can help guard against accepting counterfeit money. A booklet entitled
"Know Your Money," designed by the U.S. Secret Service to help detect counterfeit money and guard against losses because of
forgery, is available from Government Printing Office Bookstores. The booklet is also available at Www.ustreas.gov/ussSI
Www.ustreas.goV/lJSSSI on the
internet.
If the Cashier suspects that counterfeit money is presented as payment, he/she should follow these instructions taken from that
booklet:

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

C. REVIEW OF CHECKS, MONEY ORDERS, ETC.

Each check, money order, or other negotiable instrument presented must be carefully reviewed before it is accepted as payment
for a fee. Missing or incorrect data will result in banks returning the payment as "Unable to Process." The Cashier must be sure that
the following key elements for each negotiable instrument are reviewed before being accepted:
•

Date: The date should be current and not stale-dated (over six months old). Undated checks can be accepted provided
the current date is inserted.

•

Payee: Refer to Inscription on Checks below.

•

Address and phone number of payee (may be handwritten).

•

Amount: If the written and numeric amounts differ, the check will be deposited and the collection processed for the
written amount.
Signature: Checks must be signed.
Bank: Verify that the bank is an institution located in the U.S. and that funds are payable in U.S. currency.

Required Identification.
D. INSCRIPTION OF CHECKS

Checks should be made payable to the "Immigration and Naturalization Service." Checks should never be made out payable to
"INS" because the check is easy to alter (e.g., LN. Smith). Under no circumstances should visitors make, or may INS staff accept,
checks payable to individual officers or employees of the U.S. Government by name.
E. REQUIRED IDENTIFICATION

Each check, including personal checks, business checks, certified checks, and money orders, requires identification. Two forms of
identification are preferred. At a minimum, one form of legal, government-issued picture identification is required. The picture must
match the person presenting the check. If the check is a business check, the person presenting the check must show evidence of
employment with the firm. Examples of government-issued picture identification include:
Current driver's license,
Alien Registration Card (ARC),
INS Employment Authorization Card, or
As an alternate, a foreign government-issued passport.
F. RECORDING THE INFORMATION

The identifying number of the identification presented should be recorded legibly on the face of the check. For example, the U.S.
Social Security Number, if available, and driver's license number, ARC number, credit card number, etc., are to be recorded on the
face of the check or money order. The manual receipt number must also be written on the face of the check. These numbers are
essential for tracing a returned check to the applicant. Note: When the remitter and the applicant are not the same person, applicant
information must also be entered onto the check.
G. ENDORSEMENT
POEs should use a rubber stamp to affix the proper endorsement on the check.
Checks must be endorsed immediately with a stamp saying" For Deposit Only, US Immigration and Naturalization Service" when
accepted as payment for a fee.

Endorsement for checks must be within the payee endorsement area located 1 112 inches from the beginning of the trailing edge of
the check.

X. CHANGE FUNDS
A. POLICY

The Immigration and Naturalization Service shall establish Change Funds in accordance with applicable principles and standards in
the Supplement to the Treasury Financial Manual entitled "Manual of Procedures and Instructions for Cashiers" and the INS "Cashier's
Handbook".
Funds shall not be advanced for Change Funds unless adequate facilities for safeguarding cash are available.
A Change Fund shall not be established for more than $500.
POEs, depending on volume and staffing, may deem it necessary to have more than one Change Fund. Having a separate Change
Fund for each Cashier or shift may provide easier accountability and control than passing the Change Fund to a new Cashier after
counting and signing a Form G-277, Report of Imprest Fund Verification.
B. ESTABLISHING CHANGE FUNDS

Change Funds shall be requested in an amount not to exceed the actual amount needed for change-making purposes. To establish
Change Funds,
•

District Directors, or their designees, shall complete a Form OF-211, Request for Change or Establishment of Fund, for
each POE requiring Change Funds.

•

The Forms OF-211 must be submitted to the Director, Dallas Finance Center, for signature. Only the original Form OF211 need be signed.

•

Upon receipt, the Director will sign section VI, return a copy to the appropriate requesting office, and maintain a file
copy.

All such requests must be supported by INS Form 2958, Designation of Cashier.

Change Funds should be maintained with small denominations of currency to provide maximum flexibility in meeting U.S. currency
change-making requirements.

C. AUTHORIZED USE OF CHANGE FUNDS

The sole purpose of Change Funds is to make change for U.S. currency.
Change Funds shall not be commingled with fee receipts.
Change Funds may not at any time (even for a short period of time) be used for:

•

Loaning official funds;
Personal purposes, to include cashing personal checks; or
Exchanging money with other funds, personal or otherwise.

D. INCREASING AUTHORIZED AMOUNT

The amount of cash authorized and advanced may be increased, as the needs of the organization require, but cannot exceed $500.
To obtain an increase, the District Director, or his/her designee, shall submit a request supported by a justification to the Director,
Dallas Finance Center.
E. REDUCING OR CLOSING THE CHANGE FUND

It may be determined, on the basis of experience or because of changed conditions, that an excessive amount of cash is being
maintained or the need for the fund no longer exists. In those cases, the District Director, or his/her designee, will forward a Form OF211 along with a Cashier's check or money order for the returned funds to the Director, Dallas Finance Center, by registered mail
(return receipt requested), to have the fund reduced to a level commensurate with operating needs or to have the fund discontinued.
F. ACCOUNTABILITY FOR TRANSFER OF THE CHANGE FUND BETWEEN CASHIERS

Funds may be advanced to an employee for brief periods for approved purposes upon execution of a properly prepared SF-1165,
Interim Receipt for Cash. For example, an employee may take large denomination bills to a bank to exchange for smaller
denominations of currency.
A Form G-277, Report of Imprest Fund Verification, shall be prepared whenever there is a transfer of accountability for the Change
Fund, such as a change in Cashiers. The outgoing Cashier will sign Form G-277, and the incoming Cashier will sign the Verification
section of the form after verifying the Change Fund balance. The Remarks section shall state that accountability for the Change Fund is
transferred to the name of the incoming Cashier. Each Cashier shall retain a copy of the completed Form G-277 and a copy of the form
will also be forwarded to the Dallas Finance Center.
G. SAFEKEEPING FACILITIES FOR CHANGE FUNDS

Safekeeping facilities should be tailored to the size of the fund, as well as the vulnerability of the facility.
Small Funds ($50 or less). Relatively small funds may be stored in a file cabinet. A bar and combination lock must be
installed on the file cabinet as file cabinets with just key locks are inadequate.
•

Larger Funds (Over $50). Larger funds shall be stored in a relatively non-removable safe with a three-position dial
combination feature.
As cash requires absolute security, it is extremely important that security be constantly maintained over the Change Fund.
Therefore:
Principal Officers and Cashiers shall maintain exclusive control of their respective Change Fund, and work from separate
cash boxes or safe drawers, regardless of the type of safekeeping facilities provided.
A duplicate key to cash boxes shall be placed in a secure envelope, signed, dated and retained in a secure area controlled

by an appropriate official.
•

Change Funds shall be kept separate from all other funds.
Cash may not be stored in:
•

File cabinets with key locks;

•

Desk drawers;
Depositories and safe deposit boxes in the name of the Principal Officer or Cashier.
Accountability will be strengthened if Change Funds are maintained and controlled by one individual for each shift.

H. VERIFICATION OF FUNDS
The amount of cash shall be verified daily by the Principal Officer or Cashier responsible for the Change Fund. A suggested aid to
document cash verification is Form G-277, Report of Imprest Fund Verification. The G-277 will also provide a breakdown of the coins
and currency in the fund to determine if the denominations are sufficient to meet currency change-making requirements.
In accordance with Treasury requirements, POE Change Funds, exclUding remote locations, shall be verified quarterly by
unannounced audits by immediate supervisors, District Administrative Officers or the Dallas Finance Center. Treasury will give
consideration to the location of the Cashier, the amount of the fund, and other relevant factors if an audit requirement, other than
quarterly, is established. The District Director will ensure that an independent INS office will perform audits of Change Funds at least
once each fiscal year and document their findings. Findings will be sent to the Dallas Finance Center, and a copy will be provided to the
Port Director.
Unannounced audits of Change Funds will verify that:
•

All funds are properly accounted for;
The amount of the fund is not in excess of the cash requirements;
Unauthorized use of the funds is not occurring;
Procedures are being followed to protect the funds from loss or misuse.

I. Verification of Change Funds $200 or Less in POEs in Remote Locations
The Department of the Treasury approved INS's request for a waiver related to Change Fund audits at remote locations. Treasury
waived the regulation for verifying cash balances each quarter at POEs in remote locations, with Change Funds established for $200
and less. A location shall be considered "remote" when postal or banking services are not available for a radius of approximately 25
miles or an extraordinary circumstance exists, i.e., a ferry, which is time consuming and costly, must be taken to reach a town.
When visiting location sites having Change Funds, District Administrative Officers, INS Finance officials, or immediate supervisors
will conduct unannounced verifications of the cash balance in Change Funds. The results of these verifications will be forwarded as
specified below in order to meet the minimum Treasury reqUirement of an annual verification. Individuals verifying the Change Funds
shall count the cash, and complete and sign a Form G-277, Certificate of Verification. The original Certificate of Verification shall be

forwarded to the Dallas Finance Center for review and retention. A copy of the certificate shall also be retained at the Change Fund
site.
More comprehensive and frequent audits can be done at the discretion of cognizant authorities such as the District Director or the
Office of Financial Management. The frequency of audits will depend on the location, the amount of the fund, and other relevant
factors.

J. PERSONAL LIABILITY FOR CHANGE FUNDS
While acting as custodian of a Change Fund, the official is personally liable (legally responsible) for the Government money and
obligated to perform duties faithfully. For further information see section II-D.

XI. REFUNDS
A. POLICY
Only the District Director or his/her formally named designee is authorized to determine that a refund is warranted. In that case, a
revised Form G-266, Request for Refund of Fee, shall be processed to reimburse an applicant for a fee previously paid. It is INS policy
that refunds are issued only in the case of Service error.
Form G-266 can be found on the INS Intranet in the "Table of Contents" section and on the cc:Mail bulletin board under "Finance
Notices." Only one refund request may be made on each form.

XII. SAFEGUARDING COLLECTIONS AND SUPPORTING DOCUMENTS
The Principal Officer will have primary responsibility to ensure that appropriate security and accountability for funds and valuables
received and accepted by INS employees are maintained to the fullest extent possible. Similar security and accountability is also to be
maintained over all supporting documents which record individual INS transactions such as applications, manual receipts/ as well as all
material documenting transaction history such as cash register tapes and Forms G-253, Daily Registers of Fee Receipts/ etc. In
addition to establishing the following procedures regarding collections, supervisors are also to establish procedures specific to their POE
in order to ensure independent accounting of transactions and proper safeguarding of documents supporting them.
A. PERSONNEL
The recruitment/ screening, and selection of persons for positions reqUiring the performance of cash functions should be
accomplished by supervisors with primary regard to the sensitive nature of those positions and with the safeguarding of public funds as
their ultimate objective.
Accountable employees must be able to account for the full amount of funds being held at any given time. Employees performing
coilection duties are responsible for maintaining appropriate accounting and internal controls for the assets for which they are
responsible. Responsibility continues from the time the fees are collected until proper and acceptable accounting of the fees is made
and the receipts are either deposited or turned over to another individual.
Officials are personally liable (legally responsible) for the Government money in their custody and are obligated to faithfully
perform duties. Personal liability is addressed in the section on the Principle of Liability for Public Funds, in section II -D.

Bo SEGREGATION OF DUTIES

Segregation of duties is an important facet in maintaining accountability ;n the fee collection and fee handling process. It is a
management tool that provides a system of checks and balances in the fee collection process. While the Cashier remains fully
accountable or responsible for the Government funds in his/her custody, segregation of duties provides that the integrity of the
process is maintained by establishing a division of accountability. Establishing segregation of duties will prevent a single person (the
Cashier) from having total control over fees taken and the means to account for them. For these reasons, segregation of duties must
be established and maintained throughout the entire process.
The following are examples of segregation of duties:
Dividing the Inspection and Cashier functions by:

•

1.

Requiring the Inspector to separate the Departure portion of the Form 1-94 and retain the Arrival portion in a locked box
in order to keep an independent count of the Forms 1-94 issued, before the applicant proceeds to the Cashier.

2.

Requiring the Inspector to retain a copy of other applications, such as an 1-90 or 1-193, in a locked box, before the
applicant proceeds to the Cashier.

Requiring two people (Cashier and verifier who is not the Officer working with the Cashier) to count the cash at the end of a day
or shift,
Requiring a separate person, preferably a supervisor, to initial off on "Void" entries on the journal tape and, under the manual fee
collection process, on the G-211 or the G-711 immediately after the void occurs. The void must also be recorded on the G253.
Requiring the supervisor, rather than the Cashier, to retain custody of the keys to the cash register, etc.

C. DROP SAFES
Drop safes enable individuals to deposit funds in safes without having access to safe combinations.
Funds are placed in a sealed envelope and dropped through the slot of the drop safe. Individuals must initial over the
sealing point of the envelope before depositing in the drop safe slot so it can be determined if the envelopes were
opened after being sealed. Taping across the initials is a further deterrent.
Two individuals shall be assigned to open the sealed envelopes and verify the seal and contents. Accountability can only
be maintained if more than one individual verifies the envelope seal and contents of each envelope.
At certain times, the individual with the safe combination opens the drop safe and, in the presence of another individual,
removes all envelopes deposited. Funds are then prepared for deposit.

D. SAFE COMBINATIONS
Safe combinations shall be memorized. Safe combinations should be placed in sealed envelopes, signed, dated and retained in a
secure place that is controlled by an appropriate official, i.e. Security Officer, Administrative Officer, etc. They may not be carried on
the person, written on a desk calendar or stored in a desk.
•

Combinations shall be changed:

At least annually, and
When there is a change of any accountable officer with access to the safe;
When it has been necessary to effect access to the funds in the case of an unforeseen absence of the employee; or
When the combination has otherwise been made known to unauthorized employees or otherwise compromised.

If, in the event of an unforeseen absence or other emergency, it is necessary to access an accountable employee's storage
facility, the Principal Officer shall appoint at least two employees to effect access and account for any funds and
valuables on hand.
More information on this subject is available in the INS Security Officers' Handbook.

E. PASSWORDS AND PINs
Passwords and Personnel Identification Numbers (PINs) must be memorized. They should also be placed in sealed envelopes,
signed, dated and retained in a secure place that is controlled by an appropriate official, i.e. Security Officer, Administrative Officer,
etc. They may not be carried on the person, written on a desk calendar or stored in a desk.
Passwords and PINs shall be changed:
When it has been necessary for another person to gain access to the password or PIN in the case of an unforeseen event,
or
When the password or PIN has otherwise been made known to unauthorized empioyees or otherwise compromised.
Passwords and PINs are personal identifiers. When an employee having a password or PIN leaves his/her position, the new
employee selects or is assigned new passwords or PINs. Passwords/PINs programmed into cash registers should be
deleted when no longer used.

F. COURIER SERVICE CONTRACTS
Volume I of the Treasury Financial Manual 6-8030.30 states that deposits will be made as late as possible prior to the specified
cutoff time of the depositary to maximize daily deposit amounts. Treasury's definition of cutoff time is a time predesignated by a
financial institution beyond which transactions presented or actions requested will be deferred to the next banking day's business.
It is recommended that locations mail deposits to FRBs by registered mail. Registered mail is tracked and kept under lock and key
by the Post Office from time of receipt until it is delivered at its final destination. It is important that the depositing location maintain
enough information regarding the checks in the deposit in order to obtain replacement checks if the deposit is lost or destroyed in
transit.
It is essential that the depositary's cutoff time be known prior to designating the time of day that pickups will be made by couriers.
The pickup time designated for the courier should be as late as possible to maximize daily deposit amounts and also insure the pickup
will be delivered for deposit before the depositary's cutoff time.
Courier service contracts shall include acceptable pickup timeframes to insure deposits reach depositaries in accordance with

Treasury requirements and include contractual provisions with appropriate liquidated damages for failing to deliver deposits to the
designated financial institution by the cutoff time specified.

G. CASH REGISTER INVENTORY
The Center's staff must know how many cash registers are at each POE and their make and model. In addition, each cash register
at a service location must be designated by a unique number. Therefore, when cash register inventories change (i.e. additions,
deletions, malfunctions, or replacements), the Port Director or his/her designee must notify the DMC of the change. Notification must
be written format. The POE may choose a method such as facsimile, e-mail, or by a note with the deposit.

H. CASHIER ROOM CONSTRUCTION RECOMMENDATIONS
Cashier Rooms shall be constructed to protect both employees and funds. Specific security guidance can be obtained from the INS
Office of Security. The following construction measures should be considered for areas that handle funds and valuables:

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

More information on this subject is available in the INS Security Officers'
Offfcers' Handbook.

XIII. FEE COLLECTION QUALITY ASSURANCE

A. FEE COLLECTION QUALITY ASSURANCE CHECKLIST, FORM G-l031
To view a copy of this form, click on Form

G-1031.

B. WORKSHEET A - RECONCILIATION OF END-OF-SHIFT, FORM G-l032

To view a copy of this form, click on Form

G-1032.

C. WORKSHEET B -TRACKING APPLICATIONS

To view a copy of this form, click on Form

I

CASH COUNTS, FORM G-1033

G-1033.

D. WORKSHEET C - DEPOSIT ACTIVITIES, FORM G-1034

To view a copy of this form, click on Form

G-1034.

E. WORKSHEET D - JOURNAL TAPES, FORM G-1035

To view a copy of this form, click on Form

G-1035.

F. WORKSHEET E - MANUAL RECEIPTS, FORM G-1036

To view a copy of this form, click on Form

G-1036.

G. FEE COLLECTION INSTRUCTIONS FOR COMPLETING CHECKLIST QUESTIONS

To view a copy of this form, click on Form

G-1037

Footnotes for Appendix 46-1
Quality Assurance
FN 1

AM 5.5.103, INS Quality Assurance Program, established the INS Quality Assurance Program under the direction and oversight
of the office of Internal Audit. The program will provide for continuous monitoring and measuring compliance with procedures
in all program areas to mitigate adverse aspects to operations and assure program processes are performed with integrity and
in compliance with applicable law.

FN 2

Each QAA has been provided a copy of an automated random number generator to be used ion a Pc.

Appendix 47-1 TWOVlIn-Transit Report to HQINS (Added INS TM2)
mOV/IN-TRANSIT REPORT TO HQINS
ONLY FOR THOSE APPLICANTS WHO FAIL
TO DEPART THE U.S. AS REQUIRED
CARRIER
TYPE OF APPLICANT

PORT

TWOV APPLICANT 1.
PAROLED INTO THE U. S.
IN-TRANSIT APPLICANT 2.
EXCLUDED BY INS IMMIGRATION JUDGE
IN-TRANSIT DEPORTEE 3.
ESCAPED AFTER INSPECTION
UPDATE 4.
ABSCONDED BEFORE INSPECTION
5.
PLACED IN INS CUSTODY
6.
PLACED IN CARRIER CUSTODY
6a._ ESCAPED IN CARRIER CUSTODY (1-259)
7. _ OTHER (Explain)
_
DID APPLICANT CLAIM POLITICAL
ASYLUM? YES
NO_ _
IF APPLICANT ESCAPED/ABSCONDED: DATE OF ESCAPE _1_1_.
GUARD ESCAPE REPORT AVAILABLE: YES_ NO_
DOCUMENT NAME . - - - - - : - - - - - - - - DATE OF ARRIVAL
(last name, first name)

_

DOCUMENT DOB_/_/_ SEX M_F_
mm dd yy
DOCUMENT NATIONALITY
CLAIMED/TRUE NAME
(circle one)
(last name, first name)

ARRIVING FLIGHT #

U.S. CONNECTING FLIGHT #
(if applicable)
DEPARTING FLIGHT #

CLAIMED/TRUE DOB _/_/_SCHEDULED DATE OF DEPARTURE
mm dd yy
CLAIMED/TRUE NATIONALITY
TICKET # (13-digits)

_

FILE#A

ITINERARY

_
_
_

ADDITIONAL COMM ENTS:
Instructions:

Note:

The POEs should send a facsimile of this report to HQINS within 5 days of the TWOV/lnTransit applicant's failure to depart, except those failing to depart timely. This report will be
directed to TWOV Liaison Officer at FAX # 202 - 514 - 8345. A copy of this report and related
information (including all documentation, photo-copies, guard reports, etc.) should be kept at
the POEs and not REPEAT not sent to HQINS.

All subsequent changes, additions, and/or deletions in status of aliens should be reported to HQINS
within 5 days by facsimile using this form. (HQINS-1-93)

Appendix 48-1 Inspections Overtime Audit Manual (Added INS TM2)
(April 25, 1994)

Prepared By
Headquarters, Inspections Division

Table of Contents

Part I.

Introduction

Part II.

Purpose

Part III.

Background

Part IV.

National Audit Scheduling

Part V.

Documentation Needed for Full Audit

Part VI.

Conduct of Audits

Part VII.

Completion of Audit Report

Part VIII.
Part IX.

National Overtime Agreement
INS Policy and Correspondence Memoranda on Staffing and Overtime Control

Overtime Review
Part I. Introduction
Audits will be conducted of ports-of-entry (POEs) in each district annually by designated District Overtime
Control Officers (DOCO) as part of the national Inspections Program overtime management and assessment
program. The National Overtime Control Officer will conduct independent audits of POEs and also review the
reports prepared by the DOCOs. These audits will assist the Service in management of overtime expenditures
in the Inspections Program.

Part II. Purpose
The purpose of the audits is to insure that overtime funds are used appropriately and in accordance with
Headquarters directives and gUidance. The intent of the assistant commissioner, Inspections is to document
the cost-effectiveness and prudent administration of overtime expenditures. The audit teams will provide
documentation to the Inspections Program managers showing how field units are complying with current
policy and/or provide suggestions for improvement.
The audits will help the districts document their performance in this critical area and will provide regional and
Headquarters program personnel the opportunity to evaluate the districts' performance and make suggestions
as appropriate.

Part III. Background
The Service has for many years been the SUbject of substantial scrutiny by various outside entities for its
expenditures of perceived large amounts of money for the inspection of passengers and crew arriving in the
U.S. from foreign territories. These entities have repeatedly cited a lack of management control of
expenditures for inspections performed and compensated under the Act of March 2, 1931. General policy for
control of overtime assignments is set forth in AM 1.3.104.
The Service made several policy changes, as a result of audits and reports, to ensure that the overtime funds
are used prudently. They included, but were not limited to, the following:
Critical elements were added concerning overtime in the Performance Work Plans for all supervisory
personnel, from the first line supervisor through Headquarters personnel. This was accomplished in the

Commissioner's memorandum of October 17, 1989 (CO 235-P):
A recent review of scheduling and billing practices involving 1931 Act overtime has been conducted by the
Office of Inspections. The audit has identified various areas where Service policies and practices must be
changed in order to fulfill our responsibility to wisely expend both appropriated and user fee funds.
These changes were identified through both desk and on-site examinations of scheduling and billing practices
at over a dozen ports of entry, as well as through the efforts of an overtime study group convened in March at
Central Office. The group was composed of Assistant Regional Commissioners, their representatives, Central
Office Inspections Program personnel, and representatives from Central Office Labor Relations and Finance
divisions. The following items delineate the problems identified by the group and substantiated by the port of
entry audits.
Scheduling is used to maximize overtime earnings in certain locations.
Overtime wheels are not accounting for all overtime earnings in computing totals toward the
congressionally mandated cap of $25,000 (Note: cap raised to $30,000 since this memo was issued),
when per year.
Many local union agreements are in direct contravention to national policy and to the Administrative Manual
regarding overtime policy.
Waivers of the $25.000 (Note: cap raised to $30,000 since this memo was issued) cap are granted routinely
without review of scheduling practices or need.
District and regional offices of the Inspections program frequently do not review expenditures of 1931 Act
overtime funds at specific ports of entry within their jurisdictions.
The audits conducted to date have identified at least $2,500,000 in excessive 1931 Act overtime billings
during the current fiscal year. By eliminating the above practices and administering overtime in compliance
with existing policy, a significantly larger amount will be available in coming years to provide added personnel
and equipment for the Inspections Program.
One of the most effective means of improving management of the overtime accounts is through the
Performance Work Plans of key officials. With few exceptions, it has been noted that the plans of Regional
Commissioners, District Directors, and other Inspections Program and Examinations Program managers with
Inspections program oversight do not hold these officials specifically accountable for the cost effectiveness of
1931 Act expenditures at ports of entry within their jurisdictions. In order to correct this deficiency, the
following policy shall become effective as of the date of this directive.

Fiscal Responsibility for Overtime Monies
The attached is a model of a critical element, specifically requiring the responsible and efficient administration
of overtime. Rating officials shall use this model as a point of departure, and, if necessary, tailor the
performance standard to reflect specific requirements and conditions which are unique to a particular work
environment. Such a critical element shall be placed in the Performance Work Plans of all managers with
responsibility for oversight of inspectional operations. This element shall specifically address scheduling
practices and the need for advanced planning to wisely utilize personnel resources. The Assistant
Commissioner for Inspections; Associate Regional Commissioners for Operations; Assistant Regional
Commissioners for Examinations and Inspections; District Directors; Deputy District Directors; Officers-inCharge; Assistant Officers-in-Charge; Assistant District Directors for Examinations; Assistant District Directors
for Inspections; Deputy Assistant District Directors for Inspections; Port Directors; Assistant and Deputy Port
Directors; and Supervisory Immigration Inspectors shall be held accountable for the proper expenditure of
overtime monies utilizing this method. Incorporation of a job element and accompanying performance
standard into an employees work plan requires discussion with the employee, rating official and reviewing
official on the employee's work plan acknowledging the addition.

CRITICAL ELEMENT; FISCAL RESPONSIBILITY FOR OVERTIME MONIES
JOB ELEMENT: Incumbent is accountable for the efficiency and cost effectiveness of Inspections Program
personnel and overtime resources.
PERFORMANCE STANDARDS:
Fully successful: Evaluates use of resources in order to determine cost savings methods; e.g., possible
elimination or combination of programs, personnel realignments for greater cost effectiveness. Determines
cost savings methods and establishes procedures to implement and monitor their effects. Makes accurate
projections of resource needs and maintains close communication with district, region and Central Office
on changes in expenditures of funds to achieve maximum use of resources. Insures full compliance with
Service instructions and Congressional mandate to limit overtime earnings of employees to $30,000 each
per year. Performs necessary adjustments in operations procedures and field assignments which prevent
the expenditure of overtime funds for overtime services exceeding $30,000 for each employee. If it is
determined that an individual employee is projected to exceed the overtime earnings ceiling of $30,000,
incumbent exhausts all other scheduling possibilities before requesting a waiver pursuant to Service
policy.
Excellent: In addition to fully successful, the incumbent deploys employee resources to the Inspections
Program so that costs for overtime, travel, and related inspections expenditures are maintained within
allocated amounts. Makes prompt decisions, often under high pressure conditions and takes appropriate
actions. Adjusts priorities based on changing needs and circumstances. Determines the nature and

availability of resources needed to respond SWiftly to special situations and makes necessary and timely
adjustments in resource allocations. Identifies existing or potential problems and decides on solutions.
Coordinates with district, regional, and Central Office managers, officials from other agencies, and other
individuals to evaluate progress in meeting objectives of emergency or other special situations. Incumbent
assures that all employees stay at or below the $30,000 individual earnings cap set by Congress.

Minimally successful: Due to oversight or negligence, incumbent allows inspections costs to noticeably
increase disproportionally in relation to expected workload. Alternatively, due to negligence or oversight,
allows overtime earnings in one location to reach the point that it is necessary to cease assigning some
employees to overtime work well before the end of the fiscal year. While waivers of the overtime cap may
be necessary, such need does not occur due to negligence or oversight in the incumbent's administration
of overtime monies.
Measures were directed requiring strict control of overtime assignments and expenditures. Bi- weekly reviews
of all duty assignment sheets and Forms G-202 by District and Regional Offices were instituted in a
memorandum dated April 6, 1990 (CO 235-P):
During FY '89, the Office of Inspections conducted a comprehensive audit of 1931 Act overtime practices at
ports of entry in all four regions. Servicewide patterns of overtime spending were examined, through both
desk and on-site audits of overtime administration, in more than a dozen ports of entry. Further, overtime has
been the subject of audits by outside entities, including the Department of Justice, and has resulted in
criticism of Service overtime policies.
This scrutiny has revealed that many managers authorize overtime in a responsible manner. However, certain
problems with use and control of overtime have been identified at audit sites and elsewhere. Such practices
violate Service policy and have other serious consequences.
Review of scheduling practices at both large and small inspectional facilities has revealed a growing problem
in justifying expenditures for overtime. At several airports no evening shift is scheduled, despite the fact that
35% or more of regularly scheduled flights arrive at night, and adequate staff exists to work such a shift. At
other facilities, both air and sea ports of entry, between 30% and 50% of arrival occur between the hours of 5
a.m. and 8 a.m., with no standard shift to cover the workload. Similarly, in at least two instances seaport
personnel are scheduled from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. only, when less than 5% of all arrivals occur during these
hours.
In addition, in many locations, the 40 hour work week of Immigration Inspectors is scheduled Monday through
Friday rather than the mandated Monday through Saturday. Overtime in the form of '45 Act funds is being
utilized to staff Saturday inspectional services.
It is important to remember that inspectional overtime monies are to be expended for the expeditious

inspection of arriving passengers and the good of the Service. The use of other officers not assigned full time
to the Inspections Program is designed to meet these objectives. The number of officers assigned to overtime
should not exceed actual staffing needs.
Union notification has been handled by the Central Office labor Relations Specialists on the national level
issues. Where local agreements are not in conformity with the national policy, management shall give notice
to the union at the district level and bargain in accordance with the negotiated agreement. Where requested
by the local union, reasonable extensions of time for bargaining shall be granted to permit participation of
national union officials in the local bargaining.
Policy.
In recognition of the problems listed above, anq in order to improve and standardize accountability for
overtime expenditures as well as to streamline scheduling to minimize the need for overtime, the following
policy shall be implemented. This policy provides direction for the control of 1931 and 1946 Act overtime and
is to be implemented after Service compliance with all contractual obligations to the employee unions at the
national and local levels.
1. Scheduling Saturday as part of the basic work week at all ports of entry. Within the constraints of
available staffing, inspectional service shall be scheduled for all ports Monday through Saturday. Such
scheduling shall focus on the elimination of recurring assignments of 1945 Act overtime on Saturdays. A
bargaining unit employee may be scheduled on Saturday solely to perform supervisory functions;
however, this should occur only when management determines that a Service need exists.
2. Scheduling basic tours of duty at seaports and airports to cover a greater portion of the working
day. Consistent with the negotiated agreement and the law enforcement mission of the Service, tours of
duty shall be established at seaports and airports where arrivals routinely occur outside of the currently
established hours on other than Sundays. Such tours of duty shall be arranged after review of port arrival
trends and shall be commensurate with current levels of staffing and the distribution of workload. Where
appropriate, regions and districts shall review port of entry scheduling practices to ensure that regularly
scheduled flights or ships are scheduled for inspection on regular shifts, the Service shall give due
consideration to the effect such shifts will have on the employees' personal lives, where operationally
feasible.
3. Inspector to passenger ratios at airports. The inspector to passenger ration used for making overtime
assignments shall be the same as those used during the regularly scheduled workweek. Excluding
supervisory and secondary inspections officers, the staffing ratios on overtime shall not be less than the
following without prior explicit approval by the regional Commissioner and Central Office, Inspections:
(a)

At U.S. airports: One to forty-five (1 - 45) on all alien flights; one to sixty (1 - 60) for mixed flights;

one to one hundred (1 - 100) on U.S. citizen (including returning residents) flights.
(b)

At preclearance locations: One to sixty (1 - 60) for mixed flights; and one to one hundred (1 -100)
on U.S. citizen (including returning residents) flights.

On-duty inspectors are to be utilized to the fullest extent possible to reduce ratios rather than permit
backup of passengers in inspection areas. For example, inspectors shall not be withheld from inspections
to work on adjudications or collateral duty assignments while a passenger backup is occurring in the
inspection area.
In addition, an unprojected overtime cost increase of over 10 percent over the prior pay period shall trigger
an automatic review of local scheduling practices. Any absence of immigration inspectors on detail
(excluding training), shall then be reviewed by the District Director, in concert with the affected regional
program managers; to reassess the need for continuing any given detail. Scheduling of assignments shall
be revised when appropriate.
4. All overtime earnings are subject to the statutory overtime cap. Administratively Uncontrollable
Overtime, 1931 Act and 1945 Act overtime shall be included in overtime computations, when appropriate.
It shall be the responsibility of each officer and his or her first line supervisor to assure that such earnings
are reported in a timely manner to the Overtime Control Officer.

5. Employees who are eligible to work inspectional overtime and do not wish to do so shall be
identified. Employees who are eligible to work inspectional overtime and do not wish to do so shall be
identified, shall not be required to work overtime except when needed, and may be excused from working
overtime in keeping with local staffing and workload projections. However, any eligible employee may be
required to work on an overtime basis when management determines that a Service need exists.
6. Equitable distribution of overtime. Overtime assignments shall be equitably distributed, and tracked
on a monetary basis. Such assignments and earnings shall be reconciled, at minimum, quarterly. Such
reconciliation shall ensure that all employees remain within the statutory overtime earnings cap. Nothing in
this policy shall preclude the establishment of other than monetary overtime wheels.
.
7. Limiting the participation in 1931 Act overtime of officers in grades GM-13 and GM-14. No one
above the grade of GM-14 shall participate in inspectional overtime in any capacity. Participation at the
GM-13 and GM-14 level shall be restricted to Port Directors and Assistant Port Directors. Such
participation shall not be regularly scheduled and shall, in fact, occur on random shifts on an irregular
basis. Time spent in '31 Act activity shall only be spent in first line supervision of immigration inspectors
engaged in inspecting applicants for entry into the United States. It shall not be spent in completing
administrative paperwork, training, or other non-inspectional activity.

8. Exercising more rigorous control over scheduling and billing of overtime. All management
personnel in the Inspections Program chain of command, including participating supervisors, are
responsible for the administration and control of overtime.
(a) A critical element, specifically requiring the responsible and efficient administration of overtime, shall
be placed in the Performance Work Plans of all managers with responsibility for oversight of
inspectional operations. This element shall specifically address scheduling practices and the need for
advanced planning to Wisely utilize personnel resources. The Associate Commissioner, Examinations;
Assistant Commissioner, Inspections; Regional Commissioners; Deputy Assistant Commissioners,
Inspections; Associate Regional Commissioners, Operations; Assistant Regional Commissioners,
Examinations and Inspections; District Directors; Deputy District Directors; Officers-in-Charge;
Assistant Officers-in-Charge; Assistant District Directors, Examinations; Assistant District Directors,
Inspections; Port Directors; Deputy Port Directors; and Supervisory Immigration Inspectors shall all be
held accountable for the proper expenditure of overtime monies utilizing this method.
(b) Officers-in-charge and Supervisory Immigration Inspectors shall maintain strict control of overtime
assignments and expenditures. Such officers shall conduct a continuing in depth review of all work
schedules, staffing patterns, primary inspection activity reports, duty assignment sheets, secondary
inspection logs, and schedules of arriving vessels and aircraft. Information obtained from such a
review shall be used to ascertain where and when changes in scheduling and overtime assignments
will result in more efficient and economical operations. Their efforts shall be regularly monitored at the
district and regional levels.
(c) District and regional offices shall review biweekly all duty assignments sheets (G-259a). Such a
review shall ensure that Sunday and holiday assignments, for primary and secondary, are held to a
minimum. Such assignments shall be commensurate with actual workloads, established inspector to
passenger ratios, and normal as well as seasonal traffic patterns. Primary and secondary staffing on
all overtime assignments, including Sundays and holidays, shall not exceed weekday staffing,
inclUding supervisors, without a valid justification and advance approval. Sunday and holiday staffing
which exceeds weekday staffing for comparable passenger loads must be specifically authorized by
the Regional Commissioner.
(d) The use of Form G-202A, Inspection -- Order and Report, shall be instituted. It shall be reviewed
daily by supervisors and biweekly by both the district and regional Inspections Program Managers.
Any errors in billing shall be corrected by the executing officer. Inadvertent charges which have been
paid shall be immediately referred to the appropriate Regional Finance Office so that such monies can
be recovered.
(e) The CINSP-33 Report, Form G-690, System to Review and Control '31 Act Overtime, shall be

reinstituted and shall serve as the vehicle to monitor the results of these procedures.
Each monthly report shall contain a summary of specific actions taken to carry out all provisions of this
directive. Included shall be the results achieved in terms of changes effected, problem areas or
discrepancies identified and corrected, and dollar amounts saved. Regional reports shall cover the
above items by district.
9. Scheduling of Supervisory Immigration Inspectors and Supervisors from other decision units. All
Supervisory Immigration Inspectors shall be scheduled for a basic work week of five days, Monday
through Saturday. Such scheduling shall focus on the elimination of recurring assignments of 1945 Act
and 1931 Act overtime on Saturdays to provide supervisory coverage. Supervisors from decision units
other than the Inspections Program who participate in inspectional duties shall do so as journeymen
Immigration Inspectors, not as Supervisory Immigration Inspectors.
10. Overtime scheduling of Supervisory Immigration Inspectors. When the number of immigration
officers required to perform inspectional duties on a particular shift is adjusted, the number of Supervisory
Immigration Inspectors scheduled for that shift shall be adjusted proportionally.
All pertinent portions of the Administrative Manual will be amended to conform with this policy. Forms G-202
and G-690 are being revised and updated. Existing supplies of current forms should be utilized until such
revisions are available.
District Directors were required to conduct bi-weekly reviews of a random sample of time and attendance
reports, pursuant to a memorandum dated March 4, 1992 (C) 235-P):
In the recent draft report on inspectional overtime by the Department of Justice, Office of the Inspector
General (OIG), several recommendations were made to improve district control over inspectional overtime
costs. Our reply to these recommendations indicated that instructions would be provided to each district to
implement the OIGs recommendations.
In most cases these instructions merely re-emphasize or clarify policies for management and control of
inspectional overtime that have been previously issued as official Service policy by the Executive Associate
Commissioner for Operations. The following instructions are to be implemented upon receipt of this
memorandum.
1. District Directors shall conduct biweekly reviews of a random sample of time and attendance reports
from among all officers who perform inspections, or who supervise officers conducting inspections, to
determine whether all claimed payments for inspectional overtime are appropriate and provide the most
efficient use of resources.

Based on the findings of these reviews, District Directors shall certify in writing, by memoranda, that
charges for payments as a result of performance of inspectional overtime were reviewed, that all Service
policies for management and control of inspectional overtime were complied with and, where indicated b
the review, that immediate action to correct errors or deficiencies in time and attendance reporting has
been taken. Copies of these certifications shall be filed with local time and attendance records.
2. District Directors will ensure that all Forms G-202, Inspection Order, Report and Certification, for all
Immigration Officers who are not classified as Immigration Inspectors, are approved by the supervisor or
manager ordering the overtime inspection, and that the approved form G-202 is then promptly sent to the
appropriate timekeeper at the Immigration Officer's regUlar duty station for review and processing.
3. District Directors shall ensure that Service policy concerning overtime assignments by GM-13 and GM14 Immigration Officers, payable under the Act of March 2, 1931, is strictly adhered to in all instances.
This policy is contained in the April 6, 1990 memorandum from the Executive Associate Commissioner for
Operations, and provides that these officers shall only work 1931 Act overtime assignments on a random
and infrequent basis.
The office of Inspections is working with the Resource Management Branch to develop automated reports on
inspectional overtime based on the personnel database. One of these reports will target GM-13 and higher
graded employees who submit payroll reports for inspectional overtime. Analysis of these reports will be used
to identify instances of non-compliance with Service policies in this regard.
It is anticipated that, once these new reports are tested and placed into routine production, the current CINSP33/G- 590B report will be discontinued. However, until this occurs, districts should continue to submit this
monthly report.

Part IV. National Audit Scheduling
A. Selection criteria. The Office of Inspections will direct and conduct audits at selected POEs in each
district. These audits will be scheduled on an annual basis. The selection of port(s)/districts to be reviewed 1
audited will be based upon the following factor(s):

1. Scheduled reviews - A schedule of audits will be developed by Headquarters, Inspections. At least one
POE in each district will receive an audit annually either by the District Overtime Control Officer or by a
National Audit Team. Each district will receive, at a minimum, an audit by a National Audit Team once every
three years. The pay periods to be audited will not necessarily be the pay periods of the scheduled audit
month. The schedule will remain flexible to allow for other selection methods noted below.
2. Audit requested by district - Districts may request a review to determine if its Inspections Program
Managers are in compliance with Headquarters policies and directives.

3. An audit may be conducted in a district where any number of employees are projected to reach or exceed
the statutory overtime cap.
4. An audit may be initiated based on review of reports:

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

or

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

(b)(2), (b)
(7)(E)

-Overtime report showing cumulative earnings and designating individuals projected to exceed the

~ecap.

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)
~vertime
report by pay period - shows the overtime amounts earned by individuals during a given
pay period.

(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

_ P a y r o l l Exception Report - shows the number of employees earning inspectional overtime who
are not inspections program personnel, possibly indicative of a need for improved scheduling practices.
(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

- R e p o r t - This report may show an abnormally high number of rollback hours, high amount of
~ory '31 Act overtime hours, or a large amount of '31 Act with a low amount of '45 Act hours.
5. Non-statutory overtime - Total expenditures of 1931 Act overtime on weekdays are greater than 30% of
what is expended for the statutorily required Sundays and holidays.
6. An increase in overtime expenditures of 10% over comparable pay periods in previous years.
7. Complaints from carriers concerning amounts of overtime being billed; audits by other agencies, etc.
8. Regional/Headquarters review of workload and scheduling which indicates a possible imbalance.
9. Historical data - previous aUdit(s) detected a pattern of scheduling and overtime use that has not been in
compliance with Headquarters policy. Review may be necessary to evaluate effectiveness of changes
instituted.
10. The use of GS-13/14 managers to perform inspectional duties in excess of one Sunday or holiday per
month.
B. Methodology for selection of audit site and auditors.

The majority of audits will be desk audits conducted away from the POE. An on-site audit will be conducted as
circumstances dictate, such as lack of full compliance with recommendations made as a result of a previous
audit; substantial increase in overtime use without a similar increase in workload; or where desk audit findings
indicate unusual local circumstances which may only be validated/verified by an on-site visit.

Auditors for each specific audit detail will be selected from those experienced auditors residing in various
districts and from regional and Headquarters Inspections staff. Each audit detail will consist of at least one
regional or Headquarters staff officer and at least one District Overtime Control Officer (DOCO).
No DOCO will be selected for participation in a national audit of the district in which he or she is employed.
Part V. Documentation Needed for Full Audit
The documentation to be requested for a full audit will include, but not be limited to, the following:
1.

Forms G-202 - Inspection Overtime Order Report. In numerical order for all officers, regardless of actual
branch, for the specified period of the audit.

2.

Forms G-259 - Duty Assignment Schedules and keys explaining coded information.

3.

Forms 1-577 - Daily Air Passenger Inspections Log.

4.

Forms 1-429 - Schedule of Arriving or Departing Aircraft.

5.

Form 8-22 - Monthly Workload Summary - Inspections

6.

Current, or most recent, traffic survey by hour (land border).

7.

Incident reports (if any) reporting unusual situations, arrivals, problems, etc.

8.

Overtime schedule.

9.

Shipping arrival logs.

10.

Map of area jurisdiction showing inspection sites (especially for ports with extended seaport areas or
multiple airports covered from one location), to include average travel times to these sites.

11.

Locally negotiated overtime agreement.

12.

Copy of most recent AGO certification, locally utilized AUO tracking worksheets covering the audit
period, and copy of the latest percentage recalculation.

13.

Time and attendance sheets for all employees performing overtime during the audit period.

Locally produced and utilized forms may be submitted in lieu of the above specifically named forms, where
necessary.

The normal length of time covered in an audit is two pay periods, which mayor may not, be consecutive. If
possible, one pay period should include a holiday.
Part VI. Conduct of Audits

A. Land Borders.
1. Complete the Overtime Audit Work Sheet (Available Staff Regular Duty) with data from Form G-259. This
data is to be filled in the worksheet for each day of the pay periods audited by each hour of the day with the
number of on duty staff as noted below.
Check the block specifying the worksheet as containing the data from Form G-259.
Each column across the top of the worksheet, after the date and day of week column, relates to an hour of
the day using a 24 hour clock.
Each row down the worksheet relates to the specific day of the week and the specific date as assigned by
the auditor.
Complete the date column for the two pay periods included on the work sheet.
Fill in each cell with the number of inspectors scheduled to work during each hour period of the day of the
audit period. Do not include personnel such as the port director, senior inspector, training officer, and
intelligence officer not working primary or secondary inspection. Round periods of 30 minutes or more up
to one hour. Alternate work schedules (AWS) are handled the same way; use the hours worked each day.
Inspectors working a lieu holiday and receiving overtime pay should not be counted here but with
personnel on overtime.
2. Complete Overtime Audit Work Sheet (Workload) with data from the most recent traffic survey. Fill in the
dat for each day of the pay periods audited by each hour of the day. He data is the number of applicants by
hour. The number used is the average number. This is used to look for trends which might be better serviced
by changes in schedUling practices.
3. Compare the staffing to the number of applicants for admission by hour/day.
(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

4. Review th~and _eports to see who earned 1931 Act and 1945 Act overtime in a given pay
period, or pay periods, to verify appropriateness of individuals working, Le., area port director, port director,
ADD for Examinations, ADD for Inspections, etc.
(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

5. Look for repetitive overtime assignments. holdovers, and early call-ins indicative of a pattern which could

possibly be handled by scheduling an officer to include that period, or adjusting shifts.
6. Review Forms G-202 to determine if:
The hours and claimed amounts are correct.
Overtime is charged to the appropriate account (user fee vs. appropriated).
Overtime is properly recorded on the T&A .
The use of overtime was appropriate.
Any unusual overtime is explained in the remarks block.
7. Complete Overtime Audit Work Sheet (Staff Working on Overtime Basis), with data from Forms G-202.
Include staff working a lieu holiday and receiving overtime pay. Auditor should consider use of different color
pens to distinguish between 1931 Act and 1945 Act overtime. Round periods of less than one hour up to one
hour.
8. Compare the number of management and non-management personnel working overtime in relation to nonovertime days, i.e., two SII's/PD needed on Sunday when one is normally needed for non-overtime periods,
and no major increases in traffic or expected unusual incidents.
9. Review most recent AGO certification records for any inspections personnel receiving AGO.
10. Instructions for completing the Overtime Audit Work Sheets - Frequency Distribution Chart(s). The manual
Frequency Distribution Chart work sheet is a tool to allow quick manual plotting of the information gathered
and organized into the Overtime Audit Work Sheets. Factors such as the size and inherent complexity of the
individual audit site will determine the number of individual charts produced. The use of available computerbased work sheets is highly recommended over the procedure outlined below.
Complete the Location and Pay Period to be included on the work sheet.
Notate what activity (land, air, or sea or combination) is being included on the worksheet in the upper righthand corner near the location line.
Look at the information gathered into the Audit Work Sheet and decide upon a scale of the shaded left
hand column which will allow plotting the information form the work sheet. Take the greatest possible
number of inspectors on duty at any time and divide it by 28. Round up this number to the nearest whole
number and use the result as the scale for each line on the chart. For example, a work sheet shows that
the greatest number of inspectors on duty at any given time is 52. 52/28 = 1.85, which rounds up to 2. The

scale should reflect that each line represents 2 officers. The scale should be progressive, e.g., 2,4,6 ... ,
thereby allowing the plotting of the number of staff on duty at any given hour.
A similar computation of the greatest number of arrivals will yield the scale for the arrivals work sheet(s).
Always round upwards.
Decide what information is desired on the individual work sheet. Some locations may warrant and
individual chart for each day of the audit period while others will allow a consolidated chart with all days of
the week plotted in different colors and keyed in the bottom margin. If multiple days are plotted on each
work sheet, then it is recommended that individual charts be produced for each type of chart, i.e., staffing
and workload.
Analysis of the resulting charts will assist the auditors in determining the effectiveness of the scheduling
methods employed at the audited site and in formulating suggestions, if warranted.
B. Seaports and Airports. The audit process for seaports and airports is virtually identical; the only
difference may be in the size of the workload or number of facilities to be covered by the staff of one location.
1. Complete Overtime Audit Work Sheet (Available Staff Regular Duty), with data from Form G- 259. This
data is to be filled in for each day of the pay periods audited by each hour of the day with the number of on
duty staff as noted below.
Check the block specifying the work sheet as containing data from the Form G-259.
Each column across the top of the work sheet, after the date and day of week column, relates to an hour of
the day using a 24-hour clock.
Each row down the work sheet relates to the specific day of the week and the specific date as assigned by
the auditor.
Complete the date column for the two pay periods included on the work sheet.
Fill in each cell with the number of inspectors scheduled to work during each hour period of the day for
each day of the audit period. Do not include personnel such as the port director, senior inspector, training
officer, and intelligence officer not working primary or secondary inspection. Round periods of 30 minutes
or more up to one hour. Inspectors working a lieu holiday and receiving overtime pay should not be
counted here, but with personnel on overtime.
2. Complete the Overtime Audit Work Sheet (Workload).
Use data from the current form 1-429. Fill in the data for each day of the pay periods audited by each hour

of the day. The data is the projected number of passengers/crew expected during a given hour. As an
example, place the figures for arrivals scheduled at 8: 12 a.m. and 8:50 a.m. in the 0800-0900 cell. The
number used is the average number, not the maximum capacity of the aircraft. This is used to look for
trends which might be better serviced by changes in scheduling practices.
If the Form 1-429 is not available, use the actual data as provided on the Form 1-577, following the
procedure to complete the work sheet outlined above. For private aircraft, use the arrival time given.
3. Review Forms G-202:
a. Check for the following:
Completion of all blocks of information.
The hours worked and compensation claimed are correctly computed.
Reporting times, for computational purposes, are the same as the estimated time of arrival, unless the
vessel or aircraft arrived early.
Charged to the appropriate account (user fee vs. appropriated) (carrier liability vs. government liability).
Would a split shift have been more appropriate (Sundays)?
Unusual circumstances, i.e. seemingly excessive inspectional time, delays, etc.
Do the Forms G-202 reflect that certain officers always complete their assignment(s) right at, or shortly
after, an additional overtime period has been reached, e.g. 8:00 p.m. or 8:05 p.m., 10:00 p.m. or 10:05
p.m. (Compare closing time on G-202 with closing time on 1-577 or 1- 418.)
Completion of supervisory certifications.
Who the reviewing officials were and when they verified and signed the Form G-202. Some officers are
assigning their own overtime, completing their own Forms G-202, approving their own overtime, and
completing their own T&As, without timely, adequate supervisory review.

b. Note the items below concerning the number of officers held over or called out:
What is the amount of time they are held over? Does it extend beyond the end of the subsequent shift of
officers? Is the subsequent shift released prior to the officers that are being held over or called out?
Are officers being held over or called out every day? Could this be eliminated by an adjustment jn the
number of officers assigned to shifts?
Does the workload justify the hold overs or call outs? Check the flight log for the number of secondary
referrals from each flight and the disposition of those referrals.
c. For en route inspections, determine if the time shown for the inspection is appropriate for the number of
passengers and crew shown as inspected.
d. Check to ensure that GS-13 and GS-14 district officials were not working overtime on a regular basis. The
only GS-13 and GS-14 managers that should be working overtime, on random shifts on an irregular basis, are
the port directors and assistant port directors.
4. Review most recent AUO certification records of any inspections personnel receiving AGO.
5. Complete Overtime Audit Work Sheet (Staff Working on Overtime Basis), with data drawn from the Forms
G-202 completed relative to the audit period. This is the actual number of officers working on an overtime
basis during any given hour. Round periods of less than one hour up to one hour. Include officers working a
lieu holiday and receiving overtime pay.
6. How does the staffing compare with the number of applicants for admission by hour/day? Compare the
number of management and non-management personnel working overtime in relation to non-overtime days,
i.e., four SII's/PD needed on Sunday when two are normally needed for non-overtime periods, and no major
increase in traffic or expected unusual incidents.
7 Analyze the work sheet to see if there is an established pattern of arrivals during an overtime period that
could be more economically covered by a regularly scheduled shift. For example, three or more days a week

overtime is incurred in the same time block, just prior to, or immediately following a scheduled shift.
8. Does the staffing indicate effective scheduling to cover the peak arrival periods with peak resources? Or is
the facility over staffed/understaffed? Could the shifts be realigned to provide better coverage for all flights
during the hours of operation?
9. Review the completed work sheets and look for trends which might allow the district to provide service at a
lesser cost. Determine if overtime expenditures and/or backlogs can be reduced by schedule adjustments.
Examples of these comparisons might include comparing an hourly ratio of passengers to the staff.
10. Review the number of officers working on Sundays and holidays as opposed to regular work days. If more
are assigned on Sundays and holiday than on normal work days, compare the workloads. If the workload on
Sundays and holidays are very similar to other days of the week, there could be a lack of compliance with
Headquarters policy on overtime control and staffing ratios.
11. Review the processing time for regularly arriving vessels on regular work days as compared to overtime
periods. Does it take longer on overtime periods? The vessel arrival log should have all arrival and processing
information for all vessels.
12. Were overtime assignments made in compliance with the local union/district overtime policy as well as the
national agreement?
13. Instructions for completing the Overtime Audit Work Sheets - Frequency Distribution Chart(s). The manual
Frequency Distribution Chart work sheet is a tool to allow quick manual plotting of the information gathered
and organized into the Overtime Audit Work Sheets. Factors such as the size and inherent complexity of the
individual audit site will determine the number of individual charts produced. The use of available computerbased work sheets is highly recommended over the procedure outlined below.
Complete the Location and Pay Period to be included on the work sheet.
Notate what activity (air, or sea or combination) is being included on the worksheet in the upper right-hand
corner near the location line.
Look at the information gathered into the Audit Work Sheet and decide upon a scale of the shaded left
hand column which will allow plotting the information from the work sheet. Take the greatest possible
number of inspectors on duty at any time and divide it by 28. Round up this number to the nearest whole
number and use the result as the scale for each line on the chart. For example, a work sheet shows that
the greatest number of inspectors on duty at any given time is 52. 52/28 = 1.85, which rounds up to 2. The
scale should reflect that each line represents 2 officers. The scale should be progressive, e.g., 2,4,6,..,
thereby allOWing the plotting of the number of staff on duty at any given hour.

A similar computation of the greatest number of arrivals will yield the scale for the arrivals work sheet(s).
Always round upwards.
Decide what information is desired on the individual work sheet. Some locations may warrant and
individual chart for each day of the audit period while others will allow a consolidated chart with all days of
the week plotted in different colors and keyed in the bottom margin. If multiple days are plotted on each
work sheet, then it is recommended that individual charts be produced for each type of chart, Le., staffing
and workload.
Analysis of the resulting charts will assist the auditors in determining the effectiveness of the scheduling
methods employed at the audited site and in formulating suggestions, if warranted.

Instructions for Completion of Overtime Audit Work Sheet(s)
Frequency Distribution Chart
(Sample on following page)
he manual Frequency Distribution Chart worksheet is a tool to allow quick manual plotting of the information
gathered and organized into the Overtime Audit Work Sheets. Factors such as the size and inherent
complexity of the individual audit site will determine the number of individual charts produced.
1. Complete the Date, Location, and Pay Period lines to be included on the work sheet.
2. Notate what activity (land, air, sea or combination) is being included on the work sheet in the
upper right hand corner, near the Location line.
3. Look at the information gathered into the Audit Work Sheet and decide upon a scale of the shaded left
hand column which will allow plotting the information from the work sheet. Take the greatest possible number
f inspectors on duty at any time and divide it by 28. Round up this number to the nearest whole number and
use the result as the scale for each line on the chart. For example, a work sheet shows that the greatest
number of inspectors on duty at any given time is 52. 52/28 = 1.85, which rounds up to 2. The scale should
reflect that each line represents 2 officers. The scale should be progressive, e.g., 2,4,6,.., thereby allowing
the plotting of the number of staff on duty at any given hour.
A similar computation of the greatest number of arrivals will yield the scale for the arrivals work sheet(s).
5. Decide what information is wanted on the individual work sheet. Some locations may warrant an
individual chart for each day of the audit period while others will allow a consolidated chart with alldays of

he week plotted in different colors and keyed in the bottom margin. If multiple days are plotted on each work
heet, then it is recommended that individual charts be produced for each type of chart, Le., staffing and
orkload.
Analysis of the resulting charts will assist the auditors in determining the effectiveness of the scheduling
ethods employed at the audited site and in formulating suggestions if warranted.

Overtime Audit Worksheet
Frequency Distribution Chart
Page 1 of 1 (For

Windows 95/98)

Page 1 of 1 (For

Windows 3.1)

nstructions for Completion of Overtime Audit Work Sheet
Sample on following page)
. Determine what data is being recorded on the work sheet and check the box relating to that data.
- Available staff on regular duty
- Workload
- Staff working on overtime basis
D

Complete the Dates, Location, and Pay period to be included on the work sheet.

B.

Notate what activity (land, air, sea or combination) is being included on the work sheet in the upper right
corner near the Location line.

~and

~. Insert the individual dates of the audit period in the shaded column on the left side of the work sheet.
Complete the balance of the work sheet with the dat collected from the duty assignment sheets,
chedules of arriving aircraft, Forms G-202, as appropriate and relative to each hour of the day and each day
)f the audit period.
J.

Overtime Audit Work Sheet
Page 1 of 1

(For Windows 95/98)

Page 1 of 1

(For Windows 3.1)

Part VII. Completion of Audit Report

Upon completion of the review of all documentation, overtime control officers will prepare a report for the
district director from the notes made during the audit. It will include recommendations to correct any
deficiencies noted. A copy of the report, after review by the district director and with any attachments, will be
forwarded within 10 working days to the National Overtime Control Officer at Headquarters, Office of
Inspections. These reports will provide background information and will provide documentation that the audit
process is in place and functioning.
National Audit Team reports, drafted for the Assistant Commissioner, Inspections, will be forwarded in draft
format to the district director within two weeks of completion of the audit. These draft reports will contain the
same information and recommendations that would have been given to the district director at the closeout
meeting of an on-site audit. District directors will then be afforded two weeks to provide written comments to
the draft report prior to the report, in draft and final form, along with the district response and any attachments
being sent forward to the National Overtime Control Officer for final signature and forwarding to the Assistant
Commissioner, Inspections.
Part VIII. National Overtime Agreement

See Article 27 of the Agreement between INS and the AFGE (NINSC) effective April 14, 1997.
Part IX. INS Policy and Correspondence Memoranda on Staffing and Overtime Control.

The follOWing policy directives relate to the subject of overtime and may be useful source materials for officers
engaged in conducting overtime audits. Some have been reproduced in their entirety for reference in this
manual, others may be obtained from local files or by contacting Headquarters, Office of Inspections.
(b)(2), (b)(7)(E)

1.

Teletype of 8/17/89 _ R e p o r t and Instructions for Form G-690, CO 235-C from COINS.

2.

Memorandum of 10/17/89 - Fiscal Responsibility for Overtime Monies, CO 235-P from COMMR.
(Reproduced in Part" of this appendix.)

3.

Memorandum of 3/21/90 - Mid-Year Performance Review for Managers - Critical Element on Overtime
Management, CO 235-P from COMMR.

4.

Memorandum of 4/6/90 - Procedures for Controlling and Reducing 1931 and 1945 Act Overtime in the
Inspections Program, CO 235-P from COMMR. (Reproduced in Part II of this appendix.)

5.

Memorandum of 6/7/90 - Additional Guidance for the Administration of Inspectional Overtime Policy, CO
235-P from Executive Commissioner.

6.

Memorandum of 7/11/90 - Overtime Payment for Travel to Perform Remote Inspections, CO 235-C from
COINS to Assistant Regional Commissioner, Inspections, Southern Region.

7.

Memorandum of 9/19/90 - Payment of 1931 Act Overtime for Custodial Detention of Aliens at Ports of
Entry, CO 235-C from COINS to Assistant Regional Commissioner, Inspections, Southern Region.

8.

Memorandum of 2/14/91 - Inspectional Overtime Management New Form G-202 "Inspection Overtime
Order, Report and Certification," CO 235-C from the Office of the Executive Commissioner.

9.

Teletype of 8/30/91 - Resumption of 1931 Act Overtime Billing, from HQFIN.

10. Teletype of 9/25/91 - Limitation of Overtime Pay to $25,000, from HQMGT.
11. Memorandum of 3/4/92 - Management and Control of Inspectional Overtime, HQ 235-C for HQEXM.
(Reproduced in Part II of this appendix.)
12. Memorandum of 1992 - Inspectional Overtime: Clarification of Policy on Staffing Ratios, CO 235-C from
HQOPS.
13. Memorandum of 10/29/92 - Guidance and Clarification of Service Overtime/AGO Policy from HQMGT.
14. Memorandum of 3/5/93 - Overtime Compensation for Travel, HQ 235-C from HQOPS.
15. Memorandum of 3/19/93 - Definition of Overtime Under the Appropriation Act $25,000 Cap, HQ 600-C
from HQFIN.
16. Memorandum of 10/16/92 - Overtime Policy from the Office of the Commissioner to the Management
Team.
17. Teletype of 10/22/93 - Control of Inspectional Overtime - Explanation of new utilization of HQINS-33 and
new G-690C. HQINS Report instructions for Form G-690C.
Following is a sample overtime audit report:

Subject: Review of Overtime - Ports of X, Y, and Z
To: District Director, ABC District

From: Joe Snoops, Audit Team Leader
Procedures set forth in the Service's Inspections Overtime Audit Manual were followed in completing an audit for the above-named ports-of entry within
your district. The audit team appreciates the help provided and quick responses to its inquiries.
The audit team reviewed the following documentation:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Forms G-202
Forms G-259
Forms 1-429
Overtime schedule
etc....

Port of X
It was noted that all employees were scheduled to be off on the holiday which fell during the audit period. The Administrative Manual 04.205(VI)(C)(1)
requires that the basic work week include Monday through Saturday, including holidays occurring on those days. Article 29 of the Union Agreement,
paragraph 4 states: "The occurrence of holidays shall not affect the designation of the basic work week."
Forms G-202 are not signed in block 24, the approval block. If block 6 is completed, it is usually signed by the officer working the assignment.
According to Forms G-259, all three inspections officers were scheduled to work Monday through Friday, 8:00 AM to 4:30 PM. The call times for
inspections assignments were tracked from August through December. If one officer was assigned to an 8:00 Am to 4:30 PM shift and a second officer
assigned to a 1:00 PM to 9:00 PM shift, the overtime assignments could have been reduced by 28 in August, 22 in September, 18 in October, 13 in
November and 16 in December. A review should be conducted of all inspectional assignments and the shifts assigned to provide the optimum coverage
with the least overtime expenditures.
Forms G-202 show the numbers of passengers and crew inspected for each arrival. After reviewing, it appears that the vessel and aircraft inspections are
properly staffed.
The following items are questions raised during the review of the overtime bills:
XXX-93-123 Sunday. The officers worked 0630 to 1430 and 1700 to 1940 for two and one half days of 1931 Act overtime. The callouts for the
assignments were 0630, 0700, 1400, 1415, and 1900. The shift should have been split to cover all of the assignments with a total of 8 hours on duty.
XXX-93-124. The ETA was 0430. arrival was at 0450, inspection began at 0500 and completed at 0600, one hour later. Only 12 people were
inspected. No reason was shown for the extraordinary amount of time taken to complete the inspection.

No Forms G-202 were submitted for the period September 1 - 6,1992, and only 2 Forms G-202 were submitted for October 7. There should have been
more than 2 forms submitted for October 7.
The vessel arrival log reflects arrival during an overtime period for which there are no bills. For example, October 7 - the MN Davy Jones and the MN
Albatross. The bill for the MN Star Trek indicates that the officer inspected it without assistance. but the log indicates that the MN Star Trek had two
inspectors. The bills should reflect the names of all vessels inspected by that officer.
1931 and 1945 Act overtime may be shown on the same bill. It is not required that a separate bill be completed as there were on November 10.

ZZZ·93-123. The officer billed for two days (Sunday) "called by agent to complete 18 0·2 1·95 for crewmen signing off and return home. aircraft departing
at 0710 hours. Relieving crew arrived at 2345 on preceding night and were kept in a moteL" It would appear that the vessel had already been inspected.
1931 Act overtime may not be charged to sign off crewmen, except upon arrival of the vessel from foreign. The time charged, 0430·0600, is to be charged
at two hours of 1945 Act overtime. The T&A should be amended.

Summar)'

Recommended Actions:
1. The overtime program needs to be more closely monitored at all of the cited locations to eliminate the problems revealed
by this review.
2. The Port of Y must submit copies of Forms G-202 to the Inspections Office as previously requested.
3. The scheduling of shifts and assignments must be made to maximize coverage more economically. (Audit officer should
provide examples, such as split shifts, different shifts, and examples of savings if done so.)
4. Explanations for any delay in completion of the inspection must be contained in the remarks block on Form G-202.
Your response should be addressed to the Regional Chief Inspector, ZZZ Region. no later than 15 days from the date of this
memorandum.

(signature of audit officer)

 

 

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