Skip navigation
PYHS - Header

Nh Women in Justice Report Women in Prison 2008

Download original document:
Brief thumbnail
This text is machine-read, and may contain errors. Check the original document to verify accuracy.
NH Women’s Policy Institute    

Women Behind Bars  

December 2008 

 

 
 

 
Women Behind Bars  
The Needs and Challenges of NH’s             
Increasing Population of Incarcerated Women  

 
 
 
December 2008 

~ The New Hampshire ~
WOMEN'S POLICY
_

Institute

_ ,"
 

www.nhwpi.org   Two Delta Drive, Concord, NH 03301 
 

 

NH Women’s Policy Institute    

Women Behind Bars  

December 2008 

 

Women Behind Bars    
The Needs and Challenges of New Hampshire’s 
Increasing Population of Incarcerated Women 
Authors: 
Katherine Merrow 
Laura McGlashan, Research Associate 
Katherine Lamphere, Research Assistant, New Futures 

 
Acknowledgements: 
This project was generously funded by the NH Charitable Foundation.  New Futures 
partnered with the Foundation in defining the research questions.  The Institute has 
retained complete editorial control over the content of the report.  The Institute extends its 
appreciation to the Foundation, New Futures, and to the many professionals in the justice 
system who took the time to talk with us and provide data for this report.  We are 
particularly indebted to the Superintendents of New Hampshire’s Houses of Correction and 
those working in the county system who went to considerable effort to provide information 
about their female inmates, in some cases allowing us the opportunity to conduct in‐depth 
study of the women in their facilities.   The Institute is also grateful to the staff from the NH 
Department of Corrections, and the Merrimack County Diversion Program. 

About the NH Women’s Policy Institute 
The NH Women’s Policy Institute is a non‐partisan, non‐profit research organization 
dedicated to informing policies and decision‐making related to women in New Hampshire.  
The Institute was founded in 2002 on a belief that credible, unbiased data on issues 
affecting women can inform meaningful policy change, enable the public and private sectors 
to work together more effectively, and advance the well‐being of women in this state.
September 2008 Board of Directors: 
Jennifer Frizzell, Chair (Concord) 
Edda Cantor, Treasurer (Pembroke)  
Jonathan Baird (Claremont)   
Elizabeth Murphy (Deerfield) 
Kathy Eneguess (Berlin) 
Mary Rauh, Secretary (New Castle)  
 
NH Women’s Policy Institute Staff: 
Rachel Rouillard, Executive Director 
Kelly Paquette, Office Manager 

 
Carrie Griffiths, Vice Chair (Hampton) 
Connie Rakowsky (Henniker) 
Lucy Hodder (Hopkinton) 
Rep. Alida Millham (Gilford)  
Sen. Martha Fuller Clark (Portsmouth) 
Iris Estabrook (Durham) 
 
 
Wendy Behling, Bookkeeper 
Laura McGlashan, Research Associate 
 

NH Women’s Policy Institute    

Women Behind Bars  

December 2008 

 

CONTENTS 

Executive Summary .................................................................................................................................................1 
Introduction................................................................................................................................................................3 
Women in the system—Multiple Needs & Challenges ..............................................................................3 
High prevalence of substance abuse .......................................................................................................4 
Mental illness and depression ...................................................................................................................4 
Past abuse and trauma..................................................................................................................................5 
Low education and employment ..............................................................................................................6 
Family Status and Children..............................................................................................................................8 
Many are single mothers..............................................................................................................................8 
Over 1000 children may be affected each year ..................................................................................8 
Criminal Histories: Extensive But Not Violent......................................................................................10 
In the county houses of correction .......................................................................................................10 
In the state prison........................................................................................................................................13 
The Number of Women Behind Bars in NH ................................................................................................14 
Increasing incarceration of women at the county level....................................................................15 
Increasing admissions of women to the state prison ........................................................................16 
Arrests Trends in NH and the Nation ............................................................................................................18 
Arrests of women are increasing ...............................................................................................................19 
What can be done? ................................................................................................................................................21 
Effective Treatment for women offenders .............................................................................................21 
System Gaps in NH and Barriers to Success ..........................................................................................22 
Policy Implications ...........................................................................................................................................23 
Appendix ...................................................................................................................................................................25 
Supplemental data tables, methodology and assumptions .............................................................25 
Data sources:.......................................................................................................................................................26 
Interviews ............................................................................................................................................................27 
Selected Bibliography ..........................................................................................................................................28 

 

 
FIGURES 
Figure 1: Female Inmates Education Levels..................................................................................................6 
Figure 2: Unemployment among Male and Female Sullivan County HOC Inmates.......................7 
Figure 3: Marital status and motherhood among women in the county jails 2007 ......................8 
Figure 4: Prior convictions, women in Cheshire County HOC 2007……………………… ................11 
Figure 5: Charges against women and men admitted to Sullivan County 2007*........................12 
Figure 6: Sullivan County HOC female admissions by offense type 2002 – 2007.......................12 
Figure 7: Female Admissions NH State Prison 2007 ..............................................................................13 
Figure 8: Admissions to the State Prison for Women 1997 ‐ 2007...................................................13 
Figure 9:  Admissions at Grafton, Hillsborough, Merrimack, Strafford, and Sullivan HOCs ...15 
Figure 10: Female admissions to the state prison 1997 – 2007 ........................................................16 
Figure 11: Female parole violators as a percent of NH State Prison for Women admissions17 
Figure 12: Time served for parole and probation violations ..............................................................17 
 
 

NH Women’s Policy Institute    

Women Behind Bars  

December 2008 

 
Figure 13: Female arrests by offense type, NH and US, 2006 .............................................................18 
Figure 14: Percent change 2002 to 2006 US Arrests by gender ........................................................19 
Figure 15: Percent change in arrests ‐ six NH communities*..............................................................20 
Figure 16: Female alcohol and drug arrests 2002 to 2006, six NH communities.......................21 
 

TABLES 
Table 1:  Alcohol and drug abuse among women in NH's justice system .........................................4 
Table 2: Mental Health of Women in NH County Houses of Correction and State Prison..........5 
Table 3: Women in NH State Prison and Shea Farm who have experienced past abuse............6 
Table 4: Percent of women admitted during 2007 by education and employment .....................7 
Table 5: Demographic characteristics of women in the county houses of correction 2007 .....8 
Table 6:  Estimated number of NH children living with mother before her incarceration........9 
Table 7: Percent of female HOC admissions by offense, categorized by primary charge ........11 
Table 8: New Hampshire's State Prison* Incarceration Rate Compared to the Nation ...........14 
Table 9: Estimated Number Women in NH Justice System During 2007.......................................14 
Table 10:  Women under DOC community supervision ........................................................................15 
Table 11: Detailed calculations and estimates for total number of women in the system .....25 
Table 12: Female county admissions as a percent of all admissions ...............................................26 
Table 13: Average days served by female inmates in county houses of correction...................26 
Table 14: Average age of women admitted to Grafton and Sullivan County HOCs ....................26 

 

 
 

NH Women’s Policy Institute    

Women Behind Bars  

December 2008 

 

DEFINITIONS 
Alcohol offenses – Alcohol offenses in this report include driving under the influence and 
liquor law violations, and also—due to the way arrest data is reported— ‘holds’ for 
drunkenness and protective custody; though these cases are not actual arrests.  These holds 
constitute approximately 20% of the total alcohol offenses arrests, in NH and nationwide.   
Drug Offenses – Drug offenses consist of both drug and narcotic violations, and drug 
equipment violations, including sales and possession.  
Felony – A serious crime (as distinguished from the less serious misdemeanor), which often 
results in a sentence of a year or more to be served in state prison. 
House of Correction or HOC – A correctional facility operated by a county government, 
including a jail for offenders being held until trial and a house of correction for those 
serving sentences of up to a year.      
Misdemeanor ‐ A crime that is less serious than a felony, which may result in a fine, 
probation, or a sentence of less than a year to a House of Correction. 
Jail – The part of the House of Correction where offenders are held while awaiting trial. 
Parole – Correctional supervision in the community after release from state prison, where 
the offender is still under the jurisdiction of the NH Department of Corrections.  Conditions 
of behavior are imposed by the state Parole Board and monitored by Probation and Parole 
Officers.  Violation of those conditions can result in a return to state prison. 
Prison – A correctional facility operated by the state, for offenders serving sentences of a 
year or more.  
Probation­ Correctional supervision ordered by the court and monitored by NH 
Department of Corrections Probation and Parole Officers.  Violation of conditions imposed 
by the court may result in sanctions, including incarceration. 
Protective Custody­ When an adult is taken into custody for their own protection due to 
drunkenness; these individuals are not actually arrested but are held in protective custody 
and released within 24 hours.  
Recidivism – The act of committing a new criminal offense after having been convicted of 
and serving time for a prior offense. 
Violent Crime – In this report, offense data on national and statewide arrests and prison 
admissions is categorized using the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Uniform Crime Reports 
definition of violent crime, which includes murder and non‐negligent manslaughter, forcible 
rape, robbery and aggravated assault.  For data on county house of correction admissions, 
‘violent’ offenses include any assault except simple assault.  The Institute recognizes that 
offenses such as simple assault, resisting arrest, or disorderly conduct may involve some 
level of violence in some cases, but for purposes of this report, these less serious crimes are 
not categorized as violent.

 
 

NH Women’s Policy Institute    

Women Behind Bars  

December 2008 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY   
Women’s incarceration and involvement in New Hampshire’s criminal justice system is 
increasing, at a faster pace than men’s, driven by drugs, alcohol abuse and a complex set of 
rehabilitative and treatment needs.  Poverty, unemployment and past victimization of 
domestic violence are also underlying factors.  Women’s role as primary caregivers for 
children complicates both their incarceration as well as their path to rehabilitation.  While 
these multiple needs do not excuse women’s crimes, they provide a context for 
understanding their involvement in the system and the challenges they face in getting out, 
and suggest a need for programs with comprehensive supports and services.   
 
On any given day in New Hampshire the Institute estimates there are about 430 women 
behind bars, plus 1,450 who are or were under correctional supervision in the community 
during the past year, and approximately 960 who were released from county houses of 
correction at some point during the past year, or 2,850 women in all (this estimate makes 
adjustments to avoid double counting individuals).   With increasing admissions to the 
houses of correction and state prison, the current system designed to rehabilitate and 
punish men, is becoming increasingly overburdened supervising and addressing the 
complex needs of the women‐ offender population.    
 
This report presents the findings of the Institute’s study of women at all levels of the 
system, focusing on women in the county jails.  The study is based on an extensive review of 
the best data available, including paper files, electronic records, and aggregate data 
provided by county and state departments of correction.  The Institute also interviewed 
New Hampshire experts in the field and reviewed the national literature.  Our major 
findings appear below; references and data sources are provided throughout the report.  
Women are less likely than men to be involved in the criminal justice system, representing 
only 26 percent of all those arrested in NH, 18 percent of the jail population, and 7 percent 
of the state prison population, but their involvement is increasing: 
•

Admissions to the county houses of correction increased by 24 percent for women 
between 2003 and 2007, and by 14 percent for men.  Admissions to the State Prison 
for Women increased by 64 percent during the same time period.   

•

In six of New Hampshire’s larger communities, arrests of women increased by 25 
percent between 2002 and 2006, compared to 9 percent for men.  These trends are 
consistent with national data.  Alcohol offenses among young women were one of 
the fastest growing arrest categories.     

Women in New Hampshire’s justice system have complex and multiple treatment and 
rehabilitative needs, which impact not only them but also their children.  Among women in 
the county houses of correction that we studied: 
1 
 

NH Women’s Policy Institute    

Women Behind Bars  

December 2008 

 
•

Two‐thirds have children and approximately 45 percent are single mothers.   An 
estimated 1,300 or more children are impacted by their mother’s incarceration each 
year.  The social and financial costs of the impact on these children are significant. 

•

54 percent of the women are unemployed and one‐quarter did not graduate from 
high school.  Poverty and economic security are significant challenges, and drive 
women’s dependence on bad relationships that contribute to their failure. 

•

85 to 92 percent have problems with substance abuse; and corrections staff 
consider that in most cases this abuse contributed to the inmates’ economic and 
legal problems, based on a sample of female inmates studied. 

•

Two‐thirds say they have had previous diagnoses of mental illness; 14 to 20 percent 
have a primary diagnosis of mental illness confirmed while at the jail.   About half 
the women report both substance abuse problems and a history of mental illness.  
The jails are functioning as an integral part of the state’s mental health system 
without sufficient resources to identify and treat mental health problems. 

•

The data, at a minimum, suggest troubled pasts, and may signal histories of trauma 
and abuse: nearly three‐quarters of the women said they struggled with depression 
in the past and 30 percent reported past suicide attempts.    

 
Many professionals we talked to described a cycle of drugs, poverty, and domestic violence 
with repeated incarcerations and involvement in the criminal justice system.  Indeed, 
recidivism is a major factor driving the increase in incarceration.   Among women we 
studied in the jails, 82 percent had prior convictions and one‐fifth had prior felonies.   An 
average of 23 percent were in for probation violations, suggesting the need to re‐examine 
probation to determine whether the current structure could be more effective.  Recidivism 
is driving admissions to the state prison as well, where parole violators made up 36 percent 
of female admissions during 2007, and probation violators made up 19 percent.   
While substance abuse is an underlying problem for most female offenders, research shows 
the most effective programs for women in the justice system are comprehensive, going 
beyond substance abuse treatment to include child care and child involvement in treatment, 
mental health treatment, housing assistance, job training and case management services.  
Very few communities in New Hampshire have comprehensive, one‐stop programs for 
women in the criminal justice system.   
The upward trend in women’s involvement in crime and incarceration, the impact on their 
children, and the future cost to the state of that impact, calls for action.  The Institute 
encourages New Hampshire county and state leaders to come together to address this 
growing problem and to consider alternative models and supports that might prove more 
effective and less costly than incarceration.   
2 
 

NH Women’s Policy Institute    

Women Behind Bars  

December 2008 

 

INTRODUCTION 
This report provides a comprehensive study of women in New Hampshire’s criminal justice 
system: who they are, what offenses they have committed, and the challenges they face.  The 
first section describes the women’s treatment needs, family status, and criminal histories.  
Next we review the number of women in the county jails and state prison, projecting 
current incarceration trends forward into 2012.  The third section reviews the increasing 
trends in female arrests in New Hampshire and nationally.  Lastly we look at effective 
practices in rehabilitation and substance abuse treatment for women, examining gaps in the 
New Hampshire system relative to national best practices. 
 
This study is based on data gathered from the state Department of Corrections and the 
county houses of corrections and interviews with professionals in the field.  Data sources 
are detailed in the Appendix and throughout the report.  The Institute is indebted to the 
correctional and treatment professionals who provided data and insights for this report. 

WOMEN IN THE SYSTEM—MULTIPLE NEEDS & CHALLENGES 
Women in the New Hampshire’s criminal justice system are challenged with substance 
abuse, mental illness, a history of domestic abuse, low education, and poverty.   Many are 
unemployed, single mothers.  The data suggest most of the women have experienced some 
kind of past abuse, and that substance abuse is an underlying medical problem for the vast 
majority.   None of these factors excuses the women’s crimes, but they do provide a context 
for understanding their path to criminality and the challenges they face in turning their 
lives around.  Most are serving time for nonviolent crimes, though some have criminal 
histories that are fairly extensive.  National research shows women in the criminal justice 
system are more likely to have these multiple disorders and needs than women in the 
treatment or in the general community. 1   
The following section details the extent of the women’s rehabilitative and treatment needs, 
focusing on women in the county houses of correction, or HOCs. 2    The findings are based on 
an in‐depth review of intake records of nearly all the women admitted to the Cheshire 
County House of Correction during 2007 and an analysis of electronic records of all 
admissions to the Sullivan County Jail over the past five years, 3  as well as aggregate data 
provided by Grafton, Hillsborough, Merrimack, and Strafford county HOCs .  The Institute 
also used results of a survey of female state prison inmates conducted by faculty and 
                                                             
1 Pimlott‐Kubiak and Arfken, “Beyond gender responsivity: Considering differences between 
community dwelling women involved in the criminal justice system and those involved in 
treatment.” Women and Criminal Justice, 17 (2/3). 
2 The House of Correction is for inmates serving sentences of up to a year; the Jail or Pre‐Trial section 
is for inmates being held until trial; state prison is for offenders serving longer sentences. 
3 The Institute reviewed 148 comprehensive intake records of all weekday admissions during 2007; 
more detail is provided in the Appendix.   

3 

 

NH Women’s Policy Institute    

Women Behind Bars  

December 2008 

 
students from St. Anselm College.   Since not all counties were able to provide data on all 
characteristics, many of the Institute’s findings are county‐specific and may not be 
representative of the state as a whole.  Discussions with professionals in the field, however,  
suggest the characteristics of women in the system are relatively consistent across the 
state, 4   with variation as noted.   Data tables indicate the counties on which each finding is 
based; all data are based on self‐report by female inmates unless otherwise indicated.     

HIGH PREVALENCE OF SUBSTANCE ABUSE  
The large majority of women in New Hampshire’s county houses of corrections abuse 
substances.  These findings are consistent with national research. 5    In Grafton and 
Merrimack counties, 85 and 92 percent of the female inmates admitted during 2007 had a 
known or suspected substance abuse problem.   In Cheshire County, the facility’s intake staff 
rated 70 percent as having a problem severe enough to lead to legal or economic problems, 
and in a few cases, assaultive behavior. 
Table 1:  Alcohol and drug abuse among women in NH's justice system 
Cheshire

Grafton

Merrimack

Prison 6

AOD problem (per jail treatment staff)

70%*

85%

92%

 

Received prior AOD treatment (self-report)
Used drugs** (self report)

46% 
41%

 
 

26%

57%

 

13 yrs old

 

ALCOHOL & OTHER DRUG (AOD) ABUSE

Used alcohol*** (self report)
Average age of first use

58%
43%

*More inmates may have used substances, but 70% had a problem that caused legal or economic problems.
**Because these are self reports, it is likely that drug use is under-reported.
***These data reflect inmates who say they ‘use’ alcohol and not necessarily alcohol abuse.

Many women who abuse substances also suffer from mental illness.  Nearly three quarters 
of those identified by Cheshire County staff as having substance abuse problems said they 
had a prior diagnosis of mental illness, and 38 percent were referred for counseling.     

MENTAL ILLNESS AND DEPRESSION  
Fourteen to 20 percent of women in the county jails had a primary diagnosis of mental 
illness confirmed by HOC treatment professionals, based on data from Merrimack and 
Grafton counties.  Many more women reported histories of mental health problems.  In 
Cheshire County nearly three‐quarters of all female inmates reported a history of 
depression, about two‐thirds reported having a prior mental health diagnosis, and half said 
they had received mental health treatment.  The most common mental illnesses reported by 
                                                             
4 The Institute conducted unstructured and semi‐structured interviews with county superintendents, 

probation and parole officers, and treatment professionals, as listed in Appendix. 

5 Belknap, 2003; Holtfreter & Morash, 2003; Marcus‐Mendoza & Wright, 2004; Silber‐Ashley, 

Marsden, and Brady, 2003, see Bibliography for full citations. 
6 From the survey ‘Community Assessment: NHSP‐W and Shea Farm: 2008’ conducted by Margaret 
Hayes, Ph.D., and St. Anselm College students. 

 

4 

NH Women’s Policy Institute    

Women Behind Bars  

December 2008 

 
the women were depression and anxiety.  7   In 40 percent of admissions, the intake 
evaluator referred the inmate for mental health counseling.  
The gap between the larger number of women with self‐reported problems and those with 
confirmed diagnoses may reflect several factors.  The HOCs have limited staff resources to 
identify mental illness, so the actual percentage with diagnoses may be higher.  At the 
national level, research has concluded that insufficient mental health assessment and 
screening of women in the system is insufficient to prevent adequate identification and 
treatment. 8   In addition, substance abuse may cloud the detection of mental illness, mental 
illness may be the secondary as opposed to primary diagnosis, or the inmates’ self‐report of 
mental health problems may be unreliable.   
Table 2: Mental Health of Women in NH County Houses of Correction and State Prison 
MENTAL HEALTH (percent of women admitted
that have characteristic or history)
Cheshire Grafton Merrimack Prison**
MH diagnosis ever (self report)
67%
60-75%*
78%
Confirmed MH diagnosis (by clinical staff)
14%
20%
60%
 
 
‘Mentally impaired’ (per intake staff)
13%
Prior MH treatment
Referred for MH counseling (by staff)
On psychotropic meds (per staff)
CO-OCCURRRING DISORDERS
Substance abuse and prior MH diagnosis
Substance abuse and under MH care at
admission
Substance abuse and referred to MH care by
HOC or Prison

49%
40%

 

26%

78% 

50% (est)

62%
58%

51%

66%

24%

57%

26%

67%

*Estimated percentage who would respond affirmatively if asked, per HOC counselor Nancy Gallagher.
**These data provided by Edmund Hucks of the NH State Prison for Women.

 
PAST ABUSE AND TRAUMA  
Women who have experienced family violence are at significantly higher risk for substance 
abuse, addiction, and mental health problems and they often engage in delinquent or 
criminal behavior. 9    National research finds the majority of women in the criminal justice 
system, in some studies as many as 90 percent, say they have experienced physical, 
emotional, or sexual abuse in childhood or adulthood. 10   It should be noted that men in the 
                                                             
7 Less common diagnoses included post traumatic stress disorder and bi‐polar and mood disorders. 
8 M. Kelley, M., The state‐of‐the‐art in substance abuse programs for women in prison, in  S. Sharp, 

The incarcerated woman: Rehabilitative programming in women’s prisons., 2004. 

9 Brown, Miller & Maguin, 1999; Baugh, Bull and Cohen, 1998; Marcus‐Mendoza & Wright, 2004; 

Ritchie, 2000; Daugherty,1998; Grella, Stein and Greenwell, 2005, see Bibliography for full citations. 
10 Marcus‐Mendoza & Wright, 2004; Browne, Miller and Maguin, 1999; and Ritchie, 2000. 

5 

 

NH Women’s Policy Institute    

Women Behind Bars  

December 2008 

 
justice system also have experienced relatively high rates of past violence, though the rates 
for women are higher. 11    
Unfortunately the houses of correction could not readily provide data on inmates’ past 
abuse or trauma, but interviews with corrections professionals indicated a high prevalence 
of domestic violence victimization among female inmates.   The types of mental illnesses 
reported in Cheshire County—depression, anxiety, and post‐traumatic stress disorder—
coupled with the fact that 30 percent of the women reported past suicide attempts, suggest 
troubled pasts, and possibly histories of trauma.  In the state prison, 47 to 85 percent of 
women report past abuse of some kind, as shown in Table 3.    
Table 3: Women in NH State Prison and Shea Farm who have experienced past abuse  
Type of abuse
Physically harmed by intimate partner
Emotionally harmed by intimate partner
Sexually abused by intimate partner

Percent female inmates responding affirmatively
67%
87%
45%

 
LOW EDUCATION AND EMPLOYMENT 
                                                                                        
Figure 1: Female Inmates Education Levels
Poverty 
appears  to  be  a  significant   
challenge  for  women  in  the  county 
Educational Level 
corrections  system.    Most  have 
female county inmates
limited  education  and  low  or  no 
(Cheshire, Grafton, Merrimack,  Sullivan)
employment.  More than one‐fifth did 
not graduate from high school, and an 
< HS
Some 
average  of  54  percent  were 
College 
22%
unemployed at the time of admission.  
28%
Merrimack  County’s  female  inmates 
had  significantly  higher  levels  of 
HS or 
education  and  employment,  which 
GED
pulls  the  average  up  since  it  is  the 
50%
largest  county  that  provided  this 
                                                                                          
 
data.
 
 

In Cheshire County, female inmates who were employed at time of admission worked 
primarily in clerical positions or in service jobs requiring little or no education, such as 
housekeepers, cooks, waitresses, or painters.  A few women reported working as licensed 
nursing assistants or in a managerial capacity.   
 

                                                             
11 Belknap 2003, Browne, Miller, and Maguin 1999, and Grella, Stein & Greenwell, 2005. 

6 
 

NH Women’s Policy Institute    

Women Behind Bars  

December 2008 

 
Table 4: Percent of women admitted during 2007 by education and employment   
Education &
Weighted
Cheshire Grafton Merrimack
Sullivan
County Avg
(06-07 avg)
Employmt.
Education
22%
Less than High School
22%
27%
11%
22%
50%
 
HS or GED
58%
48%
23%
28%
 
Some college
15%
41%
8%
51%
55%
53%
41%
67%
Unemployed

Prison
20%
55%
28%
52%

 
In Sullivan County, unemployment among female inmates is higher than among male 
inmates, and has been increasing while remaining constant among the men, as shown.   
Figure 2: Unemployment among Male and Female Sullivan County HOC Inmates  

Unemployment among Sullivan  County  HOC Inmates
80%

70%
n60%
o
sis
i
m
d
a  50%
n
o
p
 u
d
e
y40%
o
l
p
m
e
n30%
 u
t
n
e
rc
e20%
P

67%

64%

58%

67%

65%

57%
WOMEN

38%

36%

37%

38%
34%

36%

MEN

10%

0%
2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

 

  

A recent study of prisoner re‐entry found employment rates for women were considerably 
lower than for men, 12   and women with substance abuse problems had lower rates of 
employment than women who did not abuse alcohol or drugs. 13 

 
                                                             
12 Malik‐Kane and Visher, 2008. 

13 Pimlott‐Kubiak, and Arfken, 2006. 

7 
 

NH Women’s Policy Institute    

Women Behind Bars  

December 2008 

 

FAMILY STATUS AND CHILDREN 
MANY ARE SINGLE MOTHERS 
Most women in the county system are single or divorced.  Sixty‐seven percent of all female 
inmates have minor children.  The Institute estimates about 47 percent of female inmates 
are single mothers. 14   Single motherhood combined with unemployment and low education 
creates a cycle of poverty that is challenging to break.   
Figure 3: Marital status and motherhood among women in the county jails 2007 

Marital Status

Percent with children  

2007 female county inmates 

2007 Cheshire Cty female inmates

Cheshire, Grafton,  Strafford,  Sullivan

No 
children
33%

Married
19%

Divorced
/Sep.
23%

Never 
m arried
57%

  

With 
children
67%

            

 

The data for each county are shown below.   The average age is 33; 94 percent are white. 
Table 5: Demographic characteristics of women in the county houses of correction 2007 
Demographics of
female inmates
Marital Status
Never married

Weighted Cty
Average

Grafton

Merrimack

Strafford

Sullivan

Prison

57%

62%

54%

57%

57%

48%

Divorced/Separated/
Widow

23%

22%

22%

26%

15%

30%

Married
Race - % White
Average Age

19%
94%
33

16%
98%
33

23%
96%
 

16%
89%
33

28%
 
32

22%
80% 
33

OVER 1,300 CHILDREN MAY BE AFFECTED EACH YEAR  
Research suggests children of incarcerated parents are five times more likely to enter the 
criminal justice system than children whose parents have never been incarcerated. 15   
Children of incarcerated mothers often have emotional and psychological problems 
                                                             
14 This estimate of single mothers is based on the following data and assumptions: 19 percent of 

county inmates are married, but we assume a higher rate of 30 percent for incarcerated mothers, 
based on national research.   If 30 percent of the 67 percent with children are married, that leaves an 
estimated 47 percent who would be single mothers. 
15 Charlene Wear Simmons, Children of Incarcerated Parents, California Research Bureau, 2000. 

8 
 

NH Women’s Policy Institute    

Women Behind Bars  

December 2008 

 
stemming from the trauma of separation from their mother, as well as from witnessing 
substance abuse and criminal behavior in the home. 16     
Nationally, 64 percent of mothers in state prison lived with their children immediately 
before being incarcerated. 17    Assuming similar rates of child custody in New Hampshire, we 
can estimate that approximately 1,350 children in New Hampshire had mothers—their 
primary caretakers—who were incarcerated during 2007, as shown in Table 6.  (The 
estimates of the number of women are explained in more detail in Appendix Table 11.) 
Table 6:  Estimated number of NH children living with mother before her incarceration 
Number of Women Incarcerated at Any Point during 2007 18
In Prison or Shea Farm Halfway House
142
In House of Correction (includes protective custody cases)*
291
Paroled during 2007
31
Released from HOCs during 2007(estimate)*
967
1431
Total women incarcerated at some point during 2007
Estimated Number of Children Affected:
Est. number of women incarcerated who are mothers (1431 x 67%)
958
Est. number who lived with their children before incarceration (958 x 64%)
613
Est. number of children they have (x 2.2 each, based on Cheshire County)
1350
*The jails hold people who are severely intoxicated in ‘protective custody’ for 24 hours.

While there are far more children with incarcerated fathers, there is generally greater 
impact when a mother is incarcerated because of her role as primary caregiver.  Nationally, 
less than half of fathers in prison lived with their children at the time they were 
incarcerated, and most who did said their children were being cared for by the mother 
during their incarceration.   In contrast, two‐thirds of mothers in prison lived with their 
children immediately before their incarceration; only 28 percent reported their child being 
cared for by the father. 19   Mothers relied more on grandparents, relatives, and foster care.   
 
Some mothers lose custody of their children when incarcerated, creating significant stress 
on both the inmate and the correctional facility during this process.  New Hampshire’s 
foster care system plays a significant role in caring for children of incarcerated mothers.  
Unfortunately, data on these children is not readily available.  There is need for further 
study on their needs and characteristics, whether the system is meeting the demand, and 
how the children ultimately fare. 20     Most mothers do continue to be the primary caregivers 
to their children after incarceration, and must support their children economically and 
                                                             
16 Greene, Haney, and Hurtado, 2003; Grella and Greenwell, 2006; Sharp, 2003. 
17 Mumola, Christopher, Incarcerated Parents and Their Children, U.S. Department of Justice, Special 

Report, August 2000, NCJ 182335.  

18 Prison and parole data are excerpted from data provided by the Department of Corrections; county 

estimates are based on data provided by the county houses of corrections, see details in Appendix. 

19 These data are based on state prisoners; Mumola, 2000, see footnote 17. 

20 Discussions with Kristina Toth of the Family Connections Center, Lakes Region Facility, NH 

Department of Corrections.  

9 
 

NH Women’s Policy Institute    

Women Behind Bars  

December 2008 

 
emotionally immediately upon release from prison or jail. 21   Corrections professionals we 
talked to said the need to care for children upon release was a particular challenge for 
women; and suggested subsidized child care would help mothers and their children become 
economically stable.   
 
Corrections officials also told the Institute that the growing number of pregnant female 
inmates is straining the system, and raising a myriad of complicated issues that the system 
is not equipped to address.  One Superintendent recounted his frustration at trying to be 
proactive in protecting the well‐being of a child to be born to one of his female inmates.  He 
contacted the state to arrange care for the unborn child, but was told the state could not 
intervene because the child had not yet been abandoned or neglected.   When the inmate 
found a distant relative in another state to care for the child, the Superintendent himself 
drove out of state to get the relative in order to ensure she would be present at the birth to 
bond with the infant and take the child home.   Superintendents told us they will try to get 
an inmate released before she gives birth whenever feasible, but it is not always possible.  
One county house of corrections recently found the costs of supervision and care for one 
pregnant inmate totaled $20,000, including medical care and transportation.   County 
houses of correction were obviously not designed for infants and mothers, with cramped 
quarters that limit opportunities for mothers to bond with and feed their babies, and 
corrections officials hard pressed to guarantee the safety of the children. 

CRIMINAL HISTORIES: EXTENSIVE BUT NOT VIOLENT 
IN THE COUNTY HOUSES OF CORRECTION 
Women  in  the  county  jails  are  likely  to  be  repeat  offenders  with  fairly  extensive  but 
nonviolent  criminal  histories,  though  some  are  first‐time  offenders.    Of  those  admitted  to 
Cheshire County, one‐fifth had a prior felony conviction and almost half had a current felony 
charge.    More  than  half  said  they  had  been  incarcerated  before,  39  percent  of  them  in 
Cheshire County.  In Grafton County, only 11 percent of the female inmates had been in that 
facility before.  Figure 4 shows the criminal history of women admitted to Cheshire County 
HOC.  As shown, almost one‐fifth had no prior convictions. 

                                                             
21 Grella and Greenwell, 2006 (see Bibliography for full citation). 

10 
 

NH Women’s Policy Institute    

Women Behind Bars  

December 2008 

 
                   Figure 4: Prior convictions, women in Cheshire County HOC 2007                          

Number of Prior Convictions
Women admitted to Cheshire Cty HOC 2007

No 
priors
18%

3 or 
more 
priors 
28%

1 ‐ 2 
priors
54%

 

 

 

 

    

 

Women in the county HOC’s are commonly serving time for sale or possession of drugs, 
theft, aggravated DWI, violation of probation, and forgery, among other offenses; the 
majority are facing a single charge.   Despite the women’s significant criminal histories, 
violent offenses account for only one to six percent of the total female admissions, varying 
somewhat by county.  Geographic differences may explain some of this variation.   
Rockingham County, for example, reports a higher percentage of violent offenses due to its 
proximity to more urban areas in Massachusetts. 22   Differences in the categories of offense 
reported and the way data was reported by each county prevent exact comparisons. 
Table 7: Percent of female HOC admissions by offense type, categorized by primary charge 23 
Percent of 2007 Female Admissions by Offense Type (partial 2007 for Cheshire)
County
Simple
Obstruct.
Prot.
Prob. Other/
DWI/
Cheshire
Strafford 24
Sullivan
Merrimack

Violent

Drug

2%
6%
3%

11%
12%
15%

Traffic*

19%
15%
9%

Property

20%
12%
12%

Assault

Justice**

Custody

Viol.

unkn

4%
6%
3%

5%
26%
22%

28%(est.)

17%
16%
26%

0%
2%
2%

Not avail.

8%
24%

Alt. Sent.
Not avail.

5%
Not avail.

*Includes serious offenses such as driving after license revocation and others that lead to ‘habitual offender’
conviction, which carries a mandatory one-year sentence.
**Includes resisting arrest, disorderly conduct, breach of bail, tampering with a witness and other offenses
related to obstructing justice.

                                                             
22 Discussions with Albert Wright, Superintendent, Rockingham County House of Corrections. 

23 The majority of admissions have multiple charge; when determining primary charge the Institute 

considered violent charges to be primary, and alcohol and drug charges secondary; see Appendix 
section on ‘data sources’ for full discussion.   Probation violations also included new crime charges. 
24 Strafford data are for 566 of the 952 female admissions in 2007, and exclude Rockingham County 
inmates, federal inmates, and NH State Prison inmates that are held in the Strafford County facility. 

11 

 

NH Women’s Policy Institute    

Women Behind Bars  

December 2008 

 
In Sullivan County, women are more likely than men to be admitted for drug and alcohol 
charges or probation violation, with fewer violent charges and charges related to 
obstructing justice, as shown below.   
 
Figure 5: Charges against women and men admitted to Sullivan County 2007* 

Sex
<1%

Male Admissions Sullivan Cty 2007

Female Admissions Sullivan Cty 
2007
Prob/Par 
Viol
26%

Violent
<1%
Obstruct. 
Justice/ 
Other
24%
Simple 
Asslt or 
Person
6%

Sex
1%

Violent
3%

Prob/Par 
Viol
18%

Obstruct. 
Justice/ 
Other
33%

Alcohol 
and Drug
31%

Alcohol 
and Drug
27%
Simple 
Asslt or 
Person
10%

Property
12%

Property
8%

 

*DWI and traffic offenses are included under alcohol and drug offenses.

Figure 6: Sullivan County HOC female admissions by offense type 2002 – 2007 

F emale admis s ions  to S ullivan C ounty HO C  by offens e type
250

Number of admissions

200
Violent
P rob/P arole Viol

150

S imple 
As s lt/pers on

P roperty

100

Obs truc ting  
J us tic e

50
Alc  and Drug
0
2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

 
12 
 

NH Women’s Policy Institute    

Women Behind Bars  

December 2008 

 
The fastest growing offense type for women in Sullivan County was obstructing justice, 
almost all of which was breach of bail and bench and arrest warrants for prior offenses.  
Admissions for alcohol and drug crimes increased by 51 percent between 2002 and 2007. 

IN THE STATE PRISON  

               Figure 7: Female Admissions NH State Prison 2007  

Compared  to  the  houses  of 
correction,  the  state  prison 
has  a  higher  percentage  of 
women  admitted  for  violent 
offenses  and  drug  crimes.   
Violent  offenders  increased 
from  seven  percent  of  female 
admissions  in  1997  to  20 
percent of admissions in 2007, 
as shown at right and below. 

Female Admissions 
NH State Prison 2007
OBSTRUCT
JUSTICE
6%

DRUGS
30%
DWI/ 
TRAFFIC
8%

SEX
<1%
VIOLENT 
20%

PROPERTY
34%

 

 
Figure 8: Admissions to the State Prison for Women 1997 ­ 2007  

Female admissions by original offense
180 . . , . - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 160 - 1 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 7

140 - 1 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - " 2 " ' "
~
l:

'"o0 120

-j----------------------.,

'iii
'Vi
,~

'"
E 100 + - - - - - - - - - . . . . " ,

-

."
"t:l

ro

....
~
0

QI
Q)

80 -j-----~".

PROPERTY

.c

E

:I

zZ

60
40
20

o
1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

 
13 

 

NH Women’s Policy Institute    

Women Behind Bars  

December 2008 

 

THE NUMBER OF WOMEN BEHIND BARS IN NH 
The number of women in state prison in New Hampshire is relatively low compared to 
other states, but among the fastest growing in the country.   Over the past three decades the 
growth in state prisoners has been exponential for both men and women, for women 
growing from two in 1977 to 142 in 2007.   The increases in the number incarcerated at the 
state and the county levels far exceed the recent growth in the state’s overall population. 
Table 8: New Hampshire's State Prison* Incarceration Rate Compared to the Nation 25 
NH/US State Prison Incarceration as of 2004 NH Women NH Men and Women US Women
Incarceration rate per 100,000
18
119
64
National rank for incarceration rate
47th lowest
47th lowest
n/a
Percent increase 1977 to 2004
5850%
799%
757%
Ratio male to female prisoners
20 to 1
13 to 1
*Excludes county houses of correction.

During 2007, the Institute estimates there were roughly 2,850 New Hampshire women who 
were under some kind of correctional supervision at some point during the year, as shown 
in Table 9.   Most were under community supervision or cycling in and out of the county 
jails.  This estimate is based on data provided by the HOC’s, the NH Department of 
Correction, diversion programs, with estimates where data were not available.   The 
Institute has adjusted all the data to avoid double counting individuals who are incarcerated 
multiple times or on probation and also serving time in jail.  The assumptions and 
methodology are detailed in Appendix Table 11. 
Table 9: Estimated Number Women in NH Justice System During 2007 
Incarcerated (at single point in time, on average):
Houses of Correction
291
Prison/Shea Farm
142
Total behind bars
433
In the Community:
Released from HOC during 2007*
967
Probation
954
Parole
150
In Academy alternative sentencing program
70
In Diversion/Alternatives
72
In Merrimack Cty AOD Education program
(FAST)
199
Total in community
2417
Grand Total (estimate)
2850
*Includes protective custody cases.

The number of women on probation greatly exceeds the number on parole.  Regionally, 
most female offenders are concentrated in the state’s larger communities. 
                                                             
25 Women’s Prison Association, the Institute on Women and Criminal Justice, The Punitiveness Report, 

Hard Hit: The Growth in Imprisonment of Women, 1977 to 2004. 

14 
 

NH Women’s Policy Institute    

Women Behind Bars  

December 2008 

 
Table 10:  Women under DOC community supervision  
DOC District Office
Berlin
Claremont
Concord
Dover
Exeter
Haverhill
Keene
Laconia
Manchester
Nashua
Ossipee
Total 26

Female probationers (April 2008)
51
67
116
151
158
93
60
58
145
76
46
1021

Female Parolees (June 2008)
7
11
44
8
9
11
11
12
16
21
5
155

INCREASING INCARCERATION OF WOMEN AT THE COUNTY LEVEL  
Incarceration at the county level has been increasing.  In recent years Carroll, Merrimack, 
and Strafford counties have all built new jails, with Cheshire County just beginning the 
process.  County incarceration is increasing faster for women than for men, increasing by 24 
percent for women and by 14 percent for men between 2003 and 2007.  These findings are 
based on information provided by 7 of the 10 counties; detail is provided in the Appendix. 
 

Figure 9:  Admissions at Grafton, Hillsborough, Merrimack, Strafford, and Sullivan HOCs 

Six County HOC Admissions 2003 to 2007 
(Grafton, Coos,* Hillsborough, Merrimack, Strafford, and Sullivan Counties)
18,000 
24% increase 
for women,
14% for men

16,000 
14,000 
s
n 12,000 
o
is 
si 
m1  0,000 
d
a   
f
o
 r   8,000
e
b
m  6,000
u
N 
4,000
2,000
0 

MEN

2012 if 
trend 
continues 

12,740 
10,904

11,175

2,178

2,391

2,340

2,902

2005

2006

2007

2012 
projected

9,779 

10,062

10,217

1,893 

WOMEN 
2,042 

2003 

2004 

Data provided by county houses of corrections; figures adjusted to avoid double counting of inmates being held  for other
counties based on interviews with county staff.   *Grafton admissions include Coos female inmates except protective  custody. 

 
                                                             
26 This total differs from that in Table 7, because figures in Table 7 were adjusted downward to avoid 

double counting probationers serving time in the county houses of correction. 

15 
 

NH Women’s Policy Institute    

Women Behind Bars  

December 2008 

 
Women represented 16 percent of the daily population in 2003, and 18% in 2007, based on 
data from four counties. (See Appendix Table 12.)  If the admissions trend continues, female 
admissions at the six facilities shown above will top 2,900 by 2012, resulting in an average 
daily population of 52 beds higher than current levels for the facilities shown. 27    
 
The increasing percentage of women in the daily population of the HOCs is primarily driven 
by increases in admissions, including significant recidivism, and not by an increase in time 
served, as shown in Appendix Table 13. 

INCREASING ADMISSIONS OF WOMEN TO THE STATE PRISON 
Admissions to the State Prison for Women are also increasing, by 64 percent between 2003 
and 2007.   Recidivism is a major driver of admissions; the greatest increase in admissions 
is in parole violators, followed by those sentenced for new crimes, as shown below.  The dip 
in 2004 is explained by DOC staff as reflecting back‐ups in the courts when state leadership 
was discussing the possibility of closing the prison. 28   Interestingly, this shows the ability of 
administrative policies to impact incarceration rates, and suggests an opportunity for policy 
makers to consider limiting bed space in order to redirect resources to other programs that 
may be more effective. 
Figure 10: Female admissions to the state prison 1997 – 2007 

Female Admissions 1997 ‐ 2007 
State inmates only, excludes county and federal, also excludes secure psychiatric unit

180
160

Number of admissions

140
120
100
80

Sentenced

60
Probation 
Violator

40
20

Parole Violator

0
1997

1998

1999

2000

Source: Data provided by the Department of Corre ctions

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

 

                                                             
27 This is based on average time served of 34 days, see Appendix Table 13. 

28 Discussion with Edmund Hucks, NH Department of Corrections, May 2008. 

16 
 

NH Women’s Policy Institute    

Women Behind Bars  

December 2008 

 
As with the male prison population, female parole violators represent an increasing percent 
of admissions, growing to 36 percent of all admissions in 2007. 
 
Figure 11: Female parole violators as a percent of NH State Prison for Women admissions 

Admissions of parole violators as a percent of female admissions 
(excludes county and federal admissions)
50%
45%

43%

40%
36%

37%

36%

35%
30%

27%
25%

25%

25%

24%

22%
20%

20%
14%

15%
10%
5%
0%
1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

 

 

 Figure 12: Time served for parole and probation violations 

The  number  of  days 
women  serve  for  parole 
violations  has  remained 
relatively  consistent  in 
recent  years,  while  time 
served  for  probation 
violations  has  decreased.  
On  average,  women  who 
violate probation are in for 
about  twice  as  long  as 
those who violate parole. 

Average Days
Davs Served on Probation and Parole Violations
Female Inmates
900
800
800
III

~7/\~--------'-------

-J-----7''-------''t-----,--------------

700

~

600
Q
1ii
Q; 500 ~-----------------..c
~
"0

E

- Probation Viol.
-------------------- ~ 400 r 400 ]
-Parole Viol.

...~
~

C!
~ 300 - r - , - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - f - .- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

~200
~ ...............~ ~ ~
200

-J----"""'-------::r-------"'--==------:~=-------

100

o
1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006

 
17 
 

NH Women’s Policy Institute    

Women Behind Bars  

December 2008 

 

ARRESTS TRENDS IN NH AND THE NATION 
Nationally and in some of New Hampshire’s larger communities, female arrests have been 
increasing.  Arrest trends often reflect crime trends, but also reflect changes in enforcement, 
so must be interpreted with caution.  The Institute analyzed national trends and trends in 
six of New Hampshire’s larger communities where complete data were available, because 
arrest trend data for the state as a whole was not available.  29   
 
Arrest data show women are far less likely than men to be involved in criminal activity and 
violence, comprising 26 percent all those arrested and only 15 percent of those arrested for 
violent crimes. 30    Alcohol offenses are one of the largest categories of arrest that bring 
women—and men—into the justice system; accounting for 18 percent of female arrests 
nationally and 38 percent of female arrests in New Hampshire, as shown in Figure 1.  Due to 
the way arrest data is reported, individuals held for drunkenness, or ‘protective custody,’ 
are counted in the total alcohol arrests although they are not actual arrests; they account for 
about 20 percent of alcohol arrests in NH and nationwide.  
   
Figure 13: Female arrests by offense type, NH and US, 2006 
US female arrests 2006 

NH Female Arrests 2006

Alcohol 
18%

Alcohol
38%

Drug
5%
Violent Property
11%
1%

Non 
Violent
45%

Data Source: NH Department  of Public Safety, based  on reporting towns.

Drug 
11%

Violent 
3%

Non 
Violent
55%

Property
13%

 

Data source: FBI Uniform Crime Reporting data  2006

The higher percentage of alcohol arrests in New Hampshire may reflect greater prevalence 
of illegal alcohol activity, fewer treatment options, and differences in enforcement or state 
law.   New Hampshire does rank 18th nationally in the percentage of drivers who drove 
while intoxicated, 31   suggesting slightly more drunk driving activity than other states.   In 
addition, New Hampshire enacted stricter laws for alcohol possession in 2003, after which 
                                                             
29 Law enforcement agencies report arrests to the state on a voluntary basis, so reporting varies from 

year to year, making statewide trend analysis unreliable. 

30 US Uniform Crime Reporting System, 2006 adult arrests. 
31 Office of Applied Studies, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). 

National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 2004‐2006 

18 
 

NH Women’s Policy Institute    

Women Behind Bars  

December 2008 

 
arrests for underage possession increased. 32   Finally, limited treatment options may be a 
factor; national surveys have shown New Hampshire to have a relatively high unmet 
treatment need for alcohol and drug treatment among young adults. 33    
Minority women accounted for only 20 percent of all minority arrests, while women overall 
accounted for 26 percent of all NH arrests.   During 2006, minorities comprised five percent 
of all NH arrests, consistent with their representation in the general population.  At the 
State Prison for Women and Shea Farm, however, minorities make up 24 percent of the 
population. 34    Other studies have also found representation of minorities to increase at 
deeper levels of the system. 35    

ARRESTS OF WOMEN ARE INCREASING  
Nationally, female arrests have been increasing.  Between 2002 and 2006 drug arrests 
increased by a 25 percent and arrests for alcohol offenses 36  by 13 percent—while men’s 
arrests increased more slowly or actually decreased.  Female arrests for violent and 
property crimes have also increased slightly, as shown in Figure 14.   Again, the data do not 
indicate whether crime has increased or whether police practices and enforcement have 
changed.   
 
Figure 14: Percent change 2002 to 2006 US Arrests by gender 

Percent Change US Arrests 2002 ‐ 2006 
by gender and offense type
25%
17%

WOMEN

13%

MEN

4%

‐3%

‐1%
Violent crimes

Drug Offenses

Alcohol Offenses

‐2%

1%

Property crime

 
                                                             
32 Merrow, Katherine, Teen Drug Use and Juvenile Crime, NH Center for Public Policy Studies, 2005. 
33 Office of Applied Studies, SAMHSA. National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 2004‐2006.  

34 Unpublished data from a 2008 survey of women in NH State Prison for Women and Shea Farm, 

conducted by Margaret Hayes, Ph.D., St. Anselm College.   

35 Merrow, Katherine, Teen Drug Use and Juvenile Crime, NH Center for Public Policy Studies, 2005. 
36 As noted earlier, drunkenness or Protective Custody (PC) cases are counted in the alcohol arrests, 

and account for about 20 percent of total alcohol arrests.    

19 
 

NH Women’s Policy Institute    

Women Behind Bars  

December 2008 

 
The Institute also analyzed arrest trends in Concord, Manchester, Keene, Laconia, Plymouth, 
and Portsmouth, which account for 30 percent of all NH reported arrests.  While these 
communities may not necessarily be representative of the state as a whole, they do provide 
a sense of arrest activity in the state’s larger communities.     
 
Consistent with national trends, the increase in female arrests is striking, and greatly 
exceeds the increase for men.  In the six communities female arrests increased by 25 
percent between 2002 to 2006, compared to nine percent for men.   Female alcohol and 
drug arrests also increased, 37  while decreasing for men, as shown in Figure 15.    Interviews 
with corrections professionals suggest the increase in arrests is driven by drug use. 
 
Figure 15: Percent change in arrests ­ six NH communities*  

  

30%

Percent Change in Arrests by Gender 
in Six NH Communities 2002  ‐ 2006 
25% 

25%

WOMEN

20%
15%

12%

10%

WOMEN

9%
MEN

5% 
0% 
‐ 5% 
‐ 10%

MEN

‐ 6%
Alcohol and Drug Arrests

All Arrests 
 

*Chart includes arrests in Concord, Manchester, Keene, Laconia, Plymouth, and Portsmouth.
Unlike the national trends, the New Hampshire communities saw a greater increase in 
arrests for alcohol offenses than for drugs.   Arrests for DWI and drunkenness increased by 
six percent; underage drinking arrests nearly doubled, as shown below.   Surprisingly, drug 
arrests increased in three communities, and decreased in the other three, for an overall 
decline of 23 percent.   
                                                             
37 Alcohol arrests include protective custody and drunkenness holds, which are about 20% of alcohol 

offenses.  

20 
 

NH Women’s Policy Institute    

Women Behind Bars  

December 2008 

 
Figure 16: Female alcohol and drug arrests 2002 to 2006, six NH communities 

~

700

Female alcohol and drug arrests
,
,----------IH+~iX
- - - - - - - - - - 1 - °n--six-N-l=l-co.mm-umt-i·e~---N H comm-uf-liti..~~---

600

+
+----------------

500

V>

~

"*E'" 400

~

~ 300

• OTHER ALCOHOL & OWl

..Q
..c

• UNDERAGE DRINKING

'"

E
::J

Z

200

100

o
2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

Includes arrests from Concord, Keene, Laconia,
laconia, Manchester, Plymouth, and Portsmouth;
S

 

0

Most of the increase in alcohol arrests was among young women aged 18 to 24.  In this age 
group arrests for DWI and drunkenness increased by 10 percent; arrests for underage 
drinking increased by 37 percent, with the biggest jump after the statutory change in 2003 
noted earlier.  Alcohol and drug arrests among women aged 25 to 49 actually decreased by 
12 percent overall.    

WHAT CAN BE DONE? 
EFFECTIVE TREATMENT FOR WOMEN OFFENDERS 
Research on mixed‐gender programs for offenders has shown that the most effective 
programs target those at high risk of reoffending and address their criminogenic needs—
factors associated with recidivism that can be changed such as antisocial attitudes, poor self 
control, and substance abuse. 38   A cognitive behavioral approach, length of time in the 
program, and strict adherence to the program model are also associated with effectiveness, 
as is comprehensive integration of services.    

                                                             
38 Edward J. Latessa, Ph.D., Presentation on Improving the Effectiveness of Correctional Programs 

Through Research, Center for Criminal Justice Research, Division of Criminal Justice, University of 
Cincinnati, accessed July 31, 2008 at www.drc.state.oh.us/web/iej_files/200802_Speaker_Latessa.pdf 

21 

 

NH Women’s Policy Institute    

Women Behind Bars  

December 2008 

 
A review of literature on substance abuse treatment specifically for female offenders 
indicates that the most effective programs for women are those that are comprehensive, 
that include not just substance abuse treatment but also components such as child care and 
child involvement in treatment, parenting issues, mental health treatment, housing 
assistance, job training and case management services. 39   The majority of the research 
concluded that programming for women re‐entering the community should also improve 
economic conditions and support children and family. 40   These findings are not surprising 
given the complexity of issues and multiple needs identified among New Hampshire’s 
female offender population.   
Some research suggests that effective substance abuse treatment for women requires a 
specialized set of principles that are ‘gender specific,’ or tailored to the women’s specific 
strengths and challenges.  This approach uses relationships in treatment and addresses 
issues like past trauma, depression and post traumatic stress disorder, and parenting 
issues.  Gender‐specific programming is a relatively new development in the field, and 
research comparing outcomes of mixed gender and gender‐specific programs is still limited.  
Some studies have shown promising results, including greater treatment retention in 
women‐only programs; 41  better treatment retention has been associated with better 
outcomes in previous studies.  In the county jails, one must question whether it is even 
possible to accomplish gender‐specific programming in a setting that is overwhelmingly 
male.  Superintendents from some counties reported that even work assignments for female 
inmates are complicated or prevented by the need to address safety concerns and keep the 
male and female inmates separate.   
Interestingly, a national study has shown men have better outcomes in some aspects of re‐
entry from prison or jail.  In follow‐up interviews, men showed better outcomes in 
employment, housing, self‐reported mental health and substance use or abuse.  Researchers 
concluded that it is essential for social service and criminal justice professionals to be aware 
of the unique needs of women who are transitioning from incarceration to the 
community. 42   

SYSTEM GAPS IN NH AND BARRIERS TO SUCCESS 
The Institute interviewed several professionals familiar with community‐based services to 
better understand the adequacy of services available to women offenders. 43    Services were 
described as adequate in some counties, and inadequate in others, but nowhere did 
interviewees describe programs that were comprehensive and addressed the multiple 
                                                             
39 Silber‐Ashley, Marsden & Brady, 2003. Gillece, 2002. 

40 Marcus‐Mendoza & Wright, 2004; Holtfreter & Morash, 2003; Browne, Miller & Maguin, 1999; 

Baugh, Bull & Cohen, 1998. 
41 Silber‐Ashley, Marsden & Brady, 2003. 
42 Mallik‐Kane & Visher, 2008. 
43Interviewees included treatment professionals, cooperative‐extension service staff, and probation 
and parole officers, as listed in the Appendix. 

22 

 

NH Women’s Policy Institute    

Women Behind Bars  

December 2008 

 
needs identified in this report available to women during re‐entry.  Many treatment 
professionals highlighted the need for one‐stop access to services and case management, 
and a better understanding of how past trauma affects female offenders and their 
relationships to services and correctional supervision systems. 
Some we talked to identified lack of vocational skills and gainful employment as the greatest 
barriers for women, with economic dependency fueling women’s connections to negative 
and abusive relationships and contributing to relapse and repeat offending.  Corrections 
officials cited the lack of reentry supports in employment as well as housing as a significant 
factor in recidivism for female offenders in New Hampshire.   Interviewees told us women 
often live with other substance abusers upon release; national research confirms this is 
more common among women than men, which may contribute to their poorer outcomes. 44   
Affordable child care, affordable housing, and transportation too, were all seen as critical to 
enabling women to overcome these barriers and gain economic independence.   
Another barrier mentioned was offenders’ own lack of motivation to change.   Corrections 
and treatment professionals described internal motivation along with supportive and 
positive relationships as key to helping women breaking the cycle of substance abuse, 
offending, and incarceration.   These observations notwithstanding, mandated treatment 
has been shown to increase the length of time an offender stays in a program, increasing 
chances of treatment success.  Finally, those we talked to highlighted mental health care as 
inadequate, particularly noting access to affordable medications upon release as a problem.   

POLICY IMPLICATIONS 
Women in New Hampshire’s criminal justice system have complex histories of victimization 
with multiple treatment and rehabilitative needs.  The upward trend in women’s 
involvement in crime and incarceration is alarming, and the impact on children, and the 
future cost of that impact, is significant.  The women have significant criminal histories 
though only a small percentage are violent.  Taxpayers are paying for incarceration of these 
women again and again at both the county and state levels.   
There are few places in the state where the kind of comprehensive, transitional supports 
found to be effective in other states are available in New Hampshire.  It is therefore difficult 
to determine whether public investment in community‐based supports would reduce the 
population behind bars and the associated costs, though research suggests it would help 
stem the increasing rates of incarceration.   While New Hampshire’s current correctional 
model is effective in protecting public safety during an offenders’ incarceration, it is costly 
and ineffective in terms of long‐term successful rehabilitation.  New Hampshire would do 
well to experiment with another model, and the female offender population, being less 
violent and more directly involved in the care of children, would be a good place to start. 
                                                             
44 Mallik‐Kane & Visher, 2008. 

23 
 

NH Women’s Policy Institute    

Women Behind Bars  

December 2008 

 
The Institute provides this report as a starting point for discussion among county, state, and 
community leaders, to bring communities together to address this growing challenge and 
the associated societal and monetary costs, and to work toward coordinated solutions and 
supports. 
 

24 
 

NH Women’s Policy Institute    

Women Behind Bars  

December 2008 

 

APPENDIX 
SUPPLEMENTAL DATA TABLES, METHODOLOGY AND ASSUMPTIONS 
The Institute based its estimates of the number of women in the system on admissions and 
average daily population data from county HOC’s, and from data provided by the NH 
Department of Corrections, details on each calculation and assumption are provided below. 
Table 11: Detailed calculations and estimates for number of women in the system in 2007 
County
Incarcerated:
Belknap
Carroll
Cheshire
Coos
Grafton
Hillsborough
Merrimack
Rockingham
Strafford
Sullivan
Total in HOCs
In Prison/Shea Farm
Total behind bars
In Community:
Recently released from HOC
Belknap
Carroll
Cheshire
Coos
Grafton
Hillsborough
Merrimack
Rockingham
Strafford
Sullivan
Total admitted to HOC

#
12
4.5
12.6
0
16
87.7
45.8
0
92
20
291
142
433

250
148
198
0
236
819
454
0
817
178
3100

Reduce by 40% for recidivism
Subtract those still in HOC
Reduce by 23% to avoid
double counting prob.violators
Reduce by 20% for those
released to probation
Released from HOC in 2007
On Probation
On Parole
In Academy alt. sentencing
In Diversion/alternatives

1860
1569

In FAST program
Total in community

199
2417

1208
967
967
954
155
70
72

Data source or assumptions and sources for estimate
Estimated, based on 2001 HOC capacity as per Nat. Inst. Of Corrections* multiplied by 15%.
Estimated, based on 2001 HOC capacity as per Nat. Inst. Of Corrections* multiplied by 15%.
Estimated, based on 2001 HOC capacity as per Nat. Inst. Of Corrections* multiplied by 15%.
Included in Grafton County numbers; Coos HOC female inmates are housed in Grafton.
Provided by Grafton County.
Total provided by County; females estimated at 16% of total (16% of 2007 admits are female).
Total provided by County; females estimated at 21% of total (21% of 2007 admits are female).
Included in Strafford County, since Rockingham HOC female inmates are housed at Strafford.
Provided by Strafford County.
Actual female jail population (22% of total), plus an estimated 22% of the non-jail population.
Total of estimates above
Provided by the NH Department of Corrections

Based on 2007 admissions to HOCs , less those currently incarcerated, as detailed below.
Estimated, 2001 jail admissions adjusted for population increase** estimate 14% are female.
Estimated, 2001 jail admissions adjusted for population increase** estimate 14% are female.
Actual count of 2007 admission files.
In Grafton numbers
Provided by HOC.
Provided by HOC.
Provided by HOC.
In Strafford County HOC numbers
Provided by HOC, admissions for federal inmates and for NH DOC inmates subtracted.
Provided by HOC.
Total admitted at any time during 2007.
To avoid double counting offenders, assumes 40% have served time previously in same year.
Subtracts 291 still incarcerated; they are counted above.
Based on average admissions for probation violators in Cheshire (20%) and Sullivan (26%);
probationers are counted below.
To avoid double counting those admitted on new charges but released to probation, and
therefore counted in probation numbers below.
Total after subtracting estimates for those counted elsewhere.
Probationers as of 4/15/08, provided by NH DOC, less 23% of the 291 incarcerated in HOCs.
Provided by NH DOC, number of female parolees as of June 23,2008.
Provided by NH DOC, number of women in the Academy during 2008.
80% of estimate of women in alternatives and diversion, based on partial data from counties.
80% of 2007 admissions (assumes 20% counted elsewhere above), provided by Merrimack
County Attorney's office.

GRAND TOTAL
2850 Includes those under supervision or incarcerated at any time during the year.
* National Institute of Corrections Jail Division, NIC TA 01-J1179, Planning Of A New Institution, Phase I, August 6-8,
2001, by NIC Consultants, Nate Caldwell, Robert C. Cushman.
**Based on 2001 HOC population as reported in Under the Influence Part 2, NH Center for Public Policy Studies, 2003,
p. 25, adjusted for population increases using 2006 American Community Survey data.

25 
 

NH Women’s Policy Institute    

Women Behind Bars  

December 2008 

 
Female admissions as a percent of total admissions has are increasing, as shown below.  
Table 12: Female county admissions as a percent of all admissions 
County
2003
2004
2005
17%
19%
20%
Merrimack
15%
16%
15%
Hillsborough
18%
14%
19%
Grafton
19%
17%
20%
Sullivan
16%
17%
17%
Weighted average four counties
 

2006
21%
15%
25%
21%
18%

 

2007
21%
16%
22%
18%
18%

Data on average days served shows increases in some counties, decreases in others. 
Table 13: Average days served by female inmates in county houses of correction 
County
2003 2004
2005
2006
2007
Change 03 - 07
13
19
15
17
21
64%
Grafton
65
62
58
65
49
-25%
Strafford*
33
42
43
42
21
-36%
Sullivan
Not available
45
Not applicable
Hillsborough
34
1%
Average
*Strafford’s ‘average days served’ may be longer partly because it excludes anyone held for less than one
day; the other counties do not.

 
In Grafton and Sullivan counties, the average age of women has declined slightly.  This may 
reflect year to year variation in the small population, or that female inmates are getting 
younger, consistent with the data showing an increase in arrests among younger women. 
Table 14: Average age of women admitted to Grafton and Sullivan County HOCs 
County HOC
Sullivan
Grafton

2002
34

2003
31
34

2004
30
31

2005
30
30

2006
30
31

2007
32
33

DATA SOURCES: 
The Institute used a number of different data sources for this report, as detailed here. 
Study of women in Cheshire County House of Correction: 
The Institute reviewed the records from all 148 intake interviews with women being 
admitted to the House of Corrections during 2007.  The sample included all weekday 
admissions except for protective custody cases, and excluded women admitted during the 
weekend when intake interviews are not completed.   A cursory review of files for weekend 
admissions indicated no notable difference between weekend and weekday admissions in 
terms of prevalence or severity of reported substance abuse.  Intake interviews were 
conducted by a senior corrections professional, and included inmates’ responses to 
standardized questions on an extensive intake assessment questionnaire.  The intakes also 
included staff assessments of severity of problems, and all intake interviews were 
conducted and coded by the same senior staff person. 
26 
 

NH Women’s Policy Institute    

Women Behind Bars  

December 2008 

 
Sullivan County House of Corrections Study: 
The Institute analyzed electronic records from 5,560 admissions to the Sullivan County 
House of Corrections from 2002 to 2007, aggregating and coding data on charges, 
employment, and time served.   In determining the primary charge, the Institute used the 
following order of priority: violent and sex offenses, drug and alcohol offenses, and other 
offenses.  Violent offenses included any assault charge except for simple assault. 
Other County Houses of Correction 
The Institute requested aggregate data on specific questions from all New Hampshire’s 
counties and received data from 7 of the 10 counties, including Cheshire, Grafton, 
Hillsborough, Merrimack, Strafford, Sullivan, and Rockingham.  Coos county women are 
held in Grafton, so they were included in that county’s data.  Data were provided through 
the offices of the Superintendents of each institution.  Not all counties were able to provide 
data in response to all the Institute’s questions.  The types of data provided included female 
admissions from 2002 to 2007, average daily population, offense types, percent of 
admissions with substance abuse problems or mental illness, and other socio‐demographic 
factors such as marital status, age, employment status, and race of the female population.   
NH Department of Corrections 
The Institute’s findings on the female state prison population were based on the following 
data provided by the NH Department of Corrections: 
• Electronic records of prison bookings from 1995 to present 
• Listing of female parolees as of April 2008 
• Listing of female probationers as of June 2008 . 
• Aggregate data on female prisoners, based on intake interviews performed by 
mental health clinician. 
And also by the results of interviews with female state prison and halfway house inmates, 
conducted by St. Anselm College faculty and students; the results of which summarized in 
“Community Assessment: NH State Prison for Women and Shea Farm, 2008.” 

INTERVIEWS 
The Institute conducted unstructured and semi‐structured interviews with a number of 
corrections and treatment professionals to gather insights for this report:   
Ann Aubertin, former House Manager, Angie’s Place Women’s Shelter  
Tiffany Bleumle, Director, Vermont Works for Women 
Nancy Bradford‐Sisson‐Cheshire County Cooperative Extension 
Christine Brehm, Mary’s Place, Keene 
Laurie Caldwell, Vermont Works for Women 
Cooperative Extension staff (confidentiality requested) 
Jill Evans, Director of Women’s Services, Vermont Department of Corrections 
Cathy Green, private defense attorney 
Scott Harrington, Chief Probation and Parole Officer Manchester District Office, NH 
Department of Corrections 
Owen Helene, Rhode Island Foundation 
27 
 

NH Women’s Policy Institute    

Women Behind Bars  

December 2008 

 
Howard Helrich, Assistant County Attorney, Rockingham County 
Gail Kennedy‐ Sullivan County Cooperative Extension Service  
Christine McKenna, Chief Probation and Parole Officer, Rockingham County District Office, 
NH Department of Corrections 
Leslie Masterman, Clinical Director, Odyssey House 
Niki Miller, Director, NH Task Force on Women and Recovery 
NH DOC Probation and Parole Officer (confidentiality requested) 
Alan Robichaud, Director, Belknap County Citizens Council 
Superintendents of County Houses of Corrections (group discussion) 
Ellie Therrien, Director, Hillsborough County Reentry Program 
Albert Wright, Superintendent, Rockingham County House of Corrections 

SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY 
Office of Applied Studies, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration.  
Changes in Prevalence Rates of Drug Use between 2002‐2003 and 2004‐2005 among States.   
National Survey on Drug Use and Health, February 2007, available at 
http://www.samhsa.gov. 
 
Baugh, S., Bull, S. & Cohen, K. (1998). Mental health issues, treatment, and the female 
offender. In R. Zaplin, Female Offenders: Critical Perspectives and Effective 
Interventions. Gaithersburg, MD: Aspen Publication. 
 
Belknap, J. (2003). Responding to the needs of women prisoners. In S. Sharp, The 
incarcerated woman: Rehabilitative programming in women’s prisons. Upper Saddle River, 
New Jersey; Prentice Hall. 93‐106. 
 
Browne, A., Miller, B. & Maguin, E. (1999). Prevalence and severity of lifetime physical and  
sexual victimization among incarcerated women. International Journal of Law and 
Psychiatry, 22(3‐4). 301‐322. 
 
Conners, N., Bradley, R., Whiteside‐Mansell, L. & Crone, C. (2001).  A comprehensive  
substance abuse treatment program for women and their children: An initial evaluation. 
Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, 21(2001). 67‐75. 
 
Dougherty, J. (1998). Female offenders and childhood maltreatment: Understanding the  
connections. In R. Zaplin, Female Offenders: Critical Perspectives and Effective  
Interventions. Gaithersburg, MD: Aspen Publication. 227‐244. 
 
Gillece, J. (2002).  Leaving Jail: Service linkage and community re‐entry for mothers with 
co‐occurring disorders.  The National GAINS Center for People with Co­Occurring 
Disorders in the Justice System. 
 
Greene, S., Haney, C. & Hurtado, A. (2000).  Cycles of pain: Risk factors in the lives of  
Incarcerated mothers and their children.  The Prison Journal, 80(1). 3‐23. 
 
28 
 

NH Women’s Policy Institute    

Women Behind Bars  

December 2008 

 
Grella, C., Stein, J. & Greenwell, L. (2005). Associations among childhood trauma, adolescent 
problem behaviors and adverse adult outcomes in substance‐abusing women offenders. 
Psychology of Addictive Behaviors, 19(1). 43‐53. 
Grella, C. & Greenwell, L. (2006a). Treatment needs and completion of community based 
aftercare among substance‐abusing women offenders. Womens Health Issues, 17(2007).   
244‐255. 
 
Grella, C. & Greenwell, L. (2006b).  Correlates of parental status and attitudes toward 
parenting among substance‐abuse offenders.  The Prison Journal, 86(1). 89‐113. 
 
Kelley, M. (2003). The state‐of‐the‐art in substance abuse programs for women in prison. In  
S. Sharp, The incarcerated woman: Rehabilitative programming in women’s prisons. Upper 
Saddle River, New Jersey; Prentice Hall. 119‐148. 
 
Kubiak, S.P. & Arfken, C.L. (2006). Beyond gender responsivity: Considering differences 
between community dwelling women involved in the criminal justice system and those 
involved in treatment. Women and Criminal Justice, 17 (2/3). 
Marcus‐Mendoza, S. & Wright, E. (2003).  Treating the woman prisoner: The impact of a 
history of violence. In S. Sharp, The incarcerated woman: Rehabilitative programming in 
women’s prisons. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey; Prentice Hall. 107‐117. 
 
Marcus‐Mendoza, S. & Wright, E. (2004).  Decontextualizing female criminality: Treating  
abused women in prison in the United States. Feminism and Psychology, 14(2). 250‐255. 
 
Ritchie, B.E. (2000). Exploring the link between violence against women and women’s 
involvement in illegal activity, in B. Ritchie, K. Tsensin and C. Widom, Research 
on Women and Girls in the Justice System, Research Forum. 1‐13. Washington, DC:  
National Institute of Justice (NCJ 180973), available at http:/www.ncjrs.org/pdffiles1.nij/ 
180973.pdf. 
 
Sharp, S. (2003). Mothers in prison: Issues in Parent‐Child Contact.  In S. Sharp, The  
incarcerated woman: Rehabilitative programming in women’s prisons. Upper Saddle River, 
New Jersey; Prentice Hall. 107‐117. 
 
Silber Ashley, O., Marsden, M.E. & Brady, T.M. (2003).  Effectiveness of substance abuse 
treatment for women: A review. The American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse,  
29(1). 19‐53. 
 

29

 

 

The Habeas Citebook Ineffective Counsel Side
Advertise Here 4th Ad
Prison Phone Justice Campaign