Skip navigation

Segall Mass Incarceration Ex-felon Discrimination and Black Labor Market Disadvantage

Download original document:
Brief thumbnail
This text is machine-read, and may contain errors. Check the original document to verify accuracy.
MASS INCARCERATION, EX‐FELON DISCRIMINATION, & BLACK LABOR MARKET DISADVANTAGE 
 
Jordan Segall 
 
 
ABSTRACT 
 

This Article considers the impact of labor market discrimination against ex-felons on both the
life chances of individual criminal defendants and the systemically unequal American labor
market as a whole. I argue that there is an immediate relationship between employment
discrimination against ex-felons and the black-white unemployment gap, and that hiring
discrimination on the basis of previous criminal record is a form of racial discrimination—not
just because of the overrepresentation of black defendants in the criminal justice system but also
because employers systematically disfavor black ex-felons compared to whites with identical
criminal records. The Article then considers the limited effectiveness of legal antidiscrimination
remedies to the problems posed by ex-felon discrimination, and concludes that a vigorous
antidiscrimination regime aimed at promoting the hiring of ex-felons cannot be rooted in either
contemporary antidiscrimination jurisprudence or in laws that seek to conceal criminal records
from employers. Instead, such an effort would require substantial new legislation, predicated on
accommodationist antidiscrimination norm and reflecting a new national consensus about how to
weigh the benefits of post-prison social reintegration against the rationality of discrimination
against ex-felons.
 
 
 
 
INTRODUCTION ...................................................................................................................... 2 
I.   EXPLAINING THE UNEMPLOYMENT GAP ........................................................................... 5 
II.   THE EFFECT OF INCARCERATION ON ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY ..................................... 13 
III.  REMEDIAL APPROACHES: ANTIDISCRIMINATION LAW AND SOCIAL POLICY .................... 19 
A. Statutory Limitations on Ex‐Felon Unemployment .......................................... 19 
B. Criminal Record Discrimination ....................................................................... 25 
C. Policy Reform: Race, Privacy, and Statistical Discrimination ......................... 34 
CONCLUSION ........................................................................................................................ 36 
 
 
 
 
 

1 
 
Electronic copy available at: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1674064

INTRODUCTION 
 

Between 1980 and 2008, the country’s incarcerated population spiked from around 

500,000 to a high of 2.3 million.1 This incredible growth in the carceral apparatus—which gave the 
United States the dubious distinction of becoming the world’s biggest incarcerator, as well as the 
only country in the world that imprisons more than 1% of its adult population2—has attracted 
significant attention from journalists, social scientists, and legal commentators. These observers 
have paid special attention to the racialized character of the transition to mass incarceration. The 
ethnic composition of the inmate population in the United States has been inverted in the last 
half‐century, going from about 70% white in 1950 to around 30% white today.3 Though blacks 
have been overrepresented in American prisons since the federal government began keeping 
records of admissions to state prisons in 1926,4 the extreme overrepresentation that characterizes 
modern prison demographics is a phenomenon of the last quarter century.5 This growth in the 
black‐white inmate gap has occurred despite the arrest rates for whites and blacks remaining 
stable. 

                                                            
* J.D. Candidate, Stanford Law School, 2011; Ph.D. Candidate, Stanford University Department of 
Sociology, 2013. I am grateful to Mark Kelman, Andrew Yaphe, Rakesh Kilaru, and Alexis Casillas for their 
support and assistance.  
1
 Bureau of Justice Statistics, Correctional Populations, 
http://bjs.ojp.usdoj.gov/content/glance/tables/corr2tab.cfm (last visited Feb. 1, 2010). The rate of inmate 
growth far outstripped population growth; in fact, the number of incarcerated inmates per 100,000 more 
than tripled between 1980 and 2008. Bureau of Justice Statistics, Incarceration Rate 1980 – 2008, 
http://bjs.ojp.usdoj.gov/content/glance/tables/incrttab.cfm (last visited Feb. 1, 2010). 
2
 See PEW CTR. ON THE STATES, ONE IN 100: BEHIND BARS IN AMERICA 2008, at 5 (2008). For more statistics 
on global incarceration, see ROY WALMSLEY, INT’L CTR. FOR PRISON STUD., WORLD PRISON POPULATION LIST 3 
(8th ed. 2008), available at http://www.kcl.ac.uk/depsta/law/research/icps/downloads/wppl‐8th_41.pdf. 
3
 Loïc Wacquant, From Slavery to Mass Incarceration, 13 NEW LEFT REV. 41, 44 (2002). 
4
 Patrick Langan, Racism on Trial: New Evidence to Explain the Racial Composition of Prisons in the 
United States, 76 J. CRIM. L. & CRIMINOLOGY 666, 666 (1985) (“That year, about one in four persons entering 
state prisons was black while only one in every eleven persons in the United States was black.”). 
5
 African‐American men did not supply the majority of prison entrants until 1988. See Wacquant, supra 
note 3, at 44. 

2 
 
Electronic copy available at: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1674064

 

In the age of mass incarceration, the lifetime cumulative probability of spending a period 

of time in prison is 4% for whites, but a staggering 29% for blacks.6 The prison is thus a major 
social institution, affecting the lives of a large and growing portion of the American population. 
And it is an expensive institution, in terms of both state spending and the costs it imposes on 
inmates, correctional workers, and employees. These costs have attracted extensive attention 
from researchers, on topics ranging from the impact of felon disenfranchisement on American 
politics to the implications of prison privatization to recidivism rates and chronic offending.7  

 

One underattended effect of mass incarceration is its effect on income and lifetime 

employment outcomes after prison. Stratification research on occupations typically focuses on 
schools, families, and other institutions as the primary determinants of job‐market inequality. But 
the large and growing influence of the half‐million prisoners released from the criminal justice 
system each year raises obvious questions about the impact of incarceration on labor markets. 
The lack of attention paid to the link between incarceration and unemployment is explicable 
when one considers that it has been some time since unemployment has been considered a 
pressing social problem. Beginning in 1992 and continuing through the end of the decade, the 
United States experienced a sustained period of declining unemployment, reaching a low of 4.0% 
in 2000.8 But as this Article will show, this upbeat historical unemployment data conceals a 
chronic gap that has existed between black and white unemployment rates since the 1960s—one 

                                                            

6

 Id. 
 For a good summary of this literature, see INVISIBLE PUNISHMENT: THE COLLATERAL CONSEQUENCES OF 
MASS IMPRISONMENT (Marc Mauer & Meda Chesney‐Lind eds., 2002). 
8
 U.S. BUREAU OF LAB. STAT., LABOR FORCE STATISTICS FROM THE CURRENT POPULATION SURVEY, at tbl.A‐1, 
available at http://www.bls.gov/webapps/legacy/cpsatab1.htm (select “seasonally adjusted unemployment 
rate” and click “Retrieve data”). 
7

3 
 

that has grown steadily wider since the subprime mortgage crisis began in 2007.9 Even research 
studying this gap, however, has typically paid only passing attention to the role of incarceration.  

 

Discrimination against ex‐felons may be mandated by the state—as in laws that restrict 

ex‐felons from public employment or licensed professions—or simply permitted by the state. The 
impact of state and federal laws imposing collateral job‐market consequences on felons has been 
better‐studied, thanks to the vigorous debate over these laws that took place in the 1970s and 
1980s.10 Recently, however, new data have emerged on the impact of felony convictions on 
employment opportunity in professions not subject to these laws. This Article is an effort to 
evaluate recent research on the link between employment discrimination against ex‐felons and 
black unemployment. Unlike discrimination on the basis of race, sex, or age, employment 
discrimination against ex‐felons is not typically considered pernicious, given the strong interest 
employers have in hiring law‐abiding employees. But the parameters of contemporary mass 
incarceration compel the conclusion that employment discrimination against ex‐felons in the 
labor market should be understood as a form of racial discrimination. And not only because 
blacks represent such a large percentage of the post‐prison population: as I discuss in Part III, 
recent research indicates that the impact of a conviction is much worse for black job‐seekers than 
it is for whites.  

 

In Part I, I summarize the predominant explanations in the social science literature for the 

durability of the black‐white unemployment gap, and propose that ex‐felon discrimination may 
be one mechanism through which racial bias in employment—often believed to be waning or 
mostly eradicated—is exercised. In Part II, I evaluate sociological investigations of the 
relationship between prison record and unemployment, first to demonstrate that the failure to 
                                                            

9

 See infra Part II. 
 See infra Part III. 

10

4 
 

properly account for the evolution of mass incarceration has distorted unemployment statistics 
and concealed the ruinous impact of incarceration on blacks, and especially black youth, and 
second to describe the scope and function of racialized ex‐felon discrimination. I additionally 
suggest that the current practice of mass plea‐bargaining—whereby the overwhelming majority of 
criminal cases are resolved with pleas instead of trials—magnifies the discriminatory effects of 
discrimination against job applicants with criminal records. Finally, in Part III, I consider legal 
and policy remedies to the problems posed by ex‐felon discrimination. I argue first that 
antidiscrimination law, as currently constituted, is unlikely to help remedy the racially biased 
nature of ex‐felon discrimination, and I consider what an accommodationist ex‐felon 
antidiscrimination program might look like. Second, I argue that certain policy approaches to the 
problem—in particular, efforts to restrict employer access to criminal records—may have 
unintended consequences that paradoxically make employers more likely to discriminate on the 
basis of race. 

I. EXPLAINING THE UNEMPLOYMENT GAP 

Since the early 1970s the black unemployment rate has remained persistently higher than 
the white unemployment rate.11 At the low ebb of national unemployment in October 2000, blacks 
were unemployed at a rate of 7.3%, compared with a white unemployment rate of 3.4%.12 The gap 
has widened in periods of recession: in June 2003, after a period of economic contraction 
following the September 11 attacks, white unemployment peaked at 5.5%, but black 

                                                            

11

 See Finis Welch, The Employment of Black Men, 8 J. LAB. ECON. 526 (1990).  
 U.S. BUREAU OF LAB. STAT., LABOR FORCE STATISTICS FROM THE CURRENT POPULATION SURVEY, at tbl.A‐2, 
available at http://www.bls.gov/webapps/legacy/cpsatab2.htm (select “seasonally adjusted unemployment 
rate” for whites and blacks and click “Retrieve data”). 
12

5 
 

unemployment reached 11.5%.13 The recession triggered by the financial crisis has pushed the gap 
wider: in April 2010, 9.0% of whites were unemployed, but a remarkable 16.5% of blacks were 
without work.14 Sociologists and economics in the last quarter‐century have worked at length to 
reconcile the black‐white unemployment gap with substantially narrowed gaps in other aspects of 
socioeconomic life, including education, occupational attainment, and earnings.15 Three general 
hypotheses have attracted the most attention from academics.  

A first possibility—usually termed “spatial mismatch theory”—is that the discrepancy 
reflects a shift in the demand for black labor, given the particular demographic characteristics of 
the black labor pool. This view is most associated with William J. Wilson, who argues that spatial 
and structural changes in the American economy—particularly a transition away from 
manufacturing in urban centers and toward service‐sector jobs located in suburbs—produced 
disproportionate joblessness in less‐educated workers, especially those without the resources to 
relocate outside of the ghetto areas of major cities.16 Douglas Massey and Nancy Denton, in their 
well‐known 1993 monograph American Apartheid, offer a dialectical version of this argument, 
noting that increased joblessness among the black ghetto poor accelerates the flight of employers 
out of these racially segregated areas even as this flight helps expand the “urban underclass.”17  

Wilson is generally sanguine about the success of antidiscrimination laws in reducing 
barriers to occupational entry for blacks whose skills match the needs of the new economy.  But 
                                                            

13

 Id. The particularly deleterious impact of recessions on African Americans is well‐documented in the 
social science literature. See, e.g., Gerald D. Jaynes, The Labor Market Status of Black Americans: 1939‐1985, 4 
J. ECON. PERSPS. 9 (1990).  
14
 Id. 
15
 See Franklin Wilson, Marta Tienda, & Lawrence Wu, Race and Unemployment: Labor Market 
Experiences of Black and White Men, 1968‐1988, 22 WORK & OCCUPATIONS 245, 249 (1995). 
16
 WILLIAM J. WILSON, THE DECLINING SIGNIFICANCE OF RACE (1978); WILLIAM J. WILSON, THE TRULY 
DISADVANTAGED (1987);.. See also SASKIA SASSEN, CITIES IN A WORLD ECONOMY (2006).  
17
 DOUGLAS MASSEY & NANCY DENTON, AMERICAN APARTHEID: SEGREGATION AND THE MAKING OF THE 
UNDERCLASS (1993).  

6 
 

he has also observed that processes of ghettoization give employers incentive to statistically 
discriminate against inner‐city blacks.18 Because employers use race as a proxy for a variety of 
pathologies associated with residents of the inner‐city—whom they view as unstable, dishonest, 
unreliable, undereducated, undermotivated, hostile, and rebellious—they are able to justify race‐
biased hiring processes on productivity grounds. Discrimination against working‐class blacks, 
Wilson and his adherents argue, is much more difficult to extirpate with conventional 
antidiscrimination law than discrimination against white‐collar, professional, or public 
employees, and so is a major contributor to the black disadvantage in the labor market.  

A second approach, termed the “voluntary withdrawal” thesis, rejects spatial mismatch 
theory and argues that black workers have been unresponsive to changes in labor demand since 
the 1970s. By amassing a large amount of data about service‐sector work in inner‐cities, Lawrence 
Mead argues that inner‐city blacks who did seek and secure jobs in the 1980s experienced rising 
earnings and stable employment.19 Mead contends that the main criteria for securing new service‐
sector jobs were timeliness, appropriate work‐related attitudes, and a commitment to work 
regularly. Mead concludes that the high jobless rate among inner‐city blacks reflects voluntary 
withdrawal, either because of dissatisfaction with these new expectations or because of more 
attractive alternatives (especially welfare, but also illegal income).20 Roger Waldinger’s 
controversial monograph Still the Promised City is a version of this approach.21 Waldinger follows 
                                                            

18

 William J. Wilson, Studying Inner‐City Social Dislocations: The Challenge of Public Agenda Research, 
56 AM. SOC. REV. 1, 10 (1991).  
19
 LAWRENCE MEAD, THE NEW POLITICS OF POVERTY: THE NONWORKING POOR IN AMERICA (1992); see also 
Welch, supra note 11.  
20
 But see Samuel L. Myers, Jr., How Voluntary Is Black Unemployment and Black Labor Force 
Withdrawal?, in THE QUESTION OF DISCRIMINATION: RACIAL INEQUALITY IN THE U.S. LABOR MARKET 100, 105‐06 
(Steven Shulman & William A. Darity eds., 1989) (concluding that “fewer blacks than whites are voluntary 
withdrawals,” and urging social science research to address the causes of involuntary withdrawal of black 
men from the labor force). Notably, Lawrence Mead was a significant proponent of welfare reform in the 
1990s.  
21
 ROGER WALDINGER, STILL THE PROMISED CITY (1997).  

7 
 

Mead and others in arguing that legitimate work in the inner‐city is more abundant than spatial 
mismatch theorists admit. But his argument hinges on expectations and competition rather than 
attitudes. He contends that urban blacks failed to adjust their wage expectations downward as 
increasing competition from new immigrants and the rapid decline of the manufacturing sector 
drove down working‐class wages. Finally, some politically conservative commentators have 
advanced a cultural variant of the voluntary withdrawal thesis, arguing that the fatalism of “ghetto 
culture”  is an important determinant of their problems in the labor market.22 

A third hypothesis—which I will term the intractable discrimination theory—is that the 
unemployment gap is a product of persistent exclusionary barriers in labor markets.23 Steven 
Shulman’s analysis of federal labor statistics demonstrates high relative rates of black 
unemployment in among all age groups, education levels, and occupational categories, casting 
doubt on both the spatial mismatch and voluntary withdrawal hypotheses.24 In particular, 
sociologists have observed that black employment gains have largely been a product of expanded 
public‐sector employment, and that private‐sector employment gains resulted from publicly 
                                                            

22

 See, e..g., DINESH D’SOUZA, THE END OF RACISM: PRINCIPLES FOR A MULTIRACIAL SOCIETY 478, 484 (1995) 
(“The conspicuous pathologies of blacks are the product of catastrophic cultural change . . . . Blacks in 
America seem to have developed what some scholars term an ‘oppositional culture’ which is based on a 
comprehensive rejection of the white man's worldview.”). Liberal observers have echoed these culturalist 
arguments, albeit typically with more sympathy toward those blacks whom they allege to hold economically 
disadvantageous cultural attitudes. See, e.g., Stephen Petterson, The Enemy Within: Black‐White Differences 
in Fatalism and Joblessness, 3 J. POVERTY 1, 1, 26 (1999) (proposing a mild version of this hypothesis, 
explicitly disclaiming a “strong cultural argument” but finding that a justifiably “fatalistic orientation” to the 
labor market hobbles black youth); see also ELIJAH ANDERSON, CODE OF THE STREET: DECENCY, VIOLENCE, AND 
THE MORAL LIFE OF THE INNER CITY (2000); MARY C. WATERS, BLACK IDENTITIES: WEST INDIAN IMMIGRANT 
DREAMS AND AMERICAN REALITIES 335 (1999) (“[S]ome blacks in the United States detach themselves, 
especially from education, redefine social norms, and see behaviors such as doing well in school, speaking 
standard English, and so on as oppositional to their very core identity.”)  
23
 Charles Hirschman, Minorities in the Labor Market, in MINORITIES, POVERTY, AND SOCIAL POLICY (Gary 
D. Sandefur & Marta Tienda eds., 1988).  
24
 See, e.g., Steven Shulman, Discrimination, Human Capital, and Black‐White Unemployment: Evidence 
from Cities, 22 J. HUM. RESOURCES 361 (1987). In fact, Wilson, Tienda, and Wu found that positive 
relationship between education and black‐white unemployment ratio: the unemployment gap for college‐
educated black men was higher than it was for those with no high school diploma. Wilson, Tienda, & Wu, 
supra note 15, at 250. 

8 
 

mandated affirmative‐action programs.25 As a consequence, black employment levels have been 
highly sensitive to the shifting political climate: in periods of aggressive civil rights enforcement 
and high spending on social programs, the unemployment gap has closed somewhat.26 Many 
observers have taken these findings about the impact of federal intervention on the racial 
composition of the workforce as evidence that discriminatory barriers to private‐sector black 
employment are mostly to blame for the black‐white unemployment gap.27  

Much of the literature advocating the intractable discrimination theory has sought to 
identify more nuanced mechanisms of discrimination than the conventional account of a white 
racist employer making prejudiced personnel decisions. Richard Freeman predicted as early as 
1973 that this sort of overtly bigoted employment discrimination would decrease over time, for 
three reasons: an increased cost of discrimination due to federal policy, a decline in individual 
bigotry, and the growth of “relatively nondiscriminatory” sectors of the economy as blacks moved 
out of agriculture and household labor and into bureaucratic firms or public employment.28 
Empirical evidence and historical commonsense confirm the prediction: the naked bigotry in 
hiring that had characterized the Jim Crow era was rapidly stigmatized after the 1964 Civil Rights 
Act. Academics seeking to link the enduring black‐white unemployment gap to intractable labor 

                                                            

25

 See William Darity, Race and Inequality in the Managerial Age, in SOCIAL, POLITICAL, AND ECONOMIC 
ISSUES IN BLACK AMERICA (Wornie Reed ed., 1990); Jonathan Leonard, The Impact of Affirmative Action 
Regulation and Equal Employment Law on Black Employment, 4 J. ECON. PERSPS. 47 (1990).  
26
 From 1969 to 1973, for example, the black‐white unemployment gap declined to its lowest point since 
the passage of the 1964 Civil Rights Act, thanks to favorable economic conditions coupled with 
employment‐maximizing public policies. During the 1980s, by contrast, the gap remained high, especially 
for college‐educated black men who were the most likely to suffer from the Reagan‐era retreat from civil 
rights enforcement. See John Bound & Richard Freeman, Black Economic Progress: Erosion of the Post‐1965 
Gains in the 1980s?, in THE QUESTION OF DISCRIMINATION: RACIAL INEQUALITY IN THE U.S. LABOR MARKET, 
supra note 20, at 32. 
27
 See Wilson, Tienda, & Wu, supra note 15, at 249‐63. 
28
 Richard Freeman, Changes in the Labor Market for Black Americans, 1948‐72, 4 BROOKINGS PAPERS ON 
ECON. ACTIVITY 67, 68 (1973).  

9 
 

market discrimination have thus sought to identify subtler practices by which contemporary labor 
market discrimination is realized.29   

One example is the realization that the increased mobility of the black middle and upper‐
middle classes—a key reason Wilson invoked “the declining significance of race”—is more illusory 
than it first appears. Many successful black professionals and managers occupy a racialized niche 
in the American corporate apparatus, occupying jobs that are linked to the needs of the black 
community. As companies increasingly came to associate compliance with antidiscrimination 
statutes with elaborate institutional structures—affirmative action offices, personnel and public‐
relations managers, grievance boards, and so forth—a “parallel job ladder” developed in many 
firms, with black professionals primarily occupying positions within these structures. 
Marginalization into this niche has had a host of negative consequences for black professionals, 
since these positions are typically remunerated less, are qualitatively less important to the central 
work of firms than other positions, and rarely offer promotion opportunities to upper 
management.30 This employment pattern may contribute to the underemployment of blacks with 
high levels of human capital, because blacks are considered qualified to fill only this limited 
subset of positions.  

Another example of a subtle discrimination mechanism—one that operates to disfavor 
working‐class blacks—is Wilson, Tienda, and Wu’s discovery that black men are substantially 
                                                            

29

 This same conundrum—the need to reconcile durable racial inequality with the apparent decline of 
bigotry—has motivated a variety of theses with varying degrees of credibility, from Charles Lawrence’s 
“unconscious racism” to Nicholas Kristof’s “racism without racists.” See Charles R. Lawrence III, The Id, the 
Ego and Equal Protection: Reckoning with Unconscious Racism, 39 STAN. L. REV. 317 (1987) (criticizing the 
requirement of purposeful intent that pervades American antidiscrimination law on the grounds that most 
racism is unconscious); Nicholas D. Kristof, Racism Without Racists, N.Y. TIMES, Oct. 4, 2008, at WK10 
(arguing that “racial biases are deeply embedded within us” but sounding the hopeful note that “we can 
overcome unconscious bias” by electing Barack Obama). 
30
 For a good summary of empirical research into this phenomenon, see JACK NIEMONEN, RACE, CLASS, 
AND THE STATE IN CONTEMPORARY SOCIOLOGY 109‐10 (2002).  

10 
 

more likely to be unemployed because of firings and layoffs than white men.31 They pointed to 
empirical evidence showing that even in employment sectors with a history of black 
overrepresentation—for instance, in certain public employment and manufacturing positions—
blacks were 1.55 times as likely as whites to be unemployed because of dismissals.32 Exaggerating 
the stratifying effects of dismissals was the tendency of employers to give preferential treatment 
to white employees in periods of economic contraction. Paul Schervish’s longitudinal study of 
private‐sector employment showed that on average, within the same firm, white employees were 
more than twice as likely as blacks to be placed on temporary layoff in lieu of being permanently 
fired, and 1.7 times as likely to be rehired after a period of layoff.33 These early studies failed to 
adequately control for human‐capital characteristics, and so invited the claim that the 
discrepancy was the result of the inferior quality of black employees, rather than a form of 
employment discrimination. The argument was refuted by later studies which showed that, net of 
human capital and job characteristics, blacks remained twice as likely to be dismissed as whites,34 
strongly suggesting that inequalities of the rate of involuntary job terminations reflected 
employer discrimination.  

This research has proved especially useful in explaining why the black‐white 
unemployment gap widens in recessionary periods, and why the black unemployment rate is 
slower to decline in periods of growth. Critically, this research also complicates the spatial 
                                                            

31

 Wilson, Tienda, & Wu, supra note 15, at 265‐66. 
 Id. at 252. 
33
 PAUL SCHERVISH, THE STRUCTURAL DETERMINANTS OF UNEMPLOYMENT (1983). 
34
 See, e.g., Craig Zwerling & Hillary Silver, Race and Job Dismissals in a Federal Bureaucracy, 57 AM. SOC. 
REV. 651, 657‐58 (1992) (reporting that black postal workers in a large metropolitan region were more than 
twice as likely to be fired as white employees with identical work histories and personal characteristics); see 
also Alfred J. Field & William R. Winfrey, Job Displacement and Reemployment in North Carolina: The 
Relative Experience of the Black Worker, 25 REV. BLACK POL. ECON. 57 (1997) (examining the unemployment 
experiences of workers in North Carolina involved in mass layoffs and plant closings and concluding that, 
relative to their white counterparts, blacks are laid off in numbers disproportionate to their composition in 
the labor force, are more likely to be repeatedly laid off, and are more likely to return to lower‐wage 
occupations upon reemployment than white workers). 
32

11 
 

mismatch hypothesis. Though most of the research on layoff and dismissal differentials has been 
motivated by an effort to dispute spatial mismatch theorists’ conjecture that class, not race, is the 
more salient demographic feature for predicting long‐term life chances, the relationship between 
the two lines of argument is more complicated. Abundant evidence suggests that the black 
population does suffer from its particular residence and labor market position. Residence in 
central cities, for instance, raises unemployment for both blacks and whites by approximately the 
same amount, but blacks are disproportionately concentrated in these areas.35 Similarly, the 
concentration of blacks into industries and occupations with high rates of unemployment since 
the 1970s has also contributed to the black‐white unemployment gap.36 But William J. Wilson and 
others may be overhasty in announcing the “declining significance of race” on the basis of these 
findings. Joblessness and economic exclusion may have “triggered a process of 
hyperghettoization” that disproportionately impacts blacks, but the consequences of economic 
transition may be magnified for blacks because they are the first targets of recessionary layoffs 
and the last candidates for rehiring.37 Moreover, the “asymmetric causality”38 between the general 
economy and the inner city—that is, the tendency for conditions in the inner city to become 
dramatically worse in recessionary periods but not to return to normal when the economy 
improves—may be partially explained by the structural barriers to reemployment that blacks face. 

Social scientists have made impressive strides in explaining why blacks face consistently 
worse outcomes in job markets, despite improvements in black education, the political 
commitment to affirmative action and antidiscrimination efforts, the movement of blacks into 
                                                            

35

 See Franklin D. Wilson & Lawrence Wu, A Comparative Analysis of the Labor Force Activities of Ethnic 
Populations, in U.S. BUREAU OF THE CENSUS, PROCEEDINGS OF THE 1993 ANNUAL RESEARCH CONFERENCE 340 
(1993). 
36
 See Wilson, Tienda, & Wu, supra note 15, at 266. 
37
 Loïc Wacquant & William J. Wilson, The Costs of Racial and Class Exclusion in the Inner City, 501 
ANNALS AM. ACAD. POL. & SOC. SCI. 8, 9 (1989).  
38
 Id. at 24. 

12 
 

occupations with lower turnover rates, and the marginalization of bigotry as an acceptable public 
attitude. The most persuasive theories have combined social‐structural elements—both 
macroeconomic factors like human capital attainment and spatial factors like neighborhood 
composition—with evidence of continued employment discrimination, which appears today to 
operate in subtler or more indirect ways than in the past. In the next Part, I consider the impact of 
the criminal justice system on black socioeconomic outcomes, and suggest that the detrimental 
impact of the carceral apparatus on black workers is a product both of sociopolitical configuration 
and simple racial discrimination. 

II. THE EFFECT OF INCARCERATION ON ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY 

 

Research in the 1980s and ‘90s on the effect of contact with the criminal justice system on 

economic opportunity showed contradictory results. Analysis of longitudinal survey data—
typically the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Current Population Survey—showed that conviction was 
strongly correlated with reduced income and employment probabilities after release.39  

 

Other analyses, mostly by economists, observed a negligible effect of incarceration in 

unemployment.40 These studies rejected a causal link between incarceration and employment 
outcomes, and in the absence of any other explanation, attributed the poor outcomes of ex‐
offenders to preexisting personal traits—like drug and alcohol abuse, behavior and anger 
problems, poor interpersonal skills, and impulsiveness—that made them both crime‐prone and 
bad employees. Some of these studies seemed to strain credulity. Jeffrey Kling, for instance, 
                                                            

39

 See, e.g., Richard Freeman, The Relation of Criminal Activity to Black Youth Employment, 16 REV. 
BLACK POL. ECON. 99 (1987); Daniel Nagin & Joel Waldfogel, The Effect of Conviction on Income Through the 
Life Cycle (Nat’l Bureau of Econ. Research, Working Paper No. 4551, 1993).  
40
 See, e.g., Jeffrey Grogger, Arrests, Persistent Youth Joblessness, and Black/White Employment 
Differentials, 74 REV. ECON. & STAT. 100 (1992); Jeffrey Kling, The Effect of Prison Sentence Length on the 
Subsequent Employment and Earnings of Criminal Defendants (Woodrow Wilson Sch. Discussion Papers in 
Economics, Working Paper No. 156, 1999). 

13 
 

reported in an unpublished paper that there existed no difference in the impact on future 
earnings or employment rates between convicts who served long sentences for serious felonies 
and convicts with shorter sentences.41 

 

As evidence mounted that criminal convictions had serious long‐term economic 

consequences, the “personal trait” studies came under strenuous methodological attack by 
economists and sociologists. Many of the personal trait studies were conducted using data that 
linked from court records to administrative data from state unemployment insurance files. Critics 
argued, among other things, that relying on these data introduced powerful selection effects, 
because low‐wage and temporary jobs were much less likely than other types of jobs to be 
compliant with unemployment insurance laws. Compared to results from national longitudinal 
data, studies using unemployment insurance data appeared to systematically understate the effect 
of convictions on income and the probability of employment, except for the white‐collar workers 
who were least likely to have been convicted of serious crimes.  

 

In 2000, Western and Pettit published a paper that showed that the black‐white 

unemployment gap was much higher than previously thought.42 Western and Pettit observed that 
the majority of longitudinal data that prior researchers had used to calculate unemployment 
statistics excluded institutional populations from the sampling frame. By combining data from a 
variety of sources, including labor force surveys, aggregate incarceration figures, and correctional 
facilities microdata, Western and Pettit demonstrated that the reported unemployment rate was 
artificially suppressed by the high incarceration rate. Developing an accurate dataset of the penal 
population led Western and Pettit to reconsider the findings of prior survey research that had 
                                                            

41

 See Kling, supra note 40, at 10‐13. 
 Bruce Western & Becky Pettit, Incarceration and Racial Inequality in Men’s Employment, 54 INDUS. & 
LAB. REL. REV. 3 (2000). 
42

14 
 

concluded that the black‐white unemployment gap stopped growing in the 1980s. After accurately 
accounting for the penal population, they concluded that the gap had in fact grown steadily:  

In 1982, a young unskilled white man was about 50% more likely to hold a job than 
a  young  unskilled  black  man.  By  1996,  young  white  high  school  dropouts  were 
more  than  twice  as  likely  to  hold  jobs  as  were  there  African  American 
counterparts.43 
These effects were so stark that the across‐the‐board improvements in the job prospects of young 
disadvantaged minority men during the economic expansion of the Clinton years was completely 
overshadowed by the rise in incarceration. 

 

By highlighting the misleading effect of mass incarceration on conventional 

unemployment statistics, Western and Pettit’s study decisively rebuked Pollyannaish research 
that alleged that racial disparity in employment was declining. But their paper was unable to 
identify the causes of the persistent racial disparity in labor force participation. Significant racial 
disparities in rates of contact with the criminal justice system appeared to be a significant factor, 
and survey researchers proffered a broad array of hypothesis to explain the observed relationship 
between incarceration and unemployment. 44 These included the labeling effects of criminal 
stigma,45 the disruption of social and family ties,46 injury to preexisting social networks,47 human 
capital loss,48 and legal barriers to employment.49  

 

In 2003, the sociologist Devah Pager published the results of an audit‐pair study of 

Milwaukee‐area employers designed to evaluate whether criminal history influenced the odds of a 
                                                            

43

 Id. at 9. 
 
 
 See Devah Pager, The Mark of a Criminal Record, 108 AM. J. SOC. 937, 940‐41 (2003).  
 
45
 See Richard Schwartz & Jerome Skolnick, Two Studies of Legal Stigma, 10 SOC. PROB. 133 (1962). 
46
 See ROBERT J. SAMPSON & JOHN H. LAUB, CRIME IN THE MAKING: PATHWAYS AND TURNING POINTS 
THROUGH LIFE (1993). 
47
 See John Hagan, The Social Embeddedness of Crime and Unemployment, 31 CRIMINOLOGY 465 (1993).  
48
 See GARY BECKER, HUMAN CAPITAL (1975). 
49
 See Mitchell Dale, Barriers to the Rehabilitation of Ex‐Offenders, 22 CRIME & DELINQUENCY 322 (1976); 
infra Part III.A. 
44

15 
 

job applicant receiving a callback from an employer after an initial interview. Pager formed two 
pairs of auditor teams, one composed of two white students, and the other composed of two black 
students. The teams were matched on the basis of physical appearance and mode of self‐
presentation, and were given identical work history and education credentials. The audit pairs 
were randomly assigned to 15 introductory job interviews each week, drawn from postings for 
entry‐level positions in the local newspaper and online. At any given time, one of the auditors was 
asked to represent that he or she had been convicted of felony cocaine possession and had served 
an eighteen‐month prison sentence.50  

 

Pager discovered that regardless of race, a criminal record drastically reduced the chance 

of receiving a callback from an employer. A criminal record reduced the likelihood of a callback 
by fifty percent for whites. Blacks, however, fared much worse; Pager reported that the effect of a 
criminal record was forty percent larger for blacks than for whites.51 Pager also collected 
qualitative evidence to suggest that employers anticipated black criminality. On at least three 
occasions, black auditors were asked preemptively about their criminal records. No white auditor 
had the same experience. 

 

Pager’s study was the first research project to empirically validate a mechanism linking 

felon status to reduced job prospects. Her findings strongly support the hypothesis that a direct 
causal relationship exists between criminal record and unemployment.52 Black auditors who 
represented a criminal record applied to 200 entry‐level positions and yet received fewer than ten 
callbacks (much less outright job offers). And these results were in spite of Pager’s use of 
articulate, well‐dressed college students with effective modes of self‐presentation.  
                                                            

50

 Pager, supra note 44, at 949. 
 Id. at 959. 
52
 Id. at 960. 
51

 

16 
 

 

In addition to illuminating the profound obstacles to employment faced by all ex‐felons, 

Pager’s study showed that African Americans are doubly victimized by ex‐felon discrimination. In 
addition to their disproportionate  representation in the ranks of the incarcerated, Pager’s data 
indicates that a criminal history has a stronger negative effect on black applicants than it has on 
white applicants.  Ex‐felon discrimination thus exaggerates the preexisting structural 
disadvantage of minority overrepresentation in prisons by making employers more likely to make 
racially biased hiring decisions. Given this double discrimination, mass incarceration helps 
explain the puzzle of the high rate of involuntary employment and labor force withdrawal among 
working‐ and middle‐class blacks.53 

 

The extraordinarily high incidence of plea bargaining in the American criminal justice 

system exacerbates the racially discriminatory function of ex‐felon discrimination. American 
criminal sentencing is predicated upon laws that are “draconian on the books but mitigated in 
practice, largely through the practice of plea bargaining.”54 It is well established that there exists a 
substantial “trial penalty,” in the form of longer sentences, for the five percent of American 
criminal defendants who pursue their cases to jury trial in lieu of pleading guilty.55 And the 
                                                            

53

 See generally Myers, Jr., supra note 20. Harry J. Holzer and others have shown that ex‐offenders have 
a human‐capital deficit compared to the nonoffending population. Combined with the well‐known 
employer preference for applicants without criminal histories, black male job seekers in particular may 
either assume job seeking is hopeless or grow discouraged quickly. See Harry J. Holzer, Steven Raphael & 
Michael A. Stoll, Will Employers Hire Former Offenders?: Employer Preferences, Background Checks, and 
Their Determinants, in IMPRISONING AMERICA: THE SOCIAL EFFECTS OF MASS INCARCERATION 205‐06 (Mary 
Pattillo, David F. Weiman & Bruce Western eds., 2004). 
54
 McCoy, supra note 55, at 92. In the U.S. federal sentencing guidelines and many state sentencing 
statutes, discounts are awarded to criminal defendants for pleading guilty at any stage in the process, with 
deeper discounts available for guilty pleas that obviate the time and expense of trial preparation. See id. at 
100 n.46; Nancy J. King, David A. Soulé, Sara Steen, & Robert R. Weidner, When Process Affects Punishment: 
Differences in Sentences After Guilty Plea, Bench Trial, and Jury Trial in Five Guidelines States, 105 COLUM. L. 
REV. 959, 973‐75 (2005) (surveying data from five states to demonstrate that sentences negotiated in plea 
bargains are significantly lower than sentences for the same crime assigned after bench or jury trials). 
55
 See, e.g., Candace McCoy, Plea Bargaining as Coercion: The Trial Penalty and Plea Bargaining Reform, 
50 CRIM. L.Q. 67, 89 (2005) (finding, via a controlled analysis based on data from the State Court Processing 
Statistics dataset, that sentences after jury trial “were about nine times more severe than guilty plea 
sentences”). For an excellent journalistic account of how the trial penalty operates to generate a high rate of 

17 
 

coercive power of the trial penalty makes more defendants plead guilty: as early as 1975, 
researchers observed that the plea bargaining system serves to increase the number of defendants 
who emerge from the criminal justice system bearing a felony record.56 

Plea bargaining is in the short‐term interest of criminal defendants because it yields 
substantially lower sentences than sentences that follow jury trials. But by increasing the 
proportion of criminal defendants who end up with criminal records, the plea system amplifies 
the long‐term collateral consequences of an encounter with the criminal justice system on life 
chances—and especially on employability. And the burden is likely to be particularly heavy for 
minority defendants, for three reasons. First, they represent a disproportionately large percentage 
of all criminal defendants, so any process that makes defendants more likely to emerge from 
encounters with the courts bearing criminal records will adversely impact minority defendants 
who seek jobs after serving their sentences.57 Second, blacks fare worse at trial than whites and 
are more likely to be incarcerated following a trial—a fact that many black defendants surely 
recognize.58 It follows that it is rational for black defendants to negotiate reduces sentences via a 
plea arrangement, even when it would be irrational for a similarly situated white defendant to do 
so. Finally, minority defendants are more likely to be impoverished and unable to post bail. One 

                                                                                                                                                                                                
guilty pleas, see generally STEVE BOGIRA, COURTROOM 302: A YEAR BEHIND THE SCENES IN AN AMERICAN 
CRIMINAL COURTHOUSE (2005). 
56
 Michael O. Finkelstein, A Statistical Analysis of Guilty Plea Practices in the Federal Courts, 89 HARV. L. 
REV. 293, 293 (1975) (concluding that more than two‐thirds of “marginal” plea‐bargain defendants would be 
acquitted or dismissed if they contested their cases at trial). 
57
 See Langan, supra note 4. 
58
 See Shawn D. Bushway & Anne Morrison Piehl, Judging Judicial Disrection: Legal Factors and Racial 
Discrimination in Sentencing, 35 LAW & SOC’Y REV. 733, 761 (2001) (finding that in Maryland, a state with 
determinate sentencing guidelines, African‐Americans received 20% longer sentences than whites on 
average); Darrell Steffensmeier & Stephen Demuth, Ethnicity and Sentencing Outcomes in U.S. Federal 
Courts: Who is Punished More Harshly?, 65 AM. SOC. REV. 705, 724‐25 (2000) (finding that in federal 
criminal cases, black and Hispanic defendants fare worse in terms of both imprisonment and term‐length 
decisions than whites). 

18 
 

major incentive to plea bargain for defendants who cannot post bail is that it can result in a faster 
release from incarceration.59 

The large‐scale plea bargaining that is the norm in the American criminal justice system 
results in a larger proportion of the defendants who pass through the country’s courtrooms 
leaving with criminal records. This is especially the case for minority defendants, a racial disparity 
that aggravates the racially disparate impact of the pernicious, long‐term collateral consequences 
of a criminal record.  

Many questions remain about how discrimination against ex‐felons operates in practice. 
In particular, it is not known whether employers categorically disfavor applicants with criminal 
records, or whether certain crimes are associated with better or worse hiring outcomes. However, 
it is clear that ex‐felon discrimination is a form of racial discrimination with profound 
implications for black unemployment. In the next Part, I consider the adequacy of contemporary 
antidiscrimination law for addressing this racially disparate impact. 

III. REMEDIAL APPROACHES: ANTIDISCRIMINATION LAW AND SOCIAL POLICY 

A. Statutory Limitations on Ex‐Felon Unemployment 

 

In many states, discrimination against ex‐felons is mandated by law. In the 1980s, the 

popularity of tough‐on‐crime policies resulted in a wave of new laws restricting the ability of 
felons to seek public employment.60 Today, all fifty states restrict felons from public employment 
to some degree. Some states narrowly apply the restrictions to ex‐felons who commit certain 
types of crimes (such as Delaware’s limitation of the public employment ban to felons convicted 
                                                            

59

 DAVID W. NEUBAUER, AMERICA'S COURTS & THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM 282 (1988). 
 Anthony C. Thompson, Navigating the Hidden Obstacles to Ex‐Offender Reentry, 45 B.C. L. REV. 255, 
280 (2004). 
60

19 
 

for an “infamous crime”), or make public employment rights restorable after a period of time, but 
seven states have a blanket lifetime ban on ex‐felons working in the public sector.61 Only six states 
require there exist a relationship between the character of the criminal conduct and the job 
sought; the majority of states treat “felons” as an undifferentiated group for the purposes of 
restricting access to unemployment.62 Most ex‐felons are also barred from military employment 
without a special waiver.63  

 

In the private sector, occupational licensing restrictions that apply to ex‐felons nationwide 

constitute de facto bars to entry in many instances. Professional licensing is a primary method for 
ensuring uniformity of service and regulatory control over qualifications and occupational entry 
in the modern workforce. Licensing requirements exist in occupations at all wage levels: among 
many others, attorneys, accountants, general contractors, barbers, and gas station operators are 
subject to licensing requirements.64 Ex‐felons are barred from more than 800 discrete occupations 
by laws regulating public‐employment hiring or licensing.65 Parolees and ex‐felons are routinely 
excluded from these jobs because of federal, state, and municipal laws that exclude ex‐felons from 
regulated occupations, either directly or via “good moral character” requirements or their 

                                                            

61

 The seven states are Alabama, Arkansas, Indiana, Iowa, Nevada, Ohio, and South Carolina. See 
BUREAU OF JUST. STAT., U.S. DEP’T OF JUST., STATE COURT ORGANIZATION 2004, at tbl.47 (2004), available at 
http://bjs.ojp.usdoj.gov/content/pub/pdf/sco04.pdf. 
62
 Id. States that have attempted to fashion more specific requirements have occasionally produced 
peculiar results. California, for instance, prohibits all parolees from working in real estate. I note in passing 
the irony of keeping drug users out of the ranks of real estate agents at a moment when the state of the 
housing market surely makes chemical escape particularly appealing for realtors.  
63
 See DEP’T OF THE ARMY, ARMY REG. 601‐210, at ch. 4‐7 (2007) (“A waiver is required for any applicant 
who has received a conviction or other adverse disposition for a serious criminal misconduct offense.”). The 
military’s recruiting difficulties since the start of the Iraq War has led to these waivers being more 
frequently granted. See Bryan Bender, More Entering Army with Criminal Records, BOSTON GLOBE, July 13, 
2007, at A1. 
64
 See Bruce E. May, The Character Component of Occupational Licensing Laws: A Continuing Barrier to 
the Ex‐Felon’s Employment Opportunities, 71 N.D. L. REV. 187, 193 (1995). 
65
 PAUL F. CROMWELL, LEANNE FIFTAL ALARID & ROLANDO V. DEL CARMEN, COMMUNITY‐BASED 
CORRECTIONS (2004). 

20 
 

equivalents.66 Good moral character requirements pose a special problem for ex‐felons seeking to 
obtain an occupational license. Unlike specific statutory restrictions on ex‐felon entry into 
regulated occupations, which typically are limited to a subset of offenses relevant to the position 
and are sometimes limited to recent convictions, statutes rarely define “good moral character,” 
giving licensing boards broad latitude in defining the term.67 In some cases, then, any felony 
conviction can constitute a bar to employment, regardless of the nature of the conduct or the date 
of the offense. 

 

Plaintiffs have had some success challenging statutory barriers to employment for ex‐

felons on equal protection grounds. This long line of jurisprudence dates to 1898, when the 
Supreme Court decided Hawker v. New York.68 Hawker was a physician and ex‐convict who sued 
to invalidate a New York statute that criminalized the practice of medicine by anyone with a 
felony conviction. Hawker’s theory was predicated on the Ex Post Facto Clause of the 
Constitution, which he argued prevented the state of New York from imposing the additional 
punishment of the loss of his medical license after he had served his sentence. The Court 
disagreed, holding that the state police power was sufficient authority to impose a character 
requirement on physicians, and that the state legislature had plenary power to define the content 
of this requirement. The Court also suggested that New York’s licensing rules were good public 
policy, because “[i]t is not, as a rule, the good people who commit crime.”69 

 

Over time, the rule in Hawker has evolved into a simple Fourteenth Amendment principle 

that occupational restrictions on felons must bear a rational relationship to the state’s legitimate 

                                                            

66

 Id. at 193‐94. 
 See generally Deborah L. Rhode, Moral Character as a Professional Credential, 94 YALE L.J. 491 (1985). 
68
 170 U.S. 189 (1898). 
69
 Id. at 197. 
67

21 
 

regulatory interests.70 (Courts have universally refused to apply strict scrutiny or heightened 
scrutiny to classifications based on criminal record.71) In practice, this has meant that the majority 
of statutory employment discrimination against ex‐felons has survived constitutional scrutiny, 
even in cases where the link between the criminal conviction and the employment was highly 
attenuated. In Schanuel v. Anderson,72 for instance, the Seventh Circuit upheld an Illinois law 
denying ex‐felons employment as private investigators and detectives. The court noted that the 
“legislature has broad latitude, particularly where matters of social and moral welfare are 
involved,” and held that “[d]etective agency employees perform the potentially sensitive tasks of 
guarding persons and property.”73 “It is not unreasonable,” the court concluded, “to suppose that 
the public trust might be undermined by assigning such tasks to ex‐offenders.”74 

 

If the Seventh Circuit could conclude that the job of private detective is a locus of public 

trust, it is not surprising that most challenges to employment restrictions on ex‐felons have been 
unsuccessful. Nevertheless, there have been exceptions. Courts have been especially skeptical of 
sweeping statutes that exclude felons as a class from an entire occupational niche. In Kindem v. 
Alameda,75 for instance, the court ruled that a plaintiff’s ten‐year‐old juvenile felony conviction 
had “little if any bearing on his ability to perform as a janitor for the City,” and concluded that a 
                                                            

70

 See, e.g., De Veau v. Braistead, 363 U.S. 144 (1960) (upholding a New York law prohibiting ex‐felons 
from collecting dues on behalf of a longshoreman’s union because of the state’s legitimate interest in 
addressing corruption among organized labor); Schware v. Board of Bar Examiners, 353 U.S. 232 (1957) 
(holding that Communist Party membership, use of aliases, and arrest record without convictions is 
insufficient grounds to exclude the plaintiff from the state bar, on the grounds that a state “cannot exclude 
a person from the practice of law or from any other occupation in a manner or for reasons that contravene 
the Due Process Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment”). 
71
 See, e.g., Hunter v. Erickson, 393 U.S. 385, 392 (1969); Levy v. Louisiana, 391 U.S. 68 (1968); Korematsu 
v. United States, 323 U.S. 214, (1944). 
72
 708 F.2d 316 (7th Cir. 1983). 
73
 Id. at 319‐20. 
74
 Id. at 319. 
75
 502 F. Supp. 1108 (N.D. Cal. 1980). See also, e.g., People v. Lindner, 535 N.E. 2d 829 (Ill. 1989) (striking 
down an Illinois state law revoking driver licenses from sex offenders on the grounds that no rational 
relationship exists between sex offenses and good driving). 

22 
 

generalized distinction between felons and non‐felons “is not rationally related to any legitimate 
state interests.”76  

 

Viewed as a whole, the striking feature of this line of jurisprudence is its inconsistency. To 

take one example, six years before the Seventh Circuit’s opinion in Schanuel, a district court in 
Connecticut faced precisely the same facts in Smith v. Fussenich, but decided the case the 
opposite way.77 There, the plaintiff challenged Connecticut General Statute § 29‐156a(c), which 
barred felony offenders from employment with licensed private detective and security guard 
agencies. The state made the same argument as the defendants in Kindem: that the law was a 
justifiable effort to sequester “"the criminal element from a business that affects public welfare, 
morals and safety."78 This court, however, wasn’t buying: it struck down the law on the grounds 
that it “fail[ed] to recognize the obvious differences in the fitness and character of those persons 
with felony records.”79 The court maintained further that “positions of private investigators and 
security guards . . . require little skill and responsibility,” and there was no evidence that 
“criminality was a serious problem” among security guards and private investigators.80 

 

The incoherency of this line of cases gives courts the power to generate idiosyncratic 

conclusions about laws restricting ex‐felon employment on a case‐by‐case basis. Plaintiff‐friendly 
courts can manipulate three factors to produce desirable outcomes: they can emphasize the 
tenuous relationship between a given plaintiff’s past criminal conduct and the job he is seeking 
(as the Kindem court did); they can focus on the injustice of clustering all felons into a single 
generic category (as the Fussenich court did); or they can broadly deny the legitimacy of the 

                                                            

76

 Kindem, F. Supp. at 1112. 
 Smith v. Fussenich, 440 F. Supp. 1077 (D. Conn. 1977).  
78
 Id. at 1080. 
79
 Id. 
80
 Id. at 1081. 
77

23 
 

state’s interest in regulating a particular occupation (as few courts have been willing to do). 
Defendant‐friendly courts have often arrived at starkly opposite conclusions when considering 
the same factors. In Hill v. Gill, the Rhode Island district court noted that “the law in this circuit . . 
. recognizes a state’s right to disqualify convicted felons, as a class, from employment in positions 
of public trust.”81 

 

Despite its inchoate application to this line of cases, rational basis review is, by its nature, 

deferential to state prerogative. Even courts that have been aggressively skeptical toward 
overbroad exclusionary statutes have deferred to more narrowly tailored legislation. And the 
situation is unlikely to change: lawmakers today are more savvy about articulating convincing 
state interests behind employment regulations, and better at designing laws that appear at least 
minimally tailored to those interests. Indeed, the jurisprudence appears to be at a standstill. In 
the 1960s and ‘70s, the number of state laws imposing collateral employment sanctions on felons 
declined, and successful equal protection challenges to such laws peaked, especially in more 
progressive jurisdictions.82 A comprehensive review of all state statutes in 1986 concluded that 
“states generally are becoming less restrictive of depriving civil rights of offenders.”83 But just as 
the criminal justice system generally became more punitive in the 1980s and ‘90s, the popularity 
of collateral employment sanctions increased rapidly in this period, and courts made no move to 
stem the tide. Today, there is no sign that lawsuits will be an effective vehicle for reform. 

 

Collateral consequences for ex‐felons are preconditions for a system of punitive 

segregation with no remedy in equal protection or antidiscrimination jurisprudence. The large 
and growing population of ex‐felons—today more than 12 million people, representing 8% of the 
                                                            

81

 Hill v. Gill, 703 F. Supp. 1034, 1038 (D.R.I. 1989) (emphasis added). 
 Jeremy Travis, Invisible Punishment: An Instrument of Social Exclusion, in INVISIBLE PUNISHMENT: THE 
COLLATERAL CONSEQUENCES OF MASS IMPRISONMENT, supra note 7, at 15. 
83
 Id. at 21.  
82

24 
 

working‐age population84—constitutes a marked caste, subject to diminished life chances and 
discrimination mandated by statute. These laws are a powerful driver of class and racial 
stratification. Laws preventing felons from seeking public employment are especially hard on 
blacks because the ratio of employment in the public sector to employment in the private sector 
is much higher for blacks than for other groups.85 In inner cities, in particular, public employment 
is often the best available employment. Statutory limitations on ex‐felon employment therefore 
exert a disparate impact on black Americans even net of their representation in the population of 
ex‐felons. 

B. Criminal Record Discrimination 

 

Statutory discrimination against ex‐felons affects only public employment and those jobs 

that are subject to licensing requirements. Discrimination against ex‐felons of the form that 
Devah Pager observed in her audit‐pair study—employers systematically disfavoring applicants 
with criminal records—exists across occupations. Efforts to remedy the disparate racial impact of 
ex‐felon discrimination via conventional antidiscrimination law has produced mixed, but mostly 
poor, results.   

 

Title VII does not categorically prohibit employers from using criminal records as a basis 

for hiring decisions.86 To win an antidiscrimination suit against an employer for using criminal 
records in hiring, a plaintiff must either demonstrate that the employer was intentionally using 
criminal records as a proxy for race or that the employer’s practice had a disparate impact on a 

                                                            

84

 See Christopher Uggen, Melissa Thompson & Jeff Manza, Citizenship, Democracy, and the Civic 
Reintegration of Criminal Offenders, 605 ANNALS AM. ACAD. POL. & SOC. SCI. 281 (2006). 
85
 See generally Darity, supra note 25. 
86
 42 U.S.C. § 2000e‐2 (2004). 

25 
 

class of persons protected under the statute. Employers may defeat the latter argument with a 
showing of business necessity. 

 

Disparate‐impact litigation with ex‐felon plaintiffs faced enormous obstacles from the 

start. Title VII’s “business necessity” defense means that even disparate impact analysis operates 
in service of the law’s broader goal of eradicating only irrational discrimination. The Supreme 
Court has indulged employer defenses of racially disparate hiring practices on safety and 
efficiency grounds, and a criminal record, to the minds of most judges, implicates both.87 
Nonetheless, plaintiffs alleging criminal record discrimination found some early success. In the 
1970s, two federal courts invalidated hiring practices that automatically disqualified candidates 
with criminal records. In the more notable of the two cases, Green v. Missouri Pacific Railroad Co., 
the Eighth Circuit sustained a disparate impact suit against Missouri Pacific Railroad, whose 
felon‐disqualification program rejected 2.5 black applicants for every white applicant it rejected.88 
The court in Green expressed considerable doubt that a criminal record was a useful predictor of a 
prospective employee’s quality. Unfortunately, the court failed to rigorously interrogate the 
circumstances in which a criminal record would or would not convey meaningful data to a 
potential employer. Instead, the court settled for the gnomic declaration that a “sweeping 
disqualification for employment resting solely on past behavior . . . rests upon a tenuous and 
insubstantial basis.”89   

 

The Supreme Court’s 1979 decision in New York City Transit Authority v. Beazar put a 

hasty stop to the progress of ex‐felon discrimination cases litigated under Title VII.90 In Beazar, 
                                                            

87

 See N.Y.C. Trans. Auth. v. Beazer, 440 U.S. 568, 584 (1979) (acknowledging the “legitimate 
employment goals of safety and efficiency” in assessing job‐relatedness). 
88
 Green v. Mo. Pac. R.R. Co., 523 F.2d 1290 (8th Cir. 1975); see also Gregory v. Litton Sys., Inc., 472 F.2d 
631 (9th Cir. 1972). 
89
 Green, 523 F.2d at 1296. 
90
 440 U.S. 568 (1979). 

26 
 

the Court upheld the Transit Authority’s policy of refusing to employ methadone users, despite 
the policy’s disparate impact on African Americans and Latinos. The Court’s invocation of the 
Transit Authority’s “legitimate employment goals of safety and efficiency” became a touchstone of 
subsequent disparate impact litigation, and later courts were substantially more receptive to 
employers who could proffer a public safety rationale for their discriminatory practice.91 Justice 
White’s plaintive dissent in Beazar noted that the sudden emphasis on safety was rooted more in 
intuition than empirical fact: the petitioners, he wrote, “[p]resented nothing to negative the 
employability of successfully maintained methadone users as distinguished from those who were 
unsuccessful.”92  

The paucity of empirical evidence linking drug use or criminal records to poor job 
performance did not stop the logic of Beazar from being rapidly institutionalized. In fact, after 
Beazar, courts became more and more conclusory in asserting the “common‐sense” presumption 
that employers had legitimate rationality and safety reasons to discriminate against ex‐felons. In 
Williams v. Scott, for instance, an Illinois district court resolved the issue in a single sentence: 
“[T]he question of placement of the burden of persuasion does not at all affect the situation here, 
where there is no basis whatever for drawing a rational inference that the absence of a felony 
record is not ‘job related for the position in question and consistent with business necessity.’”93 

 

Even if they were required to mount a more persuasive empirical case that there exists a 

legitimate business reason for discriminating against applicants with criminal records, 
contemporary employers could easily make the case that the practice of ex‐felon discrimination is 
justified by business necessity thanks to the emergence of the law of negligent hiring. 
                                                            

91

 Id. at 587. 
 Id. at 605 (White, J., dissenting). 
93
 No. 92 C 5747, 1992 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 13643, at *9 (N.D. Ill. Sept. 3, 1992) (emphasis in original). 
92

27 
 

Discrimination against ex‐felons has become inherently rational, because ex‐felon labor creates 
higher costs for employers. Because employees that expose an employer to risk are inherently 
more expensive than identical employees who do not invite that risk, employers bear this cost 
regardless of whether the ex‐felons they hire provoke lawsuits. The relationship between 
negligent hiring and disparate impact law reflects what Lauren Edelman has called the 
“endogeneity” of law.94 Like Beazar, negligent hiring presumes that past behavior is an accurate 
indicator of future action. This presumption reinforces its own market rationality. As this view of 
human nature is institutionalized in the doctrine of negligent hiring, employers adopt compliance 
strategies that not only symbolize a commitment to finding safe employees, but actually are 
market‐rational, because they reduce the threat of litigation. Coming full circle, this rationality 
then becomes legitimate grounds for defeating disparate impact cases.  

 

As virtually any law review article on the subject published in the last decade will tell you, 

disparate impact litigation has limited doctrinal vitality. A vigorous antidiscrimination regime 
aimed at promoting the hiring of ex‐felons is possible, but would require extensive new 
legislation. One model might be state efforts. Eight states—Connecticut, Hawaii, Illinois, 
Massachusetts, Minnesota, New York, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin—have attempted to limit by 
statute the extent to which employers can rely on criminal records to make hiring and firing 
decisions. New York’s effort is the most progressive, as well as the one most squarely positioned 
within the framework of antidiscrimination law. Article 23A permits employers to deny 
employment as the result of a criminal conviction only when there is a direct relationship 
between the past conviction and the duties of employment or where the employee’s criminal 

                                                            

94

 See Lauren Edelman, Christopher Uggen & Howard Erlanger, The Endogeneity of Legal Regulation: 
Grievance Procedures as Rational Myth, 105 AM. J. SOC. 406 (1999). 

28 
 

history indicates that employing her would pose an “unreasonable risk” to public safety.95 Despite 
its use of the language and logic of federal antidiscrimination jurisprudence, Article 23A 
represents an improvement because it signifies the New York legislature’s effort to more 
rigorously question assumptions about behavior, rationality, and business necessity. Article 23A 
explicitly discourages the automatic assumption that ex‐felons lack good moral character, and 
requires employers to consider eight factors when hiring: 

(a)  The  public  policy  of  this  state,  as  expressed  in  this  act,  to  encourage  the 
licensure and employment of persons previously convicted of one or more criminal 
offenses. 
 
(b)  The  specific  duties  and  responsibilities  necessarily  related  to  the  license  or 
employment sought. 
 
(c) The bearing, if any, the criminal offense or offenses for which the person was 
previously convicted will have on his fitness or ability to perform one or more of 
such duties or responsibilities. 
 
(d)  The  time  which  has  elapsed  since  the  occurrence  of  the  criminal  offense  or 
offenses. 
 
(e)  The  age  of  the  person  at  the  time  of  occurrence  of  the  criminal  offense  or 
offenses. 
 
(f) The seriousness of the offense or offenses. 
 
(g) Any information produced by the person, or produced on his behalf, in regard 
to his rehabilitation and good conduct. 
 
(h) The legitimate interest of the public agency or private employer in protecting 
property, and the safety and welfare of specific individuals or the general public.96 
 
 
These factors are among the ones that federal courts could have considered, but opted not to, 
in developing an ex‐felon discrimination jurisprudence. The racial bias that ineluctably attends 

                                                            

95

 N.Y. CORRECT. LAW §§ 750‐755 (McKinney 2005). 
 N.Y. CORRECT. LAW § 753(1) (McKinney 2005). 

96

29 
 

discrimination against job candidates with criminal records demands, at the very least, that courts 
consider these questions thoroughly, with proper attention to empirical research.  

This has not been the case in New York, despite Article 23A’s best intentions. New York 
State courts have inconsistently enforced the requirement that employers consider the statutory 
factors when hiring. They have also allowed city agencies and other employers to stretch the 
limits of the statutory language by affirming tangential relationships between certain crimes and 
certain jobs.97 In Al Turi Landfill Inc. v. New York State Department of Environmental 
Conservation, for instance, the New York Court of Appeals upheld the denial of a license to 
expand a landfill based on the applicant’s prior conviction for federal tax fraud.98 The court found 
that the “dishonesty” inherent in tax crimes was anathema to the duties of the license, which 
included “accurate record keeping” and “effective self‐policing.”99 Decisions like these show that 
Article 23A suffers from the same malady as federal ex‐felon antidiscrimination jurisprudence. It 
gives employers virtually unconstrained leeway to reject applicants, provided they can articulate a 
creative account of how the plaintiff’s offense revealed a character flaw. Because most felonies do 
involve generic malfeasance of some kind—“dishonesty,” “self‐dealing,” “untrustworthiness,” 
“peevishness,” and so forth (felonies are called “malum in se” for a reason)—a criminal record will 
always be legitimate grounds for disqualifying an applicant if “good character” is treated as a de 
facto requirement of all jobs. When the requisite nexus between the criminal act and the 
character of the employment is sufficiently loose, laws like Article 23A become impossible to 
distinguish from the generic and infinitely pliable “good moral character” requirements employed 

                                                            

97

 See generally Jocelyn Simonson, Rethinking “Rational Discrimination” Against Ex‐Offenders, 13 GEO. J. 

ON POVERTY L. & POL’Y 283, pt. III (2006).   
98

 751 N.Y.S.2d 827 (N.Y. 2002).  
 Id. at 829. 

 

99

 

30 
 

by many professional licensing boards. it is not surprising, then, that one Legal Aid attorney has 
concluded of the New York law, “[T]hese rights are often very hollow and rarely enforced.”100 

Laws like Article 23A tend over time to be vitiated by the same process that made federal 
antidiscrimination law an inadequate vehicle for addressing the disparate impact of criminal‐
record discrimination: the legal ratification of abstract relationships between bad character (of 
which a criminal record is purportedly indicative) and inadequacy as a candidate for employment. 
What, then, is the alternative?  

One option would be to treat criminal record discrimination as a problem that requires a 
jurisprudence of accommodation. In her analysis of Article 23A, Jocelyn Simonson advocates a 
rethinking of the concept of “rationality” as it relates to ex‐felon discrimination.101 She proposes 
that judges shift the focus of the discussion away from the impact of ex‐felon discrimination on 
marginal productivity or individual employers’ exposure to litigation risk. Instead, she proposes 
that judges be “instructed to think of the effect that the repeated denial of jobs to people with 
criminal records has on society as a whole.”102 Stated in other terms, Simonson’s proposal can be 
understood as a demand that employers be required to “accommodate” job applicants with 
criminal records by treating them on equal footing as applicants without criminal records, 
regardless of whether hiring the employee with the criminal record would result in increased 
costs. 

Advocates of imposing accommodation requirements on employers emphasize that 
antidiscrimination law is properly aimed not at extirpating acts of private animus but at 
addressing a “pattern of social and economic subordination that has intolerable effects on our 
                                                            

100

 Simonson, supra note 97, at 297 n.83. 
 Id. at 307. 
102
 Id. (emphasis in original). 

 

101

31 
 

society.”103 The collateral consequences of a criminal conviction entail massive and largely 
unacknowledged racial inequality. Ex‐felon discrimination impairs the integration of large 
numbers of Americans, especially black men, back into civic life. And it is uniquely difficult to 
address through conventional antidiscrimination approaches, because discrimination against ex‐
felons is typically market‐rational. These factors may justify reorienting efforts to curb criminal 
record discrimination toward an accommodation standard.  

One obvious objection is that ex‐criminals are morally culpable in a way that other groups 
that employers are obligated to accommodate, like the disabled, are not. But moral desert is of no 
particular moment to the accommodation standard in federal disability law, which requires 
employers to accommodate disabilities even when they stem from iniquitous behavior.104 
Whether one finds the argument for civic integration of ex‐offenders as persuasive as the parallel 
argument for the civic integration of the disabled depends on one’s belief in the possibility of 
rehabilitation. The material, social, and political consequences of mass incarceration without a 
concomitant commitment to reintegration are well documented.105 But even those strongly 
opposed to requiring employers to bear costs that stem from the applicants’ past misdeeds must 
acknowledge that the special toll of ex‐felon discrimination on blacks makes reducing labor‐
market discrimination against erstwhile criminals a greater moral imperative. 

This uncertainty about the proper role of antidiscrimination law is exacerbated by the 
absence of any principled national consensus on the proper balance between competing societal 
commitments to rehabilitation, deterrence, and crime prevention. The failure of consensus about 

                                                            

103

 Samuel R. Bagenstos, “Rational Discrimination,” Accommodation, and the Politics of (Disability) Civil 
Rights, 89 VA. L. REV. 825, 837 (2003). 
104
 See generally Mark Kelman, Market Discrimination and Groups, 53 STAN. L. REV. 833, 840‐54 (2001). 
105
 See, e.g., R. Richard Banks, Beyond Profiling: Race, Policing, and the Drug War, 56 STAN. L. REV. 571, 
594‐99 (2003) (detailing the social harms of incarceration). 

32 
 

the goals of incarceration surely contributes to the country’s inconsistent and myopic prison 
policy. But it is a debate that an accommodationist ex‐felon antidsiscrimination model would 
have to confront head‐on to be successful. The Americans with Disabilities Act requires judges to 
strike a seemingly simple balance between two competing considerations, inclusion and cost. An 
ex‐felon accommodation regime would be much more complicated. The cost to individual 
employers—including the risk of employees committing crimes in the workplace—would have to 
be directly balanced against the social costs of ex‐felon exclusion, rather than considered in a 
vacuum as they are at present. The legitimacy of other reasons employers offer for refusing to hire 
felons would have to be evaluated and similarly balanced against the benefits of reintegration. 
Collateral consequences for ex‐offenders would have to be standardized and reduced to narrowly 
address the real short‐term risk of recidivism. And most importantly, federal lawmakers would 
have to develop specific national standards to distinguish between illegitimate ex‐felon 
discrimination and discrimination that is clearly justified by criminological data (for instance, 
discrimination against sex offenders for positions involving exposure to children). Such an 
antidiscrimination regime would be orders of magnitude more difficult to properly administer 
than the ADA.  

To the extent that antidiscrimination law is the appropriate vehicle for remedying 
employment barriers faced by ex‐felons, the emphasis should be on the consequences of those 
barriers to racial minorities. The diffuse social impact of a large post‐prison population is a 
serious concern whatever its racial composition. But if the collateral consequences of mass 
incarceration did weigh so heavily on black men, their consequences would be better addressed 
with political and structural reform of the criminal justice system. The racial inequity of criminal 
record discrimination, however, aggravates the black‐white unemployment gap, excludes willing 
black workers from the labor force, and vitiates our society’s commitment to liberal 
33 
 

antidiscrimination norms. Put another way, the problem of mass incarceration is the problem of 
the color line. For this reason, antidiscrimination law may be the best vehicle for addressing the 
needs of ex‐felons.  

C. Policy Reform: Race, Privacy, and Statistical Discrimination 

 

Part of the reform effort of the 1970s and ‘80s to reduce collateral consequences of 

convictions centered on the privacy rights of ex‐offenders.106 In 1976, however, the Supreme Court 
ruled in Paul v. Davis that arrest records were public information. But individual states were 
allowed to set their own standards about access to central repositories of criminal records, and 
search and retrieval of records was cumbersome in the pre‐digital era.107 Noncriminal access by 
employers or others was relatively rare. Today, the rapid decline in the costs of criminal record 
checks thanks to the transition to digital repositories makes discrimination on the basis of 
criminal record easier than ever before, and raises an obvious question: can we prevent employers 
from discriminating against ex‐felons by limiting employers’ access to those records? 

 

Compelling recent research suggests that efforts to limit employer access to criminal 

records may make things worse for black male job seekers by leading employers to statistically 
discriminate against black men. Holzer, Raphael, and Stoll tested the statistical discrimination 
hypothesis by surveying a sample of employers to determine each firm’s willingness to hire 
employees with criminal records.108 They also asked about their most recent hire for a position 
with no higher education requirement.  

                                                            

106

 See Shawn D. Bushway, Labor Market Effects of Permitting Employer Access to Criminal History 
Records, 20 J. CONTEMP. CRIM. JUST. 276, 285 (2004).  
107
 Id. at 286. 
108
 Harry Holzer, Steven Raphael & Michael Stoll, Perceived Criminality, Criminal Background Checks, 
and the Racial Hiring Practices of Employers, 49 J.L. & ECON. 451, 451‐52 (2006). 

34 
 

 

The findings of the study showed that statistical discrimination against black males is 

commonplace. Employers who conducted criminal background checks were a startling fifty 
percent more likely to hire black employees than employers who didn’t.109 And the effect was 
much stronger for employers who claimed to be unwilling to hire ex‐offenders. Consistent with 
the statistical discrimination hypothesis, the effects for black males were much larger than the 
effects for black females. Given that an earlier survey by Holzer had shown that more than sixty‐
five percent of employers would not knowingly hire an ex‐offender,110 the researchers concluded 
that in the absence of criminal records, the use of race (and gender) as a proxy for criminality is 
pervasive. They additionally argued that easy access to background checks was a net positive for 
African American job applicants: 
This positive net effect indicates that the adverse consequences of employer‐
initiated background checks on the likelihood of hiring African Americans is more 
than offset by the positive effect of eliminating statistical discrimination.111  
Holzer, Raphael, and Stoll’s results suggest that a policy of concealing accurate criminal records 
would both offer little benefit to African Americans with criminal records and needlessly punish 
law‐abiding African Americans.112  
 

The results of the Holzer, Raphael, and Stoll study are grim news for the great 

desideratum of the American rehabilitative ideal: the clean slate. For what they truly reflect is the 
extent to which race and criminality are intertwined in the era of mass incarceration. When a 
black male has a 29% chance of spending time in prison over the course of his life, race and crime 
become mutually constitutive. As R. Richard Banks has argued, incarceration rates have “made 
                                                            

109

 Id. at 464. 
 HARRY HOLZER, WHAT EMPLOYERS WANT: JOB PROSPECTS FOR LESS‐EDUCATED WORKERS (1996). 
111
 Holzer et al., supra note 108, at 473.  
112
 Interestingly, the results of Pager’s audit‐pair study may support Holzer’s statistical discrimination 
hypothesis. Pager eliminated as candidates for her study any employer that said that a criminal background 
check was conducted as part of the job application. Her sample of employers is thus composed of precisely 
the sort of employer Holzer predicts will be most prone to statistically discriminate: those who care about 
criminal records, but do not conduct background checks.  
110

35 
 

the image of black criminality less an ungrounded stereotype and more a social reality.”113 Given 
this, blaming employers for tending to statistically discriminate misses the point. Racialized mass 
incarceration compels statistical discrimination. The stigma of prison affixes itself to all black 
men.  
 

What, then, is a policy alternative to heightened privacy regulations? One alternative to a 

more aggressive accommodationist antidiscrimination regime might be direct subsidies to 
employers who hire ex‐felons.114 These subsidies could come in the form of tax credits or transfers 
to institutions that hire ex‐felons, or in the form of government programs that insure employers 
against a variety of losses associated with ex‐felon employees—exposure to tort risk, on‐the‐job 
crime, and so forth. And because the government could condition receipt of subsidies on racially 
equitable hiring, a subsidy program would reduce the racially discriminatory impact of ex‐felon 
discrimination. Such a program would have the added benefit of transferring the costs of 
reintegration to taxpayers as a whole. The savings from decreased recidivism and higher 
workforce utilization would likely defray a substantial portion of these costs.  
 
 
 
 

  

CONCLUSION 

 

Criminal record discrimination is just one contributing factor to black labor market 

disadvantage, but there is reason to believe it is a serious one. And with the prison population 
remaining and its current high levels—and the ranks of ex‐felons growing by more than a half‐
million Americans each year—its effects will likely be magnified in years to come. Evidence on ex‐
felon discrimination complicates longstanding debates about whether it is “racism” or “social 
                                                            

113

 Banks, supra note 105, at 598. 
 See, e.g., Lior Jacob Strahilevitz, Privacy versus Antidiscrimination, 75 U. CHI. L. REV. 363, 379 (2008). 

114

36 
 

structure” that most contributes to enduring racial stratification. As studies by Pager and other 
show, it is both. Discrimination against ex‐felons hurts blacks both because of their status as the 
most heavily incarcerated social group, and because the stigmatic harms of a prison sentence are 
magnified by skin color. To properly address this subtle form of discrimination, 
antidiscrimination law would have to be dramatically reconceived—a development that seems 
unlikely at best.  

 

Ultimately, though, race‐biased ex‐felon discrimination is epiphenomenal to the modern 

carceral apparatus, and only unraveling that apparatus offers a permanent solution. The 
continued growth of the prison population is almost certainly socially and fiscally untenable.115 
Proposals for criminal justice reform are beyond the scope of this Article, but the war on drugs is 
one obvious place to begin. Between 1990 and 2000, drug offenders accounted for a greater 
proportion of prison population growth among black inmates than among any other racial 
group.116 A national commitment to the eradication of urban poverty and the destratification of 
American inner cities would have a similarly large effect. As long as the black underclass is 
vituperated as indolent and criminal, harassed by fruitless police drug interdictions, and cast into 
prison in crippling numbers, employment discrimination against ex‐felons will remain a major 
driver of black unemployment and racial stratification. 

                                                            

115

 Consider that for the first time in its history, the state of California will spend more on prisons in the 
2012‐2013 fiscal year than on higher education, at a time when its budget deficit stands at $16 billion 
(incidentally, $16 billion is approximately what the state will spend on prisons in 2012). See Evan Halper, 
California’s Budget Gap at $16 Billion, L.A. TIMES, Feb. 21, 2008, at A1; Maya Harris, Prison vs. Education 
Spending Reveals California's Priorities, S.F. CHRON., May 29, 2007, at B5. 
116
 Banks, supra note 105, at 595. 

37

 

 

PLN Subscribe Now Ad
CLN Subscribe Now Ad
Federal Prison Handbook