Skip navigation
Prison Profiteers - Header

Wa Doe Wsp Walla Walla Contamination Study 2009 Partd

Download original document:
Brief thumbnail
This text is machine-read, and may contain errors. Check the original document to verify accuracy.
4

Experimental Design

4.1 Project Tasks
Task descriptions are provided below. The list of tasks reflects the Sampling and
Analysis Plan provided in Appendix A of the Work Plan.
4.1.1 Task 1: Preparation
Task 1 includes meetings with DOC for general project orientation and project start-up to
obtain information required for the project.
This QAPP with detailed scope of work has been prepared in accordance with Ecology
formatting requirements, including a detailed description of the sampling procedures. The
Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) was prepared concurrently with this QAPP. The SAP
concentrates the sampling in identified areas of concern (AOCs) based on previous
investigations and historical land use.
4.1.2
Task 2: Sample Collection
The study has a non-random sampling design, and applies a concentrated laboratory
analysis approach to characterize surface water, groundwater, soils, and soil gas
conditions within and around the WSP. Samples will be collected at locations with
potential and/or known sources of chemical contaminants. The data collection and
sampling activities will be conducted in a phased approach as outlined in the SAP.
The RI will follow all internal and Ecology guidance on sampling of surface water,
groundwater, soil, and soil gas. The approach to sampling detailed herein is based on
previously published documents for collecting samples.
Throughout the sampling event, proper sample collection, handling, preservation,
transport, and custody procedures will be followed.
4.1.3 Task 3: Laboratory Analyses
On-Site Environmental, Redmond, Washington, will perform the analyses listed in
Table 3. On-Site is a Washington-State-accredited laboratory. On-Site will provide the
analytical results, including summary data sheets and all raw data, electronically (in
Excel and EIM formats) to Parametrix. Parametrix will coordinate analytical work with
laboratories prior to the sampling events and verify sample data delivery from the
laboratories after each sampling event.
Washington State Penitentiary RI/FS
Appendix B: Final Quality Assurance Project Plan

4-1

February 24, 2010

4. Experimental Design

4.1.4 Task 4: Reporting
Data validation and database activities:
Analytical data will be reviewed and validated to verify they meet project data quality
objectives and to identify any limitations of the data, following the process outlined in
Ecology QA1 review guidelines (PTI 1989), or other guidelines if specified. These data
will be reviewed by comparing calibration, accuracy, and precision results to the QC
criteria listed in the method, the laboratory SOP, and the QAPP. If no QA guidelines exist
for specific analytes, applicable U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) National
and Regional Data Review guidelines will be used. The contractor will enter data into
Ecology’s Environmental Information Management (EIM) database.

February 24, 2010

ecol~'
eCO)02Y

and
lIml envi.l"onmenf,
environment, inc.

4-2

Washington State Penitentiary RI/FS
Appendix B: Final Quality Assurance Project Plan

5

Health and Safety

The field work identified in this plan requires careful consideration of health and
safety, including:







Physical hazards associated with working in the WSP Landfill and within
the WSP facility,
Site security procedures for the WSP facility,
Tool Policy for the WSP facility,
Chemical hazards related to sample collection and handling, and
Safe driving.

The Health and Safety Plan is included in Appendix C of the Work Plan.
Decontamination Procedures
To the greatest extent possible, disposable and/or dedicated personal protective
and sampling equipment will be used to avoid cross-contamination.
Pre-cleaned sample bottles will be provided by the laboratory. As much as
possible, dedicated sampling equipment will be used. If the equipment is to be
reused, it will be scrubbed and washed with non-phosphate detergent and distilled
water, followed by a rinse with an appropriate solvent. A final rinse with distilled
water also will be performed. If a noticeable oily sheen or petroleum odor is
observed after decontamination, sampling bowls and utensils used to process
those samples will not be used for subsequent sample processing.

Washington State Penitentiary RI/FS
Appendix B: Final Quality Assurance Project Plan

5-1

February 24, 2010

This page intentionally left blank.

6

Measurement Procedures

The laboratory will analyze the surface water, groundwater, soil, and soil gas
samples for the applicable contaminant of concern based on the sample location.
For example, potential solvent AOC samples at metal plant #1 will be analyzed
for VOCs and metals, and UST area samples will be analyzed for VOCs, SVOCs,
and metals.
The VOCs will be analyzed using United States Environmental Protection
Agency (USEPA) SW-846 Method 8260. With this method, samples are analyzed
by gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GC/MS). Samples are purged with an
inert gas and the analytes are absorbed on a trap. The trap is quickly heated to a
high temperature and the analytes are desorbed into a GC equipped with a
capillary column. The GC uses a temperature program to separate analytes that
are then detected with an MS. Mass spectra of the sample compound and a current
laboratory-generated standard must match for positive analyte identification.
Analytes are quantified by comparing the response of a major ion relative to an
internal standard using a calibration curve developed for each GC/MS.
The SVOCs, including PAHs, will be analyzed using USEPA SW-846
Method 8270. Samples will be analyzed by GC/MS following extraction and, if
necessary, appropriate sample cleanup and derivatization procedures. With this
technique, sample extracts are injected into a GC equipped with a capillary
column. The GC uses a temperature program to separate analytes that are then
detected with an MS. Mass spectra of the sample compound and a current
laboratory-generated standard must match for positive analyte identification.
Analytes are quantified by comparing the response of a major ion relative to an
internal standard using a calibration curve developed for each GC/MS.

TPH-D will be analyzed using Northwest total petroleum hydrocarbons
(NWTPH) Method NWTPH-Dx. Samples will be analyzed by GC/flame
ionization detector (GC/FID) following extraction and, if necessary, appropriate
sample cleanup procedures. Sample extracts are injected into a GC equipped with
a capillary column, which uses a temperature program to separate TPH

Washington State Penitentiary RI/FS
Appendix B: Final Quality Assurance Project Plan

6-1

February 24, 2010

6. Measurement Procedures

components that are then detected with an FID. TPH-D is identified by comparing
the peak patterns of diesel with retention times of known standards. Diesel is
quantified by comparing the sample peak response using a calibration curve
developed for each target compound.
Metals (excluding mercury) will be analyzed using USEPA 6000 series methods.
Samples will be analyzed by either Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) or
ICP-Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS) following acid extraction. Sample extracts
injected into the ICP or ICP-MS are quantified by comparing instrument response
to a calibration curve developed for each analyte. Mercury will be analyzed using
USEPA Method 7470 or 7471. Samples will be analyzed by cold vapor
absorption spectroscopy (CVS) following acid extraction. Sample extracts
injected into the CVS are quantified by comparing instrument response to a
calibration curve developed for mercury. Results will be reported for total metals.

February 24, 2010

ecol~'
eCO)02Y

and
lIml envi.l"onmenf,
environment, inc.

6-2

Washington State Penitentiary RI/FS
Appendix B: Final Quality Assurance Project Plan

7

Quality Objectives

The data quality objectives (DQOs) for this project are presented below. They
identify the seven steps taken to develop this QAPP.
1. State the Problem – Previous investigations have confirmed the presence of
VOCs in the groundwater upgradient of the Sudbury Road Landfill and in
additional monitoring wells around the WSP landfill. All monitoring wells are
considered to be downgradient of the WSP. In several monitoring wells, the
concentrations of PCE and TCE have exceeded the MTCA Method A cleanup
levels for groundwater. In addition, the following are contaminants of concern
based on historical site use:






SVOCs, including PAHs
PCBs
TPHs
Metals

2. Identify the Principle Study Questions – The decision will answer these
questions: What is the source of the contamination in found in groundwater? Are
historical or present activities at the WSP facility responsible for environmental
contamination? Is the WSP Landfill responsible for environmental
contamination? Alternative actions include eliminating areas from further study or
plan and conduct further investigation activities.
3. Identify the Inputs to the Decision – Surface water, groundwater, soils, and soil
gas samples will be collected from the identified AOCs. In addition, sample
locations may be chosen based on field observations or decisions. Samples will be
analyzed for VOCs, SVOCs, PCBs, NWTPH as diesel, and/or total metals,
depending on the confirmed or suspected COCs in each AOC.
4. Define the Boundaries of the Study – The primary AOCs are listed in Table 3
and include the WSP Landfill, the former laundry and dry cleaning services area,
the former motor pool, UST areas, the former autobody shop and furniture
refurbishing area, the hazardous waste accumulation area, boiler ash from the
former steam plant, the sign shop, and metal plant #1. Some sampling is
dependent on field confirmation of appropriate sampling locations.
Washington State Penitentiary RI/FS
Appendix B: Final Quality Assurance Project Plan

7-1

February 24, 2010

7. Quality Objectives

5. Develop a Decision Rule – If VOCs and other contaminants of concern are
above cleanup limits, then Ecology will consider remedial options.
6. Specify Tolerable Limits on Decision Errors – Sampling should be conducted
following guidance appropriate for surface water, groundwater, soil, and soil gas
sampling and analyses, e.g., USEPA Test Methods for Evaluating Solid Waste,
Physical Chemical Methods, 3rd edition SW-846 (EPA 1986). Analyses should be
conducted using standard methods, by Ecology-approved analytical laboratories
(alternate laboratories may be used with Ecology approval). Analytical data
should meet standard quality control criteria (EPA 1999, EPA 2004).
7. Optimize the Design for Obtaining Data – The Work Plan, QAPP, and SAP
present the design for conducting an RI to characterize the nature and vertical and
horizontal extent of soil and groundwater contamination across the site and
defining the characteristics of soils and groundwater to support a future FS.
Acceptance and performance criteria are often specified in terms of precision,
accuracy, representativeness, completeness, and comparability (PARCC)
parameters. Numerical acceptance criteria cannot be assigned to all PARCC
parameters, but general performance goals are established for most data collection
activities. PARCC parameters are briefly defined below.
Precision
Precision measures the reproducibility of measurements under a given set of
conditions. Specifically, it is a quantitative measure of the variability of a group
of measurements compared with their average value, usually stated in terms of
standard deviation or coefficient of variation. It also may be measured as the
relative percent difference (RPD) between two values. Precision includes the
interrelated concepts of instrument or method detection limits (MDLs) and
multiple field sample variance. Sources of this variance are sample heterogeneity,
sampling error, and analytical error.
Accuracy
Accuracy measures the bias of the measurement system. Sources of this error
include sampling process, field contamination, preservation, handling, sample
matrix, sample preparation, and analysis. Data interpretation and reporting may
also be significant sources of error. Typically, analytical accuracy is assessed
through the analysis of spiked samples and may be stated in terms of percent
recovery or the average (arithmetic mean) of the percent recovery. Blank samples
are also analyzed to assess sampling and analytical bias (e.g., sample
contamination).

February 24, 2010

ecol~'
eCO)02Y

and
lIml envi.l"onmenf,
environment, inc.

7-2

Washington State Penitentiary RI/FS
Appendix B: Final Quality Assurance Project Plan

7. Quality Objectives

Representativeness
Representativeness expresses the degree to which data represent a characteristic
of a population, a parameter variation at a sampling point, or an environmental
condition over time. Representativeness is a qualitative parameter, which is most
concerned with proper design of the measurement program. Sample/measurement
locations may be biased (judgmental) or unbiased (random or systematic). For
unbiased schemes, the sampling must be designed not only to collect samples that
represent conditions at a sample location, but also to select sample locations that
represent the total area to be sampled. Representativeness also embodies the
concept of temporal (for example, seasonal) variations in parameters or
conditions.
Completeness
Completeness for sample collection is defined as the percentage of specified
samples listed in the QAPP that were actually collected. The completeness goal
will be 90% for this project. Completeness for acceptable data is defined as the
percentage of acceptable data out of the total amount of data generated.
Acceptable data includes data that passes all QC criteria or data that may not pass
all QC criteria but for which appropriate corrective actions are taken.
Comparability
Comparability is a qualitative parameter expressing the confidence with which
one data set may be compared to another. Sample data should be comparable with
other measurement data for similar samples and sample conditions. This goal is
achieved through the use of standard techniques to collect and analyze samples.
Analytical quality objectives for each method are summarized in Table 4.
Reporting limits are the practical quantitation limits attainable with these
methods. Ranges are presented for some analyte groups due to the large number
of compounds analyzed. Analyte-specific reporting limits are presented in
Appendix A.

Washington State Penitentiary RI/FS
Appendix B: Final Quality Assurance Project Plan

ecol~'
eCO)02Y

and
lIml envi.l"onmenf,
environment, inc.

7-3

February 24, 2010

7. Quality Objectives

Table 3

Areas of Concern

Ar e a of C on ce rn /
Pot ent ia l Ar e a of Con ce rn
1. WSP Landfill (AOC)
2. Former dry cleaning services (AOC)
3. Former motor pool (potential AOC)
4. Former UST areas (potential AOC)
5. Former auto body shop and furniture
refurbishing facility (potential AOC)
6. Former hazardous waste accumulation area
(potential AOC)
7. Steam plant boiler ash (potential AOC)
8. Sign shop (potential AOC)
9. Metal Plant #1 (potential AOC)

Conf ir me d
Cont am in ant
of C o n ce rn *
VOCs, metals

TPH-D

Su sp ec ted
Cont am in ant
of C on ce rn
VOCs, TPH-D, SVOCs,
PAHs (boiler ash fill at
various WSP locations)
VOCs
VOCs, TPH-D, SVOCs
TPH-D, SVOCs
VOCs, TPH-D, SVOCs
VOCs, SVOCs, metals,
PCBs and TPH
PAHs
VOCs
VOCs

*Analytes that have been detected in previous sampling events.
SVOCs
TPH
TPH-D
VOCs
PAHs

February 24, 2010

ecol~'
eCO)02Y

and
lIml envi.l"onmenf,
environment, inc.

=
=
=
=
=

Semi-volatile organic compounds
Total petroleum hydrocarbons
Total petroleum hydrocarbons-diesel
Volatile organic compounds
Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

7-4

Washington State Penitentiary RI/FS
Appendix B: Final Quality Assurance Project Plan

Table 4. Chemical Analytical Parameters, Laboratory Methods, and Method Detection Limits
PAHs by Method 8270D SIM
Naphthalene
2-Methylnaphthalene
1-Methylnaphthalene
Acenaphthylene
Acenaphthene
Fluorene
Phenanthrene
Anthracene
Fluoranthene
Pyrene
Benzo[a]anthracene
Chrysene
Benzo[b]fluoranthene
Benzo[k]fluoranthene
Benzo[a]pyrene
Indeno[1,2,3-c,d]pyrene
Dibenz[a,h]anthracene
Benzo[g,h,i]perylene

Soil
MDL
0.000372
0.000281
0.000204
0.000179
0.000282
0.000176
0.000186
0.000151
0.000179
0.000125
0.0000872
0.000103
0.000134
0.0000966
0.0000577
0.0000706
0.0000530
0.0000638

Soil
PQL
0.0067
0.0067
0.0067
0.0067
0.0067
0.0067
0.0067
0.0067
0.0067
0.0067
0.0067
0.0067
0.0067
0.0067
0.0067
0.0067
0.0067
0.0067

Soil
Units
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm

Water
MDL
0.0137
0.0195
0.00587
0.00438
0.00617
0.00589
0.00590
0.00494
0.00431
0.00693
0.00418
0.00503
0.00611
0.00553
0.00607
0.00391
0.00353
0.00412

Water
PQL
0.10
0.10
0.10
0.10
0.10
0.10
0.10
0.10
0.10
0.10
0.010
0.010
0.010
0.010
0.010
0.010
0.010
0.010

Water
Units
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb

Semivolatiles by Method 8270D
N-Nitrosodimethylamine
Pyridine
Phenol
Aniline
bis(2-chloroethyl)ether
2-Chlorophenol
n-Decane
1,3-Dichlorobenzene
1,4-Dichlorobenzene
Benzyl alcohol
1,2-Dichlorobenzene
2-Methylphenol (o-Cresol)
bis(2-Chloroisopropyl)ether
(3+4)-Methylphenol (m,p-Cresol)
N-Nitroso-di-n-propylamine
Hexachloroethane
Nitrobenzene
Isophorone
2-Nitrophenol
2,4-Dimethylphenol
bis(2-Chloroethoxy)methane

Soil
MDL
0.0103
0.245
0.0128
0.146
0.0135
0.0138
0.0141
0.0118
0.0123
0.0127
0.0118
0.0125
0.0127
0.0118
0.0142
0.0142
0.0157
0.0129
0.0151
0.0162
0.0129

Soil
PQL
0.033
0.33
0.033
0.17
0.033
0.033
0.033
0.033
0.033
0.033
0.033
0.033
0.033
0.033
0.033
0.033
0.033
0.033
0.033
0.83
0.033

Soil
Units
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm

Water
MDL
0.195
0.144
0.233
0.266
0.441
0.392
0.302
0.328
0.323
0.305
0.322
0.320
0.360
0.287
0.349
0.393
0.369
0.346
0.392
0.360
0.382

Water
PQL
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0

Water
Units
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb

Page 1 of 6

SPE
MDL
0.0154
0.0141
0.0142
0.0108
0.0190
0.0123
0.0101
0.00979
0.00729
0.00479
0.00585
0.00626
0.00618
0.00594
0.0143
0.00603
0.00618
0.00646

SPE
PQL
0.10
0.10
0.10
0.10
0.10
0.10
0.10
0.10
0.10
0.10
0.010
0.010
0.010
0.010
0.010
0.010
0.010
0.010

SPE
Units
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb

Table 4. Chemical Analytical Parameters, Laboratory Methods, and Method Detection Limits
Semivolatiles by Method 8270D
2,4-Dichlorophenol
Benzoic acid
1,2,4-Trichlorobenzene
Naphthalene
4-Chloroaniline
Hexachlorobutadiene
4-Chloro-3-methylphenol
2-Methylnaphthalene
1-Methylnaphthalene
Hexachlorocyclopentadiene
2,4,6-Trichlorophenol
2,3-Dichloroaniline
2,4,5-Trichlorophenol
2-Chloronaphthalene
2-Nitroaniline
1,4-Dinitrobenzene
Dimethylphthalate
1,3-Dinitrobenzene
2,6-Dinitrotoluene
1,2-Dinitrobenzene
Acenaphthylene
3-Nitroaniline
2,4-Dinitrophenol
Acenaphthene
4-Nitrophenol
2,4-Dinitrotoluene
Dibenzofuran
2,3,4,6-Tetrachlorophenol
2,3,5,6-Tetrachlorophenol
Diethylphthalate
4-Chlorophenyl-phenylether
4-Nitroaniline
Fluorene
4,6-Dinitro-2-methylphenol
n-Nitrosodiphenylamine
1,2-Diphenylhydrazine
4-Bromophenyl-phenylether
Hexachlorobenzene
Pentachlorophenol
n-Octadecane
Phenanthrene
Anthracene
Carbazole

Soil
MDL
0.0126
0.0175
0.0130
0.0147
0.00586
0.0131
0.0112
0.0143
0.0140
0.0102
0.0130
0.0117
0.0128
0.0127
0.00964
0.0108
0.0121
0.00868
0.00822
0.0118
0.0119
0.00612
0.00478
0.0102
0.0116
0.00969
0.0109
0.00843
0.00954
0.0131
0.0110
0.0185
0.00948
0.00699
0.0118
0.0156
0.00984
0.0100
0.00902
0.0199
0.0109
0.0101
0.00910

Soil
PQL
0.033
0.17
0.033
0.033
0.033
0.033
0.033
0.033
0.033
0.033
0.033
0.033
0.033
0.033
0.033
0.033
0.033
0.17
0.033
0.033
0.033
0.033
0.033
0.033
0.033
0.17
0.033
0.033
0.033
0.17
0.033
0.033
0.033
0.033
0.033
0.033
0.033
0.033
0.33
0.033
0.033
0.033
0.033

Soil
Units
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm

Water
MDL
0.313
0.0356
0.407
0.429
2.68
0.354
0.339
0.387
0.344
0.265
0.346
0.280
0.206
0.309
0.334
0.322
0.287
0.236
0.377
0.292
0.293
0.249
3.95
0.397
0.222
0.345
0.275
0.287
0.235
0.357
0.228
0.345
0.262
0.267
2.12
0.271
0.170
0.240
0.468
0.335
0.283
0.230
0.276

Page 2 of 6

Water
PQL
1.0
5.0
1.0
1.0
10
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
10
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
5.0
10
1.0
1.0
1.0
5.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0

Water
Units
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb

Table 4. Chemical Analytical Parameters, Laboratory Methods, and Method Detection Limits
Semivolatiles by Method 8270D
Di-n-butylphthalate
Fluoranthene
Benzidine
Pyrene
Butylbenzylphthalate
bis-2-Ethylhexyladipate
3,3'-Dichlorobenzidine
Benzo[a]anthracene
Chrysene
bis(2-Ethylhexyl)phthalate
Di-n-octylphthalate
Benzo[b]fluoranthene
Benzo[k]fluoranthene
Benzo[a]pyrene
Indeno[1,2,3-c,d]pyrene
Dibenz[a,h]anthracene
Benzo[g,h,i]perylene

Soil
MDL
0.0140
0.00986
0.00128
0.0117
0.0222
0.0148
0.115
0.0125
0.0126
0.0191
0.0131
0.0106
0.0151
0.00922
0.0111
0.00938
0.00920

Soil
PQL
0.033
0.033
0.33
0.033
0.033
0.033
0.33
0.033
0.033
0.033
0.033
0.033
0.033
0.033
0.033
0.033
0.033

Soil
Units
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm

Water
MDL
0.276
0.250
1.19
0.271
0.359
0.285
2.13
0.309
0.321
0.172
0.235
0.240
0.316
0.228
0.233
0.257
0.274

Water
PQL
1.0
1.0
10
1.0
1.0
1.0
10
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0

Water
Units
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb

NWTPH-Dx
Diesel
Lube Oil

Soil
MDL
8.78
14.6

Soil
PQL
25
50

Soil
Units
ppm
ppm

Water
MDL
0.0791
0.138

Water
PQL
0.25
0.40

Water
Units
ppm
ppm

Volatiles by Method 8260B
Dichlorodifluoromethane
Chloromethane
Vinyl Chloride
Bromomethane
Chloroethane
Trichlorofluoromethane
1,1-Dichloroethene
Acetone
Iodomethane
Carbon Disulfide
Methylene Chloride
(trans) 1,2-Dichloroethene
Methyl t-Butyl Ether
1,1-Dichloroethane
Vinyl Acetate
2,2-Dichloropropane
(cis) 1,2-Dichloroethene

Soil
MDL
0.628
1.69
0.857
0.536
1.69
0.647
0.210
4.57
0.643
0.281
2.74
0.789
0.173
0.219
0.231
0.253
0.179

Soil
PQL
1.0
5.0
1.0
1.0
5.0
1.0
1.0
5.0
5.0
1.0
5.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
5.0
1.0
1.0

Soil
Units
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb

Water
MDL
0.143
0.0313
0.0399
0.0978
0.175
0.0599
0.0459
0.562
0.343
0.0258
0.175
0.0335
0.0507
0.0426
0.163
0.0702
0.0380

Water
PQL
0.20
1.0
0.20
0.20
1.0
0.20
0.20
5.0
1.0
0.20
1.0
0.20
0.20
0.20
2.0
0.20
0.20

Water
Units
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb

Page 3 of 6

Table 4. Chemical Analytical Parameters, Laboratory Methods, and Method Detection Limits
Volatiles by Method 8260B
2-Butanone
Bromochloromethane
Chloroform
1,1,1-Trichloroethane
Carbon Tetrachloride
1,1-Dichloropropene
Benzene
1,2-Dichloroethane
Trichloroethene
1,2-Dichloropropane
Dibromomethane
Bromodichloromethane
2-Chloroethyl Vinyl Ether
(cis) 1,3-Dichloropropene
Methyl Isobutyl Ketone
Toluene
(trans) 1,3-Dichloropropene
1,1,2-Trichloroethane
Tetrachloroethene
1,3-Dichloropropane
2-Hexanone
Dibromochloromethane
1,2-Dibromoethane
Chlorobenzene
1,1,1,2-Tetrachloroethane
Ethylbenzene
m,p-Xylene
o-Xylene
Styrene
Bromoform
Isopropylbenzene
Bromobenzene
1,1,2,2-Tetrachloroethane
1,2,3-Trichloropropane
n-Propylbenzene
2-Chlorotoluene
4-Chlorotoluene
1,3,5-Trimethylbenzene
tert-Butylbenzene
1,2,4-Trimethylbenzene
sec-Butylbenzene
1,3-Dichlorobenzene
p-Isopropyltoluene

Soil
MDL
1.23
0.489
0.315
0.286
0.366
0.346
0.142
0.266
0.554
0.302
0.351
0.273
3.29
0.197
0.518
0.291
0.203
0.375
0.297
0.229
0.679
0.298
0.199
0.196
0.254
0.168
0.401
0.273
0.178
0.538
0.162
0.244
0.462
0.306
0.179
0.325
0.336
0.258
0.262
0.209
0.183
0.278
0.242

Soil
PQL
5.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
5.0
1.0
5.0
5.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
5.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
2.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0

Soil
Units
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb

Water
MDL
0.523
0.0710
0.0527
0.0336
0.0329
0.0612
0.0241
0.0359
0.0484
0.0542
0.0661
0.0217
0.210
0.0613
0.141
0.0291
0.0506
0.0978
0.0457
0.0660
0.0969
0.0382
0.0952
0.0340
0.0465
0.0243
0.0333
0.0255
0.0231
0.0928
0.0284
0.117
0.0557
0.0939
0.0188
0.0401
0.0402
0.0258
0.0243
0.0217
0.0220
0.0266
0.0257

Page 4 of 6

Water
PQL
5.0
0.20
0.20
0.20
0.20
0.20
0.20
0.20
0.20
0.20
0.20
0.20
1.0
0.20
2.0
1.0
0.20
0.20
0.20
0.20
2.0
0.20
0.20
0.20
0.20
0.20
0.40
0.20
0.20
1.0
0.20
0.20
0.20
0.20
0.20
0.20
0.20
0.20
0.20
0.20
0.20
0.20
0.20

Water
Units
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb

Table 4. Chemical Analytical Parameters, Laboratory Methods, and Method Detection Limits
Volatiles by Method 8260B
1,4-Dichlorobenzene
1,2-Dichlorobenzene
n-Butylbenzene
1,2-Dibromo-3-chloropropane
1,2,4-Trichlorobenzene
Hexachlorobutadiene
Naphthalene
1,2,3-Trichlorobenzene

Volatiles by Method 8260B/SIM
Vinyl Chloride

ICP Metals by Method 200.7/6010B
Antimony
Arsenic
Beryllium
Cadmium
Chromium
Copper
Lead
Nickel
Selenium
Silver
Thallium
Zinc

Soil
MDL
0.269
0.321
0.222
0.940
0.383
0.503
0.314
0.259

Soil
PQL
1.0
1.0
1.0
5.0
1.0
5.0
1.0
1.0

Soil
Units
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb

Water
MDL
0.123
0.107
0.0394
0.468
0.0398
0.0529
0.0547
0.0586

Water
PQL
0.20
0.20
0.20
1.0
0.20
0.20
1.0
0.20

Water
Units
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb

Soil
MDL

Soil
PQL

Soil
Units

Water
MDL

Water
PQL
0.020

Water
Units
ppb

Soil
MDL
3.55
1.65
0.0103
0.0744
0.155
0.384
1.18
0.389
3.37
0.201
9.64
0.361

Soil
PQL
5.0
10
0.50
0.50
0.50
0.50
5.0
2.5
10
0.50
10
2.5

Soil
Units
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm

Water
MDL
53.1
25.8
0.223
1.49
4.40
5.98
35.6
7.34
52.5
5.54
135
4.95

Water
PQL
100
200
10
10
10
10
100
50
200
10
200
50

Water
Units
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb

Page 5 of 6

Dissolved
MDL
63.2
44.1
0.466
1.17
3.26
6.42
20.9
7.99
102
5.41
184
5.85

Dissolved
PQL
100
200
10
10
10
10
100
50
200
10
200
50

Dissolved
Units
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb

Table 4. Chemical Analytical Parameters, Laboratory Methods, and Method Detection Limits
ICP/MS Metals by Method 200.8/6020
Antimony
Arsenic
Beryllium
Cadmium
Chromium
Copper
Lead
Nickel
Selenium
Silver
Thallium
Zinc

Soil
MDL
0.0180
0.0104
0.00720
0.00461
0.0438
0.0153
0.0353
0.0178
0.0485
0.0163
0.00547
0.133

Soil
PQL
5.0
10
0.50
0.50
0.50
0.50
5.0
2.5
10
0.50
5.0
2.5

Soil
Units
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm
ppm

Water
MDL
0.160
0.577
0.230
0.0401
0.654
0.321
0.218
0.303
1.06
0.199
0.0284
2.32

Water
PQL
5.5
3.3
11
4.4
11
11
1.1
56
5.6
11
5.6
56

Water
Units
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb

Mercury by Method 7470A/7471A
Mercury
Mercury (low)

Soil
MDL
0.000247
n/a

Soil
PQL
0.25
n/a

Soil
Units
ppm
n/a

Water
MDL
0.0126
0.0145

Water
PQL
0.50
0.038

Water
Units
ppb
ppb

Page 6 of 6

Dissolved
MDL
0.0441
0.0661
0.0517
0.0154
0.109
0.304
0.0123
0.0364
0.127
0.0609
0.0133
0.487

Dissolved
PQL
5.0
1.0
10
4.0
10
10
1.0
40
5.0
10
5.0
50

Dissolved
Units
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb
ppb

8

Quality Control Procedures

8.1 Field
Table 5 specifies the sample volumes, types of containers, preservation, and
holding times for all analyses.
Field Logbooks and Data Forms
Field logbooks and data forms/sheets will be used to document daily activities and
observations. Documentation will be sufficient to enable participants to accurately
and objectively reconstruct events that occurred during the project at a later time.
Entries will be made in waterproof ink, dated, and signed. Project-specific field
data forms/sheets will be used to capture field operations and observations.
If corrections to the field logbooks are necessary, they will be made by drawing a
single line through the original entry (so that the original entry is legible) and
writing the corrected entry alongside. The correction will be initialed and dated.
Corrected errors may require a footnote explaining the correction.
Custody Procedures
The primary objective of chain of custody procedures is to provide an accurate
written or computerized record that can be used to trace the possession and
handling of a sample from collection to completion of all required analyses. A
sample is in custody when it is:






In someone’s physical possession
In someone’s view
Locked up
Kept in a secured area that is restricted to authorized personnel

Washington State Penitentiary RI/FS
Appendix B: Final Quality Assurance Project Plan

8-1

February 24, 2010

8. Quality Control Procedures
Table 5
Parameter
VOCs

Laboratory
TBD

Method
8260

Matrix
Soil

Container
3 Encore® Samplers

Preservation
Cool to ≤ 6oC

VOCs

TBD

8260

Water

3 VOA vials

VOCs

Field
TBD

Soil
Gas
Soil

TBD

SVOCs

Modified
8260
8270

HCl pH < 2;
Cool to ≤ 6oC
Cool to ≤ 6oC

SVOCs

TBD

8270

Water

PAHs

TBD

8270

Soil

PAHs

TBD

8270

Water

TPH-D

TBD

NWTPH-Dx

Soil

TPH-D

TBD

NWTPH-Dx

Water

Metals

TBD

Soil

Metals

TBD

6000/7000
series
6000/7000
series

Key:
HCl
Hg
HNO3
SVOCs
TBD
TPHs
VOCs

=
=
=
=
=
=
=

February 24, 2010

ecol~'
eCO)02Y

Sample Volumes, Containers, Preservation, and Holding Times for Target
Analytes

and
lIml envi.l"onmenf,
environment, inc.

Water

8-oz glass jar,
Teflon lid
1-liter amber glass,
Teflon lid
8-oz glass jar,
Teflon lid
1-liter amber glass,
Teflon lid
8-oz glass jar,
Teflon lid
1-liter amber glass,
Teflon lid
500-ml Teflon bottle

Cool to ≤ 6oC

8-oz glass jar,
Teflon lid

HNO3 pH < 2;
Cool to ≤ 6oC

Cool to ≤ 6oC
Cool to ≤ 6oC
Cool to ≤ 6oC
HCl pH < 2;
Cool to ≤ 6oC
Cool to ≤ 6oC
Cool to ≤ 6oC

Holding Time
7 days for extraction, then
14 days until analysis
14 days to analysis
14 days to analysis
14 days for extraction,
then 40 days until analysis
7 days for extraction, then
40 days until analysis
14 days for extraction,
then 40 days until analysis
7 days for extraction, then
40 days until analysis
14 days for extraction,
then 40 days until analysis
14 days for extraction,
then 40 days until analysis
6 months to analysis,
except Hg (28 days)
6 months to analysis,
except Hg (28 days)

Hydrochloric acid
Mercury
Nitric acid
Semivolatile organic compounds
To be determined
Total petroleum hydrocarbons
Volatile organic compounds

8-2

Washington State Penitentiary RI/FS
Appendix B: Final Quality Assurance Project Plan

8. Quality Control Procedures

Field Custody Procedures
The following guidance will be used to ensure proper control of samples while in
the field:






As few people as possible will handle the samples.
The sample collector will be responsible for the care and custody of
collected samples until they are transferred to another person or dispatched
properly under chain of custody rules.
The sample collector will record sample data in the field logbook and/or on
field data forms/sheets.
The sampling team leader will determine whether proper custody
procedures were followed during the fieldwork and will decide whether
additional samples are required.

When transferring custody (i.e., releasing samples to a shipping agent), the
following will apply:









The container in which the samples are packed will be sealed and
accompanied by two copies of the chain of custody records. When
transferring samples, the individuals relinquishing and receiving them must
sign, date, and note the time on the chain of custody record. This record
will document sample custody transfer.
Samples will be dispatched to the laboratory for analysis with separate
chain of custody records accompanying each shipment. Shipping containers
will be sealed with custody seals for shipment to the laboratory. The chain
of custody records will be signed by the relinquishing individual, and the
method of shipment, name of courier, and other pertinent information will
be entered on the chain of custody record before placement in the shipping
container.
All shipments will be accompanied by chain of custody records identifying
their contents. The original record will accompany the shipment. The other
copies will be distributed appropriately to the site team leader and site
manager.
If samples are sent by common carrier, a bill of lading will be used. Freight
bills and bills of lading will be retained as part of the permanent
documentation.

Laboratory Custody Procedures
A designated sample custodian at the laboratory will accept custody of the shipped
samples from the carrier and enter preliminary information about the package into
a package or sample receipt log, including the initials of the person delivering the
package and the status of the custody seals on the coolers (i.e., broken versus
unbroken). The custodian responsible for sample log-in will follow the
laboratory’s SOP for opening the package, checking the contents, and verifying
Washington State Penitentiary RI/FS
Appendix B: Final Quality Assurance Project Plan

ecol~'
eCO)02Y

and
lIml envi.l"onmenf,
environment, inc.

8-3

February 24, 2010

8. Quality Control Procedures

that the information on the chain of custody agrees with the samples received. The
laboratory will follow its internal chain of custody procedures as stated in the
laboratory QA manual.
Field QC Samples
Field QC samples for this project will include: field (equipment rinsate) blank and
field duplicate for collection of sufficient sample volume to allow the laboratories
to conduct the QC analyses identified in Table 6. The field/rinsate blank is used to
evaluate potential contamination from sampling equipment. The matrix spike (MS)
and matrix spike duplicate (MSD) taken from the duplicate sample are co-located
samples collected concurrently with one sample; the laboratory uses the
MSs/MSDs to measure analytical precision and accuracy.
Table 6

Field Quality Control Samples for Each Parameter monitored at POTWs

Equipment/
a
b
Method
Parameter
Matrix
Rinsate Blank
Field Duplicate
MS/MSD
8260
VOCs
Soil
1 per 20 samples
1 per 20 samples
1 per 20 samples
8260
VOCs
Water
1 per 20 samples
1 per 20 samples
1 per 20 samples
8260
VOCs
Soil Gas
NA
NA
NA
8270
SVOCs
Soil
1 per 20 samples
1 per 20 samples
1 per 20 samples
8270
SVOCs
Water
1 per 20 samples
1 per 20 samples
1 per 20 samples
8270
PAHs
Soil
1 per 20 samples
1 per 20 samples
1 per 20 samples
8270
PAHs
Water
1 per 20 samples
1 per 20 samples
1 per 20 samples
8082
PCBs
Water
1 per 20 samples
1 per 20 samples
1 per 20 samples
NWTPH-Dx
TPH-D
Soil
1 per 20 samples
1 per 20 samples
1 per 20 samples
NWTPH-Dx
TPH-D
Water
1 per 20 samples
1 per 20 samples
1 per 20 samples
6000/7000 series
Metals
Soil
1 per 20 samples
1 per 20 samples
1 per 20 samples
6000/7000 series
Metals
Water
1 per 20 samples
1 per 20 samples
1 per 20 samples
a – A minimum of one rinsate blank will be collected per 20 samples of the same matrix collected using nondedicated sampling equipment.
b – A minimum of one MS/MSD for organic analyses (MS/Duplicate for metals) will be analyzed per 20 samples of
the same matrix.
Key:
MS/MSD
= Matrix spike/matrix spike duplicate.
NA
= Not applicable.
PAHs
= Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.
BNAs
= Base/neutral/acid extractable compounds (semivolatiles).
NA
= Not applicable.
NWTPH-Dx = Northwest total petroleum hydrocarbon – diesel.
TBD
= To be determined.
SVOCs
= Semivolatile organic compounds.
VOCs
= Volatile organic compounds.

The time that each individual grab sample was collected will also be noted before
the samples are composited on the site.
One equipment rinsate blank for every twenty samples will be collected. The
blanks will be collected by filling sample bottles using the same equipment used
for actual sample collection.

February 24, 2010

ecol~'
eCO)02Y

and
lIml envi.l"onmenf,
environment, inc.

8-4

Washington State Penitentiary RI/FS
Appendix B: Final Quality Assurance Project Plan

8. Quality Control Procedures

One field duplicate will be collected for every twenty samples for each analysis.
Clean blank water field (equipment rinsate) blanks will be provided by the
laboratory.
A modified one-person clean hands/dirty hands sampling technique will be used to
collect the samples.

8.2 Laboratory
Laboratory QC samples are summarized in Table 7. Detailed QA procedures are
documented in each subcontracted laboratory’s quality assurance manual. One QC
target for this project is for each lab to extract and analyze all the samples collected
during each event in a single batch. By doing this, a single set of quality control
parameters will be applicable to all samples collected during each sampling event.
Table 7

Analytical Laboratory Quality Control Samples

Method
Method
Parameter
Blank
LCS
8260
VOCs
1/batch/matrix 1/batch/matrix
8270
SVOCs
1/batch/matrix 1/batch/matrix
NWTPH
TPH-D
1/batch/matrix 1/batch/matrix
6000/7000
Metals
1/batch/matrix 1/batch/matrix
series
Key:
LCS – Laboratory control sample.
MS – Matrix spike.
MSD – Matrix spike duplicate.
NA – Not applicable.
PAHs – Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.
BNAs – Base/neutral/acid extractable compounds (semivolatiles).
NWTPH-Dx – Northwest total petroleum hydrocarbons – diesel.
TBD – To be determined.
SVOCs – Semivolatile organic compounds.
VOCs – Volatile organic compounds.
*One duplicate per batch per matrix is required for metals.

MS
1/batch/matrix
1/batch/matrix
1/batch/matrix
1/batch/matrix

MSD
1/batch/matrix
1/batch/matrix
1/batch/matrix
*

The method blank is used to assess potential contamination from sample handling
in the laboratory.
The laboratory control sample (LCS) is sometimes referred to as a blank spike.
The LCS is used to measure the accuracy of the laboratory by determining the
ability of the lab to recover known amounts of target analytes in the absence of
matrix effects.
Known amounts of target analytes are added to the MS and MSD in the laboratory.
The laboratories measure the percent recovery of these compounds to estimate
accuracy. Analytical precision is estimated by comparing the MS and MSD
recoveries. The matrix spikes allow the laboratory to assess matrix interferences.
Precision is also impacted by field variability since separate samples are being
collected.

Washington State Penitentiary RI/FS
Appendix B: Final Quality Assurance Project Plan

ecol~'
eCO)02Y

and
lIml envi.l"onmenf,
environment, inc.

8-5

February 24, 2010

This page intentionally left blank.

9

Data Verification, Review, and
Validation

9.1 Data Verification
Field data and observations will be recorded in detailed log books. All
subcontracted laboratories will provide both electronic and hard copy data
packages for data. Each data package will include a case narrative discussing any
problems with the analyses, alterations, if any, made to the methods, and an
explanation of data qualifiers. The data package will include all relevant QC
results. QC information will be used to evaluate the accuracy and precision of the
data and to determine whether measurement data quality objectives were met.
A Quality Assurance level 1 (QA1) analytical data review will be conducted
following the process outlined in Ecology QA1 review guidelines (PTI 1989).
QA1 includes review of case narratives and laboratory data. Reviews verify that
methods specified in this QAPP were followed, calibrations and QC checks are
provided for all samples, and data are correct and complete. Evaluation criteria
include holding times, calibrations, blanks, detection limits, control samples,
spike recoveries and relative percent differences, and laboratory-applied data
qualifiers.
Significant laboratory findings will be discussed with the applicable laboratory
project managers. QA summary memoranda will be prepared for the record.
Impacts, if any, to the data will be summarized and addressed in the final report.
Field data will also be evaluated for QA. Impacts, if any, to the data will be
summarized and addressed in the final report.
All reviews will be completed by the QA lead and an experienced data validation
chemist, and checked by the project manager.

Washington State Penitentiary RI/FS
Appendix B: Final Quality Assurance Project Plan

9-1

February 24, 2010

9. Data Verification, Review, and Validation

9.2 Data Quality (Usability) Assessment
Once the data verification process has been completed, the project manager will
determine whether the data are adequate for the calculations, determinations, and
decisions for which this project was conducted. If the results are acceptable, data
analysis will be completed.
Data analysis will include, but not be limited to, compiling summary statistics and
constructing plots to examine the distribution of contaminant concentrations in
samples spatially, temporally, and by source (e.g., industrial versus nonindustrial).

9.3 Data Validation
Analytical data will be validated to verify they meet project data quality
objectives and to identify any limitations of the data, following the process
outlined in Ecology QA1 review guidelines (PTI 1989). These data will be
validated by comparing calibration, accuracy, and precision results to the QC
criteria listed in the method, the laboratory SOP, and the QAPP. If no QA
guidelines exist for specific analytes, then applicable USEPA National and
Regional Data Review guidelines will be used.

9.4 Data Management Procedures
Field and laboratory project data will be entered into Excel spreadsheets. Entries
will be independently verified for accuracy.
All applicable data will be entered into Ecology’s Environmental Information
Management system (EIM). Entries will be independently verified for accuracy.

9.5 Audits and Reports
The subcontracted laboratory will conduct performance and system audits of their
procedures. Ecology’s Accreditation Program determines whether external
laboratories may be used to analyze samples.
The contractor will prepare the following reports for this project:




Draft Summary Technical Report
Final Summary Technical Report

Project data will be entered into:




January7, 2010

ecol~'
eCO)02Y

and
lIml envi.l"onmenf,
environment, inc.

Ecology’s EIM
Ecology’s Phase 2 Access database

9-2

Washington State Penitentiary RI/FS
Appendix B: Final Quality Assurance Project Plan

10

References

Ecology, July 2004a. Washington State Department of Ecology, Guidelines for Preparing
Quality Assurance Project Plans for Environmental Studies, Publication
Number 04-03-030.
EPA. 1986. USEPA Test Methods for Evaluating Solid Waste, Physical Chemical
Methods, 3rd edition SW-846
______. 1999. EPA, USEPA Contract Laboratory Program National Functional
Guidelines for Organic Data Review, EPA-540/R-99-008 (PB99-963506),
October 1999.
______. 2004. Review, OSWER 9240.1-45, EPA 540-R-04-004, October 2004.
PTI. 1989. Data Validation Guidance Manual for Selected Sediment Variables. Prepared
by PTI Environmental Services for Washington Department of Ecology, Olympia,
Washington.

Washington State Penitentiary RI/FS
Appendix B: Final Quality Assurance Project Plan

10-1

February 24, 2010

This page intentionally left blank.

A

Meeting Notes
This is Appendix A to the document:
Appendix B: Final Quality Assurance Project Plan

Washington State Penitentiary RI/FS
Appendix B: Final Quality Assurance Project Plan

A-1

February 24, 2010

This page intentionally left blank.

C

Health and Safety Plan

Washington State Penitentiary RI/FS
Appendix C: Health and Safety Plan

February 24, 2010

This page intentionally left blank

Project Health and Safety Plan
Washington State Penitentiary
Remedial Investigation/
Feasibility Study

Washlng(on
Washington Siale
State
DEPARTMENT
D6WlTMEHT Of CDRRECTlONS
CORRECTIONS

February 2010

Project Health and Safety Plan
Washington State Penitentiary
Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study

Prepared for

Washington State Department of Corrections
Departments of General Administration/Corrections (DGA/DOC) Team Program
Box 41112
Olympia, WA 98504

Prepared by

Parametrix
1231 Fryar Avenue
Sumner, WA 98390-1516
T. 253.863.5128 F. 253.863.0946
www.parametrix.com

February 2010 │ 215-2662-004 (01/03)

CITATION

Parametrix. 2010. Project Health and Safety Plan
Washington State Penitentiary Remedial
Investigation/Feasibility Study. Prepared by
Parametrix, Sumner, Washington. February 2010.

Project Health and Safety Plan Washington State Penitentiary
Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study
Washington State Department of Corrections

TABLE OF CONTENTS
PROJECT HEALTH AND SAFETY INFORMATION SHEET .................................... v
1. INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................. 1
2. SCOPE OF WORK .............................................................................................. 1
3. HAZARD ANALYSIS ........................................................................................... 1
3.1 PHYSICAL HAZARD ANALYSIS ......................................................................... 1
3.2 CHEMICAL HAZARD ANALYSIS ........................................................................ 5
4. MONITORING OF CHEMICAL HAZARDS .......................................................... 5
5. PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT ........................................................... 6
6. SITE CONTROL AND DECONTAMINATION ...................................................... 7
7. TRAINING ........................................................................................................... 8
8. PROJECT/EMERGENCY CONTACTS AND PROCEDURES ............................. 8
8.1 EMERGENCY ASSISTANCE ................................................................................. 9
8.2 POTENTIAL INCIDENTS ....................................................................................... 9
8.3 ADVERSE WEATHER CONDITIONS ................................................................. 10
9. STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES ....................................................... 10
10. REFERENCES .................................................................................................. 11
LIST OF FIGURES
1

WSP RI Project Vicinity Map ................................................................................... 3

LIST OF TABLES
1

Physical Hazard Analysis for Project Activities, WSP RI/FS ................................... 2

2

Air Monitoring and Action Levels ............................................................................ 5

3

Exposure Concentrations for Potential Chemicals of Concern ................................. 6

4

Project and Emergency Contacts ............................................................................... 8

APPENDICES
A

Forms

B

Map and Directions to Hospital

C

Standard Operating Procedures

February 2010 │ 215-2662-004 (01/03)

i

Project Health and Safety Plan Washington State Penitentiary
Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study
Washington State Department of Corrections

KEY TERMS
COCs

chemicals of concern

CPR

cardiopulmonary resuscitation

DOC

Department of Corrections

FS

feasibility study

HASP

Health and Safety Plan

HAZWOPER

Hazardous Waste Operation

HVOCs

halogenated volatile organic compounds

HWA

HWA Geosciences Incorporated

NIOSH

National Institute of Safety and Health

PID

photoionization detector

PPE

personal protective equipment

RI

remedial investigation

SOPs

standard operating procedures

VOCs

volatile organic compounds

WSP

Washington State Penitentiary

February 2010 │ 215-2662-004 (01/03)

iii

Project Health and Safety Plan Washington State Penitentiary
Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study
Washington State Department of Corrections

PROJECT HEALTH AND SAFETY INFORMATION SHEET
Project Manager:

Mike Warfel, Parametrix

Date:

February 25, 2010

Project Name:

Washington State Penitentiary RI/FS

Project No.:

215-2662-004

Site Name and
Address:

Washington State Penitentiary
1313 N. 13th Street, Walla Walla, Washington

Client Contact:

Jack Olson

Site Description:

Over many years of operation, the Washington State Penitentiary used hazardous
chemicals in its dry cleaning, machine repair, metalworking, and refueling activities. The
purpose of the Remedial Investigation is to gather more information to determine where
and how much contamination is present in soil and groundwater. The Feasibility Study
will evaluate cleanup alternatives in preparation for a cleanup action.

Estimated Date of
Fieldwork:

Spring 2010

Phone:

Due Date of Health &
Safety Plan:

(360) 725-8342

February 25, 2010

Type of Work to be Performed (check all that apply):
File Review

Notes:

Surveying

Environmental
Sampling

Engineering and/or
Maintenance Work
(specify below)

Inspection

Parametrix will be performing a subsurface soil and groundwater investigation at the three sites involving
utility location by conventional and air knife methods, direct push boring and well installation, and
sampling of soil and groundwater in preparation for road improvements.

Collection of Field Samples:
Groundwater

Surface
Water

Biological

Notes:

Soil

Air

Entry into confined spaces (e.g., storage
tank, sewer, utility vault, trenches, or other
excavations)

Wastes (specify)
Other (please specify) –
Soil Gas

Identified contaminants of concern include petroleum hydrocarbons, volatile and semivolatile organic
compounds (VOCs and SVOCs), and metals in soil and groundwater water. High levels of noise and
safety hazards may be present from sampling equipment.

Role of Parametrix at site (check one):
Prime Contractor
Notes:

Subcontractor to:

Parametrix personnel will be conducting the remedial activities shown below. Drilling will be completed
by a subcontractor.
Drilling

Operations and
Maintenance

Surveying

Remedial Actions

Construction

Field Team Leader:

To Be Determined

Health and Safety Officers:

Corporate: Sheila McConnell, CIH
Site: To Be Determined

Field Sampling

Regulatory/Enforcement Status of Site (check all that apply):
Superfund Site
Enforcement Actions (please check all that apply and describe)
Federal
State – Department of Ecology Agreed Order
Local
Voluntary Investigations by Site Owner
On-site inspectors present? (If yes, provide names, phone numbers, and agency affiliations.)
Notes:

February 2010 │ 215-2662-004 (01/03)

v

Project Health and Safety Plan Washington State Penitentiary
Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study
Washington State Department of Corrections

1.

INTRODUCTION
The Department of Corrections (DOC) has retained Parametrix to conduct a remedial
investigation (RI) and feasibility study (FS) of the Washington State Penitentiary (WSP)
located at Walla Walla, Washington (Figure 1).
This Project Health and Safety Plan (HASP) presents project specific health and safety
requirements for the RI. This project HASP is designed for use in conjunction with the
Parametrix Health and Safety Manual (Parametrix 2003).
The health and safety requirements presented in this document are applicable to Parametrix
employees and Parametrix subcontractors working on the project or persons visiting the job
site during remediation activities. Any modification or additions to this project HASP will be
completed as an addendum in the form of a technical memorandum.

2.

SCOPE OF WORK
Parametrix’s primary role is to conduct a surface and subsurface soil, soil gas, and
groundwater investigation where the proposed activities include:

•
•

Observation of utility location services provided by a subcontractor.

•
•
•

Collection of surface soil samples using hand tools and test pits.

•

Collection of samples of soil cuttings from drilling.

Observation of drilling services to be provided by a subcontractor, using the sonic
drilling method.

Collection of soil gas samples.
Collection of soil and groundwater samples during drilling.

The overall hazard level associated with the above activities is expected to be low on a scale
of low, moderate, and high. An analysis of potential hazards associated with the activities is
presented in Section 3.

3.

HAZARD ANALYSIS
A hazard analysis was conducted for the field activities described in Section 2 to identify
potential health and safety concerns. The hazard analysis will be updated if additional
project-related hazards are identified.

3.1 PHYSICAL HAZARD ANALYSIS
Physical hazards that may be encountered at the site are presented below in Table 1.

February 2010 │ 215-2662-004 (01/03)

1

Project Health and Safety Plan Washington State Penitentiary
Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study
Washington State Department of Corrections

Table 1. Physical Hazard Analysis for Project Activities, WSP RI/FS
Activity
Drilling

Hazard
Slip/Trips/Falls

Flying Debris/Soil and
Splashing Liquids
Drilling Rig

Pinch Points

Noise
Falling Objects
Utility Contact
Heat or Cold Stress

Environmental
Sampling

Slip/Trips/Falls

Flying Debris/Soil and
Splashing Liquids

•
•
•
•
•
•

Wear safety glasses or other applicable eye protection.

•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•

Wear hardhat and steel-toed footwear.
Know the location of drill emergency stop switch.
Confirm the stop switch procedure with the driller
Maintain eye contact with driller.
Don’t move drill rig with mast up.
Check minimum distance to power lines.

•
•
•

Keep work areas free of debris, etc.
Clean up work areas following completion of activities.
Watch for debris and other hazards that may be present from past site
operations.
Follow required safety procedures.

•
•

Identify pinch points prior to starting equipment.
Be aware of equipment location and body placement.
Know the location of drill emergency stop switch.
Maintain eye contact with operator.
Wear earplugs while equipment is operating.
Wear hardhat and steel-toed footwear.
Perform a utility locate prior to drilling.
Keep at least three feet from utility markings.
Wear several layers of clothing during cold weather
Dress in cotton clothing during hot weather.
Take frequent breaks to warm up in running vehicles during cold weather.
Take frequent breaks to cool down in the shade during hot weather.
Watch other workers on site for signs of heat or cold stress during the
workday.

Wear safety glasses or other applicable eye protection.

Working Around
Water

•
•
•

Use buddy system.
Wear shaded safety glasses to reduce glare from water.
Do not enter or work over water unless wearing a personal floatation
device.

Contact with
Contaminated Media
and Preservatives

•
•

Collect and handle samples wearing appropriate PPE.
Employ proper shipping and packing procedures.

Cuts/Abrasions

•
•
•
•
•
•
•

Use proper cutting tools.
Be careful with sharp objects.
Do not cut towards yourself.
Conduct sampling using proper operation of the sampling equipment.

Overhead
Lifting

2

Mitigation
Keep work areas free of debris, etc.
Clean up work areas following completion of activities.
Watch for debris and other hazards that may be present from past site
operations.
Follow required safety procedures.
Use proper illumination.

Wear hardhat and steel toed footwear.
Maintain eye contact with driller and other heavy equipment operators.
Use proper lifting equipment and techniques when moving equipment,
tools, drums, etc.

February 2010│ 215-2662-004 (01/03)

WASHINGTON
Groundwater Flow

Source: Google Earth Pro, 2008.

Washington State Penitentiary
Property Boundary

See Figure 2

Walla Walla

Washington State Penitentiary Landfill
MW-5
MW-2
MW-9
MW-4

Sudbury Landfill

MW-3

Burlington Northern Pacific Rail Road

MW-7

MW-10

MW-1
MW-8
MW-8A
MW-11
MW-6

CITY OF WALLA WALLA

Southern Drainage Pond

Key:
Sudbury Road Landfill Groundwater
Monitoring Well

Mill Creek

Washington State Penitentiary Groundwater
Monitoring Well
Washington State Penitentiary Property Boundary
Washington State Penitentiary Landfill
Sudbury Landfill
Note: Monitoring well locations are approximate.

ecology and environment, inc.
&

International Specialists in the Environment
Seattle, Washington

0

N

1072
Approximate Scale in Feet

2144

WASHINGTON STATE PENITENTIARY
Walla, Walla, Washington

Figure 1
SITE LOCATION MAP
Date:
6/9/09

Drawn by:
AES

10:002330WD2703\fig 1

Project Health and Safety Plan Washington State Penitentiary
Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study
Washington State Department of Corrections

3.2 CHEMICAL HAZARD ANALYSIS
Parametrix will be working with staff from HWA Geosciences Incorporated (HWA). HWA
has conducted several investigations within the project area. Petroleum hydrocarbons,
halogenated volatile organic compounds (HVOCs), and various metals have been identified
as potential chemicals of concern.
Precautions will be taken by all persons conducting remedial activities at the site to minimize
exposure to potential chemicals of concern. Information on reducing contact with potential
chemicals of concern is presented in the following sections.
This section will be updated if additional chemicals of concern (COCs) associated with other
locations within the WSP RI/FS project are identified.

4.

MONITORING OF CHEMICAL HAZARDS
Air monitoring with a photoionization detector (PID) will be performed when sampling soil
suspected of containing hydrocarbons or HVOCs to determine if the level of Personal
Protective Equipment (Section 5) will need to be upgraded from Level D to Level C, which
requires respiratory protection. Air monitoring and action levels are listed in Table 2, and
exposure limits for potential contaminants of concern are shown in Table 3.
If a change in conditions (i.e., odor, etc.) indicates a need to upgrade personal protective
equipment (PPE), the Parametrix Site Health and Safety Officer will upgrade the PPE to
Level C, and the Corporate Health and Safety Officer and the site Task Manager will be
notified immediately. Contact information is presented in Chapter 8.
All air-monitoring and instrumentation-calibration data will be recorded in the field
notebook. Air monitoring instruments will be calibrated and maintained in accordance with
the manufacturer’s specifications.
Table 2. Air Monitoring and Action Levels

Exposure
Screening for
organic and
inorganic
vapors

Monitoring
Description

Method
PID

A PID will be used to
assess potential
exposures to organic
vapors.

Action Level
>10 ppm
sustained for
5 minutes

Action

• Terminate operation and move
•
•
•
•

Metals

Notes:

Visual
Observation

Exposure to airborne
particulates which
could contain metals
will be assessed using
visual observation
methods

Visible emissions

upwind
Ventilate area, as needed
Investigate cause
Upgrade to Level C Respirator with
organic vapor/HEPA cartridge, if
warranted
Wet area and screen with PID prior
to resuming work

Control with water spray

HEPA = high efficiency particulate air
PID = Photoionization Detector.
ppm = parts per million

February 2010 │ 215-2662-004 (01/03)

5

Project Health and Safety Plan Washington State Penitentiary
Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study
Washington State Department of Corrections

Table 3. Exposure Concentrations for Potential Chemicals of Concern
Analyte

Time Weighted 8-Hour, Permissible
Exposure Limit

Immediately Dangerous to
Life and Health

Benzene

1 ppm

500 ppm

Ethylbenzene

100 ppm

800 ppm

Toluene

100 ppm

500 ppm

Xylene

100 ppm

900 ppm

Arsenic

0.2 mg m

Cadmium
Chromium
Lead

3

0.005 mg/m
0.5 mg/m

0.050 mg/m

Mercury

0.1 mg/m

3

3

5 mg/m

3

9 mg/m

3

25 mg/m
3

3

3

100 mg/m
10 mg/m

3

3

Naphthalene and
associated compounds

10 ppm

250 ppm

Trichloroethylene

50 ppm

1,000 ppm

Tetrachloroethylene

25 ppm

150 ppm

Vinyl Chloride

1 ppm

None Determined

300 ppm

None Determined

Gasoline
Source:

WAC 296-841 Table 3 (2007), NIOSH IDLH Program (1995)

Notes:

mg/m3 = micrograms per cubic meter
ppm = parts per million

5.

PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT
Based on available chemical information for the project sites, Level D PPE will be used for
conducting sampling activities. If site conditions indicate a high level of protection is
required, site personnel will be prepared to use Level C PPE. This level of protection
generally includes:
Level D

6

•
•

Steel-toe/shank leather or rubber boots/shoes.

•
•
•
•

Nitrile surgical weight gloves to be used as inner gloves, as needed.

•

Hearing protection for all activities in areas where it is necessary to shout to
communicate, or as decided.

Coveralls, polycoated Tyvek suit, or equivalent, as needed for working with
contaminated soil and water.

Work gloves, nitrile gloves, or equivalent, to use as outer gloves, as needed.
Hardhat.
Safety glasses or goggles for general site work and with shading to control glare
when working around water.

February 2010│ 215-2662-004 (01/03)

Project Health and Safety Plan Washington State Penitentiary
Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study
Washington State Department of Corrections

Level C

•

Steel-toe/shank leather or rubber boots/shoes.

•

Tyvek, Saranex, poly coated Tyvek, or equivalent coveralls, as needed for working
with contaminated soil and water.

•

Nitrile surgical weight gloves to be used as inner gloves.

•

Work gloves, nitrile gloves, or equivalent, to use as outer gloves, as needed.

•

Hardhat.

•

Safety glasses or goggles for general site work and with shading to control glare
when working around water.

•

Hearing protection for all activities in areas where it is necessary to shout to
communicate, or as decided.

•

Full face air-purifying respirator.

Additional information on PPE is presented the Parametrix Health and Safety Manual
(Parametrix 2003) and Standard Operating Procedure HS-002, Appendix C of this document.
At least one first aid kit and cellular phone will be available on-site in the company vehicle
during onsite activities.

6.

SITE CONTROL AND DECONTAMINATION
Work site controls will be established whenever soil disturbance may take place.
Non-intrusive inspections and other similar activities do not need hazardous waste site
controls; however, there may be other crews with site zones established, and these shall be
respected and maintained. It is anticipated that cones with tape barriers will be set up around
areas of contaminated soil prior to and during excavation activities.
The object of site control is to assure that only qualified personnel enter potentially hazardous
locations and to effectively control the spread of contamination. As a minimum, a “hot” zone,
extending approximately 10 feet from the work, should be established. If the sampling
personnel are reasonably certain that untrained, unprotected people will not enter the “hot”
zone, then demarcation may not be necessary.
Barrier tape and cones will be used to demarcate contaminated soil prior to and during
excavation activities. Only personnel with a current 40-hour Hazardous Waste Operation
(HAZWOPER) certification and up-to-date refresher course will be allowed inside the
restricted areas.
The following items will be followed when establishing site control:

•

Site control measures shall be established prior to beginning any work that disturbs
potentially contaminants soils.

•

Personnel will not enter vehicles with dirty boots, boot covers, or in dirty coveralls.
Set the job up to keep the sediments in their original location on the site.

•

The work area shall be protected from public intrusion.

•

It is up to each sampling crew to establish site control based on potential hazards and
on the crew’s planned activities. Make it practical and useful.

•

All tools used for sampling will be properly decontaminated after each use.

Any potentially contaminated personnel will decontaminate prior to getting into vehicles,
vessels, eating lunch, or leaving the site.
February 2010 │ 215-2662-004 (01/03)

7

Project Health and Safety Plan Washington State Penitentiary
Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study
Washington State Department of Corrections

For all personnel working within a “hot” zone, decontamination will be conducted to remove
gross contamination that may have accumulated on workers, equipment, and sampling
supplies during site activities and to prevent the migration of contaminants from the site.
Decontamination may consist of brushing with a stiff brush to remove dry particles and, if
necessary, washing with household soap or an Alconox solution and rinsing with clean water.
Additional information on decontamination procedures can be found in the Parametrix Health
and Safety Manual (Parametrix 2003) and Standard Operating Procedure HS-007,
Appendix C of this document.
All water used for decontamination by personnel will be containerized and disposed of
following site waste handling procedures or as described in the Parametrix Health and Safety
Manual and Standard Operating Procedure HS-006, Appendix C of this document.

7.

TRAINING
All personnel conducting sampling activities on the project site must be HAZWOPER trained
per the federal requirement 29 CFR 1910.120 and be current with their annual eight hour
refresher course. All personnel should have proof of currency with HAZWOPER training
requirements available on the project site.
All personnel working at the project site will be briefed on potential site hazards, health and
safety procedures, site construction rules and requirements, and sampling procedures. Following
completion of this training, all personnel will be required to sign an acknowledgement form
verifying that they have completed the project-specific health and safety training. A copy of the
Project-Specific Training Acknowledgement Form is included in Appendix A.
The Site Health and Safety Officer will conduct a tailgate safety meeting will be conducted
each morning prior to the start of daily field activities. Each employee and, as appropriate,
subcontractor personnel will attend the tailgate safety meeting and sign the daily tailgate
meeting log. A Daily Tailgate Meeting Log is included in Appendix A.

8.

PROJECT/EMERGENCY CONTACTS AND PROCEDURES
The project and emergency contacts are shown in Table 4. These contacts will be updated as
needed.
Table 4. Project and Emergency Contacts
Name

8

Role

Phone Number

Jack Olson

Department of Corrections Environmental Manager

(360) 725-8342

Mike Warfel

Parametrix Project Manager

(253) 863-5128
(425) 457-0621 (cell)

Arnie Sugar

HWA Project Manager

(425) 774-0106 (ext. 227)

To Be Determined

SAR Safety Officer

To Be Determined

Field Sampling Staff

To Be Determined

Field Sampling Staff

To Be Determined

Field Sampling Staff

Sheila McConnell

Corporate Health and Safety Officer

(425) 452-8655
(425) 681-7516 (cell)

Emergency (fire, accident, etc.)

–

911

Providence St. Mary Medical Center

–

(509) 525-3320

Poison Control Center

–

(800) 222-1222

February 2010│ 215-2662-004 (01/03)

Project Health and Safety Plan Washington State Penitentiary
Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study
Washington State Department of Corrections

8.1 EMERGENCY ASSISTANCE
Table 4 provides a list of emergency telephone numbers. This list is to be in the possession of
the Site Health and Safety Officer.
At least one cell phone will be available onsite at all times during sampling activities. In the
event of an emergency, 911 will be called immediately. If a non-emergency injury occurs that
requires treatment, refer to the map and directions to the nearest hospital (Providence St.
Mary Medical Center) in Appendix B.

8.2 POTENTIAL INCIDENTS
Although considered unlikely, the following situations could occur and would require an
emergency response action:

•
•
•
•
•

Sudden release of hazardous vapors/combustible gases.
Problems due to contacting utility lines (gas, electric, water).
Fire.
Medical emergency.
Overt exposure (skin contact, inhalation, ingestion).

Release of Hazardous Vapors/Combustible Gases
In the event of a sudden release of hazardous vapors or gases constituting a potentially
hazardous situation (e.g., adequate respiratory protection is unavailable, atmospheres are
immediately dangerous to life or health or explosive, there is an imminent public health and
safety hazard), the Site Health and Safety Officer will suspend operations and evacuate the
site, and call 911. All personnel will be required to evacuate to a pre-designated safe area
upwind of the release.
The Field Health and Safety Officer, in consultation with the emergency response agencies,
fire department, and facility or system owner/operator, will attempt to control or secure the
spread of contamination whenever possible.
Utilities
If aboveground or underground utilities are damaged or contacted, call 911 to notify the local
fire department. If injury occurs, see Medical Emergency section below.
Fire
In the event of a fire, call 911.
Medical Emergency
At least one Parametrix employee or onsite worker will have current certification in first aid
and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). In the event of a serious injury or illness, call 911
immediately. For non life threatening injuries that do not impair driving ability, site personnel
will drive to Providence St. Mary Medical Center in Walla Walla. Appendix B illustrates the
route to the hospital.
A first aid kit will be available at the site for use in case of minor injuries. First aid
responders should protect themselves from contact with blood and other human body fluids
by wearing latex gloves or establishing an equivalent barrier. Any contact with blood should
be reported to the Site Health and Safety Officer.

February 2010 │ 215-2662-004 (01/03)

9

Project Health and Safety Plan Washington State Penitentiary
Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study
Washington State Department of Corrections

Exposure
In the event of respiratory exposure, dermal or eye contact, or ingestion, the following
procedures will be followed:

•

Respiratory Exposure (Inhalation). Move to fresh air. Summon paramedics and notify
facility or system owner/operator. Any loss of consciousness or exposure to elevated
levels of known toxic contaminants, even if the individual appears to have fully
recovered, will require immediate treatment and/or surveillance by a qualified
physician.

•

Dermal Contact. Flush area with copious amounts of soap and water. Wash/rinse
affected area for at least 15 minutes. Decontaminate and provide medical attention.

•

Eye Contact. Flush eye(s) for a period of 15 minutes and transport worker to the
nearest emergency medical facility. Treatment and/or surveillance by a qualified
physician are required.

•

Ingestion. Notify the local Poison Control Center and/or emergency medical facility
and immediately transport to the facility.

8.3 ADVERSE WEATHER CONDITIONS
In the event of adverse weather conditions, the Field Health and Safety Officer will determine
if sampling activities can continue without endangering field personnel. Some of the
conditions to be considered prior to determining if activities should continue are as follows:

9.

•
•

Potential for thermal stress (e.g., heat or cold stress) and related injuries.

•
•

Limited visibility.

Dangerous weather related working conditions that would preclude working from a
boat (e.g., high winds, rain, snow, fog, lightning, etc.).

Potential for electrical storms. No outside activities will be permitted during
electrical storms.

STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES
The following project-related standard operating procedures (SOPs) are included in Appendix C:

10

•

Personal Protective Equipment (SOP HS-002).

•
•
•
•

Respiratory Protection (SOP HS-003).
Handling of Investigation Derived Waste (SOP HS-006).
Decontamination (SOP HS-007).
Heat Stress (SOP HS-010).

February 2010│ 215-2662-004 (01/03)

Project Health and Safety Plan Washington State Penitentiary
Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study
Washington State Department of Corrections

10. REFERENCES
National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). 1994. Documentation for
immediately dangerous to life or health concentrations (IDLH): NIOSH chemical listing
and documentation of revised IDLH values (as of 3/1/1995). Available at
<http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/idlh/intridl4.html>.
National Institute of Safety and Health (NIOSH). 2005. Pocket guide to chemical hazards.
September. www.cdc.gov/niosh/npg
Parametrix. 2003. Parametrix health and safety manual. Prepared for EPA Region X. March.
Washington Administrative Code 296-841. Department of Labor and Industries, Division of
Occupational Safety and Health. Airborne contaminants. April 2007 Edition.

February 2010 │ 215-2662-004 (01/03)

11

APPENDIX A
Forms

PROJECT-SPECIFIC TRAINING ACKNOWLEDGEMENT FORM
FOR HAZARDOUS WASTE OPERATIONS
Prior to the initiation of field activities, I attended a site-specific training for the Palermo
Groundwater Long-term Monitoring Project. The training included topics that are covered in the
Parametrix Health and Safety Manual and the project-specific Health and Safety Plan (HASP).
Additionally, I have been given an opportunity to read and questions the contents of these
documents.
By signature, I certify that I have read, understood, and agree to comply with the information
and directions set forth in the aforementioned documents and site-specific training. I further
certify that I am in full compliance with OSHA 29 CFR 1910.120 in regards to training and
medical monitoring requirements, as well as all other federal, state, and local regulations in
regards to training and medical requirements.
SITE SPECIFIC OPERATIONS, POTENTIAL HAZARDS, AND CONTROL
PRINTED NAME

SIGNATURE

DATE:

MEETING LOCATION:

TRAINER:

TITLE:

COMMENTS/EXCEPTIONS/EXEMPTIONS:

TRAINER SIGNATURE:

TRAINING DATE

PARAMETRIX
DAILY HEALTH AND SAFETY TAILGATE
MEETING LOG
DATE/TIME

NAME (PRINT)

NAME (SIGNATURE)

TOPIC

APPENDIX B
Map and Directions to Hospital

1313 N 13th Ave, Walla Walla, WA 99362 to 401 W Poplar St, Walla Walla, WA 99362 - Google ... Page 1 of 2
Directions to 401 W Poplar St, Walla Walla, WA
99362
1.8 mi – about 5 mins

Loading...

©2010 Google - Map data ©2010 Google -

http://maps.google.com/maps?f=d&source=s_d&saddr=1313+West+13th+St+Walla+Walla+WA&d... 2/25/2010

1313 N 13th Ave, Walla Walla, WA 99362 to 401 W Poplar St, Walla Walla, WA 99362 - Google ... Page 2 of 2

1313 N 13th Ave, Walla Walla, WA 99362
1. Head south on N 13th Ave/WA-125 S toward Carrie Ave
Continue to follow N 13th Ave
About 2 mins

go 1.1 mi
total 1.1 mi

2. Turn left at W Rose St
About 2 mins

go 0.4 mi
total 1.6 mi

3. Turn right at S 7th Ave
About 1 min

go 0.2 mi
total 1.8 mi

4. Take the 3rd left onto W Poplar St
Destination will be on the right

go 371 ft
total 1.8 mi

401 W Poplar St, Walla Walla, WA 99362
These directions are for planning purposes only. You may find that construction projects, traffic, weather, or other events may cause conditions to
differ from the map results, and you should plan your route accordingly. You must obey all signs or notices regarding your route.
Map data ©2010 Google
Directions weren't right? Please find your route on maps.google.com and click "Report a problem" at the bottom left.

http://maps.google.com/maps?f=d&source=s_d&saddr=1313+West+13th+St+Walla+Walla+WA&d... 2/25/2010

APPENDIX C
Standard Operating Procedures

SOP HS-002

Parametrix

Issued: March 12, 2003
Revision No.1
Page 1 of 3

ENGINEERING. PLAN .... ING • ENVIRONMI:NTAL SCIENCES

PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT

Date:

3- I () ... () 3.

Date:

Reviewed By:

Approved By:

Date:
Chief Operating Officer

1.0

Purpose

This Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) establishes guidelines for selection and use of Personal
Protective Equipment (PPE) used to protect Parametrix employees from the risk of injury by creating a
barrier against workplace hazards.

2.0

Scope

29 CFR 1910, SUbpart I requires the use of PPE to reduce employees' exposures to hazards when
engineering and administrative controls are not feasible or effective in reducing these exposures to
acceptable levels. Employers are required to determine all exposures to hazards in their workplace and
determine if PPE should be used to protect their workers. OSHA requires employers to conduct
inspections of all workplaces to determine the need for PPE and to help in selecting the proper PPE for
each task performed.
This SOP addresses eye, face, head, foot, hand, and body protection.
discussed in SOP HS~003.

3.0

Respiratory protection is

Responsibilities

There are specific responsibilities for Parametrix personnel in the care and use of PPE, depending on an
individual's role within the company or on a given project. These responsibilities are outlined below:
•

Corporate Health and Safety Officer (CHSO): The Corporate Health and Safety Officer is
responsible for developing the PPE Program and updating PPE procedures, as necessary.

•

Project Manager: The Project Manager is responsible for field implementation of the PPE
Program. This includes assurance that all personnel on site comply with the policy and that
all on-site personnel have had proper training in using PPE .

•

Site-specific Health and Safety Officer (SHSO): The Site-specific Health and Safety
Officer is responsible for initial on-site coordination of the cold stress. The SHSO assures that
all personal potentially exposed to potential environmental hazards have proper PPE.

•

Team Member: Each Team Member is responsible for understanding and complying with all
site requirements.

:~::,.::~~
.,(:-:~

.~

...

"~:'i.'~1.':

'.J

SOP

Parametrix

HS~002

I ssued: March 12, 2003
Revision No. 1
Page 2 of 3

ENGI .... eERING • Pl.ANNING • ENViRONMENTAL SCIENcES

PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT

4.0

Requirements

Eye and Face Protection

Eye and face protection shall be used when employees are exposed to potential hazards from flying
particles, molten metal, acids or caustic liquids, chemicals, or gases. Eye and face protection
requirements include:
•

Appropriate eye and face protection devices in hazardous environments for personnel who
wear contact lenses.

•

Side protectors when there is a hazard from flying objects.

•

Goggles and face shields when there is a hazard from chemical splash.

•

Face shields worn only over primary eye protection (safety glasses or goggles).

•

Eye protectors that incorporate an employee's corrective eye prescription in the design or
that fit properly over the prescription lenses.

Emergency eyewash facilities meeting the requirements of ANSI Z358.1 will be provided in all areas
where the eyes of any employee may be exposed to corrosive materials. All such emergency facilities will
be located where they are easily accessible in an emergency.
Protective eye and face devices purchased after July 5, 1994 shall comply with ANSI Z87.1-1989,
"American National Standard Practice for Occupational and Educational Eye and Face Protection."
Head Protection

Head protection (hard hat) must be worn by all employees when overhead hazards from falling or fixed
objects are present. Also, when an employee is near exposed electrical conductors that could come in
contact with the head, the employee must wear a protective helmet designed to reduce electrical shock
hazard.
''!.·'::~'n:~.~

Protective headgear shall comply with ANSI Z89.1-1986, "American National Standard for Personnel
Protection-Protective Headwear for Industrial Workers-Requirements."

,~ -""ry'.!J~

"

z.:-.;~·;:~

Foot Protection

~!.~l.~.
:.-

.;'l-~}¥~j

Steel-toed boots or shoes must be worn in work areas where carrying or handling materials such as
packages, objects, parts, or heavy tools could be dropped or fall onto the feet. Safety shoes or boots with
puncture protection are required where sharp objects such as nails, wire, tacks, screws, large staples,
scrap metal, etc., could be stepped on by employees and cause foot injury.
When working with hazardous chemicals or waste, chemical-resistant, steel-toed boots may be required.
All safety footwear shall comply with ANSI Z41-1991, "American National Standard for Personal
Protection - Protective Footwear."

SOP

Parametrix

ENGINEERING. PI.ANNING

III

HS~002

Issued: March 12, 2003
Revision No.1
Page 3 of3

ENVJRONMENTAL SCIENCES

PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT

Hand Protection
Suitable gloves shall be worn when hazards from chemicals, cuts, lacerations, abrasions, punctures,
burns, and other hazards to the hands are present. Glove selection shall be based on performance
characteristics of the gloves, conditions, durations of use, and hazards present.
The first consideration in the selection of gloves for use against chemicals is to determine, if possible, the
nature of the substances to be encountered. Employees must read instructions and warnings on
chemical container labels and MSDSs before working with any chemical.

Body Protection
Suitable body protection (torso and legs) must be worn while completing job tasks. Depending on the
hazards present, body protection may include coveralls, Tyvek or Saranex suits, totally encapsulating
suits, etc. The type of body protection required to perform a specific task will be determined by the
Corporate or Site-specific Health and Safety Officer, as necessary.

5.0

Training

Any worker required to wear PPE shall receive training in the proper use and care of PPE. The training
shall include, but not necessarily be limited to, the following subjects:
•

Determining when wearing PPE is necessary.

•

Determining the appropriate and necessary PPE.

•

Learning how to properly wear, adjust, and remove PPE.

•

Understanding the limitations of PPE.

•

Understanding the proper care, maintenance, and disposal of PPE.

References
'T<""'~\
'.;":'i":J

~~~~'7;;;

,.: • • •

0.

U.S. Department of Labor, OSHA Standard 29 CFR 1910, Subpart I.

SOP HS-003

Parametrix

Issued: March 12, 2003
Revision No.1
Page 1 of 11

eNGINeeRING. PLANNING. ENVIRONMeNTAL SCIENCES

RESPIRATORY PROTECTION PROGRAM

Date:

1.0

Reviewed By:

Date:

Approved By:

Date:

j-It) -cJ.Y

Purpose

To establish the minimum requirements for Parametrix, Inc. employees to use respiratory protection.

2.0

Scope

This Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) applies in its entirety to all Parametrix projects unless the
Corporate Health and Safety Officer (CHSO) grants a variance.

3.0

Responsibilities

There are specific responsibilities for Parametrix personnel in complying with the Respiratory Protection
Program, depending on an individual's role within the company or on a given project. These
responsibilities are outlined below:

•

Project Manager: Overall responsible for establishing and ensuring compliance with this
procedure.

-'>'·i''''''~

•

Field Health and Safety Staff:
associated with this procedure.

~~~~~

•

Managers and Supervisory Personnel: Responsible for enforcing this procedure and
ensuring that each employee is properly following the procedure.

to
~

\,. \
:5: ·w
~~*~~~

,

~':'~~t

\~'1,.:.:.~;;~.

Responsible for. implementing and/or monitoring activities

....Ji:-:-\~~

l;~,).

4.0

General Requirements

~;?~~~

Respirator wearers cannot be afforded protection from hazardous airborne contaminants when conditions
prevent a complete gas-tight face seat. Facial hair, head hair, and eyeglasses are among these physical
obstructions. While eyeglasses are in the category of obstructions that prevent a gas-tight face seal,
primarily in the case of full-face supplied-air respirators, this problem is correctable by using mounting
devices to hold the eyeglass frames inside the respirator face piece. The criteria state that there can be
no obstruction of contact between the wearer's skin and the mask. Beard stubble constitutes a physical
obstruction. Affected employees shall be required to be clean-shaven, as a condition of employment.

SOP HS-003

Parametrix

ENGINEERING

'II

Issued: March 12, 2003
Revision No.1
Page 2 of 11

PLANNING. ENVIRONMENTAL SCIeNCES

RESPIRATORY PROTECTION PROGRAM

Candidates for employment who object to this policy shall be made aware that their versatility on work
assignments may be limited and that this factor can affect their job assignments.
Parametrix shall provide respirators whenever a qualified person determines that such equipment is
necessary to protect the health of the employee from significant inhalation exposure.
Only respirator equipment that has been jointly approved by the Mine Safety and Health Administration
(MSHA) and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) shall be provided.
Employees shall be instructed and trained in the need, use, sanitary care, and limitations of such
respiratory equipment prior to being assigned to activities that require respiratory protection.
Parametrix shall provide, repair, or replace respiratory protective equipment as may be required due to
wear and deterioration.
Means of cleaning all respiratory protective equipment shall be provided.
Only those employees who are trained and medically qualified to wear respirators shall be assigned to
work requiring use of respirators.

5.0

Implementation

Respiratory Selection

When respirator use is required, only properly cleaned and maintained NIOSH/MSHA~approved
respirators shall be used. Single-use respirators (dust masks) may only be used with specific approval by
the Corporate Health and Safety Officer.
Employees shall be allowed to pick the most comfortable respirator from a selection, including respirators
of various sizes from different manufacturers.
Selection of respirators shall be approved by the Field Health and Safety Staff in all cases. and shall be
based on the following considerations:

~::;-;~~,~

:i

•

Nature of the Hazard - The chemical and physical properties, toxicity, and concentration of
hazardous material or mixture of materials.

•

Oxygen-deficient Atmospheres - Entry into oxygen-deficient atmospheres is prohibited
without prior approval of the Corporate Health and Safety Officer.

•

Immediate Dangerous to Life and Health (IDLH) Atmospheres - Entry into any IDLH
atmosphere is prohibited without prior approval of the Corporate Health and Safety Officer.

•

Irritant or Corrosive Atmospheres - Respirators selected must prOVide adequate face and
eye protection. The contaminant or mixture of contaminants must have adequate warning
properties (odor, irritation, or taste) to indicate respirator breakthrough if an air-purifying
device is used.

\<:'1',:),

'~"7?.t1r~

\,.., )
"~~";1
'~:~';~~1

SOP HS·003

Parametrix

Issued: March 12, 2003
Revision No.1
Page 3 of 11

ENGINEERING. PLANNIN.G. EN:VIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

RESPIRATORY PROTECTION PROGRAM

•

Regulated Materials - In all cases where OSHA has required that a specific respirator is used
(carcinogen standards, etc.), the specified respirator, or one providing equal or better
protection, shall be used.

•

Air-purifying respirators shall NOT be used for protection against the materials listed below.
Note that this is only a partial list; please contact the Field Health and Safety Staff for further
information:
Acrolein

Methyl chloride

Aniline

Methylene chloride

Arsine

Nickel carbonyl

Bromine

Nitrobenzene

Carbon monoxide

Nitrogen oxides

Ol1socyanates

Nitroglycerine

Dimethylaniline

Nitromethane

Dimethyl sulfate

Ozone

Hydrogen cyanide

Phosgene

Hydrogen fluoride

Phosphine

Hydrogen selenide

Phosphorus trichloride

Hydrogen sulfide

Stibine

Methanol

Sulfur chloride

Methyl bromide
Parametrix subcontracts most asbestos inspections and all asbestos abatement. Inspection personnel
may use half-mask respirators in areas where asbestos is present if they are qualitatively-fit tested.
Full-facepiece, negative-pressure, air-purifying respirators are not acceptable for protection against
asbestos exposure unless the wearer meets the quantitative fit testing requirement.

Use of Corrective Lens Eyewear with Respirators
The wearing of contact lenses in work environments that involve exposure to chemical fumes, vapors,
splashes, intense heat, molten metals, or highly particulate-contaminated atmosphere is prohibited.

.....

.,

~

.'.~ .~i

Management shall assess which employees in their operations wear eye glasses routinely, determine
what respiratory protective masks (makes and models) are used, and assure that the appropriate frames
or ophthalmic device hangers are obtained and provided at company expense.

SOP HS-003

Parametrix

Issued: March 12,2003
Revision No.1
Page 4 of 11

ENGINEERING .. PLANNING, ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

RESPIRATORY PROTECTION PROGRAM

Employee Training and Instruction
The basic respiratory training program shall include, as a minimum, the foHowing:

'1

~"'("',,,;i.
l

.;

•

Instruction in the need for, use, sanitary care, and limitations of each respirator type.

•

Opportunity for "hands-on" experience with respirators.

•

Proper fitting, including demonstrations and practice in wearing, adjusting, and determining
the fit of the respirator. A selection of respirators shall be available to determine the most
comfortable respirator and the best fit.

•

How to perform a positive and negative pressure test of the face piece to face seal.

•

A familiarization period of wear in normal air.

•

For negative pressure respirators, qualitative fit testing will be conducted by wearing the
respirator in an irritant fume test atmosphere. A qualified person using the protocol found in
Attachment A of this procedure shall perform all qualitative fit testing or other protocol, as
designated by specific standards (e.g., asbestos, benzene). Powered air-purifying respirators
(PAPRs) shaH be worn in a test atmosphere with the power supply disconnected to evaluate
fit in the negative pressure modes.

•

Qualitative fit testing shall be performed annually, or more frequently as required by law.
Quantitative fit testing may be required for some respirator or contaminants. The Field Health
and Safety Staff will determine fit test requirements. Fit testing procedures are presented in
Attachment A.

•

Instruction in the nature of the respiratory hazards, whether acute, chronic, or both, and a
description of potential health effects jf the respirators are not used.

•

Classroom and field training to recognize and cope with emergency situations (including
respirator failure).

Training provided as part of this procedure shall be performed in accordance with applicable regulations.

'.

...~~~~

Respirator Inspection, Cleaning, Maintenance, and Storage

~~'l,;;

, ?::~~$
<:"'T;;")l

General: The Field Health and Safety Staff will define and provide a program to area/facility management
regarding maintenance and care of respirators, and which shall be adjusted to the type of facility, working
conditions, and hazards involved. This program shall include the following basic elements:
•

Inspection for defects and/or deterioration.

•

Cleaning and disinfecting in accordance with manufacturers' instruction.

•

Repair, as necessary.

SOP HS-003

Parametrix

ENGINEERlNG • PLANNING. ENVIRONMENTAL sCU!NCES

Issued: March 12, 2003
Revision No.1
Page 5 of 11
RESPIRATORY PROTECTION PROGRAM

•

Establishment and maintenance of a record-keeping system to document respiratory
inspection, repair, and maintenance.

•

Proper storage.

Inspection, Maintenance, and Storage
Users shall inspect all respirators routinely before, during, and after each use. Any defects shall be
reported to the supervisor. No defective respirators shall be issued or worn. Defective respirators shall be
tagged and returned for repair.
Respirators maintained for emergency use (such as SCBA) shall be inspected and sanitized after each
use and inspected at least monthly. A record of the most recent inspection shall be maintained on the
respirator or the storage container and shall include the inspector's identification, the date, and a
respirator identification number.
An individual who is qualified by experience or training shall regularly clean, inspect, and sanitize
routinely-used respiratory equipment.
Other types of respiratory equipment shall be maintained according to the manufacturers' instructions.
Where respirators are assigned to individual employees, area management shall ensure compliance with
cleaning and maintenance requirements by periodically inspecting respiratory equipment and conducting
field audits.
Respiratory equipment shall not be passed from one person to another until it has been cleaned and
sanitized.
When not in use, respirators 'shall be stored to protect against dust, sunlight, extreme temperatures,
excessive moisture, damaging chemicals, and physical damage.
Air Purifying Respirators (APR)
Fit testing shall be accomplished In accordance with Attachment A of this procedure.
When APRs are worn, employees shall change the filter-cartridge elements daily, in the case of
cartridges used for non-particulate contaminants, or sooner if "breakthrough" is occurring. For other filter
cartridges, the filter-cartridge should be replaced whenever an increase in breathing resistance is
detected.
"~.

't::~~
.{~:;}
~~;:..~

Powered Air Purifying Respirators (PAPR)
When PAPRs are worn, employees shall change filter/cartridge elements dally, in the case of cartridges
used for non-particulate contaminants, or sooner if "breakthrough" is occurring. For other filter cartridges,
the filter-cartridge should be replaced if any of the following scenarios occur:

SOP HS·003

Parametrix

Issued: March 12,2003
Revision No.1
Page 6 of 11

eNGINEERING. PL.ANNtNG • ENViRONMENTAL SCIENces

RESPIRATORY PROTECTION PROGRAM

•

Whenever an increase in breathing resistance is detected, or

•

When airflow through filter elements decreases to an unacceptable level, as indicated by the
manufacturer's test device.

Compressed Air Systems

•

Air Quality
}>

Compressed air used for respiration shall be of high purity, and shall meet, as a
minimum, the requirements for the specification for Grade 0 or better breathing air as
described in Compressed Gas Association Specification G-7,1 (ANSI Z86.1-1973).
The supplier shall certify compliance with these reqUirements for each lot of breathing
air supplied.

}>

Breathing air shall be free from harmful dusts, fumes, mists, vapors, gases, or odors.

}>

Oxygen shall NOT be used at any time in open-circuit SCBAs or in air-line
respirators.
.

}>

Mixed or blended air shall not be used for breathing purposes.

Compressed Air Cylinder Systems (Cascade)

Breathing air cylinders shall be legibly identified with the word AIR, by means of stenciling, stamping, or
labeling as near to the valve end as practical.
Cascade systems shall be equipped with low-pressure warning bells or similar warning devices to indicate
air pressure in the manifold below 500 psi.
When a cascade system is used to supply breathing air, one employee shall be assigned as a safety
standby within audible range of the low- pressure alarm.
When a cascade system is used to recharge SCBA air cylinders, it shall be eqUipped with a high-pressure
supply hose and a coupling rated at a capacity of at least 3,000 psi.
.'I!~)~;~

,\",}

'~~,

Air-line couplings shall be incompatible with outlets for other gas systems to prevent inadvertently
supplying air-line respirators with non-respirable gases or oxygen.
The air pressure at the hose connection to positive pressure respiratory equipment shall be within the
range specified in the approval of the eqUipment by the manufacturer.
Cylinders shall be stored and handled to prevent damage to the cylinder or valve. Cylinders shall be
stored upright with the protective valve cover in place and, in such a way (e.g., supported with substantial
rope or chain in the upper one-third of the cylinder, or in racks designed for this purpose) as to prevent
the cylinder from falling. Cylinders shall not be dropped, dragged, rolled, or allowed to strike each other or
to be struck violently. Cylinders shall never be exposed to temperatures exceeding 125°F. Cylinders with
visible external damage, evidence of corrosion damage, or exposure to fire shall not be accepted or used.
Only cylinders within current hydrostatic test periods shall be used.

SOP HS-003

Parametrix

ENGINEERING. PLANNING. ENVIRONMENTAl. SCIIlNCES

Issued: March 12, 2003
Revision No.1
Page 7 of 11

RESPIRATORY PROTECTION PROGRAM

Compressor Supplied Breathing Air

All compressors used for supplying breathing air shall be equipped with the following safety and standby
devices:
•

Compressor intakes that are located to ensure that only respirable (uncontaminated) air is
admitted. This requires attention to the location of the compressor intake with respect to
compressor engine exhaust, chemical storage or use areas, and suitable intake screening or
filtration.

•

Alarms to indicate compressor failure (such as low-pressure air horns, etc.) shall be installed
in the system.

•

A receiver of sufficient capacity to enable the respirator wearer to exit from a contaminated
atmosphere upon compressor failure shall be provided.

•

Oil Lubricated Compressors - If an oil-lubricated compressor is used to supply breathing air,
it shall be equipped with both of the following devices:

»

A continuous-reading carbon monoxide monitoring system that is set to alarm should
the carbon monoxide concentration exceed 10 ppm.

»

A high-temperature alarm which will activate when the discharge air exceeds 110%
of the normal operating temperature in degrees Fahrenheit,

•

A designated employee shall be assigned as a safety standby and shall remain continuously
within audible range of the alarms.

•

An inline purifying filter assembly to remove oil, condensed water, particulate, odors, and
organic vapors shall be used in conjunction with the air compressor.

Routine inspection and maintenance of the air compressor shall be performed in accordance with
manufacturer's specifications.
~

'>0-.

.

Escape/Egress Units

'1">'."fj

\,,J

These respirators are intended for use in areas where escape with a short-term (5-10 minute) air supply is
necessary. They may be used as adjuncts to airline pressure demand respirators as a backup air supply;
or as independent emergency devices in areas where respiratory protection is not normally required.
Appropriate training shall be accomplished and documented prior to assigning employees to tasks or
locations subject to the use of these respirators.
Escape/egress units shall never be used as primary standby respirators for confined space entry.

SOP HS·003

Parametrix

ENGINEERING. PLANNING. ENVIRONMEHTAL. SCIENces

Issued: March 12, 2003
Revision No.1
Page 8 of11
RESPIRATORY PROTECTION PROGRAM

Medical Screening

All potential candidates shall complete a medical questionnaire prior to respiratory use and once every
three years. A more comprehensive medical evaluation may be reqUired based on the results of the
questionnaire.
No employee shall be assigned to a task that requires the use of a respirator unless it has been
determined that the employee is physically able to perform the work while using the required respirator.
If an employee demonstrates difficulty in breathing during the fitting test or during use, the employee shall
be re-examined by a physician to determine whether the employee can wear a respirator while
performing the required duty.
Once a medical determination has been made to physical ability to wear a respirator, a review of the
employee's health status shall be conducted annually, at a minimum.

SOP

Parametrix

HS~003

Issued: March 12, 2003
Revision No.1
Page 9 of 11

ENGINEERING. PLAPfNING • I:NVlRONMENTJl1. SCIE:N:C:e:S

RESPIRATORY PROTECTION PROGRAM

ATTACHMENT A
PARAMETRIX MANDATORY QUALITATIVE RESPIRATOR FIT TEST PROTOCOL

NOTE: This protocol does not satisfy the fit test requirements for certain materials, including asbestos
and benzene. Contact the Field Health and Safety Staff for assistance.
Respirator Selection

Respirators shall be selected as described in this procedure. The respirator shall be equipped with HEPA
filters.
Fit Test

The test conductor shall review this protocol with the test subject before testing.
The test subject shall perform the following conventional positive and negative pressure fit checks:
•

Negative Pressure Test - Cover the cartridge filter inlets with your palm and gently inhale, the
face piece should collapse against the face.

•

Positive Pressure Test - Cover the exhalation valve cover with your palm and gently exhale.
The face piece should expand away from the face.

•

If either test fails, loosen and readjust the respirator straps and check for obstructions to the
sealing surface. Repeat both tests. If the test fails again, select an alternate respirator.

A test atmosphere shall be generated with irritant smoke.
The test subject shall be advised that the smoke can be irritating to the eyes and instructed to keep the
eyes closed while the test Is being conducted (applies to half-mask respirators).
While wearing the selected respirator, the test subject shall enter the test atmosphere and perform the
following exercises:
\:'~;~<i1:l:!:!:\
,>~,~b

•

Breathe normally,

•

Breathe deeply. Be certain breaths are deep and regular.

•

Turn head all the way from one side to the other. Be certain movement is complete. Inhale on
each side. Do not bump the respirator against the shoulders.

•

Nod head up and down, Be certain motions are complete and made every second. Inhale on
each side. Do not bump the respirator against the shoulders.

•

Nod head up and down, Be certain motions are complete and made every second. Inhale
when head is in the full, up position (looking toward coiling). Do not bump the respirator
against the chest.

\~:;"l~

sop HS-003
Parametrix

Issued: March 12, 2003
Revision No.1

ENGINEERING. Pl.ANNING. • ENVUtoNMENTAL SCIENCEs

Page 10 of 11
RESPIRATORY PROTECTION PROGRAM

•

Talk aloud and slowly in a fashion that will generate a wide range of facial movements.

•

Breathe normally.

The test subject shall indicate to the test conductor if the irritant smoke is detected, If smoke is detected,
the test conductor shall stop the test. In this case, the tested respirator is rejected and another respirator
shall be selected.
Each test subject passing the smoke test (Le., without detecting the smoke) shall be given a sensitivity
check of smoke from the same tube to determ ine if the test subject reacts to the smoke. This may be
performed by cracking the mask and gently inhaling while inside the test atmosphere. Failure to evoke a
response shall void the fit test. This may trigger an asthmatic response; verify before beginning.
The test shaH not be conducted if there is any hair growth between the skin and the face-piece sealing
surface.
If hair growth or apparel interferes with a satisfactory fit, then the obstruction(s) shall be altered or
removed to eliminate interference and allow a satisfactory fit. If a satisfactory fit is still not attained, the
test subject must use a pOSitive-pressure respirator, such as a powered, air-purifying respirator, supplied
air respirator, or self-contained breathing apparatus,
If a test subject exhibits difficulty in breathing during the tests, the subject shall be referred to a physician
trained in respiratory diseases or pulmonary medicine to determine whether the test subject can wear a
respirator while performing required duties.
Qualitative fit testing shall be repeated at least every year, or more often, as required by law. In addition,
because the sealing of the respirator may be affected, qualitative fit testing shaH be repeated immediately
when the last subject has experienced:
•

A weight change of 20 pounds or more.

•

Significant facial scarring in the area of the

•

Significant dental changes (Le., multiple extractions without prosthesis, or acquisition of
dentures).

•

Reconstructive or cosmetic surgery.

•

Any other conditions that may interfere with face-piece sealing.

'I

"

face~piece

seal.

'.~~;.~~

~t'..···:'r~j

SOP HS-003

Parametrix

ENGINEERING. PLANNING. eNVIRONMENTAL SCiENCES

Issued: March 12,2003
Revision No.1
Page 110111
RESPIRATORY PROTECTION PROGRAM

Record Keeping

The following fit test forms shall be maintained in each office for three years. The Corporate Health and
Safety Officer shall maintain permanent records. The summary shall include:
•

Name of test subject.

•

Date of testing.

•

Name of test conductor.

•

Respirator selected (indicate manufacturer, model, size, and approval number).

•

Testing agent.

 

 

Prisoner Education Guide side
CLN Subscribe Now Ad
Prison Phone Justice Campaign